New Records at FindMyPast This Last Week

Databases added at FindMyPast this last week:

WWI Draft Registration Cards
Over 5.1 million new records have been added to our collection of United States WWI draft registration cards. This final update completes this fascinating collection, which now totals more than 25 million records.

The draft was authorized for the purpose of raising a national army in light of the United States’ entry into World War I. When, on April 6, 1917, the United States officially declared war on Germany, the US Army was far too small to effectively fight an overseas war. In response, the Selective Service Act was passed enabling men to be selected, trained and drafted into military service, as necessary. Following the Act’s passage on May 18th 1917, more than 24 million Americans (nearly 98% of the male population under the age of 46) registered for the draft, meaning that this collection records nearly half the male population at that time.

Each result will provide you with a transcript and an image of the original draft registration card. Transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s birth date, place of birth, residence, registration year and citizenship country. Images will often provide additional details such as your ancestor’s home address, citizenship status, marital status, occupation, employer and place of employment, prior military service, race, and details relating to their next of kin. Each card was also signed by the individual, which provides you with a look at your ancestor’s own script and signature.

Additional Sets Added This Last Week

A total of 7.3 million records from the US, Canada and the UK have been released this last Findmypast Friday. Additional collections now available to search include;

New Brunswick, County Deed Registry Books Image Browse
This browse-only collection allows you to explore over 1,400 volumes of land records in their entirety. The material covers 1780 to 1993, contains over 792,000 records and covers all 15 counties within the province. The deed books cover the years 1780 to 1930 while the Indexes run from 1780 to 1993.

Illinois, Northern District, Naturalization Index
Illinois, Northern District, Naturalization Index contains over 550,000 records. This index of naturalization cards from the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois covers petitions made by residents of northern Illinois, northwest Indiana, southern and eastern Wisconsin, and eastern Iowa. The records have the highest concentration from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s, with a few outliers. Each result will provide you with a transcript and an image of the original record. Transcripts will generally reveal the date of your ancestor’s naturalization, their country of birth, place of birth and language. Images may provide further information such as the names and addresses of witnesses, the name and place of the naturalization court, their address, and their date and port of arrival in the United States.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police obituary card index and notices 1876-2007 Browse
Find out if your ancestor died or was killed while serving with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police with over 9,000 browsable obituary cards. The collection comprises obituaries and death notices of RCMP officers who died in service and that were printed in Royal Canadian Mounted Police publications, such as the Scarlet and Gold Magazine, as well as an index of obituaries. The amount of information listed will vary depending on the source material. Most records will reveal when your ancestor died, their rank and regimental number at the very least. A number or entries also include photographs of the deceased officer.

Scotland, Post Office Directories Image Browse
More than 180,000 additional records have been added to our collection of browsable Scottish Post Office Directories. These fascinating records provide brief descriptions of local areas, lists of notable people, of local business owners and are an excellent source for both family and local historians.

1939 Register – empty addresses
Over 667,000 additional 1939 Register records are now available to search. These new records relate to vacant addresses recorded in the register.

Databases Posted at FamilySearch May 1 through June 1, 2017

The following databases were published or updated at FamilySearch between May 1 and June 1 2017:

Title – Number of Indexed Records – Last Updated

Argentina, Entre Ríos, Catholic Church Records, 1764-1983 – 601,470 – 30 May 2017
Canada, New Brunswick, Saint John, Burial Permits, 1889-1919 – 28,555 – 17 May 2017
Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821-2015 – 251,775 – 10 May 2017
Cook Islands, Civil Registration, 1846-1989 – Browse Images – 03 May 2017
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – Browse Images – 03 May 2017
Denmark, Copenhagen City, Civil Marriages, 1739-1964, Index 1877-1964 – 85,071 – 12 May 2017
El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1990 – 875,969 – 02 May 2017
France, Dordogne, Censuses, 1856 – 530,703 – 16 May 2017
Germany, Saxony-Anhalt, Halberstadt Kreisarchiv, Ahnenpäße (Ancestor Passports) – Browse Images – 18 May 2017
Italy, La Spezia, Catholic Church Records, 1838-1857 – Browse Images – 22 May 2017
Mexico, Tabasco, Catholic Church Records, 1803-1970 – 30,805 – 23 May 2017
Namibia, Dutch Reformed Church Records, 1956-1984 – 29,076 – 23 May 2017
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 498,265 – 02 May 2017
Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 68,565 – 17 May 2017
Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996 – 1,967,704 – 18 May 2017
Peru, Moquegua, Civil Registration, 1850-1996 – 1,554 – 18 May 2017
Russia, Simbirsk Poll Tax Census (Revision Lists), 1782-1858 – Browse Images – 17 May 2017
Spain, Province of Asturias, Municipal Records, 1470-1897 – 62,165 – 11 May 2017
Spain, Province of Teruel, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2013 – Browse Images – 01 May 2017
Switzerland, Fribourg, Census, 1880 – 10,443 – 18 May 2017

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Florida Marriages, 1830-1993 – 1,699,231 – 01 May 2017
Iowa, Poweshiek County Land Records, 1855-1934 – Browse Images – 08 May 2017
Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954 – 1,317,764 – 19 May 2017
Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979 – 1,493,817 – 19 May 2017
Louisiana, Parish Marriages, 1837-1957 – 1,093,880 – 01 Jun 2017
Maine Vital Records, 1670-1921 – 2,045,611 – 02 May 2017
Missouri, Reports of Separation Notices, 1941-1946 – 367,825 – 01 Jun 2017
New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866 – 250,441 – 16 May 2017
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 13,611,543 – 09 May 2017
Utah, Birth Certificates, 1903-1914 – 99,172 – 17 May 2017
Utah, Weber County Marriages, 1887-1941 – 92,337 – 16 May 2017

MISC.
Family Group Records Collection, Archives Section, 1942-1969 – Browse Images – 16 May 2017

BillionGraves Index – 20,861,710 – 01 May 2017

99 Years of the Foreign Service Journal Now Available Online – 1919-2017

Do you have relatives or ancestors who were involved in the American Foreign Service? If so, you need to check out this new website. Search it for any name by clicking on the tiny “magnifier” in the upper right-hand corner.

Note that the AFSA website also has an “obituary” section that runs from 2003 through 2017.

The following is from the American Foreign Service Association website:

The fully digitized archive of The Foreign Service Journal is finally here! Witness nearly a century of diplomatic history, stories and discussion—as told by the people who were there and shaped it firsthand. Browse the archive to learn about American diplomacy and foreign policy while diving into the extraordinary experiences of the U.S. Foreign Service.

The archive is filled with adventure, thoughtful rumination and moments of historic import. Flee Manila amidst heavy bombing from Japanese warplanes during World War II and trek through muddy dikes alongside Vietnamese commandos. Monitor Soviet ships from the National Military Command Center during the Cuban Missile Crisis and experience the outpouring of support for the United States witnessed by our embassies across the world after 9/11.

Review the ongoing discourse on the diplomatic profession as the Foreign Service community reflects on everything from tradecraft to security, constructive dissent to the right way forward on reform. Discover the great foreign policy debates that transpired as the course of world history was decided time and time again.

What becomes clear throughout is the invaluable role the Journal has played in capturing the history and the story of the U.S. Foreign Service and American diplomacy. Now available to the public—students, academics, policymakers, the military—the FSJ archive can help raise awareness about the critical role of diplomacy and raise the profile of the Foreign Service.

View the FSJ Archive homepage to browse and search more than 900 issues of the Journal. Share the link with colleagues: www.afsa.org/fsj-archive. Visit the FSJ Special Collections page to view select archive articles, highlighted for their interesting content and relevance to current affairs.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

TheGenealogist Launches the First World War Issues of The Sphere Newspaper

The following is from Nick Thorne at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist has expanded its Newspaper and Magazine collection with the release of The Sphere that cover August 1914 to June 1919.

Using the Historical newspapers and magazines resource on TheGenealogist enables researchers to follow current affairs that may have affected or concerned our ancestors at the time. Because the articles were written as events were occurring, they provide contemporary accounts of the world that our ancestors lived in and can furnish us with great insights into opinions of the time. In the case of the First World War years, covered by this release of The Sphere, we can gain information about individuals or read about situations that are similar to ones that our ancestors may have found themselves in.

The Sphere was an illustrated paper founded by Clement Shorter (1857-1926) who was also responsible for establishing the Tatler and it covered general news stories from the UK and around the world.

War Memorials collection
Also being released at this time by TheGenealogist are another 116 War Memorials containing 10,795 names. Included in this batch are a number of Boer War memorials as well as those for the First World War. With this addition the total figure for memorials on TheGenealogist has now reached 1,540 with 363,838 names.

To search these and many other records on TheGenealogist, go to: www.thegenealogist.co.uk

The Sphere, providing insights into your ancestor’s lives.

Nick Thorne uses the Newspaper and Magazines collection to better understand conditions in World War I

The Sphere December 12, 1914

I have been looking a little closer into the war exploits of my step-grandfather. I knew that he had joined the Royal Engineers Special Reserve Motor Cyclist Division as a despatch rider but, like many of his generation that fought in the First World War, he didn’t talk much about his experiences. What I did know was that he had found it ‘quite exciting’ to ride his despatches from headquarters to the front and back on a motorbike. He never expanded on this and certainly didn’t tell us stories about his escapades, nor what it was like to be a soldier on two wheels.

With the recent release of copies of The Sphere, on TheGenealogist, I was thus fascinated to come across the December 12, 1914 edition of the publication. Here was an article about motorcycle despatch riders from the early part of the war. This day’s publication featured a double page evocative image of a motor-cycle despatch rider on his machine fleeing with the enemy on his tail. As I knew that my step-grandfather was in his late twenties at the time and a keen motorcycle rider I could imagine him reading pieces such as this and wanting to join up to the R.E. Motor Cyclists to ‘do his bit’.

I know that Grandpa also served in the western theatre of war and so this image and the report that followed, resonated with me. I could now imagine him in similar situations as had been described and pictured in the newspaper. In this particular article from the newly released records, the rider telling his story suffers a whole lot of problems: ‘On returning I take the wrong road and my machine gives trouble, and whilst repairing same I suddenly find myself surrounded by Uhlans.’ This narrator is captured, has his hands bound behind his back and he feigns illness. When his guard goes to fetch a doctor the British Tommy escapes by rolling into a ditch. This episode makes me realise that when my step-grandfather said it was ‘quite exciting’ this was probably a bit of an understatement. Their duties were certainly not a simple ride in the countryside.

The British Army in World War I would often used Douglas or Triumph Motorcycles for despatch riding duties which only had between 2 and 5 hp engines. Some riders, however, brought their own machines along when they joined up. These motorbikes would have to be inspected by the military to make sure that they were suitable for the purpose; but in the early days, when many of the men were volunteers, this would have meant that this section of the Royal Engineers Signals would have been up and running quickly. In my step-grandfather’s case, however, looking at his attestation papers I can see that this part had been scored through – indicating that he would have had to be issued with an army bike.

Later in the First World War Grandpa was wounded and by reading other articles, such as that published on the 9th January 1915 about the RAMC work at the front, I got an understanding for how injured men were transferred in motorised omnibuses and ambulances that were also subject to breakdowns of their own.

Resources such as The Sphere, The War Illustrated, The Great War, The Illustrated London News, plus the other historical newspapers and magazines already found on TheGenealogist are great for building a picture of situations that our ancestors may have found themselves in. In some cases we may be lucky enough to find an ancestor actually named in a report – but even when that doesn’t happen we can find write-ups that provide us with an understanding of the wider conditions in which our ancestors worked, played or went to war in.

Another use that we can make of this resource is where we have an ancestor who was unfortunate enough to have lost their lives, while serving as an officer in the First World War. In many editions of The Sphere Rolls of Honour were published. In these we are able to find a picture along with a few lines recording their loss.The Newspaper and Magazine collection is available to all Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

New! Family Tree Lite – From FamilySearch

The following teaser is from a blog, written by Leslie Albrecht Huber, and posted May 12, 2017 at the FamilySearch blog website.

In recent years, FamilySearch has added a variety of tools that can both enrich your tree and make your research experience faster and more productive. You can attach photos, list sources—and attach or link to them—submit names directly to the temple, use record hints, search partner sites, and more. FamilySearch’s Family Tree mobile app carries these capabilities over to your phone or other mobile device. It’s truly amazing how much FamilySearch can do. But have you ever wished FamilySearch did less?

There are a number of reasons this might be the case. The first is limited available internet bandwidth. All the bells and whistles of FamilySearch.org run smoothly when bandwidth is plentiful. But in situations where it’s not, they can bog down the connection. A simpler site means a faster, less frustrating connection when bandwidth is limited such as in some countries or even just areas with less than stellar internet speed. Bandwidth can also be limited when too many devices are competing with one another. For mobile users watching their data, another benefit of a simpler site is that simplicity means less data used—which could lead to significant money saved.

These are some of the reasons that FamilySearch has released a new streamlined version of FamilySearch’s Family Tree, known appropriately as Family Tree Lite.

Read the full blog.

Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary Admissions Books (1830 and 1840s) Digitized, Transcribed & Posted

The following teaser is from a posting by Rebecca Onion at Slate.com:

The American Philosophical Society‘s library holds four fascinating admissions books offering details on prisoners held at Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary in the 1830s and 1840s. Three of those books seem to have been kept by Thomas Larcombe, a Baptist minister who was the first to hold the position of “moral instructor” at the prison.

It’s a little difficult to read the scanned versions of the books, but Scott Ziegler, of the American Philosophical Society, and Michelle Ziogas have transcribed the information within and made the data available through the University of Pennsylvania’s Magazine of Early American Datasets. Two admission books’ worth of Larcombe’s notes on Eastern State’s prisoners, one dated 1830–1839 and the other 1839–1843 appear here in .csv files

Read the full article.

View the Eastern State Penitentiary Scanned Admissions books by clicking here.

Read the Eastern State Penitentiary spreadsheets by clicking here.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Genealogy Giants: Comparing the Four Major Websites

“Which genealogy website should I use?” It’s one of the most-asked questions in genealogy — and this quick reference guide answers it!

Use this jammed-packed cheat sheet to quickly and easily compare all of the most important features of the four biggest international genealogy websites: Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, Findmypast.com and MyHeritage.com. Then consult it every time your research budget, needs or goals change. Tables, bulleted lists and graphics make this guide as easy to use as it is informative.

Family Roots Publishing purchased a large quantity of these guides, and is making them available at 10% off thru the NGS Conference this week – plus a couple days. The sale runs through May 15. Click on this link to order.

This comprehensive quick reference guide explains:

  • How knowing about all four websites can improve your family history research
  • How the sites stack up when it comes to the numbers of historical records, names in trees, DNA profiles, site users, site languages and subscription costs
  • Unique strengths of each website and cautions for using each
  • What to keep in mind as you evaluate record content between sites
  • Geographic record strengths: A unique table has an at-a-glance comparison for 30+ countries
  • How to see what kinds of records are on each site without subscribing
  • How family trees are structured differently at these websites — and why it matters
  • Privacy, collaboration and security options at each site
  • How DNA testing features differ at the two websites that offer it
  • What you can do with free guest accounts at each website
  • Subscription and free access options

Click on the following link to order:
Genealogy Giants: Comparing the 4 Major Websites QuickGuide, by Sunny Morton; Editor: Lisa Louise Cooke; 8.5×11; 4 pp, 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic – folded; April 27 2017; QuickGuide; Item #: Lu27

Sunny Morton is a genealogy writer whose work is read by thousands in magazines and online. As a Contributing Editor at Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems, she frequently posts on the news, but also loves to share quick research tips, reveal little-known resources or take genealogists for an exhilarating dive into deeper research topics and techniques. She’s also the author of My Life & Times: A Guided Journal for Collecting Your Stories.

1000+ Old Colonists of Australia Portraits Now Available Online

The State Library of South Australia have posted portraits of over 1000 “Old Colonists,” which were previously only seen at the State Library itself. Included are indexes and online catalog records. The portraits are of folks who arrived prior to 1841. The photographs have a fascinating story behind them.

According to the Library’s Facebook page,
“‘The Old Colonists Banquet Group’ of men was commissioned by businessman Emanuel Solomon to commemorate a free banquet he held at the Adelaide Town Hall on 28th December 1871 for fellow colonists ‘who date their arrival before 1841’.

“The companion mosaic of women was created partly as a consolation to women who applied for tickets only to be told that the banquet was for ‘the Male Sex’!

Take a look at the collections by clicking on the following links:
http://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+47769
http://collections.slsa.sa.gov.au/resource/B+19985

Thanks to Dick Eastman for the heads-up.

FindMyPast Adds 6.7 Million Exclusive Records to Their USA Marriage Collection

Findmypast continues to release millions of marriage records every quarter and aims to complete the entire digitization project by the end of 2017. The following is their latest news release:

5th May 2017: Leading family history website, Findmypast, has announced today the release of an additional 6.7 million United States Marriage records in partnership with Family Search International.

Covering 127 counties across 18 states, the new additions mark the latest step in Findmypast’s efforts to create the largest single online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. The collection was first launched in February 2016 and has received regular monthly updates ever since.

This is the first time that any of the records included in this update have been released online and all 6.7 million of them will only be available to search online at Findmypast. The new additions cover;

· Alabama
· Arkansas
· Connecticut
· Delaware
· Georgia
· Iowa
· Kentucky
· Maine
· New Hampshire
· New Jersey
· North Carolina
· Ohio
· Oregon
· Rhode Island
· Utah
· Vermont
· Washington
· West Virginia

Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America. More than 60 per cent of which will have never before been published online. When complete, the collection will only be found in its entirety exclusively on Findmypast. The records include marriage date, the names of both bride and groom , birthplace, birth date, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

The millions of new U.S. records will complement Findmypast’s massive collection of British and Irish data, allowing them to provide many more connections and a more comprehensive experience to family historians in the US and beyond. Customers with family trees on Findmypast will also benefit from leads connecting relatives on their trees with the marriage records, thus generating a whole new source of research.

For more information, visit: http://www.findmypast.com/marriages

55,000+ Romanian Medieval Documents Digitized

The following excerpt is from Romania-Insider.com:

Over 55,000 medieval documents from Romania have been digitized and compiled…

The database, which can be consulted at arhivamedievala.ro, is the result of a project implemented by the University of Bucharest, in a partnership with the Romanian National Archives, the Babeș-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca and the National Archives of Norway…

All the documents in the database have been scanned from the Romanian National Archives. Before this, some 1,000 manuscripts were restored.

Around 80% of the documents in the database are in Latin, 10% in Slavonic and Romanian, Digi24.ro reported. The other 10% is in languages such as German, Hungarian, Greek, Turkish or Cyrillic…

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Linkpendium is now Mobile-Freindly

Linkpendium is one of my favorite sites. Linkpendium is a 10,000,000+ resource directory to everything on the Web about families worldwide and genealogically-relevant information about U.S. states and counties. They cover both free and subscription sites, with a strong emphasis upon free resources provided by libraries, other government agencies, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals. The following was posted on their Facebook page last week.

San Luis Obispo, March 20, 2017. Linkpendium is proud to announce our first-ever press release.

Er. That’s not what we meant to say.

Linkpendium is proud to announce that our we are now mobile-friendly. Nobody old enough to order a beer may have any hope of reading one of those silly smartphones, but now you can go to: http://www.Linkpendium.com/ and have all our pages display sensibly on a 2-inch by 4-inch screen. The main link collection, all 10,159,184 links to genealogical data, is fully accessible on mobile devices.

And so is our very popular Family Discoverer search engine — the one that lets you search 2,804,127 pages of *FREE* genealogical data, much of which you cannot find using Google even if you are a certifiable wizard at building long, complex, and inscrutable query strings.

You can try the search engine at: http://www.Linkpendium.com/family-discoverer/

FREE 5-Day Western European Family History Conference – Both Online and On-Site in Salt Lake City

Oh, Wow! FamilySearch is doing another week-long series of FREE classes – all dealing with Western European research. It looks like classes are being offered dealing with research in Germany, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands, and Switzerland. Check out the class titles below. If you can make the time, I’d highly advise stopping and taking those classes that look interesting to you. These classes are available as streaming webinars, or as on-site classes in the classrooms at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Patty and I took a series of similar classes when they were offered last fall, and learned all kinds of things. The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (26 March 2017), FamilySearch’s world-renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be offering its free Western European Family History Conference, May 15 to May 19, 2017. Guests can attend classes in person or online. The conference will focus exclusively on select Western European research and is intended for beginning and intermediate researchers. Classes are free, but registration is required due to class size and webinar bandwidth limitations. For more information or to register, go to FamilySearch Wiki. Easily find and share this news release online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

Classes will be taught by the Family History Library’s staff of experts and guest genealogists. Content will focus primarily on how to research records from Germany, France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Belgium. Topics addressed will include census, church, immigration, and vital records.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Use the following links to register for deisired conference classes online or in the library: in-person guests or webinar guests.

DATE / TIME – CLASS (SKILL LEVEL) – WEBINAR | CLASSROOM

  • Mon, 15-May, 9:00 AM – Finding German Places of Origin (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 10:15 AM – Spelling Variations in German Given and Place Names (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 11:30 AM – Meyers German Gazetteer Now Online, Indexed and Fully Searchable (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 2:00 PM – German Church Records and Beyond: Deepen Your Research – Using a Variety of Town Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 3:15 PM – Elusive Immigrant: Methods of Proving Identity (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 9:00 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 1 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 10:15 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 2 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 11:30 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 3 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 2:00 PM – Out of the Ashes of Paris (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 3:15 PM – Research in Alsace-Lorraine (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 9:00 AM – Latin for Researchers (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 10:15 AM – Calendar Changes in France, Germany, Switzerland, and the Low Countries (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 11:30 AM – Gazetteers and Maps for Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 2:00 PM – Beginning Research in Luxembourg (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 3:15 PM – Beginning Research in Belgium (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 9:00 AM – Names in Belgium and the Netherlands (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 10:15 AM – WieWasWie, Past the Index: What to do Next (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 11:30 AM – Dutch Provincial and City Research (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thurs, 18-May, 2:00 PM – Dutch Research Before 1811 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thu, 18-May, 3:15 PM – Finding Your Family in the Amazing Online Amsterdam City – Archives (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 9:00 AM – Beginning Swiss Research Part 1 (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 10:15 AM – Beginning Swiss Research Part 2 (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 11:30 AM – Swiss Archives Online Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 2:00 PM – Swiss Census Records (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 3:15 PM – Swiss Chorgericht Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of March 20, 2017


The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (March 25, 2017), Hundreds of thousands of free indexed records from all over Italy are featured in these newly published online collections. Additionally, find newly searchable records from Canada, Ecuador, Germany, The Netherlands, Peru, Sweden and the United States. Search these new free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 73,853 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1800-1870 – 39,041 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Prato, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1923 – 15,463 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Rieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1840-1945 – 1,525 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Enna, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1944 – 108,603 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Grosseto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1851-1907 – 155 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Viterbo, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1870-1943 – 168 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496-1906 – 0 – 111,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 2,532,170 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869 – 42,862 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 28,563 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 2,668 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Norrbotten Church Records, 1612-1923; index 1658-1860 – 6,531 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Kopparberg Church Records, 1604-1900; index 1628-1860 – 7,194 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index – 3,390,197 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Alaska, Vital Records, 1816-1959 – 18,844 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866 – 72,842 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York State Census, 1865 – 18,804 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Pennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-1931 – 61,584 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FindMyPast Offers FREE Access to Their Entire Irish Collection Thru March 17

To coincide with St Patrick’s Day 2017, Findmypast is making their entire collection of more than 116 million Irish records free for a limited time!

Through 17 March 2017, you can access the largest collection of Irish records online for FREE!

Unique records from World War 1 and the Easter Rising, extensive travel and migration collections, as well as detailed Irish court and prison registers are all available to help you add colour to your users’ discoveries.

Access Findmypast’s Irish records for FREE through March 17 – Saint Patrick’s Day! Click on the appropriate link below for access.

You can get free access to the following:

  • Over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers
  • Over 9.5 million Census records including the 1901 and 1911 censuses
  • Over 22 million Petty Sessions Court Registers
  • Over 33 million Irish newspaper articles spanning the years 1708 to 1956
  • Over 7.3 million Dog Licenses
  • Over 24 million Irish Passenger Lists
  • Over 2.4 million workhouse & poor law records
  • 4 million Irish Quaker records
  • Over 131,000 Easter Uprising & Ireland Under Martial Law
  • Prison Registers, featuring over 3.5 million names
  • Landed Estates Court records featuring details of over 500,000 tenants residing on estates all over Ireland
  • The complete Griffith’s Valuation
  • The most comprehensive set of national directories, dating back to 1814
  • Indexes to Irish wills dating from 1270 – 1858
  • Over 400,000 gravestones and church memorials

Click on the appropriate link above to access the FREE databases. REMEMBER – the offer ends at the end of the day March 17.

Complete MyHeritage Subscription & DNA Test – $199 (Reg. $349) Now Thru Tuesday, Feb 21

As far as I can tell, the following is the best offer ever made for a MyHeritage Complete Subscription plus a MyHeritage DNA Test. 

I just returned from RootsTech, where I was again most impressed with the latest technological advances made by MyHeritage.com. While at the conference, they made two major announcements – one about their new “Photo Discoveries” feature, and another about the new Consistency Checker for online family trees at MyHeritage. Of course, Photo Discoveries was the most exciting new feature, as we can now count on getting far more photos in our trees than we’ve ever had before. NOTE: Since sending this out in the Genealogy Newsline last Monday, I’ve added the discount link to the above Photo Discoveries and Consistency Checker news releases – as I’ve had at least one reader attempt to get the discount directly from the MyHeritage Blog. WRONG PLACE! Thus the added paragraph and links in those blogs.

As I blogged last November, MyHeritage is now a major player in the DNA testing business. While at RootsTech, I worked out an exclusive offer for my readers. Subscribe to MyHeritage, and get their Complete Subscription, PLUS a MyHeritage DNA Test (with FREE shipping!) – all for just $199 (Reg. $349). This is the lowest price that I’ve ever seen offered! This offer was only good through February 20, but I got it extended for an additional day – through the 21st.  Click on this link to take advantage of the offer.

Since sending this offer out earlier, staff at MyHeritage have clarified that the offer is for new MyHeritage subscribers or those who have had subscription in the past and it is expired for at least 3 months. Anyone having a current subscription will not be able to see the offer when they click on the links… Sorry!

As my readers know, I’ve been a big fan of MyHeritage for a long time. Traditionally, I have considered the company and their website to be the European competitor to Ancestry.com, while FindMyPast filled the same niche for British research. Both MyHeritage and FindMyPast have expanded into the United States and Canada markets in recent years, with hundreds of millions of records of specific interest to Americans and their northern cousins.

Led by their founder and CEO, Gilad Japhet, MyHeritage has consistently pushed the technology envelope. The technology that Gilad and his team have produced has allowed millions of genealogists worldwide to find more ancestors. New search technologies have kept MyHeritage at the forefront of the online database business for several years. And that technology continues to make huge advances.

MyHeritage is far more than just a place to build online family trees. While their trees continue to grow dramatically, they continue to collect data in many forms worldwide. Many of their users are our European and British cousins whose data may often be accessed at the site. Using the MyHeritage technologies, users are prompted to check out new MyHeritage Discoveries, Smart Matches and Record Matches. 

Based on my personal experience with MyHeritage, I highly recommend the site, as well as their DNA test. As I mentioned early in this article, I’ve worked out a promotion for my readers offering a Complete Subscription, plus the DNA test for only $199. What’s a Complete Subscription? It’s a MyHeritage membership which includes all the MyHeritage Data, as well as the Trees. Click Here to take advantage of this amazing offer.

This offer will give you the following:
• Your Personal Private site with unlimited capacity
• Start a new tree or import by GEDCOM
• Unlimited photo storage
• Apps for the iOs/Android smart phones and tablets
• Family Tree Builder premium software for the PC and MAC
• Smart Matches with 35 Million trees
• Automatic Record Matches
• Full Privacy Control
• Global Name Translation
• Record Detective II
• Over 7 billion historical records
• More than 100 Million newspapers
• Vital records from 48 countries
• 1790-1940 USA census records
• 1841-1911 England and Wales census records
• Over 5 million Dutch records
 NEW Compilation of Published Sources collection with over 450,000 books and 91 million pages
• Book Matching
NEW PedigreeMap
• NEW Sun Charts
 Join 87 million users who have built trees with 2 billion people.

Don’t just take my word for it. The following comment was made by my friend, Dick Eastman:
“I was amazed at the results. Within minutes MyHeritage.com showed me more information about a number of my ancestors than I had found in 35 years of searching on my own”
Dick Eastman – Author of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

Here’s the deal: $199 for a full year of a Complete Subscription to  MyHeritage – that’s their PremiumPlus Family Site, their Data Plan, and a DNA Testing Kit. Everything!!! Again – This is the lowest price I’ve ever seen for these products, So Click here to order yours today. Did I mention that the DNA Test Kit ships FREE! Order now, as this price will only be offered through Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

Note that the offer is for Genealogy Newsline Readers. However, since I author and own Genealogy Newsline, I can also offer it to my GenealogyBlog.com readers and folks that read me through social media. The landing screen from the above link says “Genealogy NewslineReaders” but all my readers and friends are included. Note that I do get a portion of the subscription fee when folks use my links during the promotion period – and I thank you for that support.

Kind regards,
Leland K Meitzler
Genealogy Newsline & GenealogyBlog.com