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MyHeritage: All US Census Records Now Available!

The following release was post on the MyHeritage Blog:

We’re proud to announce that the entire collection of U.S. Federal Censuses is now available on MyHeritage.

These censuses span every decade from 1790-1930 and complement the existing 1940 U.S. Census, which you can search for free on MyHeritage.

The collection is the nation’s largest and most important set of records including a huge searchable index and all scanned images of the original census documents, covering some 520 million names.

Start searching the censuses now

A page from the 1790 U.S. Census (click to zoom)

Historical records are invaluable to everyone interested in his or her family history. Census records are among the best records available as they document almost everyone in a given country during that year. They are a source of rich information about those individuals recorded, offering name, age, address, birthplace, members of household, occupation and education.

The US Federal census is conducted every 10 years. The censuses are released to the public after 72 years, which is why 1940 is the most recent census available for viewing. Finding a person in a census record often opens the door to additional discoveries. This collection helps people to step back in time as it provides a snapshot into the lives of our ancestors from 1790 to 1930. Here’s an infographic depicting life in America during this time:

Life in the USA 1790-1930 (click to zoom)

These indexed records are now available for you to search on SuperSearch – MyHeritage’s online digital archive. SuperSearch contains over 4 billion records, including birth, marriage, death, burial, military, immigration, yearbooks and the world’s largest collection of newspapers.

Elvis Presley in the 1940 census (click to zoom)

Our Record Matching technology has been unleashed on the new US census records, so you’ll automatically receive notifications about census records which match profiles in your family tree. Stay tuned for many exciting discoveries!

Click here to read the rest of the blog.

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Christy Fillerup Appointed APGQ Managing Editor

The following was received from APG:

The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) has appointed Christy Fillerup of Salt Lake City, Utah, as managing editor of its quarterly publication, Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly (APGQ). APGQ has served the genealogy community since 1979 with staff-written and contributed articles covering all aspects of the profession.

Christy Fillerup serves as director of the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She is a member of the board of directors for the Utah Genealogical Association, and is a past editor of its Crossroads magazine. In 2007 she founded the Transitional Genealogists Forum, an email-based group for genealogists aspiring to become professionals. She is a graduate of the ProGen study group program and is taking the English track of the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

As managing editor, Fillerup will be responsible for the overall production of the APGQ, in keeping with the magazine’s high-quality style and compelling content. She will work with layout editor Matthew Wright and will coordinate content with APG eNews editor Phyllis McLaughlin.

“We welcome Christy and are excited about the ideas and expertise she will bring the APGQ,” said Kenyatta D. Berry, president of APG. “We look forward to working with her as the publication continues to grow and benefit our members.”

“APGQ is a go-to publication for professional genealogy,” said Fillerup. “I’m looking forward to working with the team and the contributing writers to further the relevance and timeliness of its content.” Fillerup is excited to publish a quality quarterly. She is particularly looking forward to including content from new voices as well as experienced ones. If you are interested in writing for the APG Quarterly please contact Christy directly at editor@apgen.org.

For more information on APGQ, see www.apgen.org/publications/index.html .

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FamilySearch Adds to Austria, Brazil, China, Italy, New Zealand & the USA Collections

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 1.7 million index records and images this week from Austria, Brazil, China, Germany, Hungary, Italy, New Zealand, Poland, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 369,729 index records and images from the U.S., North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663-1979, collection, and the 596,078 images from the Italy, Ravenna, Ravenna, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929, collection . See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection- Indexed Records- Digital Images- Comments

Austria, Tirol, Innsbruck, Sankt Jakob Parish Register Index, 1578-1970 – 0 – 5,877 – New browsable image collection.
Austria, Upper Austria, Wels, Census Records, 1613-1900 – 0 – 5,204 – New browsable image collection.
Brazil, Civil Registration, 1870-2012 – 53,981 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
Brazil, Parish and Diocesan Records – 61,416 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
China, Collection of Genealogies, 1239-2011 – 0 – 123,184 – Added images to an existing collection.
Germany, Brandenburg, Wittenberge, City Directories and Citizen Lists, 1851-1921 – 0 – 3,326 – New browsable image collection.
Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 0 – 38,663 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Bologna, Bologna, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1941 – 0 – 102,509 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Napoli, Casoria, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 40,753 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Portici, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 48,547 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Pistoia, Pistoia, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1937 – 0 – 5,228 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Ravenna, Ravenna, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929 – 0 – 596,078 – Added images to an existing collection.
New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848-1991 – 0 – 12,620 – Added images to an existing collection.
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587-1966 – 7,873 – 16 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
>Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1840-1845 – 0 – 145,535 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959 – 88,253 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
U.S., North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663-1979 – 13,302 – 356,427 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
U.S., Ohio, Trumbull County Court Records, 1795-2010 – 0 – 68,873 – Added images to an existing collection.

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Google For Genealogists – Webinar-on-CD

legweb1Popular speaker and creator of GeneaBloggers.com, Thomas MacEntee, has been Legacy Family Tree’s most prolific guest webinar speaker. His presentations are easy going and easy to follow. One of his ever popular presentations was Google for Genealogists, which is available on CD for revisiting at any time.

In Google for Genealogists, MacEntee examines the familiar basic concept for searching with Google. Then, he goes deeper. Indicating a list  of Google Products exceeds 150, MacEntee shows viewers just some of the more popular and useful tools genealogists will appreciate. He refers to Google in his presentation as the Google You May Know and the Google You May Not Know. May Not Know topics found in the presentation include:

  • Advanced Google websearch
  • Books, journals, and magazines
  • Photographs
  • Office productivity
  • Collaboration
  • Transcription
  • News
  • Geography
  • Research

As I have previously mentioned in other reviews, web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars. A large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

MacEntee’s class was originally presented as a live webinar, run 1 hour 28 minutes, and includes a link to download a 4-page handout.

Get your own copy of Google For Genealogists from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $12.69. Enjoy the presentation again and again on your own computer.

 

About the author:

Thomas MacEntee is a professional genealogist specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and as a means of interacting with others in the family history community. Utilizing over 25 years of experience in the information technology field, Thomas writes and lectures on the many ways in which blogs, Facebook and Twitter can be leveraged to add new dimensions to the genealogy experience. As the creator of GeneaBloggers.com he has organized and engaged a community of over 1,300 bloggers to document their own journeys in the search for ancestors.

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Organizing and Sharing Digital Images

legweb7Geoff Rasmussen is the host and regular presenter at Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Topics he has covered shows his wide and experienced knowledge base in genealogical research as well as Internet and digital tools valuable to genealogists.

One popular webinar given by Geoff was Organizing And Sharing Digital Images. The title alone provides a decent explanation of what this webinar covers. Part of finding and making the most of digital images comes from technique and part for using the right tools. Geoff covers using Google’s Picasa and Adobe’s Photoshop Elements to help sort, tag, and quickly locate images. Viewers will also learn how to securely locate, share, and access photos in the “cloud.” In addition, Geoff gives his expert advice on organizing digital genealogy documents (e.g. wills, censuses, etc.) and how to add them to Legacy Family Tree.

Web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars. A large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

Rasmussen’s class was originally presented as a live webinar, run 1 hour 44 minutes, and includes a link to download a 5-page handout.

Get your own copy of Organizing And Sharing Digital Images from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $12.69. Enjoy the presentation again and again on your own computer.

 

About Geoff Rasmussen:

Geoffrey D. Rasmussen is the father of four budding genealogists. He graduated with a degree in Genealogy and Family History from Brigham Young University and has served as director and vice-president of the Utah Genealogical Association. He is a dynamic genealogy speaker on all forms of genealogy technology, and as host of the Legacy Family Tree webinar series, has spoken virtually to nearly 100 different countries. He recently received the Distinguished Presenter Award at the prestigious RootsTech conference in Salt Lake City (2011). He has authored books, videos, articles, and websites, and develops the Legacy Family Tree software program. On a personal note, Geoff enjoys playing the piano, organ, cello and basketball. His favorite places are cemeteries, the ocean, and hanging out with other genealogists. He met and proposed to his wife in a Family History Center.

He is the author of the recently-released, Digital Imaging Essentials book.

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A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada

french warWhat do really know about any given historical event? Who were the major players? What smaller events led up to the bigger event? How did these events effect people living at that time? History books can do more than simply elaborate or expand on the short version of any event we learned about in high school. Books can offer insight into the lives of our ancestors, as well as providing insight into possible sources of information and records. Occasionally, books come to light that tell the story, the history, we otherwise may never hear or learn. A history does not need to be a new treatment on a subject to be of value. Time and again, we have reviewed great books on this site which are reprints of volumes originally published decades, if not centuries, ago. A History of The French War, is just such a book.

Originally published in 1882, the expanded title reads, Minor Wars of the United States, A History of The French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada with A Preliminary Account of the Early Attempts At Colonization and Struggles for Possession of the Continent. In this history, reprinted by Heritage Books, the reader will find an expanded timeline leading up to and including the French War.

This books starts by looking back at some of the earliest explorers and claims by different European countries over New World territory. These explorations, dating to the early 1500s, laid the ground work, and territorial claims, for later colonization from southern Florida on up the coast to lower Canada. The history go on, detailing event and individuals over roughly a  250 year period, on up to the major events of the war. While some of the author’s statements don’t meet today’s standards of political correctness, the fact the copy for this book is over 100 years old does not diminish its value.

 

A History of the French War can be obtained through Family Roots Publishing; Price: $30.87.

Contents

Chapter I – Early Voyages

  • Claims of European Nations to American Territory
  • Contests of the English and French
  • The Indians in War
  • The Cabots
  • Cortereal
  • Spanish Explorers
  • Decree of Alexander
  • Verrazzano
  • Cartier
  • Stadacone
  • Hochelaga
  • Donacona

[Read the rest of this entry...]

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Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse

iPad GenealogyYears ago, I taught a class on technology for genealogists. In this class I discussed the value of new technologies for genealogists, like those new USB thumb drives, some having as much as 256MB or memory, if you could pay for such. During these classes at genealogical events, I would discuss with the group new products and concepts under development and how they may help genealogists. While not every technology we discussed has become a reality, some products the were mere concepts are now mainstream tech tools. The iPad and tablets are such devices. Now, however, that the iPad is in its third generation, many genealogists are still asking the questions we discussed long ago, how can the iPad and other tablets help the genealogists.

Fortunately, there are some dedicated professionals who have pondered that very question. When the first iPad came out Lisa Louise Cooke couldn’t wait to buy one. However, after some persuading, her husband convinced her it would not take long before a second, more robust and vetted version, would find its way to market. Sure enough the iPad 2 was not long in the waiting. Even before it hit the stores, Cooke had her’s on order. Then her iPad arrived. Like so many, she played with the apps the unit came with. Then she downloaded a few more. Then, she discovered what so many others have found, no support for Flash media. How was she to watch videos? Now what? In her words, “Eventually I found myself playing Angry Birds, wondering what I was going to do with it.” She was perplexed.

“As I sat on the couch and flung yet another pudgy red cardinal at a pile of pigs my husband walked by and asked? ‘Did you just buy the most expensive email checker EVER?’

At that moment my mission became clear: Figure out how to make this amazing piece of hardware a genealogy workhorse!”

And that she did. Now Lisa Louise Cooke has shared her discoveries in a new book, Turn Your iPad into a Technology Powerhouse. Like all her writings, this new book is personable. Her writing style is both friendly and easy to read. Plus, she does waste time on lofty irrelevance. She gets straight to the point. Apps are summarized clearly, and their value to genealogists explained distinctly. In the first section, she briefly covers table thinking for genealogists. From there the book includes:

  • Over 65 ideal apps for genealogists
  • 32 fantastically helpful tips, tricks, and power user techniques
  • Ways to handle the absence of Adobe Flash
  • Recommended online videos

For those with a non-Apple tablet, comparable apps available in Google Play are included.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Most Expensive Email Checker You Ever Bought

Part One: Getting Started

Chapter One: The Tablet Mindset

Chapter Two: The Genealogist “To Do” Wish List

Part Two: The Apps

Chapter Three: There’s an App for That!

Chapter Four: Audio/Visual Apps

Chapter Five: Apps That Help You Captivate the Non-Genealogists in Your Life

Chapter Six: Collaboration and Communication Apps

Chapter Seven: File Storage and Sharing

Chapter Eight: Genealogy Apps

Chapter Nine: Note Taking Apps

Chapter Ten: Organization Apps

Chapter Eleven: Photography Apps

Chapter Twelve: Reading Apps

Chapter Thirteen: Repository Apps

Chapter Fourteen: Travel Apps

Chapter Fifteen: Utility Apps

Part Three: Become a Power User

Chapter Sixteen: Power Boost Your Table with Remote Access

Chapter Seventeen: Fabulous iPad Tips and Tricks

Part Four: Conclusion

Chapter Eighteen: Adventurous Genealogy

About the Author

Index

 

Turn Your iPad into a Technology Powerhouse can be yours. Order today, from Family Roots Publishing, Price: $18.76.

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Salt Lake Christmas Tour…………. Week’s Peek

Surely one of you has the answer to my question:  How do I get more productive time in my life???? I found and just love this Google image clock. Time swirls around, past and over me just like this crazy clock shows.

time

I must learn how to manage and maximize my time to the fullest, right? Isn’t that what you would say to me? Well, I’ve been asked to do a presentation on researching our female ancestors and immediately chose not to reinvent the wheel and got a copy of  Tracing Your FEMALE Ancestors. I know this up-to-date compilation will give me more material than I need for my presentation. Got to maximize the time, right?

 

female

 

One of my dead end female lines is Catherine Mustard who married William Potter about 1730 in Maine (then a colony of Massachusetts). I hardly ever find anything on that unusual surname. Finally, after how many years of wishing, I’ve realized I need to read more about the history of the Scotch-Irish into colonial Maine. Duh. I did a Google search and found just the book I needed……… and bought a copy of this out-of-print 1910 book for 99 cents as an E-book:

scotchirish00boltrich_0005

 

Now I just need to make/take the time to read and study the book!  Anybody tell me how to unwind that crazy clock?

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NGS Announces Release of “Mastering Genealogical Proof” by Thomas W. Jones

The following was received from NGS:
Mastering Genealogical Proof
ARLINGTON, VA, 24 April 2013: The National Genealogical Society announces the release of Mastering Genealogical Proof by Thomas W. Jones, phd, cg, cgl, fasg, fngs. As a unique textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning in the twenty-first century, Mastering Genealogical Proof guides readers in acquiring genealogical skills transcending chronological, ethnic, geopolitical, and religious boundaries. Dr. Jones, a noted writer, lecturer, and editor in the field of genealogy, explains and develops the level of proof that is appropriate to genealogy.

Dr. Jones relies on his vast experience as a genealogist to explain the various concepts and techniques involved in the genealogical research process. Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for proficiently applying the chapter’s concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues.

Mastering Genealogical Proof will first be available for purchase at the NGS 2013 Family History Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, 8–11 May 2013. Dr. Jones will also be available for book signings at the NGS booth (#205) in the exhibit hall on Friday, 10 May, from 10:45 a.m.–12:00 noon and on Saturday, 11 May, from 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Purchases may be made in advance of the signings in the NGS booth starting at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, 8 May, when the conference exhibit hall opens. Mastering Genealogical Proof may also be pre-ordered from the NGS online store at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, VA-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists. Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

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Geni.com Adds Historical Records to Advance Family Tree Collaboration

The following was received from Amanda Tantisalidchai at Geni.com:

Major new features launched to help Geni.com users enrich the World Family Tree and discover unknown relatives
geni-logo
Los Angeles, USA – April 23 2013: Geni.com, the leader in collaborative family history, today announced the release of two major new features, Record Matching and Smart Matching™, which enrich family trees with relevant historical records and help users discover unknown relatives and ancestors, respectively. This will add significant new detail and color to the World Family Tree, a global initiative by Geni.com that shows how everyone in the world is related, and will help members learn more about their shared ancestries.

The move upgrades Geni.com from a family tree network into a more comprehensive service that includes historical records, fulfilling the promise of its parent company MyHeritage that acquired Geni.com in November 2012. Record Matching and Smart Matching™ are unique technologies developed by MyHeritage which are now made available on Geni.com for the first time. They are designed to automatically search the massive MyHeritage database and suggest matching historical records and family connections that can then be added by users in one click to their family tree on Geni.com.

These new enhancements will illuminate the legacies of the millions of individuals in the World Family Tree, and allow the community to conduct family history research collectively. Enabling members to immediately leverage the work of fellow family historians without duplication is an industry-first. Once a record is confirmed and added to the World Family tree, sources and citations are automatically created, allowing users to view information in the right context. This makes the World Family Tree a more accurate and better documented resource, like the value added by footnotes at the bottom of every article in Wikipedia.

“We’re thrilled to integrate MyHeritage’s groundbreaking features of Record Matching and Smart Matching™ and extend them to our loyal community of Geni.com members and curators”, said Noah Tutak, formerly CEO of Geni.com and now General Manager, USA of MyHeritage. “By adding historical records and unique family tree matching capabilities to the World Family Tree, it becomes the authoritative reference for the human family tree and the go-to resource for anyone interested in family history. This is a great stride in advancing Geni.com to fulfill its mission.”

Record Matching
Record Matching is the next generation of family history exploration. It finds matches between family trees and a massive database of global historical records on Geni.com’s parent site, MyHeritage. The records include birth, marriage, death and divorce documents, gravestone photos, census information, military, immigration and other documents. It’s the only service of its kind to automatically find relevant newspaper articles, books and other free text content through semantic analysis, to shed light on the actual lives, personalities and achievements of one’s ancestors.

Smart Matching™
Smart Matching™ automatically finds matches for family trees on Geni.com in the global database of family trees, containing more than a billion profiles, on its parent site MyHeritage. These matches allow Geni.com members to grow their family tree, discover new ancestors and relatives, connect with other family tree owners and reunite with long lost family members. Sophisticated name-matching technology uses synonyms, phonetics and international variations to facilitate discoveries despite differences in spelling and language.

The two matching technologies work together in a cycle that constantly pushes forward the users’ knowledge of their family history. They were both developed by MyHeritage and integrated into Geni.com by the companies’ combined engineering teams.

Record Matches and Smart Matches™ are displayed on Geni.com family trees and individual profiles. Users can also view a list of all Record Matches and Smart Matches™ in their Merge Center, where they can sort, view, confirm or reject them. Confirming a match adds a reference to the tree on Geni.com in a single click. These features will continue to improve over time; planned enhancements include regular email updates about new matches and the ability to extract information from records into Geni.com using a convenient interface.

Record Matches are displayed for free as an extract and a range of record collections can be viewed in full for free. For full access to every type of historical record and to all Smart Matches, users are offered an affordable Data subscription. The same subscription also provides full and unlimited access to SuperSearch, the powerful search engine for historical records on MyHeritage.

Anyone can join, contribute to and benefit from the World Family Tree by signing up to Geni at www.geni.com. Basic accounts are free and are unlimited in size.

About Geni.com
Geni.com is the leader in collaborative family history and the home of the World Family Tree, a global initiative showing how everyone is related. The collective research of casual and expert family historians benefits the entire community of people interested in discovering and preserving their family history. The site was founded by David Sacks, co-founder of PayPal and Yammer. For more details, visit www.geni.com.

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Status Animarum Records Posted for Saint Joseph Parish Church in Stari trg ob Kolpi, Slovenia

The following was received from my good friend, Jeff Bockman:
Record from the Parish Church of St. Jozef Stari Trg ob Kolpi, Slovenia
All 788 of the Status Animarum records covering the 1875 – 1886 period from the Saint Joseph Parish Church in Stari trg ob Kolpi, Slovenia have been posted. A few of the earlier records have also been posted.

Status animarum translates as “the state of souls.” They contain names and information about baptism, marriage, burial, and relationship to head of household for everyone living in a parish by house number. Spouses often show the town and house where they were born or moved. They were kept by the parish priests for internal purposes. Handwriting and format vaies by priest. These were filmed at the church in 1999 by a second cousin of some of my second cousins. Does that make her a second cousin-in-law?

The following villages/settlements are included: Decina, Deskova Vas, Dol, Dolenja Podgora, Gorenja Podgora, Dolenji Radenci, Srednji Radenci, Gorenja Radenci, Jelenja vas, Kot ob Kolpi, Kovaca Vas, Mocile, Paka pri Predgradu, Predgrad, Prelesje, Sodevci, Stari Trg ob Kolpi, Zagozdac. A few of the villages have been indexed.

These records are sort of a mulit-generational family group sheet that often contain at least three generations with links to the house and family of the spouses, and include comments about them going to Amerika or sometimes even the name of a city.

To learn more about these valuable records and to view them, please visit www.alenjes.com/stari-trg.

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FamilySearch Adds to Collections from Australia, England, Italy, Philippines, Spain, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch 04/23/2013:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than half a million images this week from Australia, England, Italy, Philippines, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 92,436 images from the new U.S., Ohio, Southern District Naturalization Index, 1852-1991, collection, and the 73,580 images from the new Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration, 1803-1933, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection- Indexed Records- Digital Images- Comments

Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration, 1803-1933 – 0 – 73,580 – New browsable image collection.
England, Northumberland, Miscellaneous Records, 1570-2005 – 0 – 11,631 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Bari, Trani, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 6,549 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Caserta, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929 – 0 – 2,961 – Added images to an existing collection.
Philippines, La Union, Diocese of San Fernando de La Union, 1801-1981 – 0 – 25,464 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Cádiz, Testaments, 1550-1920 – 0 – 48,616 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1931 – 0 – 49,363 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Records of Widows and Orphans of Spanish Officials, 1835-1960 – 0 – 44,021 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Missouri, Cole County Circuit Court Case Files, 1820-1926 – 0 – 28,638 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Ohio, Southern District Naturalization Index, 1852-1991 – 0 – 92,436 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., South Dakota, County Naturalization Records, 1865-1972 – 0 – 124,277 – New browsable image collection.

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Tracing Your Female Ancestors

mm014Moorshead Magazines is the publisher of Family Chronicle, and Internet Genealogy. Occasionally, the company releases a special collection of articles on a key genealogical topic. Tracing Your Female Ancestors is the latest special release by the company. Published in a magazine format, this release offers 16 articles on key areas of Women’s history and genealogical research.

“The more I though about the challenges facing family historians research the women in our family trees, the more I started to question the way we research women.”

This quote comes from the first paragraph of the introduction. The author continues to state that female ancestors are different and shouldn’t be researched in the same way as male ancestors. Men and women typically had different “paper trails.” This magazine looks at the history of women, their roles in society, suffrage, their stories, and research tips and resources to help in their search by the family historian. Such articles as “25 Online Resources”, “Manuscript Collections”, and “Women in Photos” help the reader directly with the where and hows of research. While other articles, like “Women & Divorce”, “Women and the Vote”, and “Women in the Civil War”, help the reader gain perspective on the roles women have played in society. Understanding these roles help researchers not only better understand their female ancestors, but also can assist in discovering new ways to think about one’s approach to female research; in other words, the research learns to follow the correct “paper trail.”

The bulk of these articles were written by author Gena Philibert-Ortega, who has over 20 years experience in the area of female genealogical research. Maureen Taylor, author and photo expert, contributed the article on “Women in Photos”.

Here is a full contents listing:

Introduction

Tips and strategies to help you get started in your search for your female ancestors

Finding Your Pre-1850 Female Ancestors

We look at some key sources and offer some alternatives to locating female ancestors before 1850

25 Online Sources

A list of key sites you should add to your internet toolbox

Women’s Clubs

When traditional sources aren’t enough, try locating you ancestor in clubs and other organization

Tracing Your African American Female Ancestors

There are many resources available for researching your African American female ancestors

Jane S. Chatham Case Study

A look at one lady’s very difficult life and the sources used to piece it together

Women and Divorce

They didn’t do that in the good old days: researching your female ancestor’s divorce

Women’s Work

Women were more than just housewives; they filled many different roles in peacetime and wartime

Secret Lives of Women

Search for your female ancestor in cookbooks, journals, quilting books and more

Manuscript Collections

Manuscript collections can uncover details to help illustrate the life of your female ancestor

University Library Sources

University libraries are great repositories for additional information that might otherwise go unnoticed

Women in Photos

Renowned photo expert, Maureen Taylor, shines some light on finding your ancestor in photographs

Women and the Vote

Knowing more about the history of female suffrage can point you toward valuable resources

Women in the Civil War

You might be surprised to find out what your female ancestor did during the Civil War

Grandma Was an Alien?

A look at how women became aliens in their own country

Writing Their Story

Telling the story of your female ancestor is an important step in your ongoing genealogy research

 

Copies of Tracing Your Female Ancestors are available from Family Roots Publishing; a .PDF format is also available, just click here to order the electronic version.

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Google Earth for Genealogy, Volumes I and II

lu02One of the many great tools, beside web searches, provided by Google is Google Earth. But how can Google Earth help you as a genealogist? Google Earth has the power to geographically document your ancestor’s lives. Lisa Louise Cooke, producer and host of the popular Genealogy Gems Podcast, has a developed a tutorial video series called Google Earth for Genealogy. The video series is a two volume DVD set.

Lisa Louise Cooke, the producer and host of the internationally popular Genealogy Gems Podcast, an online genealogy audio show.

Volume I provide step-by-step instructions to the following:

  • Download & Use Google Earth
  • Identify Old Photos
  • Explore Church Record Origins
  • Plot Ancestor Homesteads
  • Create Historic Map Overlays
  • Save & Share Images

This 72-minute DVD tutorial video is made up of 7 video lessons.

Volume II provides step-by-step instructions to the following:

  • Pinpoint Property
  • Locate Original Land Surveys
  • Customize Place Marks
  • Create and Share Family History Tours
  • Ad Video to Maps
  • Incorporate 3D Models
  • Ad Focus with Polygons and Paths

lu03The DVD also includes:

  • Introduction Video
  • Website Links
  • Access to Bonus Podcast Interview
  • Downloadable Images

This 95-minute DVD tutorial video is made up of 7 video lessons

 

Anyone interested in expanding their use of Google Earth in a fun way while adding a new level of interest to their genealogy research should watch these great instructional videos.

Both volumes are available from Family Root Publishing:

Google Earth for Genealogy, Volume I

Google Earth for Genealogy, Volume  II

 

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One Billion Records Indexed & Arbitrated at FamilySearch.org

The following was from FamilySearch this evening:
FamilySearch Indexing

Thanks A Billion
Thank you for contributing to the billion! We did it! We reached a major milestone of one billion records indexed and arbitrated since the launch of FamilySearch indexing in September of 2006. We are grateful for the many volunteers who dedicate their time and efforts to make these records freely available for online research.

Kenneth B. (California, United States), Brittney S. (Idaho, United States), and April R. (Alberta, Canada) were the lucky ones to index and arbitrate the billionth record! They will receive a FamilySearch backpack stuffed with FamilySearch goodies. We also want to thank all the volunteers who have contributed to the billion records with a FamilySearch indexing badge. You can also download a free badge.

It took us seven years to reach the first billion. How long do you think it will take us to reach the next billion? The advances of technology and the dedication of our volunteers have increased the speed in which we can process and deliver records for publication. Join the global effort to make the next billion records available for family history research. Start indexing now!

Current and Completed Projects
To view a list of currently available indexing projects, along with their record language and completion percentage, visit the FamilySearch indexing updates page. To learn more about individual projects, view the FamilySearch projects page.

New Projects Added
· U.S., Mississippi—Military Grave Registrations, 1936–1951

· U.S., Mississippi—Enumeration of Educable Children, 1850–1892, 1908–1957 [Part B]

· U.S., Texas—County Marriages 1837–1977 [Part B]

· México, Coahuila—Defunciones del Registro Civil, 1979–1995

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Registros Civis de Nascimentos e Óbitos, 1889–1935

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3HH]

· U.S. (Community Project), New York, New York—Passenger Lists, 1942–1957 [Part I]

· U.S., Mississippi—Enumeration of Educable Children, 1850–1892, 1908–1957 [Part A]

· U.S., California—County Marriages 1850–1952 [Part D]

· U.S., Oklahoma—Land Allotment Records of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1899–1907 [Part F]

· U.S. (Community Project), Florida, Key West—Passenger Lists, 1898–1945

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Bergamo—Nati, 1875-1894 [Part 2A]

· Australia, New South Wales—Cemetery Transcripts, 1825–1981

· Philippines, Albay, Legazpi City—Civil Registration, 1946–1980

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Caltanissetta—Nati, 1875–1902 [Part 4]

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Taranto—Nati, 1875-1900 [Parte 4]

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Cremona—Nati, 1875–1902 [Part 2A]

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Pescara—Nati, 1875–1902 [Parte 4A]

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Vercelli—Nati, 1875–1902 [Parte 3]

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Pesaro e Urbino—Nati, 1875–1902 [Part 3]

· U.S., Indiana, Wabash—County Marriages, 1811–1959

· Brasil, Santa Catarina, Florianópolis—Registros da Igreja, 1751–1954 [Parte B]

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3GG]

· Belgium, Hainaut—Registres Civils, 1871–1897 [Part 2]

· Perú, Lambayeque—Registros Civiles, 1907–1950 [Parte A]

· U.S., Missouri—County Marriage Records, 1806-1965 [Part A]

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3FF]

View the FamilySearch projects page to see the full list of available projects and to learn more about how to participate in various projects.

Recently Completed Projects
Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process. They will be published at familysearch.org in the near future.

· Honduras, Tegucigalpa—Registros Parroquiales, 1684–1930

· U.S.—Registers of Enlistment in the U.S. Army, 1798–1913 [Part 2]

· U.S., Maine—Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Card Index, 1861–1865

· U.S., Indiana, Vermillion—County Marriages, 1811–1959

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Cremona—Nati, 1875–1902

· U.S., New York – Marriages 1908-1935 [Part B]

· U.S.—Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933 [Part E]

· Guatemala, Guatemala – Registros Civiles 1877-1900

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Bergamo—Nati, 1876–1900

· U.S., Maine—WWI Draft Registration Index, 1917–1919

· U.S., Ohio—County Births, 1856–1956 [Part B]

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3U]

· New Zealand—Passenger Lists, 1871–1915 [Part 2C]

· South Africa—Methodist Church Parish Registers, 1822–1996

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Taranto—Nati, 1884–1900 [Parte 3]

· U.S. (Community Project), North Carolina—Passenger Lists and Crew Lists, 1908–1958

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3V]

· U.S., New York—1865 State Census

· Italia (Antenati Italiani), Pescara—Nati, 1875–1902 [Parte 3]

· U.S., Missouri, Clinton—County Marriages, 1890–1953

· U.S. (Community Project), Maryland, Baltimore—Passenger Lists, 1891–1948

· U.S. (Community Project), New York—New York Passenger Lists, 1942–1957 [Part A]

· U.S.—Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933 [Part F]

· U.S., Indiana, Whitley—County Marriages, 1811–1959

· U.S. (Community Project), New York—New York Passenger Lists, 1942–1957 [Part E]

· U.S. (Community Project), New York—New York Passenger Lists, 1942–1957 [Part D]

· Argentina, La Plata—Registros Parroquiales, 1731–1928

· España, Ávila, Arevalo—Registros Parroquiales, 1550–1930 [Parte 2]

· Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 3X]

· U.S. (Community Project), New York—Passenger Lists, 1925–1942 [Part F]

· Argentina, Mendoza, Ciudad de Mendoza—Registros Parroquiales, 1665–1922

· U.S. (Community Project), New York—New York Passenger Lists, 1942–1957 [Part C]

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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