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Review of “Planters of Early New England”

cf9931Of course we judge books by their covers. The cover is the first indication of what is inside. However, there are times when looking beyond the cover may reveal an unexpected treasure. Such is the case with Planters of Early New England: A Sketch of Roger Mowry Mann’s Seventeenth-Century Ancestors. The subtitle would keep almost anyone from even picking the book up, unless you know your related to this Roger Mowry Mann. That, however, may be a big mistake. Let me explain.

Mann (1944—2002), like many today, could trace his ancestry to early New England. After three hundred plus years, those early settlers of New England have millions of descendents. Mann’s history, put together by his sister and brother-in-law, reveals “much about life in seventeenth-century New England — land development, public service, religion, and other aspects of daily existence.” There is information within this book on many well-known early settlers and their families. “Planters” refers to those who founded colonies as well as referring to farmers. These early settlers were often both.

This book covers and documents the founding and early settling of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, many of whom were the ancestor of Roger Mann. These are the ancestors to many more people than just Roger Mann. To demonstrate just how diverse and large the decedents pool is from these early settlers, chapter IX lists 9 U.S. Presidents who also trace their ancestry back to this group. “The work is organized as an historical description of the period, but Chapter II and the ancestor index assure that it is also a genealogical record… Also included in this work is significant other previously unpublished material transcribed from records of deeds and wills from many different towns and counties in New England, including transcriptions of town records in Concord, Massachusetts and Guilford, Connecticut.”

The table of contents provides a good overview of what the reader can expect in these pages. There is also and index of 256 names found in this book [see below]. Perhaps one of your ancestors is there, if not this book tells a great historical story anyone could find interesting.

Note: Presidents listed in Chapter IX:

  • Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (VP under Gerald Ford)
  • Franklin Pierce (14th President)
  • Abraham Lincoln (16th President)
  • James Garfield (20th President)
  • William Howard Taft (27th President)
  • Chester A. Arthur (21th President)
  • Gerald R. Fort (39th President)
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd President)
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (41st President)
  • George Walker Bush (43rd President)

Obtain your own copy of Planters of Early New England from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Chapter I – Immigration to New England by 1652

  1. The First Wave of the Great Migration: 1630-1635
  2. Possible Participants in the First Wave of the Great Migration
  3. The Second Wave of the Great Migration: 1635-1639
  4. The Continued Expansion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1640-1652
  5. Ancestors Migrating to Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
  6. Ancestors Migrating to Connecticut
  7. Ancestors Migrating to Plymouth Colony
  8. Ancestors Immigrating to Northern New England
  9. Summary

Chapter II – Family Evolution

  • Pedigrees and Index of the Early Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

Chapter III – The Acquisition and Use of Land

  1. Place of Initial Settlement during the Great Migration
  2. Land Acquisition
  3. Immigration and Migration Continue: 1636-1650
  4. Challenges after 1650 in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  5. Indian Deeds
  6. Mortgages
  7. Early Business Enterprise: Manufacturing, Mining and Milling
  8. Common Land in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  9. Travel
  10. Analysis of Land Matters

[Read the rest of this entry…]

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Black Friday Sale at the FRPC Website: 20% Off already discounted prices with FREE USA shipping on sales over $50

BlackFriday2013

Shop the Black Friday 2013 Sale at Family Roots Publishing website!

EVERYTHING is 20% off already discounted prices with the Friday2013 offer code.

Get FREE USA shipping on all purchases (made in the same checkout) when you spend $50 or more.

Enter the following code in the Offer Code box at checkout: Friday2013 (one word with no space) – to get the discount.

The Black Friday Sale runs until Midnight EST (not MST) Sunday, December 1, 2013.

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Thanksgiving and Family Drift

Ted-&-Virginia

Tomorrow is thanksgiving and I find myself looking back at the Thanksgivings of my past. Born in Washington State and surrounded by most of my extended family, we always got together with the full family at Thanksgiving and Christmas. But with the deaths of all of my grandparents and the growing up of my cousins we have all moved on from those close childhood experiences. Arizona, Australia, Maryland, Utah, California, Colorado and Washington – we are spread too far apart to get together on this holiday.

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Genealogy brings you closer to your family, but holidays also remind us of how many family members you no longer see.

On the other hand, many of us will see our loved ones on this holiday. I have my parents, my brother, our wives, their families and our children, to spend the day with. I will hold them close, remember those who cannot be there and we will share our memories. I hope you share yours too.

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The holidays are the time of year we have those people together that we may want to interview. We usually realize too late where the memory-holes in our relatives lives are. It is a tragedy when only after his death do you realize there is a 12 year gap in grandpa’s life – a gap that we really know nothing about. Where was he? Was he really a logger for that long? That would make it his longest held job!

In this vane, let me direct you to my friend, Marlo Schuldt’s, blog. In his article titled “Sharing, Recording, and Preserving Family Stories”. He discusses a number of ways to save these memories. I like his suggestions and plan on using them.

Written by Dale R. Meitzler

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Association of Professional Genealogists Names Kimberly T. Powell President

The following was received from APG:
APG
Executive Committee, Board Members, and Nominating Committee Elected for the Next Term

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 27 November 2013 − Today the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) announced election results for its 2014–2015 executive committee, as well as for nine board members, and two nominating committee members. Kimberly T. Powell of Oakdale, Penn. was elected president. Powell has been the genealogy expert for About.com since 2000 and is the author of several genealogy books. She is the chair of APG’s Professional Development Committee and currently serves as APG vice president. She will succeed Kenyatta D. Berry of Santa Monica, Calif.

“I am honored by this opportunity to continue to serve APG, and excited to work with such a talented and enthusiastic group of board members,” said Powell. “APG has played a pivotal role in advancing the genealogical profession, and I commit to honoring those who have paved the way by continuing to increase public awareness of and trust in professional genealogists, to support our members at all stages of their genealogical careers, and to increase openness, networking, and collaboration within our organization.”

Catherine Desmarais, CG, of Vermont was elected APG vice president. She is a professional genealogist and works on U.S. Army military repatriation cases. She serves on the board of the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy and is an APG Quarterly Advisory Committee member.

Janice S. Prater of Denver, Colo. will serve another term as secretary. Prater is the editor of the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History’s quarterly publication and is treasurer for the Colorado Chapter of APG. Joan Peake of West Virginia was elected for a second term as APG treasurer. She is also president of the Fayette County Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania and member of the Great Lakes Chapter of APG.

APG members elected the following board members for two-year terms:

Region 1 West: Jean Wilcox Hibben, Ph.D., M.A., CG, is a past president of the Southern California Chapter of APG, 1st vice president of the Corona Genealogical Society, and vice president of the Genealogical Speakers Guild. She was the lead researcher for the first season of Genealogy Roadshow.

Region 2 Midwest: Valerie Eichler Lair of Minnesota has been a member of APG since 1991. She is the president of APG Heartland Chapter and a member of the APG Northland Chapter.

Region 3 Southeast: Tina Sansone of Tennessee is vice president of the Second Life APG Chapter and is a director for the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors
.
Region 4 Northeast: Darcie M. Hind Posz of the District of Columbia serves as president of the National Capital Area Chapter of APG. She is a professional genealogist and writer.

Region 5 Canada: Louise St. Denis has been managing director of The National Institute for Genealogical Studies for the past 16 years. She was the founding president of Toronto’s Société Franco-Ontarienne d’Histoire et de Généalogie and a founding member of Ontario’s APG chapter.

Region 6 Ireland, N. Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales: Fiona Fitzsimons is a genealogist and a director for Eneclann and Findmypast Ireland. She has provided research for First Lady Michelle Obama and for televisions shows Who Do You Think You Are? and PBS’s Faces of America and Finding Our Roots.

Region 7 International: Michael Goldstein of Israel has been elected for another term. Michael traces roots worldwide, specializing in forensic, Jewish, and Holocaust research.

APG members elected two at-large board members. Amy E. K. Arner of Pennsylvania is a professional genealogist and proofreader of the APG Quarterly. J. H. Fonkert, CG, of Minnesota is a professional genealogist and lecturer and has served on the APG board since 2010.

Elected to one-year terms on the nominations committee are: Debra Braverman, a New York City-based professional genealogist, and Laura Prescott, a past president of APG and a full-time professional genealogist based in New Hampshire.

About the Association of Professional Genealogists
The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers, and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada, and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter (www.twitter.com/apggenealogy), and Facebook (www.facebook.com/AssociationofProfessionalGenealogists).

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Planters of Early New England

cf9931Of course we judge books by their covers. The cover is the first indication of what is inside. However, there are times when looking beyond the cover may reveal an unexpected treasure. Such is the case with Planters of Early New England: A Sketch of Roger Mowry Mann’s Seventeenth-Century Ancestors. The subtitle would keep almost anyone from even picking the book up, unless you know your related to this Roger Mowry Mann. That, however, may be a big mistake. Let me explain.

Mann (1944—2002), like many today, could trace his ancestry to early New England. After three hundred plus years, those early settlers of New England have millions of descendents. Mann’s history, put together by his sister and brother-in-law, reveals “much about life in seventeenth-century New England — land development, public service, religion, and other aspects of daily existence.” There is information within this book on many well-known early settlers and their families. “Planters” refers to those who founded colonies as well as referring to farmers. These early settlers were often both.

This book covers and documents the founding and early settling of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, many of whom were the ancestor of Roger Mann. These are the ancestors to many more people than just Roger Mann. To demonstrate just how diverse and large the decedents pool is from these early settlers, chapter IX lists 9 U.S. Presidents who also trace their ancestry back to this group. “The work is organized as an historical description of the period, but Chapter II and the ancestor index assure that it is also a genealogical record… Also included in this work is significant other previously unpublished material transcribed from records of deeds and wills from many different towns and counties in New England, including transcriptions of town records in Concord, Massachusetts and Guilford, Connecticut.”

The table of contents provides a good overview of what the reader can expect in these pages. There is also and index of 256 names found in this book [see below]. Perhaps one of your ancestors is there, if not this book tells a great historical story anyone could find interesting.

Note: Presidents listed in Chapter IX:

  • Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (VP under Gerald Ford)
  • Franklin Pierce (14th President)
  • Abraham Lincoln (16th President)
  • James Garfield (20th President)
  • William Howard Taft (27th President)
  • Chester A. Arthur (21th President)
  • Gerald R. Fort (39th President)
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd President)
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (41st President)
  • George Walker Bush (43rd President)

Obtain your own copy of Planters of Early New England from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Chapter I – Immigration to New England by 1652

  1. The First Wave of the Great Migration: 1630-1635
  2. Possible Participants in the First Wave of the Great Migration
  3. The Second Wave of the Great Migration: 1635-1639
  4. The Continued Expansion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1640-1652
  5. Ancestors Migrating to Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
  6. Ancestors Migrating to Connecticut
  7. Ancestors Migrating to Plymouth Colony
  8. Ancestors Immigrating to Northern New England
  9. Summary

Chapter II – Family Evolution

  • Pedigrees and Index of the Early Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

Chapter III – The Acquisition and Use of Land

  1. Place of Initial Settlement during the Great Migration
  2. Land Acquisition
  3. Immigration and Migration Continue: 1636-1650
  4. Challenges after 1650 in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  5. Indian Deeds
  6. Mortgages
  7. Early Business Enterprise: Manufacturing, Mining and Milling
  8. Common Land in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  9. Travel
  10. Analysis of Land Matters

 

Chapter IV – Public Service

  1. Establishment of the Colonial Government
  2. Service in Governing Bodies
  3. Jury Service in New England
  4. Town Offices
  5. Deputed Tasks by the Massachusetts General Court, Counties and Towns
  6. Summary
  • Supplement: Seventeenth-Century Deputies to the Massachusetts General Court
  • Supplement: Assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1630-1645

Chapter V – Religious Environment

  1. The Puritan Environment
  2. Church Leadership
  3. Church Membership
  4. Support for Town Ministers
  5. Shortage of Ministers
  6. Education
  7. Minister and Parishioner Movement within New England
  8. Religious Dissent within Churches and with the General Court
  9. Quaker Persecution
  10. Witchcraft
  11. Summary

Chapter VI – Indian Wars and Military Service

  1. The Pequot War: 1637-1638
  2. King Philip’s War: 1675-1676
  3. King William’s War: 1689-1697
  4. Military Service
  5. Summary

Chapter VII – Secondary Aspects of Ancestors’ Lives and Deaths

  1. Non-Agricultural Activities
  2. Services Performed by Agreement with the Town of Residence
  3. Old Age and Transfer of Estates
  4. Personal Disputes
  5. Dangers
  6. Ties with England
  7. Destitute Settlers
  8. Black Sheep
  • Supplement: Probate Records

Chapter VIII – The Three Most Significant Seventeenth-Century Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

  1. John Johnson
  2. Hopestill Foster
  3. Obadiah Holmes
  4. Summary

Chapter IX – Relationships of Direct Ancestors to Presidents of the United States

Colony and Town Record Abbreviations

Bibliography

Appendix A. English Origins of Roger Mowry Mann’s Ancestors

Appendix B. Occupations of Early Ancestors

Ancestor Index

Place Index

 

Index of the Seventeenth-Century Ancestor of Roger Mowry Mann

There are a few non-relatives included in this list who appear in the book. Women are listed by maiden name with married name in parenthesis.

  1. Aldrich, George
  2. Aldrich, Jacob
  3. Aldrich, Joseph
  4. Aldrich, Moses
  5. Aldrich, Ruth (Arnold)
  6. Aldrich, Samuel
  7. Aldrich, Sarah (Bartlett)
  8. Allen, John
  9. Allen, Sarah
  10. Allen, Samuel
  11. Allen, Sarah (Stratton)
  12. Allen, Walter
  13. Allen, Rebecca [Wyman]
  14. Angell, Alice (Whipple)
  15. Angell, John
  16. Angell, John
  17. Angell, Mary (Arnold)
  18. Angell, Thomas
  19. Arnold, Daniel
  20. Arnold, Elizabeth (Comstock)
  21. Arnold, John
  22. Arnold, Richard
  23. Arnold, Richard
  24. Arnold, Richard Daniel
  25. Arnold, Thomas
  26. Arnold, Thomas
  27. Ashton, Alice (Angell)
  28. Axtell, Mary_____ (Maynard)
  29. Ballou, Bathsheba (Arnold)
  30. Ballou, Maturin
  31. Ballou, James
  32. Bartlett, Jacob / Bartlett, Sarah
  33. Bartlett, John
  34. Bate, James
  35. Bate, Mary (Foster)
  36. Besbeech, Mary (Browne)
  37. Besbeech, Thomas
  38. Bigg, Patience (Foster)
  39. Blackmar, James
  40. Blackmar, John
  41. Browne, Chad
  42. Browne, John
  43. Browne, Sarah (Pray)
  44. Browne, Patience (Stone)
  45. Browne, Thomas
  46. Browne, William
  47. Bulkeley, Martha (Mellowes)
  48. Roger Burlingame
  49. Burlingame, Elizabeth (Arnold)
  50. Clemence, Richard
  51. Clemence, Sarah (Angell)
  52. Clemence, Thomas
  53. Clemence, Elizabeth
  54. Comstock, Hazadiah
  55. Comstock Samuel
  56. Comstock, Ann [Tucker] his wife
  57. Comstock, Samuel
  58. Comstock, William
  59. Copeland, Lawrence
  60. Copeland, Lydia (White)
  61. Dakin, Dorothy (Hubbard)
  62. Darkin, Joseph
  63. Dakin, Thmos
  64. Dakin, Susannah_____ (Stratton)
  65. [Daniel], Elizabeth (Comstock)
  66. David, Dolor
  67. Davis, Samuel
  68. Davis, Simon
  69. John, Field
  70. Field, Ruth [Fairbanks]
  71. Field, Ruth (Angell)
  72. Fletcher, Elizabeth (Stratton)
  73. Fletcher, Francis
  74. Fletcher, Robert
  75. Fletcher, [—-]
  76. Foster, Hopestill
  77. Foster, Patience (Browne)
  78. French, Judith (Rogers)
  79. Frost, Elizabeth (Rice) (Whale)
  80. Frost, Thomasine (Rice)
  81. Frye, Mary (Stratton)
  82. Gibson, John
  83. Gibson, Rebecca [Thompson] his wife
  84. Gibson, Martha (Newell)
  85. Gleason, Joseph
  86. Gleason, Joyce (Newell)
  87. Gleason, Thmos
  88. Glover, Alice
  89. Goldston, Sarch (Merriam)
  90. Goodenow, Mary (Ross)
  91. Goodenow, Thomas
  92. Goodenow, Jane [Ruddock]
  93. Goodrich, Hannah (Maynard)
  94. Goodrich, John
  95. Goodrich, Elizabeth
  96. Gourd, Elizabeth (Haynes)
  97. Harwood, Margaret (Hawkins)
  98. Hawkins, Mary (Blackmar)
  99. Hawkins, William
  100. Haynes, David
  101. Haynes, John
  102. Haynes, Walter
  103. Hayward, Juldah (Thayer)
  104. Hayward, William
  105. Heald, Dorothy (Davis)
  106. Heald, Israel
  107. Heald, John
  108. Holmes, Mary (Browne)
  109. Holmes, Obadiah
  110. Hopkins, Elizabeth (Inman)
  • Hubbard, Daniel
  1. Hubbard, George
  2. Hubbard, Mary
  3. Hubbard, John
  4. Hubbard, Jonathan
  5. Hyde, Katherine (Holmes)
  6. Iggleden, Elizabeth [Bennett] Meadows
  7. Inman, Edward
  8. Inman, Joanna (Mowry)
  9. Johnson, Davy
  10. Johnson, Mary
  11. Johnson, Mary (Ludden)
  12. Johnson, John
  13. Johnson, Mary (Mowry)
  14. Kenny, Henry
  15. Kenny, Ann
  16. Kenny, Henry
  17. Kenny, Jemima (Blackmar)
  18. King, Elizabeth (Rice)
  19. King, Thomas
  20. King, Ann
  21. Knight, Margery (Hayward)
  22. Knight, Mary (Osborne)
  23. Lewis, George
  24. Lewis, [Ann]
  25. Lewis, Philip
  26. Lewis, Priscilla (Kenny)
  27. Lippitt, John
  28. Lippitt, Martha
  29. Lippitt, Mary (Barlingstone) (Burlingame)
  30. Ludden, James
  31. Ludden, Mary (Puffer)
  32. Martin, Racheal (Bigg)
  33. Maynard, John
  34. Maynard, Moses
  35. Maynard, Zachariah
  36. Meadows, Mary (Davis)
  37. Meadow, Philip
  38. Mellowes, Abraham
  39. Mellowes, Elizabeth (Barrett) (Wright)
  40. Mellowes, Oliver
  41. Merriam, Joseph
  42. Merriam, Mary (Hubbard)
  43. Moore Benjamin
  44. Moore, Hezekiah
  45. Moore, John
  46. Moore, Mary (Ward) (Stone)
  47. Mowry, John
  48. Mowry, Mary
  49. Mowry, John
  50. Mowry, Mary (Arnold)
  51. Mowry, Nathaniel
  52. Mowry, Roger
  53. Newell, Abraham
  54. Newell, Frances
  55. Newell, Jacob
  56. Newell, Jacob
  57. Noyes, Dorothy (Haynes)
  58. Noyes, Peter
  59. Osborne, John
  60. Osborne, Patience (Aldrich)
  61. Page, Susannah (Gleason)
  62. Parkhurst, George
  63. Parkhurst, Phebe (Dan) (Arnold)
  64. Parrat, Elizabeth (Worcester)
  65. Parrat, Francis
  66. Parrat, Elizabeth [Northend]
  67. Pike, Hannah (Ballou)
  68. Pike, Robert
  69. Pike, Catherine
  70. Pray, Catherine (Comstock)
  71. Pray, John
  72. Pray, Mary (Woodward)
  73. Pray, Quinton
  74. Pray, Joan
  75. Pray, Richard
  76. Pray, Mary
  77. Puffer, George
  78. Puffer, James
  79. Puffer, Jane (Aldrich)
  80. Rice, Edmund
  81. Rice, Elizabeth [Whale] (Moore)
  82. Rice, Hannah (Hubbard)
  83. Rice, Samuel
  84. Rogers, John
  85. Rogers, Lydia (White)
  86. Ross, James
  87. Ross, Jane (Allen)
  88. Royle, Dorothy (Heald)
  89. Russell, Martha (Gleason)
  90. Russell, William
  91. Russell, Martha
  92. Seald, Katherine
  93. Sedley, Elizabeth (Puffer)
  94. Sharparowe, Elizabeth (Browne)
  95. Smith, John
  96. Smith, Alice
  97. Smith, John
  98. Smith, Sarah (Clemence)
  99. Stone, Daniel
  100. Stone, Daniel
  101. Stone, Gregory
  102. Stone, John
  103. Stone, Ann [Treadway]
  104. Stone, Tabitha (Haynes)
  105. Stratton, Samuel
  106. Stratton, Alice (Beeby)
  107. Stratton, Samuel
  108. Stratton, Samuel
  109. Stratton, Samuel
  110. Thayer, Ferdinando
  111. Thayer, Hulday (Aldrich)
  112. Thayer, Thomas
  113. Townsend, Lydia (Copeland)
  114. Upson, [Stephen]
  115. Upson, Elizabeth
  116. Upson, Hannah (Wright)
  117. Whales, Philemon
  118. Wheeler, Elizabeth (Fletcher)
  119. Wheeler, George
  120. Wheeler, Katherine
  121. Wheeler, Margery (Thayer)
  122. Whipple, Eleazer
  123. Whipple, John
  124. Whipple, Sarah
  125. Whipple, Sarah (Smith)
  126. Whipple, Margaret / Margery (Mowry)
  127. White, Hannah (Aldrich)
  128. White, Joseph
  129. White, Joseph
  130. White, Thomas
  131. White, Hannah [Workman]
  132. Whitman, Susanne (Ballou)
  133. Whitman, Valentine
  134. Whitman, Mary
  135. Williard, Margery (Davis)
  136. Woodward, Joseph
  137. Woodward, Mary (Arnold)
  138. Worcester, Dorothy (Dakin)
  139. Worcester, Samuel
  140. Worcester, William
  141. Worcester, Sarah
  142. Wright, Dorothy
  143. Wright, Dorothy (Moore)
  144. Wright, Edward (Sudbury)
  145. Wright, Edward (Concord)
  146. Wright, Martha (Heald)

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Millennia Corp. Releases New Genealogy Software – Legacy Family Tree 8.0

The following press release is from Millennia Corporation

New version 8.0 Continues 15-Years of Innovation and Quality; Now Offers Migration Mapping, Shared Events, Origins/Migration Reports and a Host of New Features

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SURPRISE, Arizona, November 26, 2013. Millennia Corporation, a leader in family history software, today announced the release of Legacy Family Tree 8.0. The new release contains dozens of significant new features and enhancements, including migration mapping, instant duplicate checking, origins and migration reports, potential problem alerts, and shared events.

legacy-8-150p

In one software package, Legacy Family Tree 8.0 provides tools to help users record their family’s history, organize their pictures, perform their research, and share their findings.

“Legacy Family Tree 8.0 continues to raise the bar of family history software,” said David Berdan, president of Millennia Corporation. “Its new source quality tool, source labels, citations on Pedigree Charts and shared events give serious researchers the tools they need, while the new reports, charts, and family statistics get the entire family excited about their history.”

The following new and updated features add to Legacy’s list of robust capabilities:

  • Origins Report – See where you came from and the percentage of “blood” you have from your countries of origin with the new Origins Report.
  • Migration Report – See how far and wide a person’s descendants spread out in the world with the new Migration Report.
  • Migration Mapping – Legacy animates the ancestor’s movement through time. Watch how they migrated from place to place. View their migration in street, aerial, or 3D modes. Hover over the balloon to see what happened in each location.
  • Instant Duplicate Checking – As you are adding new individuals to your tree, Legacy instantly checks to see if perhaps they are already in your family file, helping you avoid inadvertently adding duplicates.
  • Potential Problem Alerts and Gaps – Typos and accidental misinterpretation of data are now a thing of the past. The warning symbol is displayed immediately next to info that contains a potential problem. Unusual gaps of time are detected that you may have not previously noticed (like too many years between the births of the children).
  • Shared Events – Save time and avoid errors by sharing an event amongst all the individuals who participated in the event. You can specify each person’s role in the event.
  • Family Bow Tie Chart – Displays the ancestors of both the husband and wife, as well as their children.
  • Descendant Chart – Now available in left-to-right formatting.
  • Source Quality – Now record the quality (original vs derivative, primary vs secondary, etc., direct vs indirect) of each source as you attempt to prove your conclusions.
  • Source Labels – Now print Source Labels to attach to the top of your documents. You will never again lose the citation when making a photocopy for someone else.
  • Source Clipboard – The Source Clipboard has been expanded to load up to five different citations that can be assigned at the click of a button.
  • Pedigree Citations – Add source citations to your Pedigree Charts, and attach the complete bibliography.
  • FamilySearch Integration – Share, discuss, download and interact with FamilySearch’s Family Tree (optional).
  • Wall Charts – Duplicate lines can now be suppressed, saving room for more photographs and captions.
  • Chronology View – Now view the parent’s, grandparent’s, children’s, and grandchildren’s vital events in your ancestor’s timeline.
  • User Interface – Enjoy Legacy’s modernized look-and-feel, new color schemes, and new ribbon menu bar. Add two additional custom buttons on the new My Toolbar.
  • Tagging – View up to 9 tags at once. Advanced Tagging now shows the counts of each tag.
  • Automatic Sorting – Children, marriages, and events are now automatically chronologically sorted as they are added. New global sorting tools are also now available.
  • Statistics – Understand your family in new ways with dozens of new statistics: births by era, longest living individuals, average lifespan, longest marriages, families with the most children, most popular given names, most popular surnames, most popular locations and more.
  • Media Relinker – It is easier than ever to locate missing or unlinked pictures. Moving from one computer to another is simpler to do.
  • Media Gatherer – Got pictures all over your computer? The new Media Gatherer will help you copy or move your genealogy pictures to one common folder, making it easier to share your family file with another computer or family member.
  • Web Links – Found evidence of your ancestor online? Easily add a web link to their media gallery to organize a list of their online presence.
  • Color Coding – You can now color code from two starting points (one for you and one for your spouse, for example) and track the eight great-grandparents’ lines.

Watch the What’s New Video here.

Pricing and Availability

Legacy 8.0 is now available at www.LegacyFamilyTree.com, for just US $29.95 for the download-only version or US $39.95 version which includes the 336-page printed user’s guide, installation CD, and beginner’s training video. Discounted upgrade pricing is also available for users of previous editions of Legacy Deluxe. The free, Standard edition can also be downloaded from www.LegacyFamilyTree.com.

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Legacy Family Tree – Unlocked! a new book by Legacy’s Geoff Rasmussen, is based on the brand new Legacy 8.0. In its 236 pages, you will learn how to better utilize some of Legacy’s best features by shadowing the research process of a professional genealogist, Legacy Family Tree developer, and host of FamilyTreeWebinars.com webinar series. Be sure to add it to your cart at checkout!

About Millennia Corporation

Millennia Corporation is located in Surprise, Arizona. The company strives to provide top-quality genealogy software so people can record and track their family history. It is also the publisher of the award-winning FamilyTreeWebinars.com webinar series, now with more than 200 hours of quality genealogy education. For additional information on Millennia or the products they offer visit http://www.LegacyFamilyTree.com.

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More on the 23andMe Debacle

Article by Dale Ralph Meitzler

23andMe

Another take on the 23andme case is found on tech.fortune.cnn.com in an article by Ryan Bradley titled “The curious case of 23andMe”. He states “The FDA approval process for medical devices is insane. Even the FDA knows it’s way too long and way too expensive.”

I have to ask what’s to approve about a bottle you spit in or a swab to wipe your cheek. This same technology has been used for years without the FDA getting involved.

Back in grade school’ I was in a study regarding how many children used tobacco. They had us put a sponge in our mouth, capturing our saliva, same technology, and they didn’t even have to get parental approval.

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FDA Warns 23andme to Stop Providing Inexpensive Genetic Testing

On November 22, 2013 the FDA sent a letter to 23andme telling them to stop selling their “23andMe Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service (PGS)” The reason for the halt is that their $99 service, which provides purchasers with a genetic analysis of their saliva, hasn’t been approved by the FDA.

23andMe

In the last year 23andme has directed their advertising toward testing for diseases and drug interaction. This is what the FDA seems to be warning them to stop doing.

23andme is not the only genetic testing company to get warning letters. The FDA has been coming down on many testing facilities. Inexpensive genetic testing has become available in the last few years and the U.S. government’s bloated bureaucracy has now decided it is time to take it away from you. Or at least that’s my opinion. Others with really cool titles may disagree.

Christine Gorman from blogs.scientificamerican.com, in an article titled “FDA Was Right to Block 23andMe” compared “home gene kits” for finding your ancestors ethnicity to a “21st century equivalent of looking up your horoscope.”

Some have stated that “ the FDA is concerned about the consequences of both false positive and false negative results.” But considering how long it takes to get better medications in the U.S., I don’t buy that argument.

Razib Khan from blogs.discovermagazine.com, in his article titled “The FDA and 23andMe” compared the FDA move to the “Recording Industry Association of America” attack on Napster. Napster took the hit, but as any teenager knows, if you want the free music, you can get the free music. The FDA may successfully break 23andMe, but once we have had a taste of inexpensive genetic testing, we will find a way to continue to have it.

My opinion, for what it’s worth, is that it is just another of many attacks by the federal bureaucracy on the small businesses of America.

Article by Dale Ralph Meitzler

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FamilySearch Adds Over 39.5 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Italy, Mexico, Spain, & the SUA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 39.5 Million indexed records and images to Collections from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, El Salvador, France, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 24,856,324 indexed records and images from the U.S., New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909-1957, collection, the 2,284,230 indexed records and images from the Canada Passenger Lists, 1881-1922, collection, and the 3,399,062 indexed records from the U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1891, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Antwerp, Civil Registration, 1609-1909 – 238,573 – 27,020 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Brabant, Civil Registration, 1582-1912 – 8,758 – 2,811 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1598-1906 – 167,757 – 125,349 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600-1911 – 176,150 – 11,447 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Limburg, Civil Registration, 1798-1906 – 40,818 – 39,720 – New indexed records and images collection.

Belgium, Liège, Civil Registration, 1621-1910 – 55,048 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, Luxembourg, Civil Registration, 1608-1912 – 0 – 13,317 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Namur, Civil Registration, 1800-1912 – 0 – 33,287 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, West Flanders, Civil Registration, 1582-1910 – 160,737 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Brazil, Mato Grosso, Civil Registration, 1848-2013 – 0 – 127,795 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2013 – 0 – 207,023 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Miscellaneous Records, 1748-1998 – 0 – 461,811 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-1999 – 0 – 1,845 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980 – 0 – 328,694 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, Quebec, Notarial Records, 1800-1900 – 0 – 244,429 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada Passenger Lists, 1881-1922 – 2,201,052 – 0 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Chile, Santiago, Cemetery Records, 1821-2011 – 0 – 525,106 – Added images to an existing collection.

El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1977 – 406,035 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

France, Protestant Church Records, 1612-1906 – 33,342 – 4,712 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Italy, Agrigento, Agrigento, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1942 – 0 – 418,594 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Messina, Messina, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1939 – 0 – 141,128 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Modena, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1942 – 0 – 1,358,232 – New browsable image collection.

Italy, Napoli, Barano d’Ischia, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 14,861 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Japan, Passenger Lists, 1893-1941 – 94,842 – 0 – New indexed records collection.

Mexico, San Luis Potosí, Miscellaneous Records, 1570-1882 – 0 – 151,711 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Beja, Civil Registration and Miscellaneous Records, 1609-1950 – 0 – 291,199 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Coimbra, Passport Registers and Application Files, 1835-1938 – 0 – 444,466 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Évora, Civil Registration and Miscellaneous Records, 1554-1938 – 0 – 237,371 – Added images to an existing collection.

Spain, Cádiz, Testaments, 1531-1920 – 0 – 226,453 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Georgia, Probate Records, 1742-1990 – 0 – 18,842 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906-1991 – 0 – 187,480 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Louisiana, First Registration Draft Cards, 1940-1945 – 107,706 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 – 1,362,179 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Missouri, Cole County Circuit Court Case Files, 1820-1926 – 0 – 37,377 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Missouri, County Marriage Records, 1802-1969 – 0 – 5 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Montana, Big Horn, County Records, 1884-2011 – 0 – 27,135 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787-1931 – 0 – 153,903 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909-1957 – 24,856,025 – 299 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1891 – 3,399,062 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Oklahoma Applications for Allotment, Five Civilized Tribes, 1899-1907 – 0 – 33,418 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Wisconsin, Probate Estate Files, 1848-1948 – 0 – 122,317 – Added images to an existing collection.

United States Index to Service Records, War with Spain, 1898 – 181,326 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

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Blogging and More Blogging For Beginners

legweb13Pat Richley-Erickson, better know by many as DearMyrtle, is a renowned blogger and popular genealogical speaker. She runs a respected genealogy centric blog, is the co-founder of Genea Quilters, and is involved in many other aspects of genealogy, especially on the Internet. Who better to turn to when Legacy Family Tree wanted to do a webinar on blogging.

DearMyrtle presented Blogging for Beginners on May 3, 2013, it ran for 1 hour 32 minutes and includes a 6 page handout.

She again gave a presentation, More Blogging for Beginners on September 6 of this year. The session ran 1 hour 41 minutes and has a 5 page handout.

In the first webinar, DearMyrtle presents step-by-step approach to creating a blog, and making postings using the free service at Blogger.com. A great way to share genealogy research, post your society’s newsletter, share info with extended family members. The webinar will also feature a survey of sample blogs, and links for additional help.

Topic Include:

  • What is a blog?
  • Creating a blog in three steps
  • Creating posts (articles)
  • Genealogy blogs
  • How does a blog work?
  • Reading blogs with Google Reader
  • Blogger’s dashboard
  • How to add an image
  • Schedule blog postings
  • Using draft mode
  • Advanced settings
  • How to get help
  • Advice for professionals

legweb14More Blogging for Beginners Continuing the discussion about free online software at Blogger.com to get your message out to the world. This session’s topics include adding gadgets such as links to other websites, adding book suggestions from Amazon.com, removing the blogger search bar and inserting a Google Search box to make it easier for your readers to find previous postings.

Topics in the second webinar include:

  • Disclosure statements: why you need one
  • How to add a page (tab)
  • Design and layout tips
  • Add a graphic
  • Add the Google Search box.
  • Add Amazon. Affiliate links within a blog.
  • Print-friendly buttons
  • Backing up your blog
  • Removing the Blogger navbar
  • Q & A

Web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars. A large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

Ordered together or separately, both Blogging for Beginners and More Blogging for Beginners are available from Family Root Publishing.

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Salt Lake Christmas Tour……………… Week’s Peek

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Just a couple of weeks to go until our annual December rendezvous……. are you getting ready and/or excited?  For you first-timers joining us this year, the Christmas lights on Temple Square are always a highlight of the trip. It’s a COLD walk out to see them, but well worth the red nose and chilly fingers.

When you arrive on Sunday, look for the Santa hats……… Dale Meitzler will meet you in one terminal and Maureen MacDonald will greet you in the other one. If you arrive before Sunday, bummer, but call for the hotel shuttle.

And do remember that the Plaza Hotel is not listed on that board-of-hotels-with-free-telephones.  You must call 801-521-0130 yourself to request the shuttle. Not on Sunday, however.

What to do on Sunday if you arrive early in the day, or if you arrive before Sunday? Not too much. If you’re here by 8:30am on Sunday, you can attend the free broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word, the weekly live radio broadcast from Temple Square. That Sunday it will be in the Conference Center, not the Tabernacle.

The Church History Museum will be open and usually they have a terrific display of nativity sets made from different media and from different countries in the world. That’s free too.

Then there is shopping, either three blocks west to the Gateway Mall or right across the street to the new City Creek Mall. (Things there are not free :-)

You are always invited to hangout in the tour welcome or hospitality room. We’ll have snacks and drinks. We’ll be handing out the tour shirts, name tags and your syllabus. Joy Price plans to be there all afternoon for any one-on-one consultations to help you dive right into your research.

Cannot, cannot wait to share big hugs with all my alternate family!

Donna, aka Mother Hen

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New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases were added at The Original Record this week:
The Original Record
1442-1449 – Workers building the Trinity Aisle of Thame church, Oxfordshire
The building accounts of Thame church give details of the expenditure entailed in the building of the Trinity Aisle or north transept from 1442 onwards, listing payments to individual workmen, carting and cutting stone, bringing sand and timber.

1644-1645 – Astrologer’s Clients
William Lilly, an astrologer, kept practice books listing his clients, their questions and the figures or horoscopes that he cast. Their questions relate to stolen property, probable success in any undertaking, ships at sea, health, long-life, love, marriage, pregnancy, &c. The books came into the possession of Elias Ashmole, who bequeathed them to Oxford University. This calendar was prepared by William Henry Black and printed in 1845. He lists the clients by folio number, remarking ‘the names are often omitted, and usually written invertedly, or disguised in some other manner’. Where a date of birth is specified in the practice book, it is given in the calendar. Practice Book I is for consultations from 30 March 1644 to 4 June 1645.

1748 – Subscribers to the Devon & Exeter Hospital
List of the governors and other subscribers and contributors to the Devon and Exeter Hospital for Sick and Lame Poor, before the Bishop of Exeter and the other governors. Those subscribing £5 or more per annum were standing members of the committee, by virtue of their subscriptions; those subscribing £2 or more a year were thereby governors; those marked with a star were in 1748 the present members of the elective part of the committee. There were also fourteen governors by virtue of their past benefactions, ranging from £20 to £123 8s.

1798-1800 – Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks’ articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master’s trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice’s name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield: in 1770 a change was made to describe many of the collectors according to their county rather than their town, but no change was made to the rule that they might stamp indentures from all the surrounding area, so these labels are deceptive. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. There are returns from Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Brecknockshire, Bristol, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cardiganshire, Cheshire, Chester, Cornwall, Cumberland, Denbighshire, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Durham, East Essex, East Kent, Essex, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, Monmouthshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Norwich, Nottingham, Oxfordshire, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire, each of which has been indexed separately. IR 1/69

1818 – Yorkshire Tenants of William Long Wellesley
The election for a member of parliament to represent Wiltshire drew various accusations against one of the candidates, William Long Wellesley, which in turn elicited this testimonial from his Yorkshire tenantry, signed at York 20 April 1818: ‘We do not affirm that those unforeseen evils, or the unprecedented distress, which has been of late so universally felt by the great body of agriculturists throughout the kingdom, has been altogether unfelt by us; but we do affirm, that this burthern has been rendered comparatively light by your well-timed and liberal interference.’

1827 – Retired East-India Company Officers
The official list of retired military officers of the Hon. East-India Company gives name (surname and christian name or initials); rank; establishment; and date of retirement – corrected to 1 September 1827.

1845 – Prisoners in County Durham
A total of £2272 11d was disbursed by the County Treasurer of Durham from 31 December 1844 to 25 August 1845 to attorneys conducting prosecutions in the county sessions and assizes. The accounts list date of payment; attorney’s surname; full name of prisoner; when prosecuted; and cost. The abbreviations used are 1 S. for Epiphany Sessions; 2 S., Easter Sessions; 3 S., Midsummer Sessions; 4 S., Michaelmas Sessions; Spl. S., Special Sessions; Sp. A., Spring Assizes; S. A., Summer Assizes; W. A., Winter Assizes.

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An Exciting Beginner’s Gift Bundle at 25% Off Through Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013

Are you looking for an inexpensive gift for someone in your family that might be interested in family history? Interested, especially if you gave them a gift that would get them started on the road to success in their personal family history?

Family Roots Publishing has assembled a bundle of two of our most popular books for genealogists, cutting the price by 25%, and bundling the shipping, dramatically lowering the cost of the volumes. The books are: Jeff Bockman’s Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History (5th Edition); and Our Family Heritage: A History of Our Family.

gpc8452Gift of Genealogy

The books nomally sell for $19.90 (plus $8 p&h), but we’ve cut the price by 25%, making the bundle $14.93 (plus $5.50 p&h) through midnight EST (not MST) Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Click Here to purchase the bundle.

The following reviews have been written about the two books:

Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History

After more than five years, Jeffrey A. Bockman, has published a major update to his popular book, Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History. Now in its fifth edition, this fantastic primer covers all the basics needed for the novice to get started with family history research. Sometimes genealogists forget an important part of family history research, leaving their own story behind. Bockman created this book to guide and inspire anyone with an inkling of interest into their own past, to help search it out and leave both it and their own stories behind for future genealogists.

In this book Bockman covers all the basics, for example:

  • Forms to record the basic facts
  • Saving  documents future researchers will need
  • Identifying people in photographs
  • Preservation
  • Finding and telling family stories
  • Conducting your own research

This fifth edition is a major revision, adding over five additional years of experience and new resources. New for the fifth edition:

  • More family stories and photographs
  • Newer sources
  • More online resources
  • A new section on searching techniques
  • Comments about genealogy travel with examples
  • Mini case study (to give hope to those who have a relative that disappeared)

The book is organized for easy reading with plenty of examples to help the beginner get started. If you know someone looking to get started with family history or  hoping to help someone develop and interest in their families stories, then this book would help them in the process.

Not only is this book one of the best primers available, it is priced affordably. Family Roots Publishing has Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, for only $8.95 on a day-to-day basis.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

  • About the author
  • Introduction

Family Facts

  • Identify family members and key events
  • Recording information on standardized forms
    • Family Group Sheet
    • Ancestor Chart

Home Sources

  • Supporting documents that help to provide the necessary proof
  • List of what to use, keep, and preserve
  • Important home sources
  • Bockman family home sources

Photographs

  • Help turn names and dates into real people
  • Identify the people, the time, and the place

Preservation

  • Saving items for future generations
  • Paper & document preservation
  • Photo preservation

Family Stories

  • Can only be told by someone who was a part of it
  • Timeline of events
  • Bockman family history

Organizing It All

  • Assembling all of the information

Family History Research

  • How to start researching your family
    • Vital records
    • Wills & probate records
    • Cemetery records
    • Newspapers/obituaries
    • Census records
    • Other records
    • Immigrants
    • Didn’t find it in the index
    • Genealogy travel
    • Case Study: Finding Alvar a not so great dane

Our Family

  • Title page
  • Guidelines for filling in your forms
    • Three family group sheets
    • One ancestor charts
    • Two timeline pages
    • Notes page

    The book, by itself, is available at 15% off through midnight EST (not MST) Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Regularly $8.95, it’s just $7.61 (plus $5.50 p&h). Click here to purchase just this book, not the bundle.
    ——————————-

    The books nomally sell for $19.90 (plus $8 p&h), but we’ve cut the price by 25%, making the bundle $14.93 (plus $5.50 p&h) through midnight EST (not MST) Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Click Here to purchase the bundle.

    ——————————-

    Our Family Heritage: A History of Our Family

    Looking for an easy and fun way to preserve the memories in the closest branches of your family’s history? Or, looking for a great way to get others in your family involved in the work? Our Family Heritage: A History Of Our Family is a great solution. The book also makes a great gift, and here is why.

    Our Family Heritage is a hardback, fill-in the blank, beautiful family history memory book. This 8.5″ x 11″ hardback book, if properly cared for, will last generations. Filled with pages beautifully printed to add a sense of style to each form. This book is a journal, a memory book, and a family history reference all in one.

    Page by page, the owner will enjoy creating this long-lasting memory by hand, recording basic genealogical information along with the memories of family treasures and special family events. Forms and charts are designed for ease of use and for easy reading. There are places for both genealogical data as well as family personal and family stories. Records of family heirlooms and collections will help future generations identify important family treasures. The contents listed below show all the exciting topics and sheets this book offers for creating a new family heirloom.

    The book also comes with an inserted sheet offering “helpful suggestion for filling in your book.” This included tips on preparing and adding photographs and making the most of your entries.

    As a gift now for others, or as a gift you leave behind, Our Family Heritage: A History Of Our Family  is available from Family Roots Publishing.

    Table of Contents

    • From Generation to Generation
    • How to Use This book
    • Our Courtship
    • Our Marriage
    • Husband’s Family
    • Wife’s Family
    • Our Children
    • Our Grandchildren
    • Our Foreign-Born Ancestors
    • The Lands of Our Ancestors
    • Our Family Tree
    • Husband’s Ancestral Chart
    • Wife’s Ancestral Chart
    • The Family of the Husband
    • The Family of the Husband’s Father
    • The Family of the Husband’s Mother
    • The Family of the Husband’s Paternal Grandmother
    • The Family of the Husband’s Paternal Grandfather
    • The Family of the Husband’s Maternal Grandfather
    • The Family of the Husband’s Maternal Grandmother
    • The Family of the Husband’s Great Grandparents
    • The Family of the Wife
    • The Family of the Wife’s Mother
    • The Family of the Wife’s Paternal Grandmother
    • The Family of the Wife’s Paternal Grandfather
    • The Family of the Wife’s Maternal Grandfather
    • The Family of the Wife’s Maternal Grandmother
    • The Family of the Wife’s Great Grandparents
    • Family Weddings
    • Other Religious Ceremonies in Our Family
    • Our Family’s Religious Affiliations
    • Where We Have Worshipped
    • Special Memories
    • Our Family’s Homes
    • The Schools We Have Attended
    • The Organizations We Have Joined
    • Professions, Occupations, Crafts and Trades
    • Our Family’s Military Service Record
    • Our Best Friends
    • The Pets in Our Lives
    • Automobiles—Our Mechanical Companions
    • Special Things
    • Our Prized Family Possessions
    • Sports We Enjoy
    • Our Hobbies
    • Memorable Vacations
    • Family Gatherings
    • Cherished Traditions
    • The Most Outstanding Events in Our Family’s History
    • Our Family’s Medical History
    • Our Vital Statistics
    • Photographs
    • Genealogical Research
    • Addresses
    • Autographs

    The book, by itself, is available at 15% off through midnight EST (not MST) Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Regularly $10.95, it’s just $9.31 (plus $5.50 p&h). Click here to purchase just this book, not the bundle.

    The books nomally sell for $19.90 (plus $8 p&h), but we’ve cut the price by 25%, making the bundle $14.93 (plus $5.50 p&h) through midnight EST (not MST) Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013. Click Here to purchase the bundle.

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The Latest on Heredis 2014

The following press release is from Heredis

Heredis is about to launch new genealogy program for Windows and Mac, available on November 20th, 2013.

Heredis 2014 is a major release of the software. The new features open up new perspectives for genealogists. Heredis 2014 is the version to go further with the research. The Search Wizard highlights missing elements, suggests ways to advance and offers search online tools as Heredis Online, Ancestry, MyHeritage…

This new version enables to build and organize the family tree with the greater ease thanks to the different Family views. With 2014 version, users share their genealogy with their family on Heredis Online and they have a free personal website directly from their Heredis 2014 software in a few clicks.

MONTPELLIER, France – November.
Heredis presents today a preview of its software for Windows and for Mac available for download on
www.heredis.com and on the App Store.

What’s new?

  • Search Wizard
  • Online research tools via Heredis Online, Ancestry, MyHeritage, Family Search…
  • Extended Family View
  • Find Relationships
  • Migrations Map
  • Heredis Online
  • Management of branches
  • Descendants View

Extended Family View
Heredis displays all those who were close to your ancestors. All the people with whom they lived, all those who they knew in the extended family: siblings, remarriage, stepchildren, step-brothers and step-sisters, children from other unions of the different spouses… a view of your family from a completely new angle.

Heredis-Extended-family-vie

Migrations map
Heredis 2014 shows the movement of a whole family on maps which are interactive. Within seconds, trace the lives of your ancestors and a whole lineage just a few miles away or at the other end of the world.

Heredis-Migrations-500p

Search Wizard
Your Search assistant can take stock of your work by displaying the progress of the life of your ancestor. The display of known or missing information for the primary person and those around him/her will highlight certain unexplored tracks. At a glance, you will know if a date or place is missing. You will know if you have associated a source, witnesses, media, notes, with any event.The Search Wizard proposes various online research tools targeted to sites such as Heredis Online, Ancestry, MyHeritage…

Heredis pre-fills relevant data that is already known. At any moment, you may find new information that will add to your work. If a search has not been successful, the record of your previous research allows you to come back to it at a later date.

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Find Relationships
“Why is this person in my file?”, “How is he/she connected to my lineage?” are often questions that you ask yourself? With the Find Relationships function, discover easily the links that unite two people with this great tool. Within seconds, this exciting tool analyzes all the connections in your genealogy file to find how two people can be linked, whether they are relatives, or they have common ancestors or they simply have other links (godmother, heir…). Thus, you are able simply to weave links in your genealogy…

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Web Search and Publishing
Heredis launches Heredis Online, a new service for publishing your genealogy data and research on the Internet. The advantage? You publish your data on Heredis Online direct from your software in a few clicks. You share your work with those near to you by directing them to the site of your genealogy online. You will find new information on Heredis Online. You may exchange with other genealogists. All this without ever leaving Heredis! Much easier and no extra cost!

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Descendants View
The new Descendants tab for the primary person allows you to navigate speedily throughout the generations. It will display the number of generations of your choice. The display is customizable, both for presentation of generations and for the format of data. Highlighting the duplicate lines in red allows you to identify intermarriages immediately. Information on the descendants displayed and the option to print are also available from the indented wheel icon.

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Management of branches
Memorize different family branches, with ancestors as well as descendants, as a base for your research and its evolution. Each person displayed in the branch has a visual cue showing the status of main events (complete, incomplete, missing). You have a display filter available to choose between branch ends, complete persons, persons for whom further research is required…

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Other new points
Heredis 2014 offers a new, more intuitive interface which is ideal to use. Choose the most appropriate from the four themes. Also, you may now customize your homepage by inserting a photo of your ancestors or why not, a copy of the marriage certificate of one of your illustrious ancestors.

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Windows System Requirements
Windows XP SP3 or VISTA or 7 or 8
250 Mo disk space required
Screen 1024×700 minimum
Internet Connection for research, publication & integrated maps

Mac System Requirements
Snow Leopard (10.6), Lion (10.7),
Mountain Lion (10.8), Mavericks (10.9)
175 Mo disk space required
Screen 1366×768 minimum
64 bits only
Internet Connection for research, publication & integrated maps

Pricing
Heredis 2014 for Windows at US $39,99 and upgrade at US $19,99.
Heredis 2014 for Mac at US $59,99.

About Heredis
Heredis has been designing genealogy software for over 20 years. Avant-garde and revolutionary in its approach, Heredis keeps ahead of its competitors through its innovative technological choices and genealogical solutions which are fully geared to user needs.

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Ancestry.com and the Associated Press Bring Historical AP Archives Online

The following press release is from Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com and the Associated Press Bring Historical AP Archives Online

New Agreement Provides a View of the Past through Historical News Reports

(Provo, Utah) – November 18, 2013 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, is proud to announce a collaboration with the Associated Press that makes fifty years of news stories–in their original wire copy format–available online today.

“We are thrilled to announce this collaboration with the Associated Press to bring its name and subject catalog online,” said Quinton Atkinson, Director of Content Acquisition for Ancestry.com. “It represents a fantastic set of material for our family historians who are researching the news of an era, and gives incredible historical context for the world their ancestors lived in.”

Available at Ancestry.com/AP, the voluminous card catalog of names and subjects links to more than two million records and more than one million AP stories spanning 1937 to 1985, a resource which took Ancestry.com several years to prepare and digitize.

For Ancestry.com subscribers, the collection of AP stories adds a whole new dimension to the family history experience. Stories complement family trees and genealogical records on Ancestry.com with period news coverage that provides historical context to the times, places and people Ancestry members are researching. Ancestry.com members will be able to search for stories by name, and then click through to view a digitized copy of the full AP story. Stories can also be searched by subject and by date.

The digitization of the AP stories will simplify the research process not only for Ancestry.com members, but also for AP journalists. Reporters and news researchers can now bypass the legacy card catalog and accompanying microfilm for a searchable set of online databases that can be accessed anywhere in the world. In addition, the project has made available a set of internal AP publications dating back to 1904, including the staff magazine AP World, which began publication in 1943.

“The collaboration with Ancestry.com has enabled us to bring AP’s historical news microfilm and its card index not only to the family history community but also to AP journalists, who value their organization’s rich archival record,” said Valerie Komor, Director of the AP Corporate Archives. “And AP World offers a rare view into the workings of this 167-year-old news cooperative. “

For those wishing to search the AP archives on Ancestry.com, they may do so by visiting Ancestry.com/AP. For those looking to start researching their own family history, please visit www.ancestry.com.

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