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Archive for the ‘Dollarhide Columns’ Category

Bleeding Kansas – Part 1: Historical Timeline – Events Leading to “Bleeding Kansas”

The following article by my good friend, William Dollarhide: “Bleeding Kansas” is a reference to the bloody battles that took place in Kansas Territory from its founding in 1854 to statehood in 1861. Kansas Territory was a pre-Civil War battlefield between the Pro-Slavery and Free-Stater forces. The significant events leading up to Bleeding Kansas start […]

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An Historical Timeline for Iowa, 1673–1959

The following article is excerpted from William Dollarhide’s latest book, Iowa Name Lists, 1833-2004, Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1833-2004. For genealogical research in Iowa, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view. 1673 Mississippi River. French explorers Jacques Jolliet and […]

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An Historical Timeline for Indiana, 1614-1911

The following article is excerpted from Bill Dollarhide’s new book, Indiana Name Lists, Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1783-2007. For genealogical research in Indiana, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view. Refer to the recent Illinois Timeline article for maps […]

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An Historical Timeline for Illinois, 1673-1945

The following article was excerpted from William Dollarhide’s new book, Illinois Name Lists, 1678-2009: For genealogical research in Illinois, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical and genealogical point of view: 1673. French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet discovered the Illinois River and upper portions of […]

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An Historical Timeline for Idaho, 1670 – 1890

The following article was excerpted from William Dollarhide’s new book, Idaho Name Lists 1860s-2011: For genealogical research in Idaho, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view: 1670. The Hudson’s Bay Company was formed in London, with the intent of establishing trading […]

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Chart of the Sandwich Islands, by Jean-Francois de Galaup de La Pèrouse (1741-1788)

The following is excerpted from Bill Dollarhide’s new Hawaii Name Lists 1700s-2011 book. Chart of the Sandwich Islands, by Jean-Francois de Galaup de La Pèrouse (1741-1788). The original chart was prepared by Pèrouse while visiting Hawaii in 1785. The above chart was published in 1799 by G.G. & J. Robinson, London. Full title: “Chart of […]

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An Historical Timeline for Hawaii, 1627 – 2011

The following article is excerpted from Bil Dollarhide’s New Book, Hawaii Name Lists, 1700s – 2011. For genealogical research in Hawaii, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view: 1627. The first Europeans to see Hawaii were aboard Spanish sailing ships. In […]

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An Historical Timeline for Georgia, 1497 – 1803

The following article was written by my friend, William Dollarhide, and is excerpted from his new book, Georgia Name Lists, 1733 – 2010. For genealogical research in Georgia, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view: 1497-1498. Italian explorer Giovanni Caboto (John […]

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An Historical Timeline for Florida, 1513 – 1971

The following article was written by my friend, William Dollarhide, and is excerpted from his new book, Florida Name Lists, 1759 – 2009. For genealogical research in Florida, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical and genealogical point of view: 1513. Spaniard Juan Ponce de Leon explored […]

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Piles of Paper – Part 4

The following article is by my good friend, Bill Dollarhide. Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 43: If you can remember your ancestor’s marriage date but not your own, you are probably an addicted genealogist In the articles, “Piles of Paper – Part 1, 2 & 3,” we suggested you take your large piles of paper and […]

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Piles of Paper – Part 3

The following article is by my good friend, Bill Dollarhide. Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 42: If you took family group sheets to the last wedding you attended, you are probably an addicted genealogist. In the articles, “Piles of Paper – Part 1 & Part 2,” we suggested you take your large piles of paper and […]

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Piles of Paper – Part 2

The following article was written by my good friend, by William Dollarhide. Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 1: Treat the brothers and sisters of your ancestors as equals . . . even if some of them were in jail. In the article, “Piles of Paper, Part 1,” we left you with a large pile of paper […]

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Piles of Paper – Part 1

The following article was written by my good friend, by William Dollarhide. Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 44: Genealogy is an addiction with no cure and for which no 12-step program is available. When people first get interested in their family history they are not fully prepared for what is about to happen to them. Genealogy […]

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Will Anyone Else Understand Your Genealogy?

The following article is by my good friend, by William Dollarhide: This article is a prologue to four (4) subsequent articles relating to a genealogical organizing system described in my book, Managing a Genealogical Project. What follows are four (4) articles: “Piles of Paper,” Part 1-4. Once those four articles are published, I am hoping […]

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Records of Immigrant Arrivals in America since 1798

The following article is written by my good friend, William Dollarhide: Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 32: Your ancestor will be featured in the county history because he was the first prisoner in the new jail. I hope your immigrant ancestors were not like mine. I am convinced that some of my ancestors arrived in America […]

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