New Jersey Newspapers to be Digitized & Posted at Chronicling America

The following teaser was posted sugust 18, 2016 at the news.rutgers.edu website.

Rutgers_University_Logo_205pw

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – The New Jersey Digital Newspaper Project is a collaboration of Rutgers University Libraries, the New Jersey State Archives and the New Jersey State Library that will make the history of New Jersey known to its citizens and the world. The plan, according to project director and Rutgers University digital archivist Caryn Radick, is to scan existing microfilm from the New Jersey State Archives and to make searchable digital files available through the Library of Congress website Chronicling America. Over a two-year period, the project will digitize and catalog at least 100,000 newspaper pages, originally published between 1836 and 1922 and not currently available in digital format.

“Our goals are ambitious,” explains Radick. “We are meeting with the advisory board in September to identify the newspapers that are in greatest need of digitization and hope to have the first batch, encompassing about 25,000 pages, completed by October 2017. We will focus on influential newspapers and historically important news or themes to maximize the benefit to users of Chronicling America.”

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

New & Updated Databases Posted FamilySearch: August 15, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch-Logo-2014p

New Collections Update: Week of August 15, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY, UT — The past two weeks have brought a few new large indexed collections, including New York passenger lists, English parish registers, and United States muster rolls, plus images and indexes from the Czech Republic, Peru, Norway, Portugal, and the United States. See the interactive table below for these and more historic records added this week at FamilySearch.org. Join our online indexing volunteers anytime and help make more of these exciting collections discoverable to more people. Find out how at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

COLLECTIONS – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Czech Republic Land Records 1450-1889 – 0 – 853,178 – Added images to an existing collection

Czech Republic Church Books 1552-1963 – 31,206 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Czech Republic School Registers 1799-1953 – 0 – 1,041,753 – Added images to an existing collection

England Sussex Parish Registers 1538-1910 – 1,223,484 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Norway Probate Index Cards 1640-1903 – 194,981 – 0 – New indexed records collection

Peru Cusco Civil Registration 1889-1997 – 78,283 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru La Libertad Civil Registration 1903-1998 – 0 – 761 – Added images to an existing collection

Portugal Porto Catholic Church Records 1535-1949 – 34,701 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Arizona County Marriages 1871-1964 – 72,804 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Illinois DeKalb County Land Records 1838-1927 – 57,179 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Michigan Obituaries 1820-2006 – 152,033 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Minnesota Clay County School Census Records 1909-1962 – 296,251 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Hampshire Vital and Town Records Index 1656-1938 – 442,376 – 0 – New indexed records collection

New Jersey, State Census, 1855 – 73,030 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists 1906-1942 – 5,487,573 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Utah Tremonton and Garland Obituaries 1959-2013 – 18,360 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

District of Columbia Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records 1863-1872 – 90,597 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Freedmen’s Bureau Records of Freedmen’s Complaints 1865- 1872 – 140,985 – 209,817 – New indexed records and images collection

United States Freedmen’s Bureau Ration Records 1865-1872 – 154,587 – 97,567 – New indexed records and images collection

United States Freedmen’s Bureau Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education 1865-1872 – 145,374 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps 1798-1937 – 4,091,420 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

FamilySearch Databases Added or Updated From June 28 through August 8, 2016

FamilySearch-Logo-2014p
The following databases have been added or updated at FamilySearch.org from June 28, 2016 to August 8, 2016

Location – Number of Indexed Records – Date Posted or Updated

Australia, Tasmania, Migrant Files, 1945-1968 – Browse Images – 20 Jul 2016
Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541-1914 – 426,542 – 28 Jul 2016
Czech Republic Land Records, 1450-1889 – Browse Images – 05 Aug 2016
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – Browse Images – 02 Aug 2016
Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 481,724 – 15 Jul 2016
El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1990 – 723,047 – 30 Jun 2016
England and Wales Census, 1851 – 18,369,674 – 03 Aug 2016
France, Seine-Maritime, Rouen, Indexes to Church Records, 1680-1789 – 38,020 – 22 Jul 2016
Hungary Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 469,259 – 05 Jul 2016
Italy, Agrigento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1820-1865 – Browse Images – 26 Jul 2016
Italy, Benevento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1810-1942 – Browse Images – 12 Jul 2016
Italy, Cremona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1744-1942 – 361,876 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Forlì-Cesena, Forlì, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1800-1815, 1866-1930 – 139,112 – 19 Jul 2016
Italy, Nuoro, Nuoro, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1915 – 18,865 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Savona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1813, 1838-1936 – 154,198 – 18 Jul 2016
Norway, Probate Index Cards, 1640-1903 – 194,981 – 01 Aug 2016
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 487,853 – 02 Aug 2016
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 556,500 – 14 Jul 2016
Russia, Tver Church Books, 1722-1918 – 574,803 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1956 – 314,094 – 11 Jul 2016
Spain, Diocese of Cartagena, Catholic Church Records, 1503-1969 – 74,313 – 29 Jun 2016
Spain, Province of Córdoba, Municipal Records, 1509-1947 – 2,131,675 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Málaga, Municipal Records, 1760-1956 – 308,744 – 28 Jul 2016
Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1734-1920 – 2,564,491 – 15 Jul 2016

UNITED STATES DATABASES

United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of Freedmen’s Complaints, 1865-1872 – 140,985 – 03 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Ration Records,1865-1872 – 154,587 – 02 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education, 1865-1872 – 145,374 – 01 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Claim Records, 1865-1872 – 273,418 – 29 Jul 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Records of Persons and Articles Hired, 1865-1872 – 34,998 – 28 Jul 2016

Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957 – 1,785,018 – 28 Jun 2016
District of Columbia, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872 – 90,597 – 03 Aug 2016
Georgia World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945 – 839,636 – 05 Jul 2016
Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950 – 779,774 – 20 Jul 2016
Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967 – 1,069,456 – 19 Jul 2016
Illinois, DeKalb County Land Records, 1838-1927 – 57,179 – 01 Aug 2016
Indiana, Civil Marriages, 1828-1957 – 10,571 – 29 Jun 2016
Indiana Marriages, 1780-1992 – 1,008,158 – 28 Jun 2016
Iowa, Armed Forces Grave Registrations, ca. 1835-1998 – 147,078 – 20 Jul 2016
Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979 – 1,532,533 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky Deaths and Burials, 1843-1970 – 627,320 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954 – 1,317,764 – 05 Jul 2016
Maine Vital Records, 1670-1907 – 1,421,557 – 19 Jul 2016
Maryland County Marriages, 1658-1940 – 106,686 – 11 Jul 2016
Maryland Marriages, 1666-1970 – 227,204 – 05 Jul 2016
Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001 – 2,405,620 – 19 Jul 2016
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 533,517 – 08 Aug 2016
Michigan Probate Records, 1797-1973 – Browse Images – 30 Jun 2016
Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860-1949 – 870,856 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota Marriages, 1849-1950 – 438,331 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota, Clay County, School Census Records, 1909-1962 – 586,237 – 08 Aug 2016
Missouri, Civil Marriages, 1820-1874 – 4,883 – 28 Jun 2016
Missouri, Reports of Separation Notices, 1941-1946 – 316,539 – 07 Jul 2016
Missouri State and Territorial Census Records, 1732-1933 – 109,803 – 21 Jul 2016
Montana, Chouteau County Records, 1876-2011 – 9,505 – 15 Jul 2016
New Jersey, State Census, 1855 – 73,030 – 08 Aug 2016
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 5,487,573 – 03 Aug 2016
New York, Church and Civil Marriages, 1704-1995 – 23,819 – 11 Jul 2016
New York Marriages, 1686-1980 – 767,083 – 11 Jul 2016
North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1979 – 1,207,804 – 19 Jul 2016
North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 – 3,457,243 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio, Summit County, Veteran Burial Cards, 1700-1941 – 5,535 – 28 Jun 2016
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 – 4,709,143 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958 – 2,198,000 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003 – 4,107,607 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962 – 2,548,575 – 19 Jul 2016
Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950 – 2,255,061 – 28 Jun 2016
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages, 1677-1950 – 209,880 – 27 Jul 2016
Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950 – 4,802,418 – 28 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965 – 1,724,715 – 30 Jun 2016
Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1837-1910 – 4,575,333 – 21 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977 – 1,575,573 – 19 Jul 2016
Texas Marriages, 1837-1973 – 1,695,783 – 19 Jul 2016
Utah, Tremonton and Garland Obituaries, 1959-2013 – 18,360 – 03 Aug 2016

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798-1937 – 5,794,949 – 08 Aug 2016

CEMETERIES – WORLDWIDE

BillionGraves Index – 18,780,474 – 28 Jul 2016
Find A Grave Index – 146,748,413 – 11 Jul 2016

New Jersey Adoptees May Apply for Birth Certificates as Part of New Adoption Law

The following teaser is from an article posted July 28, 2016 at the tapinto.net website.

NEW JERSEY – Adoptees may apply for their birth certificates and potentially learn more about their family’s demographic, medical and social/cultural histories, as part of the second phase of implementing New Jersey’s new adoption law.

The Department of Health has made forms available, and applications are now being accepted. Records will start being released January 1, 2017. The FAQs, application and instructions can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.state.nj.us/health/vital/adoption/.

“The availability of these forms marks another step toward lifting the seal on thousands of records and allowing adoptees to learn more about their family makeup while maintaining the rights of biological parents who wish to remain anonymous,” Health Commissioner Cathleen Bennett said.

Those who may request copies of birth certificates are adult adoptees; direct descendants, siblings or spouses of adopted persons; adoptive parents, legal guardians or other legal representatives of adopted persons; or state or federal government agencies for official purposes.

Read the full article.

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update as of March 14, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

There are 25 new collections updated time! Check out Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928, Maryland Church Records 1668-1995, North Carolina Civil Marriages 1763-1868, United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815, United States Freedmen’s Bureau Marriages 1861-1872, and Utah LDS Missionary Registers 1860-1937. Search these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 204,849 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California San Pedro Immigration Office Special Inquiry Records 1930-1936 – 2,736 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928 – 0 – 2,993,164 – Added images to an existing collection
England Cornwall and Devon Parish Registers 1538-2010 – 11,418 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hawaii Index to Filipino Arrivals to Honolulu 1946 – 7,408 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois Church Marriages 1805-1985 – 9,190 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois Civil Marriages 1833-1889 – 8,975 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 179,181 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Marriages 1811-2007 – 0 – 16,771 – Added images to an existing collection
Maryland Church Records 1668-1995 – 137,984 – 27,644 – New indexed records and images collection
Maryland Piney Point Crew Lists 1950-1956 – 5,429 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Michigan County Marriages Index 1820-1937 – 1,012 – 0 – New indexed records collection
New Jersey Church Records 1675-1970 – 1,144 – 613 – New indexed records and images collection
New Jersey State Census 1865 – 0 – 3,646 – New browsable image collection.
New York New York Soundex to Passenger and Crew Lists 1887-1921 – 5,800 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Civil Marriages 1763-1868 – 53,614 – 4,567 – New indexed records and images collection
Ohio Marriages 1800-1942 – 3,567 – 785 – New indexed records and images collection
Peru Junín Civil Registration 1881-2005 – 87,987 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Spain Province of Cádiz Municipal Records 1784-1956 – 0 – 155,324 – Added images to an existing collection
Tennessee Civil Marriages 1838-1888 – 5,946 – 1,079 – New indexed records and images collection
Texas and Arizona Arrivals 1903-1910 – 59,299 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Marriages 1861-1872 – 34,323 – 599 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815 – 1,130,851 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Utah LDS Missionary Registers 1860-1937 – 48,207 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Virginia Alexandria Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels 1946-1957 – 6,669 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey

ngs07

“Our concern is with the beginnings of settlement within teh area that we know today as the State of New Jersey. Here, between the Hudson and the Delaware, people of many nationalities came together, at times in jarring conflict, but for the most part in peaceful harmony, to lay the foundations of a colony whose distinguishing mark was to be its heterogeneity. Unlike New England, where the Puritan townsman typified the whole population, or the South, where the tidewater English planter was equally predominant, New Jersey presented a picture of infinite variety. Its founders spoke many tongues, belonged to many religious denominations, practices their arts and crafts in many different ways. Each distinctive group had its own contributions to make, and each was to leave a lasting inheritance to future generations.”

This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey; written by Claire Keenan Agthe.

Like most states, New Jersey has its own unique diversity and history. Today, New Jersey is the most densely populated state in the U.S. and yet has a strong agricultural base, which helped it get its nickname the ‘Garden State.’ Its earliest settlers included the Dutch, Swedes, Finns, English, Scots, Scots-Irish, Germans, and French and generally welcomed people of many religions.

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Military Records and Benefits, you will find the following:

“New Jersey is fortunate in that no battles since the American Revolution have taken place on its soil, although many of its citizens have served in the armed services in both peacetime and wartime. Early military personnel records are scarce, but those that do exist can be valuable sources of information. The State Archives holds most state military records prior to World War I, while most subsequent state records are at the New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs. …”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

As an interesting side note, New Jersey has see no wartime battles since the American Revolution; yet, since “its position between British-held New York and rebel-held Philadelphia made New Jersey home to 296 engagements during the Revolutionary War.”

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Author

Claire Keenan Agthe is a professional genealogist, is president of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, and is a trustee of the Genealogical Society of New Jersey, where she lives. Claire lectures on copyright and Irish genealogy, and professionally conducts client research.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

  • Early History
  • Settlement
  • Migration
  • Economy
  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Genealogical Society of New Jersey
  • New Jersey Historical Society
  • New Jersey State Archives
  • New Jersey State Library
  • Rugers University: Alexander Library
  • Other Libraries
  • National Archives Regional Facility

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Census Records
    • Early Censuses and Substitutes
    • Federal Censuses and Substitutes
    • State Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • Federal Courts
  • Decedents’ Estates
    • Probate and Estate Records
    • Partitions and Divisions of Estates
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • German
    • Native American
    • Scots and Scots-Irish
  • Immigration
  • Land Records
    • Deeds
    • Mortgages
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Militia and National Guard
    • Colonial Wars (pre-1775)
    • American Revolution
    • Wars of 1791-1815
    • Mexican-American War (1846-1848)
    • Civil War (1861-1865)
    • Spanish-American War (1898)
    • World War I (1914-1918)
    • World War II (1941-1945)
    • Korean War (1950-1953) and Vietnam War (1959-1975)
  • Name Changes
  • Naturalization Records
    • Naturalizations in County and State Courts
    • Naturalizations in Federal Court
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
    • Catholic (Roman)
    • Jewish
    • Presbyterian
    • Protestant Episcopal
    • Reformed Church in America (Dutch Reformed)
    • Society of Friends (Quakers)
    • Unitarian Universalist Association
    • United Church of Christ (UCC)
    • United Methodist
  • School and Institutional Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Colonial and County Vital Records
    • State Vital Records
    • Inquisitions on the Dead (Coroner Reports)
    • Divorce Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women of New Jersey
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: New Jersey are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

FamilySearch Makes 2.7 Million Historic Records From the 1915 New Jersey State Census Freely Searchable Online

The following is from FamilySearch:

1915 New Jersey Census Index Search Result with Oswald Nelson as a Child
1915 New Jersey Census Index Search Result with Oswald Nelson as a Child

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (September 1, 2015) — FamilySearch International has added more than 2.7 million searchable historical records from the 1915 New Jersey State Census to its free online collections. New Jersey records are highly sought after by family historians because the state was a popular settling point for millions of immigrants during the heyday of US immigration from 1892 to 1924. The 1885 and 1905 New Jersey State Censuses are also available, making these three online collections invaluable for researchers. You can search the 1915 New Jersey Census collection and more than 5.8 billion other free historical records at FamilySearch.org.

State censuses were typically taken mid-point between federal censuses. The 1915 New Jersey Census is halfway between the 1910 and 1920 federal censuses—a peak period of US immigration where millions of immigrants settled in the northeastern states to create their new homes and pursue their hopes and dreams in America. New Jersey took state censuses every 10 years from 1855 to 1915 to allocate the number of state legislators. The 1915 New Jersey State Census includes the names of each member of the household, location, gender, birth date (month and year) and birthplace. These state censuses can help researchers discover additional family members, migration patterns, and other important information.

The 1915 New Jersey collection contains 2,785,000 records spread across 21 counties and 565 municipalities. It was taken roughly two years before the US entered World War I and contains information about thousands of residents shortly before they went to war. The population of New Jersey was growing rapidly during this time, so this new index includes over 600,000 additional records compared to the 1905 state census.

This 1915 New Jersey Census includes several notable residents at the time, including:

FamilySearch International has the rights to publish the index created by its online volunteer community, but not the rights to publish the images owned by the state of New Jersey. Patrons can access the images by renting the microfilm containing their ancestor’s entry online for a nominal fee and viewing it at any of the more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries. The film number (noted as GS Film Number) can be easily located in the Person Details page of the census index for your ancestor on FamilySearch.org. The images on microfilm can reveal additional information, including marital status, citizenship, occupation, and whether homes were owned or rented.

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 130 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Jersey Adoptees Inching Closer To Getting Their Real Birth Records

New Jersey Statehouse

According to an AP article posted at the philadelphia.cbslocal.com website, adoptees in New Jersey are now closer to receiving access to their original birth records.

The state Assembly on Thursday, May 22, voted to approve a conditional veto settlement that was worked out by Gov. Chris Christie and legislature that opens the birth records for the first time since their sealing in 1940.

The compromise does delay access for almost three years in order to give birth parents enough time to get their names removed from birth certificates – if they so decide.

The birth parents of children who were adopted before August 1, 2015 would have until the end of 2016 to get their names be removed. If they chose to do so, they will be asked to give some medical history.

Read the AP article.

FamilySearch Adds Over 3.1 Million Images to Collections from Brazil, Canada, France, Indonesia, Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch has added more than 3.1 million images to collections from Brazil, Canada, France, Indonesia, Netherlands, Peru, Portugal, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 268,969 indexed records and images from the new Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980, collection; the 350,087 images from the Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Mungkid Citizenship Records, 1985–2013, collection and the 517,928 images from U.S, California, County Marriages, 1850–1952, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Mato Grosso, Civil Registration, 1848–2013 – 0 – 96,208 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 – 17,314 – 251,655 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, British Columbia Birth Registrations, 1854–1903 – 0 – 34,334 – Added images to an existing collection.

France, Coutances et d’Avranche Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1533–1906 – 77,660 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Mungkid Citizenship Records, 1985–2013 – 0 – 350,087 – New browsable image collection.

Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Rembang, District Court Naturalization Records, 1953–2013 – 0 – 118,056 – New browsable image collection.

Netherlands, Zuid-Holland, Leiden, Notarial Records, 1591–1806 – 0 – 86,888 – New browsable image collection.

Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 – 116,244 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 – 304,551 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Portugal, Bragança, Catholic Church Records, 1541–1985 – 0 – 244,394 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, California, County Marriages, 1850–1952 – 0 – 517,928 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, District of Columbia Marriages, 1811–1950 – 0 – 7,888 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Georgia, Confederate Home Records, 1901–1930 – 0 – 1,260 – New browsable image collection.

U.S, Illinois, Northern District (Eastern Division), Naturalization Index, 1926–1979 – 2,197 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S, Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718–1957 – 0 – 515,679 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Massachusetts, Worcester County, Probate Files, 1731–1881 – 0 – 101,773 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Mississippi, State Archives, Various Records, 1820–1951 – 42,036 – 0 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, New Jersey, County Marriages, 1682–1956 – 0 – 30,643 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762–1979 – 0 – 125,264 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885–1950 – 0 – 8,693 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Death Certificates, 1803–1915 – 0 – 1,697 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790–1950 – 0 – 1,892 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Texas, Houston, Historic Hollywood Cemetery Records, 1895–2008 – 0 – 600 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, United States Census, 1820 – 0 – 180 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, United States General Index to Pension Files, 1861–1934 – 0 – 8,526 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Washington, King County Delayed Births, 1941–1942 – 0 – 6,325 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S, Wisconsin, Probate Estate Files, 1848–1948 – 0 – 116,684 – Added images to an existing collection.

New Jersey Adoptees May Get to See Their Original Birth Records Under a Compromise Made by Governor Christie and the State Legislature

Republican Governor Chris Christie and the Democratic New Jersey legislature have come up with a compromise to allow folks adopted in New Jersey to access their original birth records.

Birth parents of children adopted before Aug. 1, 2015 will now have the ability to decide if they want their names disclosed to their children. Children born after August 1, 2015, and given up for adoption will have their names automatically disclosed.

Adoptees, as well as their birth parents have been trying for a change of some sort since since 1980! The legislature passed a bill, but Christie issued a conditional veto on Monday – then a a compromise agreement was worked out. Action is expected on a final version of the bill which the Governor has agreed to sign sometime in May.

Read the original AP article at the myfoxny.com website.

Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bills Would Open Adoption Records

The following excerpt is from an interesting article by Suzette Parmley, posted at the February 23, 2014 edition of philly.com:

Not knowing the identity of her real mother was always a painful, unresolved issue, but when Susan Perry was diagnosed with melanoma, finding out became a medical necessity.

Perry, 63, of Cherry Hill, began looking 13 years ago but sealed-record laws in New Jersey prevented access to her original birth certificate, the gateway to a person’s genealogical, medical, and other information.

“I realized adopted people really have no rights,” said Perry, now battling stage-four melanoma. “With many people, there is a real wish to know something about your genealogy and to know your roots. It’s really the first chapter of your life.”

Perry has worked with the New Jersey Coalition for Adoption Reform and Education (NJ CARE) over the last decade for passage of the adoptees’ birthright bill. The measure would allow adopted adults over 18 in New Jersey to secure their original birth certificates from the state registrar.

Seven other states have passed access legislation for adopted adults since 1999. Two – Kansas and Alaska – have never sealed adoption records.

Read the full article.

New Jersey Assembly Panel Approves Bill Opening Birth Records for Adoptees

The following excerpt is from an article by Susan K. Livio, posted at the February 11, 2014 edition of nj.com:

As an adopted person who also gave up her own child to another, Mari Steed of Levittown, Pa., said there isn’t much of the adoption experience she hasn’t lived.

So when Steed — co-founder of an adoption rights group in Ireland highlighted in the Oscar-nominated film “Philomena” — urged a state Assembly committee Monday to approve a bill letting adopted people obtain their birth certificates, she wasted no time attacking the myths that have blocked the legislation for 34 years.

When representatives from the New Jersey Catholic Conference, New Jersey Right to Life and the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union asked lawmakers to protect the privacy of birth mothers, Steed replied she was “very, very tired of listening to the opposition hiding behind our skirts and claiming we asked for privacy when we didn’t.”

Steed, one of 2,000 babies trafficked from an Ireland home for unwed mothers, said she was insulted by the idea that an adopted person would stalk a birth parent who didn’t want contact. “If someone said, “I can’t handle this, I’m not ready, we would back away. To imply otherwise … makes no sense. We just want to be treated with equality and respect.”

Read the full article.

Grave of Revolutionary War Vet Found in Ringwood New Jersey, Solving Family Puzzle

From the October 29, 2013, Northjersey.com – News

Russell-Dutcher-III-200p

Seven years ago, Russell Dutcher III embarked on a quest to find a family ancestor, a veteran of the American Revolution whose life story was nearly lost to the ages

He pored over centuries-old census records and tax lists and scoured ancestry websites and cemeteries, driven by a will that David Dutcher not be forgotten.

This past summer, after more digging, Dutcher pieced together his relative’s footprint in New Jersey and located his nearly 200-year-old unmarked grave in the Ringwood Manor cemetery, part of Ringwood State Park. And now, he hopes to rededicate the site to give David Dutcher — his great-great-great-great-grandfather — the honor he deserves.

Read the full article.

New Jersey Senate Passes Adoptee’s Rights Bill

It’s been a few days since the New Jersey Senate passed this biil, but I missed it – so I’m posting this blog now. Better late than never…

The following excerpt is from the June 21, 2013 edition of njtoday.net:

TRENTON – The state Senate approve a bill sponsored by Senator Joseph F. Vitale and Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg which would give adoptees in New Jersey access to their medical history and birth records on Thursday.

“Knowing who you are and where you came from is a right that all people deserve,” said Vitale, D-Middlesex. “But without access to original birth certificates, many adoptees are left in the dark regarding their family medical, cultural and social history. Without this information, adoptees are often put at a disadvantage when it comes to making informed health decisions. Providing these men and women with access to this vital information by no means compromises the privacy of the birth parent, but instead provides adoptees with valuable insight into their family history.”

The bill, S-2814, would allow for an adopted person over the age of 18, their direct descendant, sibling or spouse, an adoptive parent or guardian, or a state or federal agency to access an uncertified, long-form copy of the adoptee’s original birth certificate through the New Jersey State Registrar. Additionally, the adoptive person would receive any available information regarding contact preferences with their biological parent and family history information.

The bill was approved by the Senate with a vote of 30-8. It must now head to the General Assembly for further consideration.

Read the full article.

New Jersy Bill Gives Adoptees Access to Their Medical History & Birth Records

The following teaser is from an article in the June 13, 2013 edition of politickernj.com.

TRENTON – A bill sponsored by Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Chairman Joseph F. Vitale which would give adoptees in New Jersey access to their medical history and birth records was approved today by the Senate Health Committee.

“Every person deserves to know who they are and where they came from, but for many adoptees sealed records leave them in the dark on their family medical, cultural and social history, making it difficult to make decisions on their own personal well being,” said Senator Vitale, D-Middlesex. “This bill would give adopted people in New Jersey access to information that is vital to protect their health and establish a line of family history that would otherwise not exist.”

The bill, S-2814, would allow for an adopted person over the age of 18, their direct descendant, sibling or spouse, an adoptive parent or guardian, or a state or federal agency to access an uncertified, long-form copy of the adoptee’s original birth certificate through the New Jersey State Registrar. Additionally, the adoptive person would receive any available information regarding contact preferences with their biological parent and family history information.

Read the full article.