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A Review of the FamilySearch Colorado Statewide Marriage Index 1900-1939

My mother was born in Canon City, Colorado in 1911. The Feller family had moved to the area from Missouri in the 1880s and were well settled in by my mother’s birth. Mother was the daughter of Hazel Feller and Neal Cornett. However, when mom was about 5 years old, her parents separated (I never have found a divorce), and she and her little brother (Merle) were adopted by her Great-Uncle and Aunt, Fred and Rosa Feller. So mom officially became a Feller.

I noted a few days ago that the Colorado Statewide Marriage Index 1900-1939 was updated early in June, so thought it was about time I did a review of the site. The Marriage Index is actually a card index created by the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health in Colorado. The index is arranged alphabetically by groom’s name providing county, names of husband and wife, age, race, date and place of marriage, and certificate number. It should be noted that some cards are out of order, but if you’re using the FamilySearch Index instead of just browsing, this will not be an issue. There are 452,357 records and 907,007 images as of 7 June 2013, when the update was made.
For the purposes of this review, I chose to make a search for all those with the Feller surname for the entire time period of 1900 to 1939. I got 115 results, with the first 27 actually being for the surname, Feller. Of the 27, nine of them are my family, with a couple other possibilities. To see the page itself, click on the illustration below.

CO-Marriage-Index-1

Clicking on the link for Virginia Feller, I got the following index image (again, click on the image for to go to the site):
CO-Marriage-Index-2

The above screen led me directly to an image of the original index card for the marriage of Virginia Feller to Maynard Claussen. Maynard was mom’s first husband, who died young of Hodgkin’s disease. By clicking on “View Image,” I got the following:
CO-Marriage-Index-3

This is a great resource. Check it out for yourself.

There is also a Colorado, County Marriages, 1864-1995 Database at FamilySearch, which contains the imaged records of county marriages from Clear Creek, Fremont, Kit Carson, Logan, Moffat, Phillips, Saguache, Sedgwick, Washington, and Yuma counties. There were 49,690 images as of 15 June 2012, when the data was posted.

For those interested in Colorado research, I might also note that Dollarhide just completed a new Colorado Name Lists 1858-1998 volume, which gives lists census & census substitutes for the state. The are hundreds of references in the book. However, just links alone to online resources totals 351! Click on the link for more information. Click here to read Dollarhide’s new blog article, What are Name Lists?

Finally – if you have an interest in what Marriage Record Databases may be found at FamilySearch, see GenealogyBlog’s own “United States Marriage Documents & Indexes Found at FamilySearch.org.” There you will find an updated listing of 148 databases of marriage records, by state, with descriptive information and links.

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Drive By Viewing

The following excerpt is from WTVR in Virginia:
Drive-By-Viewing

FARMVILLE, Va. (WTVR) —The drive-thru itself was an innovative concept, but at this one, it’s unlikely you can order any fries or a shake.
Carl Eggleston of Farmville believes in innovation when it comes to his funeral business. After 30 years in the business, he’s seen some changes and he’s tried to be one who keeps up with the times and needs of families.

Next month he’ll have cameras installed in the chapel, so services can be viewed online for family out-of-state. He’s already seen many grieving families choose to have their loved ones fingerprints made into rings, pendants and ear rings.

But now he’s leading the way in Virginia with a new service, the drive-thru.

“You can stay in your car and ride by this window, see your loved one–also see when the place and time of service is going to be held, on this board here–without leaving your car,” Eggleston said from the Oliver and Eggleston Funeral Establishment.

Read the full article atthe WTVF website.

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National Archives Awards $2.97 Million in Grants for Documentary Editing and Archival Projects

The following is from the NARA website:

June 21, 2013: Washington, DC… Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero has awarded 30 grants totaling $2.972 million for historical records projects in 18 states and the District of Columbia. The National Archives grants program is carried out through the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). A complete list of the approved grants is online.

Grants totaling $1.26 million were recommended for 15 documentary editing projects to publish the papers of key American figures, including Walt Whitman, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Martin Luther King, Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt, Thomas Edison, and the Presidential Recordings project. The Association for Documentary Editing received a grant for three years of support for the Institute for Historical Editing, a weeklong training camp for historical documentary editors, now in its 40th year.

Grants totaling just under $900,000 were recommended for 10 archival projects, including three archives in South Carolina; African American women’s collections at Emory University; historical New England manuscript collections at the Society for the Preservation New England Antiquities; Pacifica Radio’s American Women Making History and Culture collection; and a manuscripts collection process at the University of Guam comprising the premier holdings of materials related to the U.S. territory of Guam and the Marianas, as well as Micronesia.

Four projects received funding under the new Innovations funding category: Simmons College for a program of archival education for municipal clerks; a new email archives model program designed at Stanford University; strategies for enhancing digital graphics description and discovery created by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; and a digital-only edition of the George Washington Financial Papers project at the University of Virginia.

The Commission also announced the public launch of Founders Online a website that will provide access to 175,000 documents of the papers of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and Benjamin Franklin.

Kathleen Williams, Executive Director of the NHPRC, presented the grant applications and policy issues to the full Commission. The Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero, is the Chairman of the Commission. The NHPRC is the sole federal funding agency whose only focus is the documentary heritage of the United States. Established in 1934, it awards grants for preserving, publishing, and providing access to vital historical documents.

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A Genealogist’s Historical Timeline for Alaska, 1725-1959

Alaska Name Lists

The following article was excerpted from Dollarhide’s new book, Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

For any research in Alaska, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical and genealogical point of view.

1725. – Tsar Peter the Great of Russia commissioned a Danish sea captain, Vitus Bering, to explore the Northwest coast of North America. Bering is credited with the official discovery of Alaska, the first reliable information on the land, and the establishment of Russia’s claim to Northwestern North America. Although the Russians visited Alaska frequently with seal and fishing expeditions, the first attempts at colonization did not begin until 1784.

1774-1791. Charles III of Spain, fearing Russian expansion, sent several expeditions north from Mexico to Alaska, intent on claiming the entire area for Spain. But, their visits were fleeting, and no colonies or settlers were established at any of their stops. Few traces of the Spanish expeditions remain in Alaska except for a few placenames, such as Malaspina Glacier and Valdez.

1778. While searching for the elusive Northwest Passage, British explorer Captain James Cook explored the waterway (Cook Inlet) that downtown Anchorage now borders. Captain Cook’s maps of North America proved for the first time that Asia and North America were separate continents. His maps became the standard for world navigation in the North Pacific for the next hundred years.

1784. Grigory Ivanovich Shelekhov, a Siberian fur merchant, established the first permanent Russian settlement at Three Saints Bay, on Kodiak Island. His wife, Natalya, was the first European woman in Russian America.

1795. The first Russian Orthodox Church was established at Kodiak.

1799. – Alexander Baranov established the Russian post known today as Old Sitka; the trade charter from the Tsar granted exclusive trading rights to the new Russian America Company for a period of twenty years.

1821. The Russian trading charter was renewed, and extended the area of the Russian claim to the 51st parallel. Meanwhile, the British-owned Hudson’s Bay Company was trying to gain a foothold in the Alaska fur trade. In 1821 they made a deal with the Russian America Company, leasing land south of Cape Spenser. The British were a presence in Alaska for the next 30 years.

1823. President James Monroe issued the Monroe Doctrine, seeking to exclude European intervention in the New World. It was clearly aimed at Russia and Spain, countries still clamoring to gain more involvement in the Americas.

1824. Russia and the U.S. signed a treaty accepting 54 degrees 4 minutes as the southern boundary of Russian America. Also in 1824, the Russians began explorations of mainland Alaska that led to the discovery of the Nushagak, Kuskokwim, Yukon, and Koyokuk Rivers.

1857. The beginning of the end for the Russian America Company – the company was suffering from financial problems and the Tsar was threatening to revoke their charter. The company had been beaten by the Hudson’s Bay Company in the fur trade. The British company had better and cheaper items to trade with the natives for furs. The Russian America company tried new business ventures, such as coal mining, whaling, and ice trading, but failed at all of them. The company lost wealth and power before the first gold discoveries in Alaska. Gold mining was destined to replace fur trading as Alaska’s main economic activity.

1867 (April). Financial struggles forced Russia to sell Russian America to the United States. Negotiated by U.S. Secretary of State William Seward, the purchase price for what is now Alaska was $7.2 million, or about 2 cents an acre. Alaska’s value was not appreciated by most Americans, many calling it “Seward’s Folly.” The treaty was approved by Congress on 9 April 1867, and the United States flag was raised on 18 October 1867 (now called Alaska Day, a legal holiday). The rest of the U.S. may have forgotten William Seward, but in Alaska, Seward’s Day (another legal holiday) is celebrated every year on the last Monday of March.

1867 (October). While the United States and most of Europe recognized the Gregorian Calendar, Russia had still not made the change in 1867. The Gregorian Calendar had been in effect in British North America since the British officially changed from the Julian to Gregorian in 1752. On the day Alaska became part of the U.S., the change from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian Calendar caused Alaska residents to have Friday, October 6, 1867 followed by Friday, October 18, 1867. They also had their shortest year. In 1867, Alaska’s year began on March 25th and ended on December 31st.

1868. Congress designated the Russian America purchase as the Department of Alaska, under the command of U.S. Army Major General Jefferson C. Davis. Alaska was ruled by a military command until 1884, when it became the District of Alaska. As a district, Alaska had a civil government similar to that of the District of Columbia at the time. Alaska did not have a Governor or Legislature until 1912, when it became the Territory of Alaska. And, Alaska sent its first voting members to Congress after it became the State of Alaska in 1959.

1870. Although Alaska was a U.S. possession from 1867, a federal census for 1870 was not conducted there – except for a military tally of some of the inhabitants. Censuses exist for several local Alaskan jurisdictions from 1870 to 1880, many done as part of U.S. Government surveys of the seal and fishing industries. The extant name lists are included in the bibliography that follows.

1872. Gold was discovered near Sitka and in British Columbia.

1880. Richard Harris and Joseph Juneau discovered gold on the Gastineau Channel, with the aid of Kowee, a local clan leader. Soon after, the town of Juneau was founded.

1880-1900. Federal censuses came to Alaska in 1880, followed by 1890, but both were apparently statistical summaries only, since no name lists have been found. Without counties as the basic census units, the U.S. Census Bureau had to be creative in parceling out enumeration districts. The first full federal census was for 1900, which survives. In that year, the Census Bureau divided Alaska into Northern (Arctic), Southern (Kodiak Kuskokwim, Nushagak, Aleutian-Unalaska), and Southeastern (Sitka, Juneau) districts.

1896. Dawson City (Canada) was founded on the Yukon River at the mouth of the Klondike River. Gold was discovered on nearby Bonanza Creek, and Dawson City became the epicenter of the Klondike Gold Rush that followed.

1897-1900. Klondike Gold Rush. The main Gold Rush claims were on the Canadian length of the Yukon River. At the time, the easiest method of getting to Dawson City was a steamboat trip from the Bering Sea to the mouth of the Yukon River, across the length of Alaska, and into Yukon Territory. While the Yukon River was iced over, overland routes began at Skagway or Dyea over the Boundary Mountains by foot, and then a long sled-dog trek to the Yukon and into Dawson City.

1898. Skagway was the largest city in Alaska; work started on the White Pass and Yukon Railroad; Congress appropriated money for a telegraph from Seattle to Sitka; and the Nome gold rush started.

1910-1940. In the 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940 federal censuses, Alaska was enumerated using four judicial districts, indicated by the location of the district courthouse as Division 1 (Juneau), Division 2 (Nome), Division 3 (Anchorage), and Division 4 (Fairbanks).

1912. Alaska became a U.S. Territory. Alaska’s population was at 29,500 Eskimos, Indians and Aleuts; 4,300 “Caucasian Alaskans” and 26,000 Cheechakos (newcomers).

1913. The first Alaska Territorial Legislature convened. The first law enacted granted women voting rights.

1914. Congress authorized the construction of the Alaska Railroad, clearing the way for the only railroad in history which would be owned and operated by the U.S. government. The city of Anchorage was born as the main railroad construction campsite.

1924. Congress granted Native Americans the right to vote and U.S. citizenship. As a result of this act, the number of qualified voters in Alaska doubled over night.

1942. The Japanese invaded Alaska’s Aleutian Islands. As part of the defense of the West Coast, the Alaska Highway was built in the amazingly short time of eight months and 12 days, linking Anchorage and Fairbanks with the rest of the nation. Anchorage entered the war years with a population of 7,724 and emerged with 43,314 residents.

1955. A Constitutional Convention opened at the University of Alaska.

1959. The Alaska statehood measure passed Congress in late 1958. President Eisenhower signed the statehood bill, and on January 3, 1959, Alaska entered the Union as the 49th state.

Source: Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present, by William Dollarhide; published by Family Roots Publishing Co. For ordering information, click here.

To see more of Dollarhide’s Name List volumes, Click here.

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Jackie O may have been a “wee bit Irish”… and then some

Jackie O
A couple days ago, we posted a blog based on an article found at IrishCentral.com. The article was prompted by research done by Clare genealogist, Jim O’Callaghan. After posting the blog, Jim’s son, Simon, posted a comment and then emailed me about the accuracy of the original article, basically stating that the editors of the article were a bit overzealous and their finished article came to conclusions that Jim O’Callaghan himself never came to.

There’s another article by David Monagan, published at the June 23, 2013 Forbes website that deals with the same story, but tells it much more like it really is. Following is an excerpt:

This weekend Ireland is abuzz with remembrances of John F. Kennedy as thousands gather around his ancestral village of New Ross, County Wexford to mark the 50th anniversary of the late American president’s triumphal visit to Ireland just five months before his death in Dallas in November, 1963. Daughter Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg has arrived with numerous others of the clan, including former ambassador to Ireland Jean Kennedy Smith. So too has flitted forth a druidical offshoot of the “eternal flame” harvested from the one on JFK’s Arlington, Virginia grave , confirming once again that the first Catholic Irish American to become president of the United States is as sanctified in the country’s imagination of itself as, oh, St. Patrick.

But now a report surfaces in the Sunday (U.K.) Times that Jacqueline Bouvier, ala Jackie O for Onassis, was far more Irish herself – “Jackie O’?” — than her family ever let on, preferring claims to descendancy from French aristocrats. A Clare genealogist named Jim O’Callaghan has unearthed a trove of evidence indicating that Jackie was in fact only en peu and perhaps en peasant French as opposed to being at least half Irish – and maybe enough to beat the Kennedy band at its own game – because her entire maternal side came from the Ould Sod.

Read the full article.

By the way, I pulled the original article down… No need to continue to spread bad info…

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FamilySearch U.S. and Canadian Vital Records Database Updates as of 24 June 2013

The following U.S.A. & Canadian vital-records oriented databases have been recently added or updated at FamilySearch.org. This blog updates all five of the Online Database groups (see below) through 24 June 2013 [updated from 6 May 2013].

We’ve also updated all five of the GenealogyBlog Online Database Links Files, See:

THE FOLLOWING DATABASES WERE RECENTLY POSTED OR UPDATED AT FAMILYSEARCH.ORG:

[NEW] Texas, Swisher County Records, 1879-2012 – Browsable Images – Images of county records for Swisher County, Texas. Records include vital records, military discharges, probate records, deed records, marks and brands, court records and civil case files from the county and district courts. It is being published as images become available — 93,603 images as of 7 May 2013.

Ohio, Jefferson County Court Records, 1797-1940Browsable Imaged Records – Birth and probate records from Jefferson County, Ohio. This collection is being published as images become available. An index is being created in cooperation with the Jefferson County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society and will be published as it becomes available. Contact the county courthouse to get the case number for a deceased person — 980,552 images as of  9 May 2013. Up 162,190 images from 1 March 2013.

New York County Marriages 1908-1935 – Name index and images of New York county marriage records. New York state began requiring marriage records for each county in 1908. The collection includes the following counties: Allegany, Broome, Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chemung, Chenango, Clinton, Columbia, Delaware, Essex, Fulton, Genesee, Greene, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lewis, Livingston, Madison, Monroe, Montgomery, Nassau, Niagara, Oneida, Ontario, Orange, Orleans, Oswego, Otsego, Putnam, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schuyler, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Steuben, Sullivan, Tioga, Tompkins, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westchester, Wyoming, and Yates. The collection does not include New York City nor its boroughs. Currently this collection is 41% complete. Additional records by county will be added as they are completed — 633,059 records and 572,023 images as of 9 May 2013; up  10,909 records and 572,023 images since 23 December 2011.

Indiana Marriages 1811-1959 – Indexed in partnership with the Indiana Genealogical Society. Name index of marriages recorded in the Indiana Territory and in the State of Indiana between 1811 and 1959. This collection includes searchable index data for marriage returns and licenses from the following counties: Adams, Allen, Bartholomew, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Carroll, Clark, Clay, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, De Kalb, Delaware, Dubois, Elkhart, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Gibson, Hamilton, Harrison, Hendricks, Henry, Huntington, Jackson, Jay, Jefferson, Jennings, Kosciusko, LaGrange, Lake, Lawrence, Marshall, Ohio, Owen, Rush, and Sullivan. Microfilm copies of original records are available at the Family History Library and at family history centers. Currently this collection is 54% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed — 2,315,411 records and 1,771,437 images as of 15 May2013 – up 2,315 records and 9,751 images since 25 April 2013.

Illinois County Marriages, 1810-1934 – Name indexes and images of county marriages from the state of Illinois. Currently this collection is 9% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed. Counties: Adams, Alexander, Bond, Boone, Brown, Champaign, Christian, Clark and Clay. Note that in a cursory search, I didn’t spot any images posted, but this will be a wonderful database as the data and images get up! – 1,026,354 records as of 16 May 2013; up 702,642 records since 15 April 2011.

[NEW] Georgia, Fulton County Records from the Atlanta History Center, 1827-1933 – Browasable Images – Includes Atlanta city census and voter registration and a necrology including transcribed obituaries, death and cemetery records from Fulton County — 31,670 images as of 16 May 2013.

Oklahoma County Marriages – 1891-1959 – Name index and images of marriage records from counties in Oklahoma  Counties included so far include Adair, Alfalfa, Atoka, Beaver, Beckham, Blaine, Bryan, Caddo, Canadian, Dewey, Garfield, Harmon, Hughes, Jackson, Jefferson, and Kingfisher Counties. Other counties are now probably included, but I couldn’t find a list. More counties will be added over time — 579,571 indexed records and 619,792 343,289 images as of 17 May 2013; up 276,503 images since 17 April 2012.

[NEW] Idaho, Gooding County Records, 1879-1962 - Imaged Records – Land, naturalization, marriage, military, school and probate records from the Clerk of the District Court in Gooding. This collection is being published as images become available — 52,108 images as of 20 May 2013.

Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh City Deaths 1870-1905Imaged Records – Death registrations for the city of Pittsburgh. The records are arranged in numbered bound volumes and are chronological; month and year — 164,487 164,424 records and 88,173 images as of 26 May 2013, up 63 records and 41,405 images from 17 January 2012.

Washington, County Records 1856-2009Imaged Records – Collection of various records including vital, probate, school, tax, naturalization and other records. The records are from various counties in Washington State, 1856-2009. This is an ongoing collection. Check the wiki or browse the collection to determine current record and county coverage – 3,803,806 images as of 31 May 2013; up 368,047 images since 9 April 2013.

New York Queens County Probate Records, 1785-1950Browsable Images – Images of probate records and proceedings from the Queens County Surrogate’s Court in Jamaica, New York; 2,024,578 images as of 31 May 2013 – up 57,742 records since 5 May 2013.

Idaho, Bonneville County Records, 1867-2012 – Imaged Records – Marriages, military discharges and land and property records located in the county recorder’s office in Idaho Falls — 87,557 images as of 3 June  2013.

BillionGraves Index – Indexed Records - Name index of burial records courtesy of BillionGraves which is an expansive family history database of records and images from the world’s cemeteries, all tagged with GPS locations. Volunteers around the world capture images of headstones in a cemetery and upload them to the site; 3,862,588 records as of 4 June 2013; up 365,714 since 1 May 2013.

Idaho, Lincoln County Records, 1886-1972Imaged Records – Vital records, coroner’s inquests, military discharges, deeds, patents, probate case files and registers of cases located at the Clerk of the District Court, Clerk and Recorder Offices in Shoshone. This collection is being published as images become available. – 163,636 images as of 5 June 2013; up 54,365 images since 12 March 2013.

Colorado, Statewide Marriage Index, 1900-1939 – Indexed Records and Images – Card index created by the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health in Colorado. The index is arranged alphabetically by groom’s name providing county, names of husband and wife, age, race, date and place of marriage, certificate number. Some cards are out of order. 452,357 records and 907,007  images as of 7 June 2013.

Vermont, Vital Records, 1760-2003 – Indexed Records & Browsable Images – Name index and images from microfilm of births, marriages and deaths. This collection includes images for the years 1955-2003. The records for 1955-1979 are arranged alphabetically. Index and images courtesy of Ancestry.com and the Vermont State Archives —  1,974,198 records and 2,123,435 images as of 10 June 2013; up 1,974,198 records and 1,162,117 images since 4 October 2012.

Missouri, County Marriage Records, 1819-1969 – Images - Digital images of marriage records created in Missouri counties including recorded marriages, marriage applications, licenses, and certificates. This collection is being published as images become available — 1,609,998 images as of 11 June 2013; up 204,819 images since 11 February 2013.

Maryland, Register of Wills Books, 1629-1999 – Browsable Images–Images of probate records from court record collections housed at the Register of Wills in Maryland. Probate records often include wills, and other records dealing with the administration of estates including bonds, inventories, guardianships, real estate, and various indexes to the records. Includes the following counties: Allegany, Anne Arundel, Calvert, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Charles, Frederick, Garrett, Harford, Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Queen Anne’s, Somerset, St. Mary’s, Talbot, Washington, and Worcester. Also includes records from Baltimore City. This collection is being published as images become available – 1,482,012 images as of 14 June 2013; up  254,913 images since 19 November 2012.

Ohio, Trumbull County Court Records, 1795-2010 – Browsable Images – Various records from the courthouse in Warren, Ohio. This collection is being published as images become available — 300,757 images as of 17 June 2013; up 128,803 images since 12 March 2013.

[NEW] Ohio, Cleveland, Trinity Lutheran Church Records, 1853-2013 – Browsable Images – This collection contains church records from the Trinity Lutheran Church in Cleveland, Ohio and includes baptisms, marriages, deaths, burials, communions, congregational registers and other miscellaneous records — 1,702 images as of 17 June 2013.

[NEW] New Hampshire, Cheshire County, Probate Estate Files, 1886-1900 –  Browsable Images – Images of probate estate case files located at the 8th Circuit Court, Probate Division in Keene — 96,841 images as of 17 June 2013.

[NEW] Wisconsin, State Census, 1865 – Indexed Records & Browsable Images – Name index and images of the 1865 State Census which names the head of household. Most records have been destroyed but schedules exist for the following counties: Dunn, Green, Jackson, Kewaunee, Ozaukee, and Sheboygan — 21,162 records and 874 images as of 18 June 2013.

Tennessee, White County Records, 1809-1975 -Browsable Images - includes marriages, 1950-1975; chancery court records 1825-1937, and circuit court records, 1809-1900. The county court records include primarily probate records. The chancery and circuit court records include disputed estate and property records, some wills, and divorces — 235,690 images as of 18 June 2013; up 31.891 images since 26 September 2012.

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What are Name Lists?

The following article was written by my friend, William Dollarhide:

An important step in finding the place of residence for a person is the use of published censuses and census substitutes. Most genealogists are familiar with the use of federal census records – but there are a myriad of census substitutes as well. A census substitute may take the form of a territorial/state census, court record, militia list, directory, veterans’ list, tax list, or voter list. We can combine these two categories into one by calling them all “Name Lists.” And, because a name list identifies the residents of an area from various local, state, and national sources – a name list becomes a genealogist’s best place-finding tool. A good example is when a genealogist learns from a death certificate that an ancestor was born in Alabama. What needs to be done first is find the county of residence in Alabama. An Alabama name list is the first tool we can use to find the exact place of residence there. Genealogists learn early that finding the county of residence for an ancestor is a break-through in their research efforts. That is because the typical American courthouse is a treasure chest of genealogical information about the residents of a county. The courthouse is where we find birth, marriage, death, and burial records; court records, e.g., orphans, wills, probates, deeds, and property records; and many other documents with specific genealogical revelations.

Dollarhide’s New State Name Lists Books

The new series of state name lists books is a hybrid of my previous work, Census Substitutes and State Census Records (2008, Family Roots Publishing Co, 2 vols. 500 pages). Looking at updating the 2 vol. set to include the many Internet resources added since 2008, the additional name lists to be identified would have caused the 2-volume set to become a 12-volume set. After some discussion with publisher, Leland Meitzler, we decided to prepare the added name lists for one state in one book. Published in alphabetical order, the first nine state name lists books were introduced at the Southern California Genealogical Jamboree in Burbank, the first week of June 2013. A description of book 1, Alabama Name Lists was featured in a previous GenealogyBlog, which you can access here. Click here.

State & County Name Lists Identified

A census is often considered a genealogist’s main name list, but there are census substitutes that accomplish the same thing – they are Name Lists of the inhabitants of a particular area at a particular time. In each of the new state name lists books, the state and county databases (in print, microfilm, or online) came from one of the eight (8) name list categories described below:

1. Territorial & State Census Records. Any censuses taken apart from the federal censuses for a territory or state are identified for each state. Local and county censuses are included if the databases are online.

2. State and County Court Records. Records created in state and county courts are place-finders. Examples of these court records include naturalization records; miscellaneous court lists such as probates, orphans, estates, and wills; and real estate transactions. Any published or online court records at the state level are included in the bibliography; plus any county court record is included if the database is available online.

3. Directories. Town, City, or County Directories date back to the 1700s. From the late 1800s to the present, the directories give detailed information about a person/family, often including the name of the head of household, and all members of a family by name, age, and occupation. The best place to find original city directories today is the local library for a town, city, or county. Libraries often have complete runs of the directories since the first year they were published for that area. Any published or online directory is included in the state’s bibliography.

4. State Militia Lists. Beginning with the 1770s, name lists exist for rosters of men in the various state units. State Militia lists may exist for the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

5. State Veterans & Pensioners Lists. Added to the name lists of militia soldiers are the name lists of veterans and pensioners. Veterans’ lists include extensive databases for the Civil War Pensions issued by the U.S. Government for Union Veterans, as well as Confederate Pensions issued by the southern states. Each state’s involvement in all wars is identified with name lists in published books, microfilm, or online databases.

6. Tax Lists. A Tax List, Assessor’s List, or List of Taxpayers for an area, etc., is very similar to a heads of household census. Usually listed by name is the taxpayer, sometimes the number of other persons in a household; and then details about the person’s tax burden, whether personal or real property. Tax lists between census years can reveal previously unknown places of residence, and give an idea of the financial worth of a person. The earliest tax lists are also very descriptive, e.g., when there are two or more persons with the same name, they are often delineated with “Senior” or “Junior” Early tax lists may include dowager widows, or maiden women who own property subject to taxation. In some colonial areas, the earliest tax lists may even indicate the names of orphaned heirs and the court-appointed guardian responsible for paying the orphan’s taxes. As important substitute name lists, any published or online tax lists for an entire state is included in the bibliography. Countywide lists are included if there is a database online.

7. Vital Records. Published or online lists of statewide births, marriages, divorces, and deaths are included in a state’s bibliography. In addition, any lists of obituaries or burials are included. There are several name lists covering each of the U.S. states. County level vital records are included if the database is available online.

8. Voter Lists. A Voter List, Voter Registration List, or List of Eligible Voters, etc., is much like a head of household census, usually giving the name of the qualified voter, and often more information such as the voter’s age, exact place of residence, and more. Unlike tax lists, early voter lists were almost exclusively for males over 21 years of age, until the advent of Women’s Suffrage. Any published or online statewide voter list is included in the bibliography. Countywide lists are included if there is a database online.

National Name Lists Identified

Each of the state name lists books includes a National Chapter, with U.S. Maps, 1763-1940, and a bibliography of U.S. databases. The national name lists came from one of the six (6) categories described below:

1. Federal Census Records. The National Name Lists chapter identifies all federal censuses in great detail. U.S. maps, 1790-1940, add even more insight into the historical setting and show the changing U.S. political boundaries for each census year.

2. Immigration Lists. Records of ships manifests, customs reports, and lists of aliens arriving in the U.S. are all part of the National Name Lists databases. Several national lists are related to specific ethnic groups, such as Germans, Russians, Irish, and Italians arriving in U.S. ports.

3. U.S. Military Lists. Beginning with the Revolutionary War, name lists exist for rosters of men in various state units as well as the Continental Line. Many of the military name lists are for multiple states and military units. The same is true for the War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II.

4. U.S. Veterans Records. Added to the name lists of active soldiers, sailors, or marines are the name lists of veterans. Databases exist for multiple state units and veterans organizations.

5. U.S. Pension Records. Lists of pensioners from all wars are available, beginning with the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican War, Indian Wars, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II. These national databases are for multiple states and military units.

6. National Vital Records. Published or online lists of marriages, divorces, and deaths are included in the National Name Lists bibliography. In addition, any lists of obituaries or burials are included. There are several name lists covering the entire U.S., such as Veteran Burials, Find A Grave, and the Social Security Death Index.

Check out the Dollarhide Name List book at the FRPC website.

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The History of the Indian Wars in New England

hbh3291“A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time.” Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

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The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research

cbb01An excellent Genealogist uses every tool at their disposal in order to uncover the truth of their ancestors. Today, that may mean using tools which were not available just a few years ago; including, social media. This can be scary for many people. Do you still feel a little lost when people, talk of texting, of twittering, or of blogging? Are you still a little confused on just what social media is and what it covers? You are not alone. Many are still lost on what exactly social media is and how genealogists can make use of it. If you are in that category, don’t worry. A guide to this mysterious world has just been released. Genealogy expert Claire V. Brisson-Banks has written and published The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research: Applying Web 2.0 Strategies.

Claire makes understanding and getting started using social media a little easier. Just look at the table of contents below to see just how much this book covers. For example, do you know what a Wiki is? I know you see the term just about everywhere. Wikipedia is a famous wiki-based online encyclopedia with entries written by its users. A wiki, in fact, as explained by Claire in chapter five, is an Hawaiian term for “quick.” A practical uses of wikis for genealogist can be found at FamilySearch’s Research Wiki. Information about wikis, the Research wiki, and other wiki uses are for the learning in The Social Media Guide.

Sometimes the best way to describe a book is through the praise given by others; for example, this quote from Beth Taylor, BS, CGSM Reference Consultant, Family History Library:

“This book defines the next great wave of technological support for genealogists of all skill levels, Understanding the capabilities and uses of social media is a must for all genealogists and relatives around the world.”

Claire V. Brisson-Banks, BS, MLIS, AG, a native of Rhode Island, is accredited in England, a lecturer and a professional research for United States, Canada, Scotland and Web 2.0 technologies. She owns Timeless Genealogies and is on staff at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. She is a member of multiple societies, is published in genealogical and academic journals and currently serves as a board member for CCLA and ICAPGen.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Social Media

Chapter 2: Electronic Mail and Mailing Lists

Chapter 3: Instant Messaging, SMS, Twitter

Chapter 4: Blogs

Chapter 5: Wikis

Chapter 6: Forums

Chapter 7: Real Simple Syndication

Chapter 8: Social Bookmarking

Chapter 9: Sharing Digital Images

Chapter 10: Sharing Video Files

Chapter 11: Podcasts and Vodcasts

Chapter 12: E-Learning and Online Classes

Chapter 13: Social Networking and Online Communities

Chapter 14: Family History Games

Conclusion

Index

 

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research is available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.95.

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The Making of Germany, Maps and History

o-germanlands1Few countries have as confusing a past as Germany. Over the centuries literally hundreds of small kingdoms and territories existed, swelling and falling through war and domination. Beginning as early as 843, larger territories were broken up into hundreds of small lands. The people of these various lands spoke a similar language and shared many of the same customs; yet, no leader could bring them under the control of a single king or government. The squabbling and constant border changes lasted until 1871, when the German Empire was established.

One very popular book on the subject, and just reprinted, is The Lands of the German Empire and Before. This book examines the history and maps of the ever changing lands which comprise, for the most part, today’s Germany. Author Wendy K. Uncapher has take the map of the German Empire and broken it down by individual states. She then examines each state in detail, providing maps and key historical facts for each. Uncapher also takes a detailed look at Prussia, describing exactly what and where it was in its own chapter. Chapter 3 of the books takes a quick look at the overall map of the German area through major historical periods, broken down as follows:

  • Holy Roman Empire
  • Confederation of the Rhine
  • German Confederation
  • North German Confederation
  • German Empire
  • Weimar Republic
  • Third Reich
  • Allied Occupation
  • Federal Republic of Germany and German Democratic Republic
  • Federal Republic of Germany

To genealogists researching their Germany heritage, especially prior to 1919, The Lands of the German Empire and Before is an indispensable tools for finding place names for cities and lands which have come and gone, or may exist today under a different name. With historic timelines, points of interest, and alternate names, this book is not lacking in interest or useful information. See all this book as to offer in the table of contents, listed below.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Turning Points for the German Empire

Chapter 1: States of the German Empire

Chapter 2: Prussia

Chapter 3: Eras of German Political History

Lands of the Holy Roman Empire

Rivers and Ports

Rulers of Major German States and Dynasty Families

Glossary

Internet Sources for Town Lists

Gazetteers

Bibliography

Index

Following is a List of Maps provided in the book (note: the individual states are grouped together as Kreise Maps covering pages 9–70):

  • Allied Occupation
  • Berg, Mark, Kleve, Julich
  • Bishopric and Archbishopric Territories
  • Black Forest
  • Confederation of the Rhine 1806–1814
  • Europe in 1871
  • Federal Republic of German Democratic Republic 1949–1990
  • Federal Republic of Germany (Deutschland) 1990–present
  • German Confederation 18115–1866
  • German Empire 1871–1918
  • Grand Duchy of Berg
  • Grand Duchy of Frankfurt
  • Grand Duchy of Warsaw 1807–1815
  • Grenzmark Posen-Westpreussen 1918–1938
  • Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation 800–1806
  • Kingdom of Westphalia
  • Kreise Maps (individual states)
  • Luxemburg
  • North German Confederation 1867–1870
  • Partitions of Poland 1772, 1793, 1795
  • Polish Corridor
  • Prussia, Growth of
  • Rivers and Ports
  • Saarland
  • Schaumburg
  • Stem Duchies 843
  • Sudentenland
  • Swedish Land in Germany
  • Teutonic Knight’s Land
  • Third Reich 1933–1945
  • Weimar Republic 1919–1933

 

Get a copy of The Lands of the German Empire and Before for your own or a society library; available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: 19.60.

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Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

fr0211Just what are name lists and how can they be used? William Dollarhide and Leland Meitzler explain:

“Virtually all recorded events from a person’s life originated near the place the person lived, and the old records are usually still stored there today. Finding the place, therefore, is a matter of finding the local jurisdiction of the state, county, city, town, village, or local district.

An important step in finding the place of residence for a person is the use of published censuses and other name lists. A census or name list identifies the names of residents of an area from various local, state, and national sources. Thus, any name list is a place-finder.

Once a researcher has the exact place of residence, the next step is to visit the library and archives catalogs available to see what published information is available related to that place. The bibliography of name lists in this book was compiled from the most important library and archives catalogs in America – plus the vast resources of the Internet were scoured for identifying the most useful name lists online.”

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Family Roots Publishing has just released 9 new William Dollarhide Name Lists books. And, these books are all on sale for a short introductory period. Well, an introduction to a new series would not be complete without at lease one volume from the series standing in review. Herein, we look at Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

In this book, on Alaska, names lists are detailed in the following categories (with 270 links for the state of Alaska):

  • Local Census Records
  • District Court Records.
  • Directories
  • State Military Lists
  • Tax Lists
  • Voter Lists
  • Vital Records

Likewise, the National Names Lists have these categories (244 entries in all):

  • Federal Census Records
  • Immigration Lists
  • U.S. Military Lists
  • U.S. Veterans Records
  • U.S. Pension Records
  • National Vital Record

There are also a number of maps, including:

  • 1899 Alaska & Klondike Region
  • 1880-1940 Alaska Census Jurisdictions
  • 1763 British North America
  • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
  • 1790 United States
  • 1800 United States
  • 1810 United States
  • 1820 United States
  • 1830 United States
  • 1840 United States
  • 1850 United States
  • 1860 United States
  • 1870-1880 United States
  • 1890-1940 United States

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

This new series is bound to be a big hit with genealogists. The introductory offer is also difficult to pass up. If you order a print copy of the book you not only get 15% off, but you also will receive a FREE copy of the eBook version in  .PDF (Adobe Acrobat) format. The .PDF version is fully hyperlinked to take you quickly to each site, and can be viewed on any device or computer supporting Acrobat files, which is virtually every computer, laptop, tablet, and smart device on the market.

Order your copy of Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present while the deals are good, from Family Roots Publishing; Temporary Price: $16.11 for both the paper and electronic versions together. Or, get the eBook version alone for just $12.50.

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Salt Lake Christmas Tour……………. Week’s Peek

jstor_logo

 

We all…….. you all…… need to know about JSTOR because you can use this libraries-only database from the Family History Library.

Internet Genealogy magazine (June-July 2013 issue…… www.internet-genealogy.com ) carried a great explanatory article about this website. I quote from Diane L. Richard’s article:

“JSTOR is a digital library containing more than 1,500 academic journals, books, and primary sources. Until not long ago, it was only available to academic and similar researchers affiliated with a participating institution. …… After a trial test, JSTOR fully launched its public version in 2012,  http://about.jstor.org/individuals .  Note that individuals do not have access to everything JSTOR has to offer. Full access is still the purview of academic institutions. And, what we can access is invaluable!”

Richard’s article fully explains what’s there for researchers and how to use JSTOR.  She uses the William and Mary Quarterly as her example; anybody with colonial Virginia research must know about and use this resource.

My example would be this: while in the Family History Library, and working on a research project for a friend, I learned that this fellow had been a miner in Colorado in the early days. The census entry stated the name of the mine! (Lucky break, yes.) Accessing JSTOR, I found information on that mine, its production and operation, and his name on a list of miners.

That’s what JSTOR can do for your research. Look over your research problems and put JSTOR on your December To-Do list. But first go access the June-July 2013 issue of Internet Genealogy magazine.

Donna, aka Mother Hen, until next peek.

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Free Access to Irish Birth, Marriage & Death Records June 27-30, 2013 at FindMyPast.com

The following is from the FindMyPast website:

Irish Family History: Ashes to Archives

On June 30 1922, during the Irish Civil War, the Public Records Office of Ireland, located at the historic Four Courts in Dublin, was severely damaged by fire resulting in the loss of a huge number of records.

But all is not lost! Irish family history is not only one of the most perplexing to research it also one of the most rewarding. There are so many fascinating stories to be told from the records that survive and that’s why millions continue to search for their Irish ancestors.

Click on each of the links opposite to read up on how Irish genealogy differs from other countries, the best ways of getting started on your Irish family tree and the millions of records at your fingertips for piecing together your ancestor’s story.

Irish-Vital-Records-at-FindMyPast.com

Get started on your Irish family history searching the Birth, Marriage and Death records at FindMyPast.com June 27-30, 2013 for FREE!

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Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Alabama-Name-Lists-by-Dollarhide-FR0209-Front-CoverIf you have been following the GenealogyBlog over the last two days, then you are already aware that Family Roots Publishing has just released 9 new William Dollarhide Name Lists books. And, these books are all on sale for a short introductory period. Well, an introduction to a new series would not be complete without at lease one volume from the series standing in review. Herein, we look at Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

As this is the first book to be reviewed in the series, it seems relevant to examine just how these name lists books can be useful to genealogists. Pulling from the Preface, I will let Bill’s words do the explaining:

“Virtually all recorded events from a person’s life originated near the place the person lived, and the old records are usually still stored there today. Finding the place, therefore, is a matter of finding the local jurisdiction of the state, county, city, town, village, or local district.

An important step in finding the place of residence for a person is the use of published censuses and other name lists. A census or name list identifies the names of residents of an area from various local, state, and national sources. Thus, any name list is a place-finder.

Once a researcher has the exact place of residence, the next step is to visit the library and archives catalogs available to see what published information is available related to that place. The bibliography of name lists in this book was compiled from the most important library and archives catalogs in America – plus the vast resources of the Internet were scoured for identifying the most useful name lists online.”

Additionally, Dollarhide states that census records are often considered the main name list for use by genealogists. However, there are plenty of other names lists available. In this book, on Alabama, names lists are detailed in the following categories (with 400 links for the state of Alabama):

  • State Census Records
  • State and County Court Records.
  • Directories. Town, City, or County Directories
  • State Militia Lists State Veterans & Pensioners Lists
  • Tax Lists
  • Vital Records
  • Voter Lists

Likewise, the National Names Lists have these categories (244 entries in all):

  • Federal Census Records
  • Immigration Lists
  • U.S. Military Lists
  • U.S. Veterans Records
  • U.S. Pension Records
  • National Vital Record

In another post, Leland adds this commentary on the value of name lists and what this book has to offer:

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

This new series is bound to be a big hit with genealogists. The introductory offer is also difficult to pass up. If you order a print copy of the book you not only get 15% off, but you also will receive a FREE copy of the eBook version in  .PDF (Adobe Acrobat) format. The .PDF version is fully hyperlinked to take you quickly to each site, and can be viewed on any device or computer supporting Acrobat files, which is virtually every computer, laptop, tablet, and smart device on the market.

Order your copy of Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present while the deals are good, from Family Roots Publishing; Temporary Price: $16.11 for both the paper and electronic versions together. Or, get the eBook version alone for just $12.50.

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Family Photo Detective: Learn how to find Genealogy Clues in old photos and solve Family Photo Mysteries

mt06Maureen A. Taylor is know throughout the world as an expert on photo identification in the world. She is also an avid genealogist. Taylor uses her vast knowledge of photography in her research, and for years has been helping fellow genealogists do the same. She has many popular titles on key points of photo identification, including:

Now, Taylor has compiled her collective knowledge into a single comprehensive volume, Family Photo Detective: Learn how to find Genealogy Clues in old photos and solve Family Photo Mysteries. This new full-color book cover just about every aspect of photo identification, including the following skills:

  • identifying image type, from daguerreotypes to common paper prints and even stereographs
  • identifying and dating photos by clothing, accessories, and hairstyles
  • following photographer’s imprints
  • using facial features across multiple photographs to identify family traits and members
  • using interviews to gather more information
  • using photo content beyond the people to create context for an image

This well designed book is easy to follow and full of exceptional examples, charts, timelines, case studies, and resource lists to help the genealogist build all the skill sets needed to identify and date all types of photos as accurately as possible. This new book may well become the standard for those looking to become family photo detectives. See for yourself all this book covers in the contents listed below.

About the Author

“Maureen A. Taylor is an internationally known photo identification expert and genealogist. She travels extensively lecturing on photo identification, photo reservation and family history. She is a contributing editor to Family Tree Magazine and has written the Photo Detective blog since 2001. She is the autor of Preserving Your Family Photographs and the Last Muster: Images of the Revolutionary War Generation. She has appeared on The Today Show, The View, and MSNBC.”

 

Taylor’s new book, Family Photo Detective: Learn how to find Genealogy Clues in old photos and solve Family Photo Mysteries, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $25.47.

 

Contents

Introduction

1. Bringing the Past to Life

  • Compiling a Visual History
  • How to Get Started
  • Identification Tips
  • Case Study: More Than Meets the Eye
  • Draw Conclusions

2. Talking with Relatives

  • The Interview Process
  • Case Study: The Power of Persistence
  • Case Study: The Bessette Family
  • Case Study: Tall Tales and True Stories

3. Cased Images: Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, and Tintypes

  • Daguerreotypes
  • Ambrotypes
  • tintypes
  • Case Study: Meal Mysteries
  • How to Identify a Cased Image
  • Dating a Cased Image
  • Case Study: Dating Cases

4. Paper Prints and Negatives

  • Talbotypes: The First Paper Prints
  • Card Photographs
  • Stereographs
  • Candid Photography
  • Case Study: Not in the Family
  • Dating Paper Prints
  • Dating Portraits
  • Dating the Card Stock of Stereographs
  • Other Dating Clues
  • Negatives
  • Other Photographic Formats

5. Color and Digital Photographs

  • Hand-coloring
  • Case Study: Wedding Album
  • Retouching
  • Color Photography
  • Polaroid
  • Digital Photographs

6. Identifying the Photographer

  • Photographer’s Imprint
  • Researching a Photographer
  • Case Study: Tracking the Manchester Brothers
  • Online Help
  • Case Study: Which is the Original?

7. Images From Birth to Death

  • Chidren
  • School
  • Weddings
  • Military Service
  • Case Study: Barker Cotton Mill School
  • Holidays
  • Religious Occasions
  • Vacations and Recreation
  • Postmortem

8. Looking for Clues

  • Family Resemblence
  • Case Study: A Family Resemblence
  • Case Study: Celebrity Look-Alike
  • Props and Backdrops
  • Case Study: Star Signs
  • Internal Information
  • Case Study: The Curiosity Shop
  • Case Study: Examining the Front and Back of an Image
  • Case Study: Internal Details
  • Finding Answers
  • Public Libraries
  • Special Libraries
  • Research Resources Online
  • Building a Home Library

9. Identifying Costume

  • Women’s Fashions
  • Men’s Fashions
  • Resources for Costume Dating
  • Case Study: Alice McDuff

10. Reading the Clues in Photographs

  • Matrimonial Images
  • Military Images
  • Case Study: Civil War Views
  • Finding New Pictures
  • Immigrant Images
  • Foreign Lands
  • Magnifying the Details
  • Case Study: A Mystery at Sea
  • Comparing Pictures
  • Following the Trail
  • Documentary Evidence
  • Case Study: Links to La Familia

11 Photograph Albums

  • Case Study: Family Photo Album

12 Adding up the Clues

  • Family First
  • Format Focus
  • Ancestral Fashionistas
  • Family Complexities
  • Don’t Jump to Conclusions
  • Case Study: Mysterious Ladies
  • Photo Reunion Sites
  • Online Success
  • Case Study: Civil War Made Easy
  • Case Study: Bridging the Past
  • Case Study: Celebrate the Details to Discover the Story
  • Case Study: A Family Photo Mystery Remains

Appendices:

  • Labeling Your Images
  • Worksheet: Cased Images
  • Worksheet: Prints
  • Worksheet: Negatives
  • Worksheet: Prints (Group Shots)
  • Key to Worksheets
  • Important Addresses
  • Index

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