FGS San Antonio Conference Registration is Now Open

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The following News Release is from FGS:

“Gone to Texas” – A Conference for the Nation’s Genealogists

March 27, 2014 – Austin, TX. Online registration is now open for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) Conference, scheduled 27-30 August 2014 in San Antonio, Texas. Register at http://www.fgsconference.org by 1 July 2014 for an early-bird discount. This year’s conference theme is “Gone to Texas,” and the local hosts are the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society (SAGHS) and the Texas State Genealogical Society (TSGS).

Josh Taylor, FGS President, shares, “This year’s FGS conference offers an exciting opportunity for anyone interested in researching their family history. This conference will offer over 160 educational sessions on records, strategies, and tools for genealogists of all levels. Sessions will be presented by some of the leading genealogists from the United States. Ten different sponsored luncheons will provide opportunities for networking.”

Platinum sponsors include leading family history companies, Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, and findmypast. Other participating and supporting organizations include Dell, Lexmark Board for Certification of Genealogists, National Genealogical Society, The Polish Mission of the Orchard Lake Schools, and Texas State Genealogical Society, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, and The National Huguenot Society.

Conference Highlights

  • Conference Sessions: A wide variety of genealogy-related lectures and workshops for all experience levels. Attendees will be able to learn about Texas and neighboring states research, African-American and ethnic origin research, military research, genetics, technology, migration, methodology and more.
  • Exhibit Hall: The large exhibit hall will feature the latest software, books, maps, databases and gadgets on the market for genealogists and family historians, as well as information about genealogical organizations. Representatives of FGS member societies will staff their booths in the special Society Showcase area.
  • Special Events: On Wednesday evening, local hosts San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society and Texas State Genealogical Society invite registrants to an evening at the Institute of Texas Cultures, an amazing museum located directly behind the convention center. On Friday evening, The San Antonio Conservation Society hosts a festive evening with strumming guitars, shining horns, a capella voices of mariachis and local artisans at work at La Villita. The Conservation Society only hosts 10 of these events each year and FGS is excited to able to offer this. Details can be found at www.fgsconference.org.
  • Focus on Societies: On Wednesday, August 27, 2014, sessions are jam-packed with ideas and tools to help societies promote themselves, increase membership, and develop sources of revenue. The day kicks off with a first ever, half-day workshop to develop a plan and tools to use to enhance and guide their society forward.
  • Librarians’ Day: On Tuesday, August 26, 2014, ProQuest will sponsor a full-pre-conference day of sessions designed for librarians, archivists, and other information professionals serving family history researchers.

There are more activities and research opportunities too numerous to list. However, you can learn all about the 2014 FGS Conference and register for this exciting four-day event at http://www.fgsconference.org. Be sure to also visit or subscribe to the FGS Conference Blog at http://www.fgsconference.org/blog for more information.

Learn More and Stay Connected

Like FGS at: https://www.facebook.com/FGSgenealogy

Follow FGS on Twitter at https://twitter.com/fgsgenealogy and hashtag #FGS2014.

Visit San Antonio at http://visitsanantonio.com/

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)
The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS FORUM magazine (filled with articles for the family history community), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference — four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

Witter’s German-English Primer

Language barriers are always present when researching one’s ancestors prior to their arrival in America. Both language barriers and unique handwriting forming these barriers can be difficult to surmount. One great tool available to help researchers with their German is an actual early German school book.

Every now and then a book will find new life. Sometimes a movie or newsworthy incident will bring a book back into the forefront and it will experience a revitalization. Sometimes a book will find new life for a purpose other than its original intent. So it is with Witter’s German-English Primer and New First German Reader for Public Schools, Revised Edition. This book was originally produced in 1881 as a German primer for American students. Over a century later, the book has found a new purpose, not for children, but for genealogists.

This German reader is a perfect guide by example to helping English researchers decipher old German Script. The book was produced as a mixed line by line reader of German with English translations. A line in German is followed by a line in English. In the first part of the book, the German line is written in both a “Gothic” like typeset, followed by typed English, and the following line by a script font representing the handwritten form of the letters and words. Other parts of the book use paragraph style mixed line German then English translation with “handwritten” German at the bottom.

The model used in the this book was one of many renditions of German script used in the 19th century. To assist the researcher, two other alphabet models are included in the appendix. Using these script models, researchers can improver their chances at deciphering older German records; thus, taking an old book and putting it to positive use in a new way, for genealogical research.

 

Order your copy of Witter’s German-English Primer and New First German Reader for Public Schools, Revised Edition from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: IGH02, Price: $6.88.

Stage-Coach and Tavern Days

hbe0820Growing up I read my share of novels. Many of these included fantasy stories where taverns often play a major role as meeting place, rest stop, and center of information. Then there were the stories of the “wild west” where gun fights and town business seem to always center around shady activities and entertainment found in the nearest saloon. Though I knew from history, taverns and inns have often, if not always, played a major role as a community meeting place, as well as a way point for travelers, little did I think about the role of such in early America. Yet, according to Stage-Coach and Tavern Days, by Alice Morse Earle, these facilities were critical to the early colonies. Some colonial governments even made it law that each town have an operating “ordinary” or “a common victuallying house” or pay penalties.

This book offers an interesting view into the “enormous role of taverns and modes of travel in colonial culture.” The book speaks of America’s famous Revolutionaries plotting for Independence within tavern walls. Economic growth and decisions were shaped by alcohol and its sale in taverns. Even turnpikes popped up along old “Indian paths” when a tavern stood along the route.

The first chapter offers insight into Puritan life in a way many don’t consider when thinking of these early settlers for who religion dominated much of their lifestyle. Yet, for most towns, the ordinary was second in importance only to the church. Here people gathered, took and shared the news, filled their social needs and found entertainment.

Through 19 chapters, “both light-hearted and serious,” the author explores in detail the role of taverns and early transportation in the colonies. These facilities date back to even the earliest periods. This book offers more than 150 illustrations; plus, an index of names, subjects, and places (including names of taverns). Learn of the role entertainment and enticements, bans and approval for games both of chance and challenge, and the ever present spirits. Stories and personal quotes add to Alice Earle’s narrative; truly, making the book both informative as well as fun to read.

 

Contents

  1. The Puritan Ordinary
  2. Old-time Taverns
  3. The Tavern Landlord
  4. Tavern Fate and Tavern Ways
  5. Kill-devil and its Affines
  6. Small Drink
  7. Signs and Symbols
  8. The Tavern in War
  9. The Tavern Panorama
  10. From Path to Turnpike
  11. Packhorse and Conestoga Wagon
  12. Early Stage-coaches and Other Vehicles
  13. Two Stage Veterans of Massachusetts
  14. A Staging Centre
  15. The Stage-driver
  16. The Romance of the Road
  17. The Pains of Stage-coach Travel
  18. Knights of the Road
  19. Tavern Ghosts

 

Pick up a copy of Stage-Coach and Tavern Days from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $35.77.

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores is a scholarly book, full of details and amassed facts in an effort to explain the mass migrations from the war torn Rhine Valley in the early 1700s.  The Palatines were driven from their homes, into the British Empire, by circumstance and desire for a war-free life. Promises were made and hope for something better drove thousands to flee only to be hampered at every turn as politicians, monarchs, and business ventures debated and held in fist the fates of these emigrants. Despite it all, many of these German emigrants and their descendants have played major roles in the American colonies and the overall welfare of what became the United Sates.

History buffs and family historians alike will appreciate the efforts the author has made to uncover the real driving factors, political and  personal, that led to so many Palatines fleeing their homes and seeking refuge throughout the British Empire, including Ireland and the New World. Through a careful and emotionally controlled review of facts, Knittle has made connections and uncovered facts which, in many cases, go against the presumptions and stories that have endured for hundreds of years. Take this example from the introduction written by Dixon Ryan Fox:

“For example, it has usually been state that the Palatine’s disgust for the treatment they had received in New York was an important factor in diverting subsequent German settlement from that province into Pennsylvania. By cool analysis the present author reveals how untenable is this thesis. He has been ready to throw out the dramatic and the picturesque when clouded with doubt or founded on error. He cites the ‘interesting legend’ set forth by his predecessors which had it that the five Mohawk Indians taken by Peter Schulyer to London were so grieved at the plight of the Palatines, then encamped on Blackhearth, that they gave the Schoharie Valley to the Queen on consideration that’s she would bestow it upon the emigrants; then he points out that the Palatines sailed from London before the Indians sailed from Boston, that four of the five Indians were not sachems and had no authority to grant Mohawk lands and that these lands were subsequently ceded at Albany to the province with no reference to the Palatines.”

The book contains a bonus for those whose ancestry leads back to these early German settlers. Contained within these pages are lists totaling around 12,000 Palatine names.

Uncover these truths for yourself, order your copy of Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBK1977, Price: $27.93.

 

Contents

Key to Footnote Citations

I. The Causes of the Early “Palatine” Emigrations

A. The emigrations studied

B. Area in Germany affected by the emigrations

C. Causes

1. Devastation of War

2. Severe winter of 1708

3. Oppressive taxation

4. Religion and land hunger

5. Liberal advertising of British colonies

6. Favorable attitude of British government

a. The aid given to foreign Protestants

b. The naturalization act of 1709

Continue reading “Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores”

Tracing Your War of 1812 Ancestors

war of 1812 ancestorsCreated as a “200th Anniversary Research Special, Tracing Your War of 1812 Ancestors, covers resources for the United States, Canada, and British research. Moorshead Magazines, publishers of Family Chronicle, Internet Genealogy, and History Magazine, have published this special volume in memory of, and to provide assistance in researching, the War of 1812. This 82 page special offers 19 articles, covering such topics as:

  • Army & Navy Records
  • Bounty Land Warrants
  • Newspapers & Maps
  • Government Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Pension Records
  • Militia Service
  • Impressment
  • US Marines
  • Prisoners of War
  • And More!

Major events, especially war, generates mountains of records, histories, and documents. Newspapers, government and military records, and other records offer names and details about our ancestors which may not have been documented if not for these historical events. Regular contributor and expert David A. Norris has compiled helpful guides, a chronology of events, an introduction, and other articles for this publication; providing, great insight into evaluating potential sources of information and hunting those sources down.

 

Contents

War of 1812: Introduction

An introduction to look at what resources are available to researchers

Chronology & Outline

An outline of the war, and the causes and resolution

US Government Records

Local government records could reveal details of an ancestor’s home and life

Canadian War of 1812 Records

Published and online sources make tracking Canadian soldiers much easier

British War of 1812 Records

Tips on resources for locating ancestors who may have fought with the British Army or Royal Navy

US Army Records

A bit of digging might uncover a treasure trove of information on an ancestor in the US Army

United States Marines

Although US Marines were a small force in 1812, a number of resources exist for them

Naval Records

New resources provide valuable details on the lives of sailors in the US Navy

Prize Money: Spoils of War

Prize money could more than double a sailors pay

Militia Service

Most veterans of the War of 1812 served brief periods in the militia

Bounty Land Warrants

Land bounty records are a valuable source of information on veterans and their heirs

Cemetery Records

A number of resources are available that can help you locate burial sites

Impressment

Maritime records are useful research tools and document a tumultuous era

Maps

Historic maps help bring the War of 1812 era, and your family history, to life

Pensions

Pension files can reveal where your ancestor was born, where they lived and died and more

Privateer & Naval Pensions

An important genealogical resource for anyone researching a maritime ancestor

Newspapers: Breaking News!

Newspapers of the War of 1812 era are a valuable genealogical and historical resource

Prisoners Of War

Records of prisoners of war can provide additional details of an ancestor’s life

Last Survivors

As a rule of thumb, the last survivor of a war will live roughly 90 years after the war

Copies of Tracing Your War of 1812 Ancestors are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $9.75

An electronic copy is also available in .pdf format. Click here for more information.

Massachusetts and Maine Families – on Sale for 55% Off Thru Thrusday, May 15, 2014

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A while back, Family Roots Publishing was able to obtain a limited number of an extremely valuable set of three large hardcover books titled Massachusetts and Maine Families – in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis. I was familiar with the set, and when I heard they were about to go out-of-print, and by buying them all I could get a good price – that’s exactly what I did. The set is important, in that a huge percentage of Americans will find their ancestors within these volumes. Do you have New England Roots? If so, you just may find them here.

The subtitle of the book – “in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis,” throws people off in that they immediately see this as meaning that the book does not apply to their family. Wrong… The genealogies found in these volumes deals with the ancestry of a huge percentage of Americans – and these ancestors could very well be yours!

Following is a review written by Andy Pomeroy. We have added a compiled surname index that covers all three volumes following the review. Be sure and click on the Read the rest of this entry link to see the full index covering 5045 surnames!

A Review of Massachusetts and Maine Families – in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis

I couldn’t tell you why, but lately I keep coming across books worthy of serious attention but have titles that would make most think these treasure in disguise are not for them. Massachusetts and Maine Families: In the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis is just such a book. The title would have been just fine without all that “in the ancestry of” stuff. Why? Well, “almost anyone with considerable New England ancestry—and probably 100 million contemporary Americans, about 40 percent of the population, have some colonial New England forebears—will descend from one or more, often a dozen or more, of the 180 families herein.”

Massachusetts and Maine Families is a reprint, into three volumes, of an original seventeen volume twentieth-century genealogy. The work was created by Walter Goodwin Davis as a compendium of his ancestry, plus the inclusion of Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and His Descendents. There are 2,300 pages, plus an index. In all, there are 180 families covered, plus 19 English families in the “immediate ancestry of American immigrants.” Most of the families lived in Massachusetts, 114, with 29 in Maine and 18 in New Hampshire.

The introduction to the 1996 reprint was written by Gary Boyd Roberts, who now retired was then working as the Director of Special Research Projects at the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Roberts writes glowingly about Davis’ life long dedication to genealogy and his contributions to the practice. Boyd refers to Davis as “the third pillar of two triads of genealogists that revolutionized both local (i.e. northern New England) antiquarian studies and national genealogical standards overall.”

The original 17 volume set covered Davis’ sixteen great-great-grandparents, plus the inclusion of Thomas Haley of Winter Harbor and His Descendents. This reprint consolidates these seventeen volume into three, indexes the whole set, and  rearranges the contents into alphabetical order. The sixteen g-g-grandparents for whom Davis focused each original volume where:

  • Nicholas Davis, 1753-1832, of Limington, Maine
  • Charity Haley, 1755-1800, wife of Nicholas Davis
  • Joseph Waterhouse, 1754-1837, of Standish, Maine
  • Lydia Harmon, 1755-1836, wife of Joseph Waterhouse
  • Joseph Neal, 1769-c. 1835, of Litchfield, Maine
  • Sarah Johnson, 1755-1824, wife of Joseph Neal
  • Annis Spear, 1755-1858, of Litchfield, Maine
  • Sarah Hildreth, 1773-1857, wife of Annis Spear
  • Dudley Wildes, 1759-1820, of Topsfield, Massachusetts
  • Bethia Harris, 1748-1833, wife of Dudley Wildes
  • Abel Lunt, 1769-1806, of Newbury, Massachusetts
  • Phoebe Tilton, 1775-1847, wife of Abel Lunt
  • James Patten, 1747?-1817, of Arundel (Kennebunkport), Maine
  • Sarah Stone, wife of James Patten
  • Lieut. Amos Towne, 1737-1793, of Arundel (Kennebunkport), Maine
  • Sarah Miller, 1755-1840, wife of Lieut. Amos Towne

Each volume has an index for that individual book; though, the book itself is arranged by surname of each ancestor. There are pedigrees charts for each of the 16 g-g-grandparents on the first few pages. This will help the reader identify where each individual actually falls in the family with one quick glance. Volume I covers the surnames Allanson to French. Volume II covers Gardner to Moses, and the third Neal to Wright.

Contents – Volume One
Allanson, of St. Helen Auckland, Co. Durham, and Scarborough (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Allen, of Salisbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Andrews, of Ipswich (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Angier, of Cambridge (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Annis, of Newbury and Wells (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Appleton, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Averill, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Bailey, of Salisbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Basford, of HApton (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Batt, of Boston (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Baynton, of Wiltshire, England (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Beane, of London, England (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Beaumont, of Wednesbury (from Nicholas Davis, 1934)
Berry, of Ipswich (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Bisby, of Northamptonshire and London, England (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Blaisdell, of Salisbury (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Blessing, of Great Yarmouth, England (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Blessing, of Great Yarmouth, England (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Bowden, of Boston (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Bracy, of New Haven and York (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Bradford, of Beverly (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Brown (George), of Salisbury (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Brown (John), of Hampton (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Brown (John), of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Brown (Michael), of Scarborough and Arundel (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Brown (Michael), of Scarboroough (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Browning, of Salem and Topsfield (from Amos Towne, 1927
Buxton, of Salem (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Chase, of Newbury (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Chater, of Newbury and Wells (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Cheney, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Church, of Runwell, Co. Esses, England (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Clapp, of Scituate (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Clarke, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Clifford, of Hampton (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Coker, of Newbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Cooke, of Pebmarsh, Co. Essex, England (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Cousins, of Wells (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Cowes, of Ipswich (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Cram, of Hampton (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Crispe, of Watertown (from Sarah Hildreth, 1958)
Cross, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Curtis, of Boxford and Topsfield (from Amos Towne, 1927)
Curtis, of Bosford and Arundel (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Cutting, of Newbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Davis, of Biddeford and Limington (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Deering, of Braintree (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Dixey, of Beverly (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Dixey, of Beverly (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Dixon, of Ramshaw, Co. Durham, and Scarborough (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Dorman, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Dutch, of Gloucester (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Dutch, of Gloucester and Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Dutch, of Gloucester and Ipswich (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Edge, of York (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Edgecomb, of Scarborough and Biddeford (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Edgecomb, of Scarborough (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Elwell, of Gloucester (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Elwell, of Gloucester (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Emery, of Newbury (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Emery, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Estow, of Hampton (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Fernald, of Portsmouth (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Folsom, of Exeter (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Ford, of Marshfield (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Foster, of Ipswich (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
French (Thomas), of Ipswich (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
French (Thomas), of Ipswich (from Amos Towne, 1927)

Contents – Volume Two
Gardner, of Gloucester (from
Charity Haley, 1916)
Gardner, of Gloucester (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Gates, of Hingham (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Gibbons, of Saco (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Gibbons, of Piscataqua (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Gilman, of Exeter (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Goodale (John), of Co. Norfolk, England and Salisbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Goodale (Robert), of Salem and Wells (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Gould, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Griffin, of Ipswich (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Hale, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Haley, of Biddeford (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Haley, of Winter Harbor (from Thomas Haley, 1930)
Hall, of Marshfield (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Harmon, of Wells and Scarborough (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Harris, of Ipswich (from Bethia Harris 1934)
Harris, of Ipswich, from the Isles of Shoals (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Hart, of Marblehead (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Hasty, of Scarborough (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Hatch (John), of York and Wells (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Hatch (Thomas), of Scituate (from Jospeh Neal, 1945)
Hathorne, of Salem (from Dudley Wells, 1959)
Hayward, of Beverly (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Heath, of Roxbury (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Herring, of Shrewsbury (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Hildreth, of Dracut and Lewiston (from Sarah Hildreth, 1958)
Holbrook, of Weymouth (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Howland, of Marshfield (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Howlett, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Hoyt, of Amesbury, Newington, and Scarborough (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Huchason, of Litchfield and Lyndeborough (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Hutchinson, of Salem (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Ibrook, of Hingham (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Ingersoll, of Sale (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Jacob, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Jaques, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Johnston (James), of Stroudwater (from James Patten, 1941)
Johnston-Johnson (John), of Lynn, Lyndesborough and Litchfield (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Jones, of Ipswich (from Bethia Harris, 1934)
Jordan, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Kilborne, of Rowley (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Kimball, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Kirby, of Little Munden Co. Hertford, England (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Knight, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1847)
Lake, of North Benfleet, Co. Essex, England (from Betha Harris, 1934)
Lassell, of Hingham and Arundel (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Lawes, of Salem (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Lewis (Thomas) and Gibbons of Saco (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Lewis (thomas)m of Shrewsbury (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Libby, of Scarborough (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Littlefield, of Wells (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Look, of Lynn and Boxford (from Amos Towne, 1927)
Low (John), of Marshfield and Wells (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Low (Thomas), of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Lowell, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Lunt, of Newbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
March, of Newbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Marsh, of Boston (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Marshall, of Shrewsbury (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Marston, of Hampton (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Mason, of Cheltenham, Co. Gloucester, England (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Mayer, of Biddeford (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Merrill, of Newbury and Nottingham West (from Sarah Hildreth, 1958)
Miller, of Arundel (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Mitton, of Weston-Under-Lizard (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Morrison, of Newbury (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Moses, of Portsmouth (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)

Contents – Volume Three
Neal, of Litchfield (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Neale, of Salem (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Newcomb, Braintree (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Norman, of Salem and Marblehead (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Noyes, of Newbury (from Abel Hunt, 1963)
Nurse, of Salem (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Parish, of Groton (from Sarah Hildreth, 1958)
Matthew Patten, of Biddleford (from James Patten, 1941)
Hector Patten, of Boston (from James Patten, 1941)
William Patten, of Boston (from James Patten, 1941)
Robert Patten, of Arundel (from James Patten, 1941)
William Patten, of Wells (from James Patten, 1941)
Pearce, of York (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Perkins, of Topfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Pettingill, of Newbury (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Porter, of Salem Village (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Rayment, of Beverly (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Reade, of Wickford, CO. Essex, England (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Richardson, of Chelmsford (from Sarah Hildreth, 1958)
Roberts, of Oyster River, New Hampshire (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Rogers, of Marshfield (from Joseph Heal, 1945)
Roper, of Hampton and Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Safford, of Ipswich and Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Sandell, of Basildon Co., Essex, England (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Scott, of Ipswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Scroggs, of London, England, and Salem (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Searle, of Ipswich and Rowley (from Bertha Harris, 1934)
Shatswell, of Ipswich (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Silver, of Newbury (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Mary Sloper’s Family Record (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Smith (George), of Salem (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Smith (Robert), of Boxford (from Amos Towne, 1927)
Spear, of Braintree (from Annis Spear, 1945)
St. Barbe, of Salisbury, England (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
Stone, of Beverly and Arundel (from Sarah Stone, 1930)
Symonds, of Salem (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Taprill, of Great Island, New Hampshire (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Thompson and Ward, of Great Yarmouth (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Tilden, of Scituate (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Tilton, of Lynn and Ispswich (from Phoebe Tilton, 1947)
Tower, of Hingham (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Towne, of Topsfield and Arundel (from Amos Towne, 1927)
Towne, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Towne, of Topsfield (from Sarah Johnson, 1960)
Twisden, of Scituate and York (from Joseph Neal, 1945)
Underwood, of Chelmsford (from Sarah Holdreth, 1958)
Vinson, of Gloucester (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Vinson, of Glousceter (from Nicholas Davis, 1956)
Walton, of Great Island, New Hampshire (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Lithobia (from Lydia Harmon, 1924)
Wardwell, of Wells (from Annis Spear, 1945)
Waterhouse, of Portsmouth, Scarborough, and Standish (from Joseph Waterhouse, 1949)
Watts, of Cockfield, Co. Durham, and Scarborough (from Sarah Miller, 1939)
Weare, alias Brown, of Wiltshire, England (from Abel Lunt, 1963)
West, of Biddeford, (from Charity Haley, 1916)
Wheeler, of Newbury (from Annis Spear, 1945)
White, of Scituate (from Jospeh Neal, 1945)
Wildes, of Topsfield (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Wood, of Ipswich (from Dudley Wildes, 1959)
Wormwood, of York (from Annis Spear, 1959)
Wright, of Saugus and Braintree (from Joseph Neal, 1945)

Copies of the three volume set of Massachusetts and Maine Families: In the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis are available from Family Roots Publishing at 55% off the original MSRP of $135 (note that this set would most likely be more like $250 if published today). We are placing them on sale at 55% off, making them just $60.75 through midnight MDT Thursday, May 15, 2014. Click here to purchase.

Check out this index of 5040 Surnames!

  • ABBE II
  • ABBEY II
  • ABBOT I, II, III
  • ABBOTT I, II, III
  • ABEL I
  • ABELL III
  • ABERLIN II
  • ABORN II
  • ABORN III
  • ABORNE III
  • ABRAHAM I
  • ACIE III
  • ACINE II
  • ACKROYD I
  • ACRE I
  • ACRES III
  • ACTON I, III
  • ADAMS I,II,III
  • ADDINGTON II
  • ADDOT III
  • AGAS III
  • AGWAM III
  • AIKENS III
  • AILEMER I
  • AINGER I
  • AIRES II
  • AIRS III
  • AKERMAN II
  • ALABASTER I
  • ALCOCK III
  • ALCOTT I
  • ALDEN I, II, III
  • ALDIS I
  • ALDRICH I, III
  • ALEWELL I
  • ALEWY I
  • ALEXANDER II
  • ALEXANDER THE GREAT I
  • ALFORD I
  • ALGER I
  • ALIN III
  • ALINTON I
  • ALKINS I
  • ALLANSON I
  • ALLCOCK III
  • ALLD II
  • ALLDEN I
  • ALLDRIDGE I
  • ALLE III
  • ALLEN I, II, III
  • ALLEY I, III
  • ALLINE I
  • ALLING II, III
  • ALLISON I, II, III
  • ALLOWELL I
  • ALLWOOD I
  • ALLYN I, III
  • ALMARY I
  • ALPHONSO I
  • ALPORT II
  • ALVORD III
  • ALWOOD I
  • AMAZEEN II, III
  • AMBIER II
  • AMENTHES I
  • AMES I, II, III
  • AMESBURY I
  • ANDERSON II, III
  • ANDERTON II
  • ANDREW II, III
  • ANDREWES II
  • ANDREWS I, III
  • ANDROS I, II, III
  • ANDROUS I
  • ANGER I, II
  • ANGIER II
  • ANGOE I
  • ANGOULEME I
  • ANGUS III
  • ANIGER I
  • ANJOU I
  • ANN BOLEYN I
  • ANNABLE I, II, III
  • ANNADALE II
  • ANNE I
  • ANNE BOLEYN I
  • ANNE OF BRITTANY I
  • ANNESLEY I
  • ANNIBALL I, II
  • ANNIS I, II, III
  • ANSTIE I
  • ANSTY I
  • ANTHONY II, III
  • ANTRUMS II
  • AP EIGNON II
  • AP HUGH II
  • AP JEVAN II
  • AP JOHN II
  • AP LEUS II
  • AP OWEN I
  • AP REES II
  • AP RICHARD II
  • AP WILLIAM II
  • APILTON I
  • APIRL III
  • APLETON I
  • APPERRY II
  • APPLEBY I
  • APPLETON I, III
  • APPULTON I
  • APRICE II
  • AQUIRAINE I
  • ARCHER II, III
  • ARDEN III
  • ARMAND I
  • ARMEDG II
  • ARMITAGE I, II
  • ARMSTRONG II, III
  • ARNOLD I, II, III
  • ARROWSMITH I, III
  • ARTHUR I
  • ARUNDEL I
  • ARUNDELL I
  • ARVIDSON III
  • ASELEY II
  • ASH I, II
  • ASHBIE I
  • ASHBY II, III
  • ASHENDEN III
  • ASHFIELD I
  • ASHLEY III
  • ASHTON I, II
  • ASPINWALL I, III
  • ASSHENDEN III
  • ASTELEY II
  • ASTEN II
  • ASTIN I
  • ASTYE I
  • ATFEN II
  • ATHERTON II, III
  • ATKINS I
  • ATKINSON I,II,III
  • ATTE MARCH II
  • ATTILA THE HUN I
  • ATTNOKE II
  • ATWOOD II
  • AUBREY I
  • AUCHARD I
  • AUCHER I
  • AUDIE II
  • AUGER I
  • AULD III
  • AUNCELL I
  • AUSTEN I
  • AUSTIN II, III
  • AUSTINE II
  • AVENEL I
  • AVENELL I,III
  • AVERIE I
  • AVERILL I, II, III
  • AVERY I, II
  • AVERYE I
  • AVRIL I
  • AVSTEN III
  • AWBRY III
  • AWCOCKE I
  • AWSTEN III
  • AXDELL I
  • AXEY III
  • AYER I, II, III
  • AYERS I, II, III
  • AYLMER I
  • BABB I, II, III
  • BABEL I
  • BABSON I
  • BACHELDER III
  • BACHELLER II
  • BACHELLOUR III
  • BACHLER I
  • BACKER III
  • BACKHOUSE II, III
  • BACKLER I
  • BACON I, II, III
  • BADCOCK III
  • BADGERS II
  • BADGON II
  • BADLESMERE I
  • BAERT I
  • BAESH III
  • BAGLEY I, III
  • BAGLEYN I
  • BAILEY I, II, III
  • BAINTON I,III
  • Continue reading “Massachusetts and Maine Families – on Sale for 55% Off Thru Thrusday, May 15, 2014”

Genealogist John Grenham Comments on Ancestry.com’s Posting of Irish Data

The following teaser is from an article published in the March 24, 2014 edition of IrishCentral.com:

The world’s leading genealogy website is threatening to dominate the Irish heritage industry, according to new claims.

The Irish Times consultant genealogist John Grenham writes that Ancestry.com has changed the face of Irish heritage forever.

The website has added 750,000 transcripts from 71 Irish parishes in a move that has taken experts by surprise.

Read the full article.

MobileFamilyTree 7.1 Released

MobileFamilyTree-7.1-225pw

The following teaser is from the March 24, 2014 edition of betanews.com:

Synium Software has released a major update to its Apple mobile family history app with the release of MobileFamilyTree 7.1. Aside from gaining an iOS 7-inspired facelift, the app also adds AirPlay video support, rebuilds the interactive tree from scratch and includes a number of other major and minor tweaks and improvements.

Despite the major changes, the app remains free to all existing users, while new users can take advantage of a special 50 percent off promotion and purchase the app for $6.99 before March 31st.

MobileFamilyTree 7.1 debuts with a brand new, completely redesigned interface that mimics the flat iOS 7 look. The redesign affects every single view, and Synium promises that all list views are now more readable and easy to navigate. Another navigation improvement makes moving between functions simpler thanks to a single continuous list.

Read the full article.

Interactive Map Showing Where 83 Aircraft Have Disappeared Since 1948

Lost-Aircraft-InfoGraphic

According to a graphic found at Bloomberg.com, “some 83 aircraft have been declared “missing” since 1948, according to data compiled by the Aviation Safety Network. The list includes planes capable of carrying more than 14 passengers and where no trace — bodies or debris — has ever been found.”

This is interesting…

Check out the graphic at: http://www.bloomberg.com/infographics/2014-03-13/vanishing-planes-mapped-since-1948.html

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Free Freedmen’s Bureau Records Webinar May 16, 2014

Diane L. Richard

A new NCGS Webinar has been scheduled for May 16th on www.ncgenealogy.org. The North Carolina Genealogical Society presents Diane L Richards speaking on Freedmen’s Bureau Records.

The following notice was sent to me by Maryann Tuck:

Are you seeking records for your southern ancestors in the immediate post Civil War time period (1865-1868)? Learn about this little known and used Federal record collection that is full of invaluable records for many ancestors, regardless of skin color or circumstances, who lived in North Carolina (or elsewhere from DE to TX). After the war many needed assistance, from maimed soldiers, to widows with children, to the aged and feeble, to ex-slaves and their former owners. Examples of records relating to rations, contracts and indentures, courts, abandoned land, schools, hospitals, and more are presented.

After 18 May, the video Freedmen’s Bureau Records will only be accessible on the website to NCGS members as a member benefit. NCGS members and non-members may also purchase the webinar on a CD, which includes the handout, from the NCGS online bookstore.

NGS Call for Papers Deadline is 1 April 2014 for the 2015 St. Charles, MO Conference

The National Genealogical Society

The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

National Genealogical Society Call for Papers Deadline is 1 April 2014 for the 2015 Family History Conference in St. Charles, Missouri

Arlington, VA, 25 March 2014: The National Genealogical Society continues to accept lecture proposals from speakers and organizations for the NGS 2015 Family History Conference, Crossroads of America, to be held 13–16 May 2015 in St. Charles, Missouri. Topics sought include federal and state records, military and pension records, land records, methodology, analysis and problem solving, and the use of technology. NGS will also consider lectures on immigration and migration in and out of a region or country, transportation, and ethnic and religious groups. Proposals about Midwestern states and its feeder states, plus lectures on the “old country,” are encouraged.

Interested individuals and organizations should follow published guidelines at the NGS website, http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/call-for-papers/.

Speakers may submit up to eight proposals electronically through the NGS website, http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/submit-your-proposal/, no later than midnight EDT, 1 April 2014.

Organizations wishing to sponsor a lecture or track of lectures should review the details and sponsor requirements at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/ngs-2015-family-history-conference-sponsored-call-for-papers/. The deadline to submit sponsored lectures is also 1 April 2014.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists. Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

Salt Lake Christmas Tour………………. Week’s Peek

DNA kits 2 DNA kits hall 2

 

Our Salt Lake Christmas Tour family seems to be quite interested in the topic of DNA. This is especially true after our last December’s tour when Crista Cowan and Anna Swayne both came from Ancestry.com to tell us and teach us about DNA and the Ancestry.com DNA testing.  (In the above pix: here we are lining up to purchase a kit and there we are in the hall having a “spit party.)

I came across a news bit from a 2006 publication of my local genealogical society where one item of big news back then was proving that the bones and skull found were, indeed, those of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.  Here is a newspaper summary of that story:  http://www.foxnews.com/story/2006/01/09/dna-tests-inconclusive-on-mozart-skull/

An April 2013 story was wild:  http://sinfinimusic.com/uk/features/other-features/mozart-clone-news-story

How about this medical assessment: http://www.themedicalbag.com/story/wolfgang-amadeus-mozart

One of my favorite movies of all time was Amadeus, the life story of Mozart. This story is but one news story about which that I would love to read some following-up stories! Mozart did have children; wouldn’t it be wonderfully fun to connect to that line? Or find somebody who does?

Mozart

 

Donna, aka Mother Hen, until next peek.

Ancestry.com Adds Danish Vital Records From FamilySearch

A few days ago, Ancestry.com posted more Danish data that they received from FamilySearch.com. This data is for burials in Denmark between the years of 1640 and 1970. They had earlier posted databases for Denmark, Select Baptisms, 1618-1923, and Denmark, Select Marriages, 1635-1916.

I did a search for Kirsten Nielsen, and got back 69,346 hits! Picking one, I got the burial info on a Kirsten Christensdatter, nee Kirsten Nielsen. The database also gave the following information:
Gender: Female
Age: 88
Birth Date: 1773
Birth Place: Gronne, Thiim,
Death Date: 10 jan 1861
Death Place: Tim, Ringkøbing, Denmark
Burial Date: 20 jan 1861
Father: Christen Nielsen
FHL Film Number: 51994
Reference ID: Bk 5 P153

The Source Information is as follows:
Ancestry.com. Denmark, Select Burials, 1640-1917 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Original data: Denmark Burials, 1640-1917. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.

Looking futher at link leading to the FamilySearch Wiki, I found the following notation:

Record Description
This index is an electronic index for the years 1640 to 1917. It is not necessarily intended to index any specific set of records. This index is not complete for any particular place or region. This collection may include information previously published in the International Genealogical Index or Vital Records Index collections.

I looked for the FHL Film Number 51994 in the Family History Library and got the following response: “No Results Found.” So I’m still unsure as to where this record itself came from. Maybe I need to run down to the Library and see if I can locate that roll number on the shelf.(Note that I live exactly 10 miles from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.)

These records are available free at FamilySearch, having been posted from December through February. Just comparing the burial records, Ancestry.com stats show 1,252,302 records, while FamilySearch shows 656,944. It coould well be that the discrepancy is because Ancestry is counting additional names found within the entry (like the father’s name above), while the FamilySearch stats may just be the number of records. I’m just guessing here, so don’t quote me on that part!

Province of East Prussia I, RB Allenstein Map Guide to German Parish Registers is Now Shipping

East-Prussia-I-Front-Soft-Cover-300pw

Published by Family Roots Publishing Company, Volume 46 of the German Map Guide series was just published on March 21 of 2014. This volume includes a total of 2,220 places – mostly towns, found in the Kingdom of Prussia, Province of East Prussia, Regierungsbezirk Allenstein. This book also includes a master index to Volumes 46 through 48, which covers all of East Prussia. Written in English by Kevan Hansen, the volume was principally written to help family historians resolve where their family may have gone to church – and left vital records behind that may be seen today. This is the forty-fifth of a series covering all of Germany. The series is still in production. In many cases, even the smallest places are listed in this series – some with as little population as one person! These places are as of about 1870. If the place existed prior to that date, it will most likely be listed. If the place was named after that date, the chances drop.

Each volume of the series does the following:

  • Identifies the parish where an ancestor worshipped based on where they lived.
  • Gives the FHL microfilm number for the family’s parish records.
  • Identifies nearly every city, town, and place that included residents.
  • Visually identifies church parishes for Lutherans & Catholics in each district.
  • Identifies adjoining parishes in case an ancestor attended an alternate parish.
  • Aids in area searches, particularly across district or regional borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for a family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Aids in determining reasonable distances of travel from one area to another.
  • Identifies population centers in each parish.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources.
  • Aids in identification of the location of minority religions.
  • To purchase the Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Kingdom of Prussia, Province of East Prussia I, Regierungsbezirk Allenstein, with full index of included towns, by Kevan Hansen, 197 pp, Click on one of the links below.

    German Map Guide Volume 46 – Soft Cover (Item #FR0091):

    German Map Guide Volume 46 – Hard Cover (Item #FR0092):

    The following places are found in this volume.

  • Abdeckerei
  • Abstich
  • Achodden
  • Adamsgut
  • Adamsheide
  • Adamshof
  • Adamsverdruss
  • Adlersbude
  • Adlershorst
  • Adlig Kessel
  • Afrika
  • Albertshof
  • Albinshof
  • Albrechtau
  • Alexandrowen
  • Alfredshof
  • Allendorf
  • Allenstein
  • Allmoyen
  • Alt Allenstein
  • Alt Antonowen
  • Alt Bagnowen
  • Alt Borowen
  • Alt Czayken
  • Alt Czymochen
  • Altes Vorwerk
  • Altfelde
  • Alt Gehland
  • Alt Gisöwen
  • Alt Glodowen
  • Alt Görlitz
  • Althof
  • Althütte
  • Alt Jablonken
  • Alt Jucha
  • Alt Kaletka
  • Alt Kelbonken
  • Alt Keykuth
  • Alt Kockendorf
  • Alt Krzywen
  • Alt Lustig
  • Alt Märtinsdorf
  • Alt Muntowen
  • Alt Ogrodtken
  • Alt Ramuck
  • Alt Rudowken
  • Alt Schöneberg
  • Altstadt
  • Alt Suchoross
  • Alt Ukta
  • Alt Vierzighuben
  • Alt Wartenburg
  • Alt Werder
  • Amalienhof
  • Amalienruh
  • Amerika
  • Am Niskesee
  • Andreaswalde
  • Anhaltsberg
  • Annaberg
  • Annafelde
  • Annahof
  • Annenhof
  • Annenhorst
  • Annussewen
  • Antonienhof
  • Antonowen
  • Arbeiterwohnhaus
  • Arme
  • Arnau
  • Arthurshof
  • Arys
  • Atkamp
  • Auerswalde
  • Augarshof
  • Augusthof
  • Augusthoff
  • Augustthal
  • Augustwalde
  • Australien
  • Aweyden
  • Baarwiese
  • Babanten
  • Babienten
  • Babrosten
  • Bagensken
  • Baginsken
  • Bagnowenwolka
  • Bagnower Wald
  • Bahnhof
  • Baitkowen
  • Balden
  • Baldenofen
  • Ballamutowen
  • Ballau
  • Baller
  • Ballingen
  • Balzen
  • Bansen
  • Barannen
  • Continue reading “Province of East Prussia I, RB Allenstein Map Guide to German Parish Registers is Now Shipping”

The History of Railroads

mm017Like so many kids, I loved trains growing up. I never minded waiting for a train when riding in a car, I couldn’t wait to ride the train at Disneyland or Knott’s Berry Farm when we went as a family. I loved taking my own kids to the see the large collection of trains at the Orange Empire Railway Museum. I lived most of my life in Southern California, so had plenty of access to museums and theme parks where trains were always a big part of the adventure. Of course, spectacular movie events featuring trains, chases, and explosions, along with, stories of the wild west; which, almost always involved a train so only added to my childhood love. In all honesty, my enjoyment at watching trains has not entirely faded away with adulthood. I am sure many of you feel the same way.

Of course, with maturity comes a desire for added knowledge and enlightenment, to fill in the gaps of reality where fantasy lets off. For this a little bit of real history helps satisfy the curiosity. You might, then, imagine my pleasure at finding and reading The History of Railroads from the publishers of History Magazine.

History Magazine editor Edward Zapletal summarizes this exciting volume as follows:

“Thanks to improvements made by James Wyatt in the 18th century, the steam engine, in its various forms, eventually became a catalyst for a revolution in industry and travel. The image of a belching and billowing multi-ton behemoth seems almost romantic to us today, but in its day, the steam locomotive was responsible for building nations and providing a means to move people as they had never been before. Once we had a taste of the rails, there was no turning back.

In this special issue, compiled by History Magazine regular author, David A. Norris, he takes us on a tour of some of the more notable railroads in [see the list below]…

We also look at railroad stations, luxurious Pullman cars, WWI trains, tales of train robbers, locomotive thefts, dogs riding the rails, mail trains and Civil War train travel.

In addition, David also sheds some light on railroad legends the Old 97 and Casey Jones, both made famous in story and song.”

This special edition reprint of some of History Magazine’s best articles on the history of railroads, cover topics including:

  • The Transcontinental Railroad
  • Travel on the Orient Express
  • The Great Locomotive Chase
  • The Canadian Pacific Railway
  • The Panama Railroad
  • Civil War Train Travel
  • World War 1 Trains
  • Train Robberies
  • Owney the Mail Dog
  • Casey Jones and Old ‘97
  • A Look at Pullman Cars
  • And More!

 

Get your own copy of The History of Railroads from Family Roots Publishing.

Full Contents

  • The Fabled Orient Express; Leaving platform two for adventure, glamour, and excitement
  • Linked by the Golden Spike; Building the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads
  • Scandal, Rebellion, Mountains & Muskeg; The Canadian Pacific Railroad overcame natural and man-made obstacles to cross North America
  • The 1855 Panama Railroad; The first transcontinental railroad built across North America
  • From Purgatory to Pampering: Pullman Cars; The quest for rail passenger comfort
  • Stamping, Sorting and Steam; Moving the mail by rail
  • From Grand Central to the Not-so-Grand; A panorama of two centuries of great changes in railroad history
  • Trench Railways of World War I; Miniature trains were a deadly serious business from 1914-1918
  • The Great Locomotive Chase; A look at the Andrews Raid of 1862
  • Owney the Mail Dog; The mascot of the mail trains
  • Robberies on the Rails! This newfangled transportation brought a new kind of crime to the late 19th and early 20th centuries
  • Casey Jones and Old 97; Popular songs turned two railroad disasters into American folk legends
  • Taking the Cars; the first large-scale use of railroads to transfer armies and military supplies in war