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Salt Lake Christmas Tour………….. Week’s Peek

Vote now for your “Best Reason To Come On The Salt Lake Christmas Tour So That I Can Break Down My Brickwalls”:

1.  Your chance of successfully breaking through a brick wall is with the SLCT and our team of profession genealogists. Our ratio of helpers to tour folks is about 1 to 7….. the very best of any tour to Salt Lake and the Family History Library.

2.  You’ve spent way too long hoping for a break on your brick wall problem! Come on the SLCT where our track record for attendees finding new ancestors (i.e., breaking through a brickwall) is about 80%.

3.  If your brickwall is going to be broken down, it very likely will be during the SLCT. Our army of professionals practically guarantees results.

4.  Bottom line, come let us help you deal with your brick wall problem. Unless your ancestor beamed down from the planet Klingon (or any other planet!!) we will deal with and at least give you new insight onto that problem.

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This is a “tombstone” or burial mound constructed of lava/basaltic rock that I photographed on Maui in February 2014.

Come let us of the SLCT help you break down your “lava/basaltic” brick wall and make a burial mound from it……… ie, we’ll help you find out where that ancestor is buried!!

Donna, aka Mother Hen, until next peek.

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Genealogical Resources in English Repositories

cf3924While the information so nicely gathered into this single book, Genealogical Resources in English Repositories, can be found in many other locations; sometimes, it is nice to have this type of information in one place, as a quick and easy reference. This book represents an exhaustive listing of available genealogical resources available in Britain. Listed in these pages are major national archives and libraries, repositories in the greater London area, and county by county listings. This book is also the winner of the National Genealogical Society’s 1993 Book Award for Excellence in Genealogical Methods and Sources.

Genealogical Resources was designed to provide “genealogists and historians with…information on resources in the key repositories in England. It categorizes manuscript records, as well as printed, transcribed and microfilm materials, with respect to their contents, and in most instances, lists covering dates.” Originally intended to help Americans find ancestral information.

County listings represent the bulk of the information. Each county opens with a short review of local geographical and political/administrative boundary changes made over the years. The listing of each library, archive, records office, or other repository is complete with address (mostly likely not changed over the years), phone number (possibly changed over the years), and holdings of genealogical value (which most likely have only expanded over the years). Publications of possible interest are also listed.

Please note that there have been significant changes in the PRO over the years, and it might be necessary to use Google to locate the exact location of some records listed within this volume.

While this book predates web usage as we know it today (including Google), is still serves as a great one-stop listing for finding genealogically important holding in England. Think of running a search at Google for English repositories, then reducing the results to an accurate, non-repeating listing of resources and then printing those results with a listing of holdings at each repository. That pretty well describes Genealogical Resources in English Repositories.

Each book comes with a 1992 and 1996 update supplement. Just having the names of the various repositories gives the reader the name to search for when using the Internet.

 

Get a copy of Genealogical Resources in English Repositories for yourself or your favorite society’s library.

 

Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

List of Abbreviations

List of Symbols

Part I: Greater London Repositories

Baptist Church House
British Library, Department of Manuscripts
British Library, India Office Library and Records
British Library Newspaper Library
College of Arms
Corporation of London Record Office
Guildhall Library
House of Lords Record Office
Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland
Lambeth Palace Library
LDS Hyde Park Family History Centre
National Army Museum
National Maritime Museum
Principal Registry of the Family Division, Somerset House
Public Record Office, Chancery Lane
Public Record Office, Kew
Public Record Office, Portugal Street
Religious Society of Friends
Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts
Society of Genealogists
Unitarian Historical Society
Untied Reformed Church History Society
United Synagogue, Archives of
Wesley Historical Society Library
Westminster, Diocesan Archives
Dr. Williams’ Library

Part II: County Repositories (summarized)

 

Each county listing includes:

  • Record Office(s)
  • Other Repositories
  • Genealogical and Family History Societies

A few counties and metropolitan areas include sections for:

  • Metropolitan District Archives and Local History Libraries, OR
  • District Archives and Libraries

Counties are listed alphabetically as follows:

  • Avon
  • Befordshire
  • Berkshire
  • Buckinghamshire
  • Cambridgeshire
  • Cheshire
  • Cleveland
  • Cornwall
  • Cumberland
  • Cumbria
  • Derbyshire
  • Devon(shire)
  • Dorset
  • Durham
  • Essex
  • Gloucestershire
  • Hampshire
  • Hereford and Worcester
  • Hereforshire
  • Hertfordshire
  • Humberside
  • Huntingdonshiore
  • Kent
  • Lancashire
  • Leicstershire
  • Lincolnshire
  • London, County of Manchester, Greater
  • Meseyside
  • Middlesex
  • Midlands, West
  • Norfolk
  • Northamptonshire
  • Northumberland
  • Nottinghamshire
  • Oxfordshire
  • Rutland
  • Shropshire
  • Somerset
  • Staffordshire
  • Suffolk
  • Suffolk, East
  • Suffolk, West
  • Surrey
  • Sussex
  • Sussex, East
  • Sussex, West
  • Tyne and Wear
  • Warwickshire
  • Westmorland
  • Wight, Isle of
  • Wiltshire
  • Worcestershire
  • Yorkshire, East Riding
  • Yorkshire, North Riding
  • Yorkshire, West Riding
  • Yorkshire, North
  • Yorkshire, South
  • Yorkshire, West

Part III: London Borough Repositories

Greater London

Barking and Dagenham

  • Valence Reference Library
  • Barking Central Library

Barnet

  • Local History Library
  • Chipping Barnet Library
  • Church End (Finchley) Library

Bexley

  • Bexley Libraries and Museum Department

Brent

  • Grange Museum of Local History

Bromley

  • Bromley Central Library

Camden

  • Swiss Cottage Library
  • Holborn Library

Croydon

  • Croydon Public Libraries

Ealing

  • Local History Library

Enfield

  • Local History Unit

Greenwich

  • Greenwich Local History and Archives Centre

Hackney

  • Hackney Archives and Local History Department

Hammersmith and Fulham

  • Hammersmith and Fulham Archives

Haringey

  • Haringey Libraries

Harrow

  • Harrow Civic Centre Library

Havering

  • Havering Central Library

Hillingdon

  • Hillingdon Local History Collection

Hounslow

  • Chiswick Public Library
  • Brentford Public Library
  • Hounslow Public Library
  • Feltham Public Library

Islington

  • Islington Central Library
  • Finsbury Library

Kensington and Chelsea, Royal Borough of

  • Kensington Central Library
  • Chelsea Library

Kingston upon Thames, Royal Borough of

  • Kingston upon Thames Heritage Service

Lambeth

  • Lambeth Archives Department

Lewisham

  • Lewisham Library Service

Merton

  • Mitcham Library
  • Morden Library
  • Wembledon Reference Library

Newham

  • Local Studies Library

Redbridge

  • Redbridge Central Library

Richmond upon Thames

  • Richmond upon Thames Central Reference Library
  • Twickenham Reference Library

Southwark

  • Southwark Local Studies Library

Sutton

  • Sutton Central Library

Tower Hamlets

  • Tower Hamlets Central Library

Waltham Forest

  • Vestry House Museum

Wandsworth

  • Battersea District Library

City of Westminster

  • Westminster City Archives Department
  • Marylebone Library Archives Department

Other Repositories

  • LDS Family History Centre (Staines)

Genealogical and Family History Societies

  • Central Middlesex Family History Society
  • North Middlesex Family History Society
  • West Middlesex Family History Society
  • Waltham Forest Family History Society
  • Woolwich and District Family History Society

 

Appendix: Useful Addresses

Index

Maps (enlarged)

  • Pre-1974 Counties of England
  • Post-1974 Counties of England
  • Post-1965 London Boroughs

Supplements

  • Supplement to Genealogical Resources in English Repositories (1992)
  • 1996 Supplement Update: Genealogical Resources in English Repositories

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The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records

hbd4298We’ve all heard Benjamin Franklin’s sardonic quote, “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” We feel the pain in our pocketbooks every time we pay taxes. However, as genealogists we are fortunate to have tax records as a tool to researching the past. Tax records contain mountains of data, are often highly accurate, and cover a large variety of taxes, or tax types. The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records is the family historian’s educator to the world of tax document.

As the authors, Carol Cook Darrow and Susan Winchester, say, “the census taker came every ten years and often missed people, The tax collector came every year and seldom missed anyone.” North American tax records date back to the earliest colonial period, back to the 1620s. Records can help establish location, real estate, personal possessions, economic status, occupations and businesses, and sometimes even relationships between individuals, helping link you to your ancestor. This guide was written to help the researcher find the various tax records and understand the information they provide.

The first two chapters provide the necessary background and skills needed to successfully search tax records. The remaining chapters cover the different types of tax records, including:

  • Poll taxes
  • Real Estate taxes
  • Personal Property taxes
  • Federal Taxes
  • Inheritance taxes
  • School taxes
  • Liquor taxes and more…

No two taxes are collected in the same way. Government at all levels can imposes taxes. This book examines the history of tax records in the United States, including early colonial taxes, along with common tax forms and collection procedures. Learn how to evaluate tax records and compare records of different years to track your ancestors and possibly gain additional information about their families.

In addition, tax records are especially helpful for the period prior the first U.S. Federal decennial census in 1790 and for the period between 1880 and 1900, with its missing 1890 census.

 

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Preface

Chapter 1. Getting Started in Tax Records

  • Benefits of Tax Record Research
  • Research Can Be Tedious – Until You Succeed
  • Tax Process
  • Locating Tax Records
  • Research Tax Records at Courthouse or Archive
  • Tax Records as Substitutes for Census Records
  • Verify County Formation Date
  • Following the Records Year By Year
  • Isolated Records
  • Indexes: Never the Final Answer
  • A Word About Slaves
  • Finding the Right Record in the Wrong Place
  • Ready to Begin?

Chapter 2. Research Techniques

  • Types of Taxes
  • Tax Records May be Combined
  • How to Approach a Tax Record
  • Identify Information Being Collected
  • Sources for Interpreting Tax Information
  • Consider Spelling Variations
  • Become Familiar with Notations and Abbreviations
  • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name in the Same County
  • Doing the Math
  • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of an Ancestor
  • Records That Report Only Assessed Value
  • Paying Taxes in the Coin of the Realm
  • Calculating with Pounds, Shillings, and Peace
  • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of an Ancestor
  • Forming a Hypothesis
  • Summary of Research Techniques

Chapter 3. Poll Taxes

  • Taxes “By the Poll” Were Earliest American Taxes
  • Massachusetts Poll Tax, 1646
  • Virginia Tithables
  • The Tithables Process
  • Poll Books and Voting Rights
  • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name int eh Same County
  • Tracking Changes Through Tax Lists Over Time
  • Research Example: Identify Men as They Become Adults
  • Finding the Landless Ancestor
  • Research example: Research A Landless Ancestor
  • Poll Tax Records Can Replace the Census

Chapter 4. Land Taxes

  • Colonial Land Distribution
  • Land Taxes After the Revolution
  • Land Exemptions Used to Encourage Settlement
  • Tax Records Can Identify the Land and Location
  • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name in the Same County
  • Research Example: Use Tax Information to Lead to Other Valuable Records
  • Delinquent Land Tax Sales
  • Tracking Delinquent Land Tax Sales Records
  • Land Tax Records Can Point to a Migration Trail
  • Land Holdings May Imply Arrival Date
  • Tax Ledgers Arranged by Legal Land Description
  • Additional Information Collected in Tax Records
  • Information Common to Land Tax Records

Chapter 5. Personal Property Taxes

  • Paying for Government
  • Estates Are Taxable
  • Research Example: Establish a Year of Death as Estate Becomes Taxable
  • Land and Personal Property Tax Lists Combined
  • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of tan Ancestor
  • Property Tax Lists Expanded Over Time
  • State Income Tax Replaces Some Personal Property Taxes
  • Homestead Exemptions Enacted
  • Personal Property Tax – “Everyman” Tax

Chapter 6. Federal Taxes

  • Direct Tax of 1798
  • Tariffs and Import Duties
  • Direct Taxes of 1813, 1815, and 1816
  • Direct Tax of 1861
  • Federal Income Taxes (1962-1872)
  • Confederate Taxes
  • Tariffs Decline in Significance
  • Income Tax Reconsidered
  • Tax Protests
  • Tax Assessors and Collectors

Chapter 7. Inheritance and Estate Taxes

  • Federal Estate and Inheritance Taxes
  • State Estate and Inheritance Taxes
  • Research Example: Identify the Heirs of an Estate
  • Estate and Inheritance Taxes Can Prove Relationships

Chapter 8. Miscellaneous Tax Records

  • Militia Service
  • Road Orders
  • Ecclesiastical Taxes
  • Faculty Taxes
  • Business Licenses
  • Liquor Taxes
  • School Taxes
  • Federal Head Tax on Aliens
  • Old Age Assistance Tax

Chapter 9. Summary

  • Summary of Research Techniques

Appendix A Textural Records of the Direct Tax Commission in the Southern States

Appendix B Microfilmed Records of the Internal Revenue Assessment Lists, 1862-1874

Appendix C State Inheritance Tax Laws Through 1913

Appendix D State Old Age Assistance Laws, as of 1934

Glossary

Research Bibliography

Bibliography of Selected Tax Records

Index

 

We cannot help you with your Taxes, but we can take some of the burden off researching tax records by offering The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records at the Family Roots Publishing website.

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Blogging on a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 Tablet

Galaxy-Tab-3-250pw

A few days ago, I made some changes to my Sprint cell phone service and got a free tablet in the process. It’s a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3. It has a 7 inch screen, bigger than my iPhone, but still much smaller than any computer I have used before.

Now don’t get me wrong… “Free” also meant that Ì was obligated to a two year data contact about $15 per month. I almost declined getting the free tablet, but decided maybe I could use it for blogging. This blog is being written using the tablet.

I purchased a case and external bluetooth keyboard for about $40, thinking that this might keep the tablet in better shape, as well as allowing me to type a little easier. Thus far, I am finding the slight delay between the keyboard and screen to be a bit disconserting. I find that I have to press the keys a lot more solidly than I am used to. It’s also really easy to accidentally turn on the caps lock key when hitting shift. I imagine that these are things I can get used to. Note that these are all keyboard issues, and have nothing to do with the operations of the tablet itself.

I just imported the photo, and that process seems to work okay. This just might work. Only time will tell.

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An Historical Timeline for Indiana, 1614-1911

The following article is excerpted from Bill Dollarhide’s new book, Indiana Name Lists, Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1783-2007.

Indiana-Name-Lists-200pw

For genealogical research in Indiana, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical, jurisdictional, and genealogical point of view. Refer to the recent Illinois Timeline article for maps and illustrations that apply to Indiana and the old Northwest Territory.

1614. Samuel de Champlain, Governor of New France and the founder of Québec, was believed to be the first of the French explorers to visit the Miami du lac region between present Toledo, OH and Fort Wayne, IN. Later, the name Maumee was an anglicized spelling of the Ottawa name for the Miami Indians, and became the origin of the name for the present Maumee River, the main water access to Indiana via Lake Erie.

1679. French explorer René-Robert Cavelier (Sieur de LaSalle), began negotiations with the Miami Indians to secure an area near the confluence of the St. Marys and St. Josephs rivers forming the Maumee River at present Fort Wayne, IN.

1702. The area of present Indiana was first inhabited by French fur trappers, from Lake Erie via the Maumee River to present Fort Wayne, and a short portage to a stream flowing into the Wabash River. A continuous canoe route now existed from Lake Erie, connecting with the Wabash, Ohio, and Mississippi rivers.

1717 French Louisiana. The French jurisdiction, la Louisiane Française, extended from the Highlands along the Wabash River, down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, to include New Orleans and several ports on the Gulf of Mexico. The Highlands, in French, Terra Haute, became the division line between the Québec and Louisiana jurisdictions.

1721. The French established Fort Philippe, later called Fort Miami, on the St. Marys River, where the St. Marys and St. Josephs rivers form the Maumee River. Fort Philippe/Fort Miami was administered as part of French Québec. The original site is encompassed by the modern city of Fort Wayne, IN.

1732. Vincennes was established on the Wabash River, becoming Indiana’s first permanent settlement.
It was named after Jean Baptiste Bissot (Sieur de Vincennes), the military commander of Quebec. The town of Vincennes became the largest French settlement in Upper Louisiana.

1733-1762 French Colonies vs British Colonies. Lower Louisiana, with its ports on the Gulf of Mexico, had been the destination of colonists directly from France and other French colonies in the Caribbean. Upper Louisiana, however, was mostly inhabited by French Canadians, coming into the area from Québec. From 1733 to 1762, no new farming communities were ever established in French Louisiana. The French presence in the Mississippi Basin and around the Great Lakes consisted mainly of single French trappers and traders paddling their canoes from one outpost to the next. The French established military/trading posts at strategic locations, partly as a means of protecting the trappers during their contacts with the Indians. Unlike the French Québec settlements, French Louisiana had very few farming communities, and there was little exchanging of goods or produce, except for the trapping and trading of furs. During this period, the French had built one road (the Wabash-Erie Portage Road), a road less than 12 miles long, and that was only to provide portage between rivers. In comparison, the British colonies by 1762 had over 2,500 miles of improved wagon roads, between Boston and Savannah. The British colonies had an economy based on town tradesmen surrounded by small farms, with the exchange of goods and produce up and down the Atlantic coast.

1763. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended the French and Indian War. In Europe and Canada, it was called
the “Seven Years War.” The treaty required France to surrender all of its claims to land in North America, with the exception of fishing rights and a couple of fish-drying islands off of Newfoundland. The treaty gave Spain all of Louisiana west of the Mississippi, while Britain gained the areas east of the Mississippi River to the Appalachian Mountains. Great Britain also acquired the Province of Québec from France.

1764-1770 Transition Period. After the departure of all French military personnel by 1764, the French-colonized areas of Louisiana and Québec were still inhabited mainly by French settlers and trappers. The transition from French control to Spanish or British control took several years. In former French Louisiana, French civilian settlements still operated at Prairie du Chien, now Wisconsin; Kaskaskia, now Illinois; and at Vincennes, now Indiana. In 1764, a French trading company established the trading post of St. Louis on the west side of the Mississippi River, after obtaining a trading license from the Spanish government. And, per terms of the Treaty of Paris of 1763, British forces began the evacuation of French Acadians from their homes in present Nova Scotia. The first shipload of Acadians arrived in Spanish Louisiana, just west of New Orleans, in February 1765. The Louisiana Rebellion of 1768 was an unsuccessful attempt by Creole and German settlers around New Orleans to stop the handover of French Louisiana to Spain. Meanwhile, the French influence in Upper Louisiana continued –
although part of Spanish Louisiana, St. Louis operated under French civilian control until it was occupied by Spanish soldiers in 1770. About the same time, the British established military jurisdiction over the French settlements at Prairie du Chien, Kaskaskia and Vincennes.

1774 Québec Act. After deciding not to repeat the evacuation of all French Acadians from Nova Scotia in the mid 1760s, the British Parliament passed the Québec Act, permitting the French Canadians to retain French laws and customs, and allowing the Catholic Church to maintain its rights. The French settlements along the Wabash River near Vincennes in present-day Indiana were included in the Province of Québec, under British rule since 1763.

1778-1779. French Acadians (the Cajuns) resettled by the British in southern Louisiana rallied in support of the American rebels during the Revolutionary War. They were joined in their support by the left-over French settlers of the Wabash Valley, who were instrumental in General George Rogers Clark’s capture of Kaskaskia on the Mississippi River and Vincennes on the Wabash River.

1783. Post-Revolutionary War. The 1783 Treaty of Paris recognized the United States of America as an independent nation, and defined its borders from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River. Although the old Upper Louisiana and Great Lakes regions were to be included within the United States, British forces continued to maintain control of Prairie du Chien, Fort Detroit, and a few other sites for several years after the Revolution.

1784. Connecticut, Virginia and Massachusetts relinquished their western claims to lands in the Great Lakes region, a large area that was to become the Northwest Territory. Title of the state’s claims were transferred to the “public domain” of the United States Federal Government.

1787-1789 Northwest Territory. The Ordinance of 1787 established the Territory Northwest of the River Ohio, and defined the procedure for any territory to obtain statehood. The first territory of the United States included the area of the present states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and that part of Minnesota east of the Mississippi River. An October 1787 census of the male voters of “Poste Vincennes” was made up of almost entirely French surnames. In 1789, Vincennes became the county seat of the newly organized Knox County, Northwest Territory, an area that included all of present Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, part of Michigan, and part of Minnesota.

1789-1815 Flatboat Era. After the opening of the Northwest Territory for settlement, migrating families heading to the Ohio River via horse-drawn wagons might stop at Brownsville, Pittsburgh, or Wheeling. There they would buy or construct a custom-built flatboat capable of holding wagons, household furniture, barrels of food and commodities; plus horses, cattle, sheep, pigs, and children. They would first hire a boatman, usually recruited out of a local tavern. The boatmen were experts in navigating streams, and provided another long-rifle to ward off bandits en route. After arriving at his client’s destination, a boatman would walk back up river to his starting point (or to the closest Tavern). The migrating families would use the flatboat lumber and nails for their first shelters upon their arrival at their new homesites along the Ohio River and tributaries. The earliest settlements in the southern portions of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois were mostly settled by flatboat travelers. Although steamboats were introduced to the Ohio River in 1812, they did not dominate transportation until the classic flat-bottomed steamboat design took hold in 1815. That ended the flatboat era.

1796 Great Lakes Region. The British evacuated Fort Detroit and abandoned their other posts on the Great Lakes, ending all British hold-outs in the Old Northwest.

1800. Indiana Territory was established from the Northwest Territory with William Henry Harrison as the first Governor and Vincennes the capital. The area of 1800 Indiana Territory was nearly identical to the 1789 area of Knox County, Northwest Territory, an area that included most of present-day Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, and the western half of Michigan. The Northwest Territory was reduced to the present-day area of Ohio and the eastern half of Michigan. See the Illinois Timeline article for a map showing the Northwest and Indiana territories as of the August 1800 federal census.

1803. Ohio was admitted to the Union as the 17th state, with Chillicothe as the state capital. The portion of present Michigan included in the Northwest Territory 1800-1803 now became part of Indiana Territory. Upon Ohio’s statehood, the name Northwest Territory was dropped.

1805. Michigan Territory was separated from the Indiana Territory. The original area was between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, as today, but did not include much of the Upper Peninsula, which was still under control of Indiana Territory.

1809. Illinois Territory was separated from Indiana Territory, with Kaskaskia the capital. The original area included present-day Illinois, Wisconsin, a portion of the Upper Peninsula of present Michigan and that portion of Minnesota east of the Mississippi River. The area of Indiana Territory was reduced in size to the area of the present-day state, plus a portion of the Upper Peninsula of present Michigan.

1810. Indiana Territory. The 1810 population of 24,320 people was within four counties: Clark, Dearborn, Knox, and Harrison. The 1810 federal census manuscripts for all four counties were lost. See the 1810 map as part of Illinois Timeline article.

1811. Battle of Tippecanoe. Tecumseh’s forces were defeated at the Battle of Tippecanoe. The American forces were led by Governor William Henry Harrison, who later used the presidential nickname “Tippecanoe.” The victory over a large force of Indians opened up much of Indiana for settlement.

1813. The Indiana territorial capital was moved from Vincennes to Corydon.

1814. Treaty of Ghent. The War of 1812 ended, reopening American settlement of the Great Lakes region of the Old Northwest.

1816. Dec. 11th. Indiana became the 19th state with the same boundaries as today. The first state capital was at Corydon.

1825. The Indiana state capital was moved from Corydon to Indianapolis.

1911. The first Indy 500 car race took place in Indianapolis.

Recommended reading: Indiana Name Lists, Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1783-2007

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Hundreds of Headstones Charred by Fire at Chattanooga National Cemetery

The following teaser is from an article in the March 11, 2014 edition of timesfreepress.com:

Charred-headstones-200pw

For the second time in less than two months a Sunday afternoon grass fire has scorched tombstones at Chattanooga National Cemetery, and state and national investigators want to know why.

A 911 call came in at 1:54 p.m. Sunday informing authorities of the fire that covered an acre and affected about 500 tombstones, severely charring some in the cemetery that houses the graves of military veterans.

The call came nearly seven weeks to the minute after a similar fire with an unknown cause engulfed five acres of the cemetery and affected 1,800 tombstones, requiring some to be replaced.

Sunday’s blaze hit a different portion of the 120-acre cemetery’s 43,000-plus grave markers.

Read the full article.

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Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox Opens Veteran’s Exhibit

The following excerpt is from an excellent article by Katrina Koerting, published in the March 7, 2014 edition of newsadvance.com.

Visitors browse artifacts on display in the new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox, Va., March 6, 2014. (Photo by Parker Michels-Boyce/The News & Advance)

Visitors browse artifacts on display in the new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox, Va., March 6, 2014. (Photo by Parker Michels-Boyce/The News & Advance)

Many people can recite facts about battles or describe the cultural environment during the Civil War, but not as much is shared about the men after the war.

These are the stories told in the first new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox. The exhibit, entitled, “When Johnny Came Marching Home: Veterans in the Postwar South,” shows visitors what the veterans faced after returning home, touching on the human cost of war, trying to reconcile what happened and the legacy the veterans and their descendants left behind.

“This is somewhat of a universal story to tell,” exhibit historian John Coski said.

This exhibit depicts what it was like for veterans during the late 1800s and early 1900s, Linda Lipscomb, the site’s director, said.

Read the full article.

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Ex-British PM Clement Attlee’s Roots Traced to Shimla in Northern India

The following teaser is from an article published March 9, 2014 at the gulfnews.com website.

British PM Clement Attlee

Shimla [Himachal Pradesh, India]: Clement Attlee’s grandson John was born in Shimla nearly nine decades ago. His great-granddaughter has just fished out her father’s birth certificate from the cavernous civic office of the “queen of the hills”.

Sally Camps, great-granddaughter of Clement Attlee, who served as Britain’s prime minister from 1945 to 1951, screamed excitedly as she traced her roots in this hill station. It was during Attlee’s tenure that India got its independence in 1947.

Simla, as it was then called, served as the summer capital of British India between 1864 and 1939.
Camps along with her husband Michael Camps was in this Himachal Pradesh capital last week to locate the birth records of her father John Keith Harwood, who was born here in 1926.

Read the full article.

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Archivist of the USA David S. Ferriero Announces Closure/Consolidations of Three National Archives Facilities

National-Archives

David S. Ferriero today announced the closure or consolidation of three of the National Archives Facilities. Those facilities are in Anchorage, Alaska; Philadelphia, PA; and Fort Worth, Texas. The facilities in Alaska and Pennsylvania will close, while two facilities in Fort Worth will be consolidated. It’s estimated that these changes will save 1.3 million dollars annually.

Take a look at the following press release. This is interesting stuff… The archival Alaskan records will be digitized at the Sand Point facility in Seattle, and the items will be placed on the Internet so Alaskans will have access to them. That’s a plus for the genealogical community. At first glance, I don’t see a downside for most of us with these moves.

Washington, DC… March 11, 2014: As part of ongoing budget adjustments, Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero announced the permanent closure of three National Archives facilities. This year, the National Archives facility in Anchorage, AK, will close and two facilities in the Philadelphia, PA, area will be consolidated to a single site. Within the next two years, two Archives’ facilities in Fort Worth, TX, also will be consolidated to a single site. These closures and consolidations will result in estimated annual cost savings of approximately $1.3 million.

“The National Archives budget is devoted primarily to personnel and facilities, both of which are essential to our mission,” the Archivist stated. “I recognize these cuts will be painful; however, we are committed to continuing to provide the best service to our customers and best working conditions for our staff nationwide.”

Anchorage, AK, facility closing
The National Archives’ facility in Anchorage, AK, will close permanently in FY 2014. The employees who work there will be offered positions at other National Archives facilities, with the National Archives paying relocation expenses. The less than 12,000 cubic feet of archival records in Alaska will be moved to the National Archives at Seattle, WA, where the National Archives will digitize these records so that they remain available to Alaskans through the internet. In addition, we will move approximately 7,500 cubic feet of records center holdings to Seattle, WA.

Philadelphia, PA, facility consolidation
The National Archives currently maintains two facilities in Philadelphia—a records center and archives at Townsend Road, and a small “storefront” archival facility at 900 Market Street in the city center. These facilities are in the same commuting area, and archival records are currently moved between the two for research use. The Market Street facility will close in FY 2014, and those employees will move to Townsend Road or telework locations. The less than 5,000 cubic feet of archival records stored at Market Street will be moved to Townsend Road, where the majority of the archival records already are stored. The Townsend Road facility’s research room will be modified to better provide appropriate access to researchers, and community outreach programs will continue.

Fort Worth, TX, facility consolidation
The National Archives currently maintains two facilities in Fort Worth: a combined records center and archives at John Burgess Drive, and a smaller “storefront” facility at Montgomery Plaza. The National Archives will permanently close the Montgomery Plaza facility in FY 2016. All employees at the Montgomery Plaza location will move to John Burgess or telework locations. No original records are stored at Montgomery Plaza, and researchers will have continued access to archival records through the research room at John Burgess Drive.

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North Dakota Heritage Center Galleries to Open Mid-Spring

The following excerpt is an article by Nick Smith, posted in the March 6, 2014 edition of bismarcktribune.com

ND-Expansion

BISMARCK, N.D. — A date for the opening of two of the three new North Dakota Heritage Center galleries hasn’t yet been finalized but officials overseeing the expansion project are expecting it to take place in mid-spring.

State Historical Society of North Dakota officials met Thursday to inform some of the society’s board members of the progress on the $51.7 million, 97,000-square-foot expansion project.

The first gallery has been installed and is called the Adaptation Gallery. It is centered on ancient North Dakota millions of years ago and will include dinosaur skeletons.

Set to open along with it is the second gallery, called the Innovation Gallery. It spans the era from the last ice age about 13,000 years ago through the year 1860.

Johnson said the Inspiration Gallery will be a post-1860 exhibit divided into several themes including agriculture, cultures, and industry and energy.

The museum has been closed since fall 2012. During construction, the state historical society and foundation offices, the state archives and museum store have remained open.

Read the full article.

Also see: http://www.history.nd.gov/exhibits/.

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New Irish Research Bundle at 15% Off through Friday, March 14

Bundle14

This last week Family Roots Publishing got in two Irish Research books – one a book on Irish research in New York City, and the other on Irish history. The Irish research in New York book is brand new (2014) and contains a lot of previously unavailable information on New York City research. The book on Irish history has been in print since 2007, but I had never seen the book prior to getting a review copy a few weeks ago. I have learned an amazing amount about Ireland and Irish research just in the few hours I’ve had with these titles.

Since I think that both of these books will be valuable to genealogists with Irish roots, I’ve decided to bundle the books together as this weeks FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer, cut the price 15%, making it just $25.42 for two volumes, and ship them together as if they were only one book ($5.50 p&h), saving the buyer another $2.50. The books are also available individually at 10% off, as announced in blogs and the Genealogy Newsline earlier. This offer ends Friday at Midnight MST, March 14, 2014.

Click Here to purchase the bundle.

Following are reviews of the two books that Andy Pomeroy wrote earlier:

Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City

gpc776From the late 1600s on, millions of Irish Immigrants have landed on the shores of North America. One million alone came during the Irish Famine, from 1846 to 1851. A significant majority of these immigrants landed, and many stayed, in New York. This has been covered many times and in many publications. Now, however, someone has finally put together a comprehensive research guide for finding and using sources of Irish records in New York. Joseph Buggy has created and published for 2014 Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City.

Just what does this new book offer? I think the author introduces the book nicely in his Introduction:

“The aim of this book is to present a comprehensive overview for anyone wishing to trace their Irish ancestors within the five boroughs of New York City. It is especially beneficial for those researching ancestors form the beginning of the 19th century to the early 20th. The Irish immigrant ancestor who arrived in New York offers researchers a good chance of finding the place of origin in Ireland, whether he or she settle in the city for generations or moved on soon after arrival. Helping you find the at place of origin is one of the central objectives of this book. To assist you in your search, detailed information about records, resources, and strategies are provided.

The history of Irish emigration to the United States, and to New York City in particular, has been covered extensively and has been detailed in a number of excellent publications. This book does not set out to retell that story. Instead, it provides resources and strategies for tracing Irish ancestors in New York City.”

Inside this guide you will find a healthy dose of information about Irish immigrants. For those who stayed in New York, discover where they settled; Catholic churches in Irish areas and records kept; newspapers; vital records; cemeteries; and more. The book is a little bit history and a lot of resources. Even those ancestors who only stopped briefly in New York, after disembarking there, left records that can help lead back to their homes of origin.

Get a copy of Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City at 10% Off for a limited time from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

  • What’s Inside?
  • Where do I Start?
  • Why Not Go Straight to Irish Records?

2. Introductory Record Sets

  • U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1940
  • Vital Records, 1795-Present
  • City Directories, 1786-1934
  • Naturalization Records
  • Wills and Letters of Administration
  • Institutions
  • Useful Resources

3. Underutilized Records

  • Almshouse Collection
  • Potter’s Field
  • Public Sector Employment
  • Nwespapters
  • A Black Sheep in the Family: Criminal Ancestors
  • Lesser Known New Your City Censuses

4. Strategies for Tracing the Irish in New York City

  • Spelling Variations-Irish Accents and Illiteracy
  • Irish Name Formations
  • Did Your Ancestors Marry or Have Children in Ireland before Emigrating?
  • Was There a Priest in the Family?
  • It’s Not All About the Immigrant
  • Your Ancestors’ FAN Club

5. Where the Irish Lived in New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

6. Sources for the Place of Origin in Ireland

  • Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank
  • Census of Inmates in Almshouses and Poorhouses
  • Headstone Transcriptions
  • Newspapers
  • Travel Writing
  • Marriage Records, Diocese of Brooklyn
  • Church of the Transfiguration Marriage Register
  • Passenger Lists
  • Irish Immigrant Girls Organization
  • Naturalization Records
  • Chronological Bibliography of Sources

7. The Roman Catholic Church

  • Parish Publications

8. Roman Catholic Parishes of New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

9. Cemeteries

  • Catholic Cemeteries
  • Public, Nondenominational, and Institutional

10. Periodicals

  • Periodical Index
  • Periodical Abbreviations
  • Periodicals

11. Websites and Publications to Compliment Your Research

  • Websites
  • Publications

Notes and Index

101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Traditions of the Emerald Isle

ig02A month and a half before we put on our sombreros, sing about a drunk cockroach, and eat too many tacos in the cultural celebration acknowledging our southern neighbors on Cinco de Mayo, we will first don a little green and hope for a little luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. Most you have probably heard the legend of St. Patrick driving snakes out of Ireland. But, what do you really know about the man? Did you know St. Patrick:

  • Was of British Celt ancestry?
  • Came to Ireland as its Bishop around 432?
  • Is credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland?
  • Used the shamrock (three-leafed clover) to teach about the Trinity?
  • Argued with High King Laoghaire on behalf of Christianity?
  • Was on “speaking terms with both God and an angel?”
  • Wrote the prayer “Saint Patrick’s Breastplate.”

Image what else you don’t know about Ireland and the Irish. How about Vikings in Ireland? Who was Kevin of Glendalough, the tree hugger, or other Irish saints? How was Dublin founded? What about Gaelic? Irish communities around the world? There is a rich history and heritage from which millions the world over have descended. Many know they come from an Irish heritage, and most probably know more of the myths than they do the truths of the Emerald Isle. 101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Traditions of the Emerald Isle was written to help those of Irish descent better know the homeland of their ancestors, as well as any other reader with a broad interest in history.

Authors Ryan Hackney and Amy Hackney Blackwell created this reference to educate the reader on:

  • the lives of the ancient Celts before the British invasions
  • famous Irish including Michael Collins, Charles Parnell and Bono!
  • the potato famine and emigration (were there really gangs of New York?)
  • Irish music and dance, and much more…

The guide even provides an Irish language prime and pronunciation guide. The book is compact in size to make reading easy; yet, full of the historical information useful to have at hand when researching Irish ancestry. Plus, the book is simply fun to read. I have always found interesting historical evidence for where myth is derived from truth. There are four sections and two appendices as outlined below in the Contents.

10% Off of 101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Traditions of the Emerald Isle for a short time only from Family Roots Publishing

 

Contents

Introduction

Part One: Prehistory and Mythology of Ancient Ireland

  1. The Earliest Inhabitants
  2. Mesolithic Age and the First Farmers
  3. Legends and Archaeology
  4. The Bronze Age
  5. Iron Come to Ireland
  6. Who Were The Celts and Kings
  7. Gaelic and Indo-European Languages
  8. Celtic Ireland
  9. Wild and Crazy
  10. The Seat of Ancient Kings
  11. Brehon Laws
  12. The Celtic Class System
  13. The Learned: Druids
  14. Celtic Art and Poetry
  15. Celtic to the End: The Never Conquered Nation
  16. The Celtic Pantheon
  17. The Otherworld
  18. Celtic Festivals
  19. Creation Myths
  20. The Battle of Magh Tuirdh and the Invasions of Milesians
  21. The Tain
  22. Heroic Deeds of Cuchulain
  23. Conchobar and Deirdre
  24. Finn MacCool
  25. Christianity Arrives

Part Two: The Arrival of Christianity (and the British Too!)

  1. Who Was St. Patrick?
  2. St. Brigid the Generous
  3. St. Columcille, Felonious Monk
  4. St. Columbanus, Missionary to Europe
  5. Wild and Crazy Irish Saints
  6. Irish Blend: Christian Traditions
  7. Monasteries in Ireland
  8. Schools and Universities
  9. The Pre-Xerox Age: A Life of Copying
  10. The Book of Kells
  11. The Rise and Fall of Irish Dynasties
  12. Anglo-Saxons in Britain
  13. Bring On the Vikings
  14. Dublin is Founded
  15. Life with Vikings
  16. What Would Brian Boru Do?
  17. An Ireland Unified
  18. The Normans  Are Here!
  19. The Irish Strike Back
  20. I’m Henry VIII, I Am: Tudor Colonization
  21. The Protestant Reformation
  22. Elizabeth I’s Reign
  23. The 1641 Rebellion and Oliver Cromwell
  24. The Williamite War
  25. Protestants Take Hold
  26. Catholic Life
  27. The Second City of the British Empire
  28. Protestant Irish Nationalism
  29. Wolfe Tone’s REbellion
  30. Hasta La Vista, Baby: Daniel O’Connel, the Liberator
  31. Catholic Emancipation

Part Three: Preserving Irish Culture and History

  1. Before the Reformation
  2. Ireland’s Counter-Reformation
  3. Religious Tensions in the North
  4. Modern Catholicism
  5. Scandals in the Church
  6. Traditional Irish Life
  7. Irish Language
  8. Irish Music
  9. Before There Was Riverdance…
  10. Death and the Supernatural
  11. Irish Sports
  12. Rich Folklore and Heritage
  13. Potatoes, for Better or Worse
  14. Life During the Famine
  15. Help! Responses to the Famine
  16. Results of the Famine

Part Four: Emigration to Modern Life

  1. Why the Irish Left–and Where They Went
  2. The Hardships of Emigration
  3. The Immigrant Experience in the United States
  4. Irish Communities in Other Lands
  5. The Rebirth of Nationalism
  6. The Home Rule Party
  7. A Celtic Revival
  8. An Ireland Divided
  9. World War I and the Easter Rebellion
  10. War of Independence
  11. Irish Civil War
  12. Irish Free State
  13. De Valera and the Fianna Fail Path
  14. World War II
  15. A New Republic
  16. Trouble in the North
  17. Sunday, Bloody Sunday
  18. The Peace Process
  19. The Good Firday Agreement
  20. Ireland’s Celtic Tiger
  21. Ireland and the European Union
  22. Modern Irish Politics
  23. The Liberalization of Ireland
  24. Women’s Rights
  25. Family Life
  26. Irish Food: Potatoes, Beef, and More Potatoes–and a Cuppa!
  27. For the Love of Irish Beer and Whiskey
  28. Irish Contributions to Literature and Art
  29. Tracing Your Roots

Appendix A: A Primer of the Irish Language

Appendix B: Irish Proverbs and Blessings

Index

 

Again – since I think that both of these books will be valuable to genealogists with Irish roots, I’ve decided to bundle the books together as this weeks FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer, cut the price 15%, making it just $25.42 for two volumes, and ship them together as if they were only one book ($5.50 p&h), saving the buyer another $2.50. The books are also available individually at 10% off, as announced in blogs and the Genealogy Newsline earlier. This offer ends Friday at Midnight MST, March 14, 2014.

Click Here to purchase the bundle.

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Mocavo Adds 450 New Records Indexes Which Include 25M Records from the USA, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

Mocavo.com

On March 7, I got a note from Cliff Shaw at Mocavo stating that “Today alone, we are adding more than 450 new record indexes in addition to the 1,000 databases that we usually launch every day. These indexes include 25 million names from a variety of countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.”

Sound interesting?

View the 283, 660 collections (as of today) now indexed and available at Mocavo.com

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Historic Ottoman Documents to Be Restored by Turkish Agency

On the 7th of February, 2014, protestors set fire to the presidency office in the Bosnian capital city of Sarejevo. Many historic documents stolen, while others were damaged by the fire.

Soon after the fire, Turkey’s Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TIKA) got hold of Shaban Zahirovic, the head of the Bosnian State Archives offering assistance. They were informed that as much as 60% of the documents were damaged or otherwise looted.

TIKA has taken on the responsibility to restore the Ottoman documents, and will work with Turkish experts to restore as much of the archives as possible.

It is said that “most of the Ottoman files remain intact, but much of the Austrian-Hungary period files were lost.”

Read more about the project, and check out pictures at http://www.worldbulletin.net/haber/128844/turkey-to-help-recover-lost-bosnian-archive-files.

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MyHeritage Team Captures over 50,000 Gravestone Images in 3 Hours in Isreal’s Segula Cemetery

I got a note from Daniel Horowitz at MyHeritage.com this morning telling me that the MyHeritage Israel team just kick-started their global initiative that we recently announced together with BillionGraves, the project in which they wish to digitally preserve the world’s cemeteries. Following is the majority of the note he sent me.

“We decided that it was important to go out as a team and experience the process of photographing and documenting gravestones using the BillionGraves app, and so 80 members of the MyHeritage team went on a grey and cloudy Sunday morning to the local cemetery – Segula – located in Petah Tikva, Israel. In just 3 hours we captured over 50,000 gravestone images and completed nearly 70% of the entire cemetery.

“It was the largest event of its kind ever held in Israel. In fact, BillionGraves told us that this was the largest single-day cemetery project held so far using the BillionGraves app. With the fast pace growth of the app, it is sure to be surpassed soon with other similar cemetery projects.

“As we know, most of the world’s cemeteries have never been systematically documented nor has their information made available online. In addition, age and exposure to the elements are rendering gravestones illegible, making this project even more urgent. This initiative is really important for genealogists and for everyone in order to make family history available to all.

“We are calling on people around the world to join us in this project, and we are happy to help and guide people in the process with advice and resources. We invite everyone to visit http://billiongraves.com/myheritage to register and download the application. This will help millions of people to discover the final resting place of their ancestors and relatives and the information it includes.”

Please more about their activity in their official blog post: http://blog.myheritage.com/2014/03/myheritage-employees-digitize-an-entire-cemetery-to-kickstart-global-initiative/

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Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City — 10% Off for a short time only

gpc776From the late 1600s on, millions of Irish Immigrants have landed on the shores of North America. One million alone came during the Irish Famine, from 1846 to 1851. A significant majority of these immigrants landed, and many stayed, in New York. This has been covered many times and in many publications. Now, however, someone has finally put together a comprehensive research guide for finding and using sources of Irish records in New York. Joseph Buggy has created and published for 2014 Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City.

Just what does this new book offer? I think the author introduces the book nicely in his Introduction:

“The aim of this book is to present a comprehensive overview for anyone wishing to trace their Irish ancestors within the five boroughs of New York City. It is especially beneficial for those researching ancestors form the beginning of the 19th century to the early 20th. The Irish immigrant ancestor who arrived in New York offers researchers a good chance of finding the place of origin in Ireland, whether he or she settle in the city for generations or moved on soon after arrival. Helping you find the at place of origin is one of the central objectives of this book. To assist you in your search, detailed information about records, resources, and strategies are provided.

The history of Irish emigration to the United States, and to New York City in particular, has been covered extensively and has been detailed in a number of excellent publications. This book does not set out to retell that story. Instead, it provides resources and strategies for tracing Irish ancestors in New York City.”

Inside this guide you will find a healthy dose of information about Irish immigrants. For those who stayed in New York, discover where they settled; Catholic churches in Irish areas and records kept; newspapers; vital records; cemeteries; and more. The book is a little bit history and a lot of resources. Even those ancestors who only stopped briefly in New York, after disembarking there, left records that can help lead back to their homes of origin.

Get a copy of Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City at 10% Off for a limited time from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

  • What’s Inside?
  • Where do I Start?
  • Why Not Go Straight to Irish Records?

2. Introductory Record Sets

  • U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1940
  • Vital Records, 1795-Present
  • City Directories, 1786-1934
  • Naturalization Records
  • Wills and Letters of Administration
  • Institutions
  • Useful Resources

3. Underutilized Records

  • Almshouse Collection
  • Potter’s Field
  • Public Sector Employment
  • Nwespapters
  • A Black Sheep in the Family: Criminal Ancestors
  • Lesser Known New Your City Censuses

4. Strategies for Tracing the Irish in New York City

  • Spelling Variations-Irish Accents and Illiteracy
  • Irish Name Formations
  • Did Your Ancestors Marry or Have Children in Ireland before Emigrating?
  • Was There a Priest in the Family?
  • It’s Not All About the Immigrant
  • Your Ancestors’ FAN Club

5. Where the Irish Lived in New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

6. Sources for the Place of Origin in Ireland

  • Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank
  • Census of Inmates in Almshouses and Poorhouses
  • Headstone Transcriptions
  • Newspapers
  • Travel Writing
  • Marriage Records, Diocese of Brooklyn
  • Church of the Transfiguration Marriage Register
  • Passenger Lists
  • Irish Immigrant Girls Organization
  • Naturalization Records
  • Chronological Bibliography of Sources

7. The Roman Catholic Church

  • Parish Publications

8. Roman Catholic Parishes of New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

9. Cemeteries

  • Catholic Cemeteries
  • Public, Nondenominational, and Institutional

10. Periodicals

  • Periodical Index
  • Periodical Abbreviations
  • Periodicals

11. Websites and Publications to Compliment Your Research

  • Websites
  • Publications

Notes and Index

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