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We Now Have Less Than 3 Weeks Until the 27th Annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour!

The 27th Annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour is less than 3 weeks away. If you would like to join the group for six full days of professionally assisted research, you must do so now ! Immediately! We must have your registration no later than 10 pm MST Wednesday, November 16 to guarantee you a place. Click here to visit the Tour website and Register.

There are numerous trips to The Family History Library, sponsored by genealogical societies and commercial firms. However, The Salt Lake Christmas Tour has been highly successful because we have the highest ratio of professional researchers to attendees of any genealogy research tour using the Family History Library. You’ve always got the help you need to overcome your difficult research problems! You can research your ancestors with the help of our experienced professional genealogists. The Salt Lake Christmas Tour is known for the quality of the professional genealogists that work with the attendees on a daily basis – Monday through Saturday. The Christmas Tour typically has professional genealogists available for consultation from 9 am until near the time when the library closes. Professionals currently planning to work the 2011 Tour are: Linda Brinkerhoff, Arlene Eakle, Loni Gardner, Kevan Hansen, Wade Hone, George Ott, Joy Price, Billy Edgington, Dwight Radford, Ruth Maness, and Trudy Schenk. The Salt Lake Christmas Tour is led by Leland K. Meitzler, Donna Potter Phillips and Bill Balter.

Don’t let this opportunity to find more ancestors pass you by. Register now. Fill in the form, scan and send a pdf to Lmeitzler@gmail.com – or Fax a copy of the filled-out form to 815-642-0103 – or just call us at 801-949-7259, and we can take your information over the phone.

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New Records From 20 Countries at FamilySearch.org

A broad range of records were added to FamilySearch.org this week from 20 countries, notably Australia, Austria, Canada (Saskatchewan), Chile, Columbia, Dominican Republic, Germany, England, Dominican Republic, Germany, Honduras, Hungary, Italy, New Zealand, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Slovakia, Spain, Venezuela, and the U.S.A. The U.S. additions include a variety of records from California, Illinois, Indiana, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin (See the full listing of new updates below).

We’ve also updated all five of the GenealogyBlog Online Database Links Files.
See:

Collection – Records – Images – Comments

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The above data is dated 11 November 2011 and was received from FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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Making Researching Your Swedish Roots Easier

Cradled in Sweden, by Carl-Erik Johansson serves one purpose, to help the genealogist overcome language barriers in researching Swedish ancestry. This one reason alone makes this book highly valuable to anyone with Swedish ancestors.

Though Swedish and English share a common basis in the Germanic languages, there are significant differences one must overcome in looking up, reading, and evaluating documents and records. To start with, the Swedish alphabet has a few more letters than in the English 26. These letters are an angle A (A with a small o over it that looks like a halo), plus an A and O with an umlaut (two small dots over the letters). The extra vowels in the language are just part of the information covered in this book.

Another key element to reading Swedish documents is in understanding the differences in handwriting from common U.S. based documents. These handwriting differences also change over the years. This book gives example of handwriting by letter as well as common examples such as names. The book also provides examples of common records and how to read them.

To add value, the book also examine common resources for vital records in Sweden. This includes some directory type assistance to what is available. Take a look at the following table of contents to see all this book has to offer:

 

Table of Contents

1 The Language

  • Values of the Sound
  • Consonants
  • Sounds by Letter Combinations
  • Spelling Reform of 1906
  • Some Hints
  • American-Swedish Spelling

2. The Country

  • The Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions
    • The Diocese (Stift)
    • The Parish (Socken or Formsamling)
  • The Civil Jurisdiction
    • The County (Lan)
    • The Province (Landskap)
    • The District (Harad, tingslag, bergslag, skeppslag)

3. Names of Places

  • Name Lists
  • Geographic Encyclopedias
  • General Encyclopedias
  • Maps
  • Some Common Names

4. Names of Persons

  • Given or Christian Names
  • Interchangeable First Names
  • Surnames
  • Patronymics
  • Soldier Names
  • Names of Tradesmen
  • Names of Children Born Out of Wedlock
  • Names of Emigrants
  • Special Practices
  • The Name Law of 1983
  • List of Family Names

5. Archives

  • The National Archives (Riksarkivet)
  • Provincial Archives (Landsarkiven)
  • The Royal War Archives (Kungliga Krigsarkivet)
  • The Archives of the Central Bureau of Statistics (Statistika Centralbyran)
  • The Archives of the House of Nobility (Riddarhusets arkiv)
  • The Archive of the State Department (Utrikesdepartementets arkiv)
  • Miscellaneous Archives
  • Emigration Archives
  • The Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Addresses of Some Swedish Archives
    • Riksarkivet (National Archives)
    • Landsarkiv (Provincial Archives)
    • Stadsarkiv (City Archives)
    • Emigration Archives
    • Miscellaneous Archives
  • Some Hints

6. Fixed and Movable Feast Days

  • Fixed Feast Days
  • Movable Feast Days
  • How to Convert Movable Feast Days into Regular Dates
  • Miscellaneous hints
  • Prayer and Penitence Days (Bondag, botdag)
  • Extracts of Dates from Parish Registers
  • The Change of Calendars in Sweden
  • Table A – Feast Days with Assigned Numbers
  • About Table B – Feast Day Dates 1650–1845
  • How to Use Tables A and B

7. Handwriting

  • The Letters
    • Capital Letters
    • Small Letters
  • Some Reading Hints
  • The Words
  • The Paragraphs

8. Emigration Records

  • (Annual) Extracts of Parish Registers
  • Police Records
  • The Larsson Brothers Emigration Papers
  • Passport Journals (Passjournaler)
  • United States Shipping Lists
  • Emigration Archives
  • The Use of the Emigration Records
  • Mormon Emigration
  • Statistics on Emigration and Immigration
    • Table A
    • Table B
    • Table C

9. Parish Registers

  • Today’s Civil Registration
  • Parish Office Records
  • Birth and Christening Records (Fodelselangd and Doplangd)
  • Word Lists:
  • Some Customs at Birth
    • Emergency Baptism (Noddop)
    • Introduction (Kyrkogang)
    • Godparents (Faddrar)
    • Confirmation Records (Konfirmationslangd)
  • Some Customs at Marriage
    • Banns (lysning)
    • Morning Gift (morgongava)
    • Court Settlement (avvittring)
  • Divorce (skilsmassa)
  • Death and Burial Records (Dodslangd, Begravningslangd)
  • Special Obituaries (Personaliebok)
  • Moving Records (Inflyttningslangd and Utflyttningslangd)
  • Moving Certificates (Flyttningsattester)
  • Parish Accounts (Kyrkorakenskapsbok)
  • Word List (from top to bottom):
  • Parish Record Exchange 1860–1920
  • Relationships
  • The Law of Secrecy

10. Clerical Survey Records

  • Content
  • Meaning of Markings
  • Clerical Survey Records Extracts
  • Research Techniques
  • Name Changes
  • Some Farmer Definitions

11. Census Records and Land Records

  • Census Records (Mantalslangd)
  • Land Records (Jordebok)

12. Court Records

  • Probate Records (Bouppteckningar)
  • Content
  • Monetary System
  • Distribution of the Death Estate
  • Use
  • Other Court Records
  • Duplicate Court Records

13. Military Records

  • The Regiment
  • Records
  • Word List
  • How to Find Your Soldier in the Muster Roll
  • Enlisted Regiments
  • Additional Military Records
  • Soldier Names
  • The Soldier Index (Soldatregister)
  • Military Definitions

14. Genealogical Associations, Magazine and Printed Books

  • The Genealogical Association (Genealogiska Foreningen)
  • The Family History Association (Personhistoriska Samfundet)
  • The Swedish Genealogical Association (Sveriges Slaktforskarforbund)
  • Printed Books

15. Chronology

16. List of Swedish and Finnish Army Units

17. Swedish Army Units

  • Index of Companies and Squadrons in Alphabetical Order

18. Swedish Probate Records and Indexes

19. Mormon Congregations (Grenar) in Sweden 1852-1950

20. Some Diseases and Causes of Death

21. Money, Weight and Measure

  • Money in 1600s and 1700s to the Money Reform of 1776
  • The Money Reform of 1776
  • The Decimal System for Coinage Begun in 1855
  • The Crown Introduced in 1873
  • Weights
  • Cubic Measures, Dry Goods (grain)
  • Cubic Measures, Liquid Goods
  • Linear Measures
  • Square Measures

22. Pedigree Chart Numbering

23. Genealogical Associations in Sweden

24. Address to Local Tax Authorities (Lokala skattemyndigbeter [LOK])

25. Alphabetical Index of All Parishes in Sweden

26. Word List

27. Bibliography

 

Order a copy of Cradled in Sweden at Family Roots Publishing; Item #: EV0005.

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Military Records in Canada

As we celebrate Veteran’s Day in the United States, our American brothers and sisters to the north are celebrating Remembrance Day. A bit more like our Memorial Day, Remembrance Day is observed in commemoration of Canada’s dead from armed conflict. In a poignant reminder to not only remember those who have served their country, but also to remember those who have served in one’s own family, a great article appeared today in the CBC News Canada:

How to uncover your family’s military roots

Digitized records help Canadians leaf out family tree military history

By Ian Johnson, CBC News

Researching a family’s military history used to be a real challenge, but as more and more paper archives go digital and are transferred to the internet, it’s becoming possible for anyone to leaf out a family tree in surprising detail by using a few tricks and knowing where to look.

“The biggest thing that’s changed is the ability to find digitized documents through simple things like Google and search tools specific to military family histories,” says Alex Herd, lead researcher for the Historica-Dominion Institute Memory Project in Toronto that aims to increase the public’s knowledge of Canadian history.

“There almost seems to be some prestige involved with finding an ancestor who served in the military and particularly in any wars, and a lot of information that was difficult to get before has become available,” adds Jeannine Powell of Duncan, B.C. Her day job is with a secretarial company, but an “18-year obsession” with genealogy has made her an expert (her nickname is GenQueen, a play on her name), and she’s involved with groups ranging from Genealogy Helplist Canada, to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints’ Family History Centre, to an array of historical websites.

“Two of the highest things people use the internet [to search] for are pornography and family ancestry. One will tear a family apart, the other will build it up,” she says with a laugh.

What’s out there

There’s a growing collection of personal military minutiae available through paid websites that cater to people researching their family trees.

READ the Full Article

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Digging Deeper with Forensic Genealogy

Usually when someone is said to be wearing the proverbial rose-colored glasses they are said to be viewing the world, or a given situations, as better than it really is. The idiom suggests not positive thinking but rather a choice to ignore the hardships of reality. However, I used to teach a class on Internet research in which I took the rose-colored glasses concept and flipped it over. The idea being, sometimes doing research should take pause, look at what seems obvious in a new light, put on the rose-colored glasses and gain a new perspective. Sometimes a different perspective, a new way of looking at information, is just what the researcher needs to take the next step. Analyzing resources in a new way, with deeper understanding, may lead to new areas of research or greater success.

Looking at information in a new way is the purpose behind Colleen Fitzpatrick’s book, Forensic Genealogy. Dr. Fitzpatrick helps the researcher dig deeper, examining sources with greater scrutiny. She hopes that through the book the reader will find:

  • “Unconventional discoveries from surprising sources
  • An understanding of how your ancestors lived
  • Fascinating insights into your family history”

An investigative journalist once taught me the value of reevaluating your resources, looking for what fits or doesn’t fit, to put on the rose-colored glasses, and to follow the paper trail. He told me the best genealogist learn to think like investigators. Forensic Genealogy is your investigator’s handbook. This guide goes deep into forensic analysis often missed in other books. For example, most books discuss dating a photograph by the material it is on, the clothing being worn, and hairdos. Fitzpatrick warns of problems with such analysis. Hairdos didn’t always proclaim a specific time period. Clothing, especially for children, was often handed down. Older relatives may suffer from memory lapses, providing incorrect information about photographs. The author points out often pictures can be evaluated to determine the type of camera used and that the placement of logos on the back can suggest time periods. These and other observations, when understood, can lend strength to or improve upon evaluations of photographs or any other information source.

If the example seems to obvious, consider some of the other sources the author has used; including, “five hundred year old weather patterns, information on the breeding cycle of mosquitoes, old almanacs, how babies were delivered in the middle ages, old hospital admission records, the 1909 National Cash Register catalog, the history of the railroad in Canada, the backs of photographic prints form the 1950s, the history of the Spanish Armada,” and more. Forensic Genealogy will definitely help the researcher dig deeper and rethink how to look at sources.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Digital Detective

  • Getting Started
  • Location, Location, Location
  • When?
  • Stumpers

Case Study in Digital Detective Work — Where, Who, When, and Why

The Database Detective

  • Introduction
  • Getting Started
  • Periodical Databases–Using City Directories
  • Event Databases
  • Unusual Reference Materials
  • Using Multiple Sources to Construct a Family Story
  • Cultural Profiling

Case Study in Database Detective Work — The History of the Ulmer Family

The DNA Detective

  • About DNA
  • Types of DNA Markers and Mutations
  • Why Surname Studies Use Certain Markers
  • Genealogical DNA Studies
  • Connecting with History Through Single Name Studies
  • Non-paternity Events
  • Genetic Genealogy Testing Companies and Testing Options
  • Online Databases
  • The Details of DNA Markers and Their Genealogical Uses
  • The Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA)
  • Cladograms and Pairwise Mismatches
  • There Will Always Be Mysteries Left

Order a copy of Forensic Genealogy from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: YA006.

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Cheshire Revealed as a Wonderland of Unusual Finds as New Local Records Go Online

The following news release was received from Amy Sell at findmypast.co.uk

  • Lewis Carroll’s baptism found in Daresbury,11 July 1832.
  • Earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612.
  • Ancestors of James Bond actor Daniel Craig sold coal and were iron moulders.
  • Over 10 million Cheshire records covering 1538 to 1910 – allowing researchers to delve back further than ever before.

Fascinating workhouse records, parish registers, bishop’s transcripts and electoral registers from Cheshire go online for the first time ever as leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk launches the ‘The Cheshire Collection’. The collection is a series of over 10 million extraordinary records provided by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, covering over 350 years of history.

Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, otherwise known as the author Lewis Carroll, is recorded as being baptised on 11 July 1832, seven months after his birth on 27 January 1832 in Daresbury, Cheshire. Although Lewis’ father, also named Charles, was the Perpetual Curate of Daresbury, he didn’t baptise his own son but on the same parish register page you can see that he baptised four other children. When Lewis was 11 years old, his father moved the family to a rectory in Croft-on-Tees in North Yorkshire, leaving Cheshire behind.

Earthquakes and unusual marriages
A number of remarkable happenings in Cheshire can be found in the records, which make the fantastical world of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland seem not so far removed from reality… On 18 March 1612, Mother Nature struck the northern county and one family braved the earthquake to get their child baptised, which unusually was recorded in the register of baptisms – ‘this daye there was an Earthquake about 7 of ye clock in ye morning’.

Another unusual occurrence was the ‘peculiar marriage’ between Daniel Broadbent and Martha Cheetham in Mottram-in-Longdendale on 9 March 1780 – Daniel was 23 and Martha was 83 years old. Unfortunately fate soon intervened to part this unlikely couple with the Mottram registers for the following year showing that Daniel Broadbent of Hattersley was buried on 30 May 1781. Furthermore, on 6 May 1776, 105 year old George Harding married Jane Darlington, 75, at St Oswald, Chester – showing that in the 18th century one could find love at any age.

Daniel Craig
James Bond actor Daniel Craig’s maternal family came from the City of Chester and can be found in these absorbing records. The parish register of St Mary shows the marriage of his maternal great-great-grandparents on 27 November 1870 – William Walker and Mary Astbury (née Ellis). William was 37 and working as an Iron Moulder, while Mary was only 21, and already listed as a widow from her first marriage.

Another maternal great-great-great-grandfather, William Hargrave, was a Coal Agent from the City of Chester, which was a highly regarded job, requiring business acumen, effective people skills and the gift of the gab as he traded between the coal manufacturers and everyday people. William married Mary Fleet in 1859 and both of their signatures appear in the parish register.

Tales of death from the plague
In 1625 the UK was hit by an outbreak of the plague which killed 35,000 people. Malpas in Cheshire was badly affected and the records made available online today reveal harrowing accounts of those who were killed by the disease. One such example is that of Richard Dawson of Bradley:

“being sick of the plague and perceiving that he must die at that time arose out of his bed and made his grave and caused his nephew to cast straw into the grave… and went and lay him down in the said grave, and caused clothes to be laid upon and so departed out of this world… he died about 28th august, this much I was credibly told.”

Debra Chatfield, marketing manager at findmypast.co.uk commented “These records make it possible for family historians and local history researchers to delve as far back as 1538, unearthing all sorts of unusual finds quickly and easily at their finger tips. Who would have known that Cheshire was hit by an earthquake in 1612 or that James Bond’s ancestors sold lumps of coal? Covering over 350 years of history, the Cheshire Collection is essential for anyone with Cheshire roots or connections and wanting to trace their family history, offering a fascinating glimpse into life at this time.”

The Cheshire Collection covers not just the Church of England but also Roman Catholic and Non-Conformist registers. Furthermore, they extend well beyond the core records of baptism, marriage and burial to a variety of other records giving biographical details for the residents of the county. The Collection consists of over 10 million records and includes Church of England Parish Registers, Bishop’s transcripts of the Parish Registers, Electoral Registers, Marriage Licence Bonds and Allegations, Non-Conformist and Roman Catholic records and Workhouse Registers. Wills and Probate records from Chester and Land Tax records will be added to the collection in the coming months.

The records have been published online for the very first time by findmypast.co.uk following a six month project after the website was awarded a contract by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies.

Jonathan Pepler, County Archivist for Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, said: “This is a very exciting development for everyone interested in Cheshire and its rich history. For the very first time it gives people online access to original records – the raw materials of family history – over a period spanning 350 years. Researchers, amateur historians and people tracing their family tree will be able to find the records they are looking for at the click of a button. This project firmly puts Cheshire Archives and Local Studies in the vanguard of local authority services.”

Councillor David Brown, Cheshire East Cabinet member with responsibility for performance and capacity, said: “This is a fantastic development that puts 350 years of Cheshire’s rich heritage and fascinating personal histories more easily within the reach of everyone. Giving online access to millions of original documents and records is another example of the Council’s commitment to excellence and working with others to deliver for the people of Cheshire East.”

To find out more and search the records, visit www.findmypast.co.uk

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QuickSheet: Citing Online Historical Resources

We recently reviewed a number of books and quicksheets by Elizabeth Mills. Her work has become the premier reference set on citation and source analysis. We have one more quicksheet by Mills which we did not cover the other week but is worth reviewing. Quicksheet: Citing Online Historical Sources; Evidence! Style is one more great guide in Elizabeth Mills collections worth having on hand.

The guide is an 11″ x 17″ laminated sheet, folded in half to fit any folder; including, space enough for a three hole punch and binder insertion. This laminated, four-page quick reference gives the researcher an easy guide to citing historical sources as found on the Internet. The QuickSheet begins with a Basic Principles section and a Basic Template to help get the researcher started. The remainder of the guide provides Models, or examples, for Common Record Types. For each model or source type there are three entries organized in columns for easy reading; Source List Entry, Full Reference Note, and Short Reference Note.

Listed here are all the source types covered in this QuickSheet:

Census Images

  • Ancestry
  • Heritage Quest

Census Indexes & Databases

  • Ancestry
  • FamilySearch
  • Heritage Quest

Census Instructions

Digital Articles & Books

  • Articles: Electronic Edition
  • Articles: Online Journal or Magazine
  • Books: Digital Image
  • Books: Online Edition (Continually Updated)

Historical Records

  • Abstracts
  • Databases
  • Images
  • Transcripts

Land-Entry Records

  • Federal Database Entries
  • Federal Patent Images
  • State Database Entries
  • State Patent Images

Newsletter & Newspaper Items

  • Electronic Delivery (Archived)
  • Images

Passenger Lists

  • Database Entries
  • Manifest Images
  • Ship Images

Social Security Death Index

Vital Records

  • State-compiled Abstracts
  • State-compiled Database at Commercial Site
  • State-compiled Database at State Site

 

Order this great companion guide, along with Elizabeth Mills’ other books and guides at Family Roots Publishing. Quicksheet: Citing Online Historical Sources; Evidence! Style is Item #:GPC3849.

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Association of Professional Genealogists Announces Election Results for Executive Committee, Regional Directors and Nominating Committee

The following news release was received from the Association of Professional Genealogists:

Kenyatta D. Berry Elected APG President

WESTMINSTER, Colo., November 9, 2011 - The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) today announced election results for its 2012–2014 executive committee, as well as for nine regional directors and two new nominating committee members. Kenyatta D. Berry of Santa Monica, Calif. was elected president. Berry, a genealogist, entrepreneur and lawyer with more than 15 years of experience in genealogy research and writing, served as APG vice president during the last term. She will succeed Laura G. Prescott of Brookline, New Hampshire.

“I am honored to be elected and excited at the depth and breadth of experience represented by our incoming officers, board and committee members,” said Berry. “APG made great strides during the last administration, growing to more than 2,400 members, adding new Chapters and expanding internationally. I look forward to continuing the important work of this organization.”

Kimberly D. Powell of Pennsylvania was elected APG vice president. Powell has been writing and blogging on genealogy for About.com since 2000. She is the author of several genealogy books and currently serves as a member on the APG board.

Janice S. Prater of Denver, Colo. will serve as secretary. Prater is the editor of the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History’s quarterly publication and is treasurer for the Colorado Chapter of APG. APG treasurer will be Joan Peake of West Virginia, a certified public accountant and the president of the Great Lakes Chapter of APG and the Fayette Ohio Genealogical Society.

APG members elected the following regional directors:

West region: Jean Wilcox Hibben, CG, is president of the Southern California Chapter of APG and the Corona (Calif.) Genealogical Society, secretary of the Genealogical Speakers Guild. Joan A. Hunter, MLS, CG, serves as Librarian General for the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, and is a past president of the Oregon Chapter of APG.

Midwest region: Billie Stone Fogarty, M.Ed., fulltime genealogist and lecturer and president of the Genealogical Speakers Guild. Jay H. Fonkert, CG, is a fulltime genealogist, lecturer and writer and a founder of the Northland APG Chapter.

Southeast region: Alvie L. Davidson, CG, is a Florida-based private investigator and circuit court qualified expert, specializing in missing persons and genealogical applications of investigations. Michael Hait, CG, is a professional genealogy researcher, writer and lecturer who currently serves as vice president of the National Capital Area Chapter of APG.

Northeast region: Debra Braverman is a professional genealogist in New York City, specializing in due diligence for trust and estates matters, and 19th–21st century New York research. Michael Leclerc of Massachusetts is a genealogist who most recently served as director of special projects at the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

International regions: Michael Goldstein of Israel, traces roots worldwide, specializing in family reunification, heir searches and Holocaust research.

Elected to one-year terms on the nominations committee are: Jana Sloan Broglin, CG, a director for the Federation of Genealogical Societies, and Debby Horton, professional genealogist and web designer.

About APG
The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,400 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter (www.twitter.com/apggenealogy) and FaceBook (www.facebook.com/AssociationofProfessionalGenealogists).

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Facebook App “Family Builder” Gets a New Owner and New Name

Facebook app, Family Builder, is a popular genealogy application running under Facebook. The app was sold last June to the background checking company, Intelius, and was given the new name, “Live Family.” Users of the app are aware of the name change, but not everyone knew of the change in ownership. The following excerpt is from an article posted on GeekWire provides all the details:

Intelius quietly buys Facebook genealogy app Family Builder

November 8, 2011 at 12:32 pm by John Cook

Intelius is best known for its background checks on family members, friends or employees. But now the Bellevue company is expanding in a new direction: Helping busy families connect and communicate.

Intelius quietly purchased popular Facebook app Family Builder on June 15th, rebranding the service as Live Family. The company has kept the acquisition pretty close to the vest up until now, with Intelius senior vice president Ed Petersen admitting that the new property is very much a work in progress.

“We did not buy Buckingham Palace,” said Petersen, who is now leading a team at Intelius who oversees the new unit. “What we bought was a great piece of property with a house that needed some work, in a really nice neighborhood.”

The property does have a decent number of tenants. When Intelius bought Family Builder in June, it boasted about 30 million registered users. That number has climbed to just over 41 million in the past four months, and Petersen sees big things ahead.

The idea, as explained by Petersen, is to create a place where brothers, sisters, cousins, moms, dads, aunts, uncles and grandparents can securely share photos, news, family tree information and more.

Petersen noted that Facebook has created a “social graph,” and LinkedIn has built an impressive “professional graph.” In his view, there’s a significant opportunity to create what he dubs a “family graph.”

Read the full article.

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The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Announces Its New Website

The following news release was received from Cathy Michelsen, Director of Development at the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society:

Members enjoy access to important new digital resources for research on New York families and families with New York connections

NEW YORK, NY, November 1, 2011 — The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society is pleased to announce that it has replaced its website with a brand new one that is easier to use and enriched with expanded content. The address www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org has not changed but visitors will find many new features.

All collections in the eLibrary may now be viewed in a browsable format, which allows the reader to easily scroll through documents and print multiple pages. Numerous unique records and digital publications have been added to the eLibrary. Example: The complete run of The New York Researcher and its predecessor publication The NYG&B Newsletter, which was first published in 1990. New guides to using newspapers, maps, and other resources have been created. Dozens of Research Aid articles have been brought up to date by the original authors. Individual guides to genealogical research in New York counties are in production; thirteen of a projected 62 guides are now online.

Additions to the eLibrary include:

  • The family records contained in the American Bible Society Collection and an index to more than 8,000 names
  • The complete set of over 500 NYG&B Member Biographies from the early 20th century
  • 32 digitized books, including many volumes originally published as part of the series Collections of The NYG&B Society and several entries in the WPA’s Public Archives Inventory, Church Archives Inventory, and Guide to Vital Statistics series for New York City.
  • Book two of the 1855 New York State Census for Manhattan’s Ward 17.

The cornerstone of the eLibrary is the full run of The NYG&B Record, which has been published quarterly since 1870 and forms the largest single collection of published material on families that lived in New York State. The collection is every-word searchable and is accompanied by a search engine based on an index to more than 1,000,000 names from the pages of The Record.

While access to the full digital resources of the website is available only to NYG&B members, there are several features available to both members and non-members:

  • News You Can Use is updated frequently and references new resources and information pertinent to New York research.
  • There are free guides on the following subjects: Getting Started on Your Family History; Finding New York Vital Records; Genealogical and Historical Societies in the New York Region; Heraldry; Heritage and Lineage Societies; and Hiring Professional Genealogical Researchers.
  • The Genealogical Exchange allows anyone to submit a specific query about a genealogical question related to New York.
  • Information about upcoming programs offered by the NYG&B and the New York Family History School is also available; tickets may be purchased through the website.

About the NYG&B
The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society has been the authoritative source for research on New York families and families with New York connections since 1869. By offering educational programs, scholarly and informational publications, and online resources, the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society helps people of all backgrounds build connections with their families and their communities, ­ especially those linked to New York City, State, and region ­ and to appreciate their families’ experience in the broader context of American history. The NYG&B maintains an eLibrary of digital material, including the entire run of its quarterly scholarly journal The NYG&B Record, for its members at www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org.

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New USA & Canada Vital Records & State Census Data at FamilySearch.org

The following U.S.A. vital-records oriented databases have been added or updated at FamilySearch.org since my last posting made October 20. Also included is the 1852 state census for California, and the Matagorda County, Texas School Census Records, 1923-1946 – as well as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police obituary card index and notices 1876-2007.

We’ve also updated all five of the GenealogyBlog Online Database Links Files.
See:

THE FOLLOWING DATABASES WERE POSTED OR UPDATED AT FAMILYSEARCH.ORG SINCE OCTOBER 20, 2011:

California State Census, 1852 – Name index of population schedules listing the inhabitants of the state of California in 1852 – 188,578 records as of 30 October 2011.

California, San Mateo County Records – 1856-1967Browsable Images – County records including marriage intentions, naturalizations, deeds, patents, homesteads, and military service discharges – 546,784 images as of 5 November 2011 – up 228,435 images since 25 August 2011.

Illinois, Macon County, Decatur Public Library Collections, 1879-2007Imaged Records – Images of card indexes from the Decatur Public Library. Includes Obituary indexes, which are by year range. The World War I Soldiers Cards give soldiers, deaths, and enlistees. 64,268 images as of 5 November 2011.

Indiana Marriages 1811-1959 – Indexed in partnership with the Indiana Genealogical Society. Name index of marriages recorded in the Indiana Territory and in the State of Indiana between 1811 and 1959. This collection includes searchable index data for marriage returns and licenses from the following counties: Adams, Allen, Bartholomew, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Carroll, Clark, Clay, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, De Kalb, Delaware, Dubois, Elkhart, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Gibson, Harrison, Henry, Huntington, Jackson, Marshall, Ohio, Owen, Rush, and Sullivan. Microfilm copies of original records are available at the Family History Library and at family history centers. Currently this collection is 48% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed. – 1,388,579 Records as of 5 November 2011 – up 84,711 records since 23 September 2011.

North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1917Imaged Records – Index and images of estate files from North Carolina counties. The originals were filmed at the North Carolina Department of Archives and History. The estate records contain loose papers relating to the settlement of estates including such matters as provision for heirs including minor children as well as distribution of funds, land and property, including slaves – This project was indexed in partnership with the North Carolina Genealogical Society and Library – 32,197 records and 688,692 images as of 30 October 2011.

Ohio, Stark County Coroner’s Records – 1890-2002Imaged Records – Images of Coroner’s Inquest books, reports, and case files from the courthouse in Canton, Ohio. This collection is being published as images become available – 45,057 Images as of 28 October 2011 – Up 39,054 imaged documents since 16 Aug 2011.

Oregon, Columbia County Records 1854-1858Imaged Records – This collection includes digital images of land and property, marriage, and naturalization records and indexes digitally captured at the Columbia County Courthouse in St. Helens, Oregon. This collection is being published as images become available – Includes Marriage Indexes 1854-1899, and Marriage Records 1854-1961 – 76,659 images as of 1 November 2011.

Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1934Digitized Records – Digital images and index of birth certificates for the state of Texas. Original records at the Vital Statistics Unit of the Texas Department of Health, Austin, Texas – 1,058,705 records as of 30 October, 2011 – up 422,956 records since 18 Mar 2011 – 999,015 images as of 30 October 2011 – from 394 rolls of film and digital images.

Texas Deaths, 1977-1986Imaged Records – Images of Texas statewide death certificates, including delayed certificates, from the Texas Department of State Health Services in Austin. Additional certificates will be added to the collection as they become available. Certificates for 1978 are currently posted by county. 130,208 images as of 11 November 2011. Up 59,536 images since 12 October 2011.

Texas, Bexar County, San Antonio Cemetery Records, 1893-2007Imaged Records – Miscellaneous cemetery records from the city of San Antonio, Texas. Records from the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Old City Cemetery, and San Jose Burial Park are included. Original records are in the custody of the San Antonio Parks and Recreation Department. 38,892 images as of 5 November 2011.

Texas, Matagorda County, School Census Records, 1923-1946Imaged Records – School census records for Matagorda County, Texas. Records are arranged by year, race (“colored” and “white”) and then alphabetically by surname. Additional images will be published to this collection as they become available – Currently covers 1923-1946 – with each year in alphabetical order – 52,548 images as of 7 November 2011.

Wisconsin Probate Estate Files, 1848-1933Images of probate estate case files from various counties in Wisconsin. This collection includes Fond du Lac County (1848-1917), Green County (1848-1885), Jackson County (1897-1935), Pepin County (1900-1935), Shawano County (1861-1933) and Trempealeau County (1900-1920). From Wisconsin State Historical Society & FHL digital images – 655,795 images as of 5 November 2011.

U.S.A. Social Security Death Index – A name index to deaths recorded by the Social Security Administration beginning in 1962 – 90,732,247 Records as of 5 November 2011.

Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police obituary card index and notices 1876-2007 - Imaged Records – Digital images of an obituary card index and the obituary section of selected periodicals located in the RCMP Heritage Collections Unit, Regina, Saskatchewan. Contains the obituary sections from the following Royal Canadian Mounted Police publications: Royal Canadian Mounted Police quarterly (title varies), 1933-2007; Pony express : Staff Relations Branch newsletter, 1976-1994; and Scarlet and gold (Royal Canadian Mounted Police Veterans’ Association. Vancouver Division), 1919-1997. Includes the honour roll section, p. 250-253, covering deaths of those RCMP killed while on duty, 1876-1971, from the following book: The pictorial history of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police / S.W. Horrall ; foreword by W.L. Higgitt. Toronto, Ontario : McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1973 – 9,476 images as of 3 October 2011.

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What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; Part 4 of 4

This week we are reviewing four great books designed to help the family historian overcome a common research stumbling block. Reading vital records, court documents, certificates, court records, and so on are a common part of genealogical research. But, how often does the researcher find words, abbreviations, or acronyms for which they are unsure of the means. These four great books can help with the genealogical research language barrier.

To read parts two and three follow these links:

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 1 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 2 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 3 of 4

 

In this blog, we review Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary, compiled by Maurine & Glen Harris.

The Genealogical Dictionary has long been well received at Family Roots Publishing. Perhaps not as well sold as What Did They Mean By That, but is popular due to the “concise” and easy to ready style of the book.

Having been a publisher and author, overall design aesthetics are important to me, and this book is well designed. I find this book, with its slightly smaller form factor at 5.5″ x 8.5″ (instead of the 6″ x 9″ of the other books), its two column printing, and its easy to read fonts and design all printed on bright, thick, white paper my visual and tactile favorite of the group. Perhaps, this is a contributor to its success.

Definitions are easily the shortest and most direct of the three dictionaries. However, as I have demonstrated in the previous parts of this blog, each book provides its own flavor and value.

Most of the books 256 pages are definitions. The last 23 pages, however, are abbreviations. One unique aspect to this book is the inclusion of numerous Latin words with the English translations. These words are common to many documents encountered by genealogist and are included alphabetically with all other entries. Latin words are marked by “(Lat.)” just after the entry. For example:

natus: (Lat.) birth; age; son; offspring.

Together, the four books discussed in this blog series provides the Genealogist with a fantastic reference set to words and symbols found in genealogical research: in both the field of study as well as in documents and records studied. While there is some overlap found between these books, there is plenty more unique to each.

 

To order copies of each book, please visit Family Roots Publishing. Or, get all four as a set and get 20% off:

Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide For Family Historians (Revised 2nd Edition); Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP269.

A-Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary For Genealogists And Historians – 3rd Edition; Family Roots Publishing Item #: GE138.

What Did They Mean By That? A Dictionary of Historical and Genealogical Terms, Old and New; Family Roots Publishing Item #: HBD7169.

Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary; Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP06X.


20% off the complete set:

Complete Genealogical Terms & Phrases Reference Set (all four of the above listed books) at 20% off. Family Roots Publishing Item #: REF001. ***Must order the set in order to receive the discount***

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What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; Part 3 of 4

This week we are reviewing four great books designed to help the family historian overcome a common research stumbling block. Reading vital records, court documents, certificates, court records, and so on are a common part of genealogical research. But, how often does the researcher find words, abbreviations, or acronyms for which they are unsure of the means. These four great books can help with the genealogical research language barrier.

To read parts two and three follow these links:

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 1 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 2 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 4 of 4

 

In this blog, we review What Did They Mean By That? A Dictionary of Historical and Genealogical Terms, Old and New, by Paul Drake, J.D.

What Did They Mean By That has long been the most popular dictionary of the group at Family Roots Publishing. There is probably good reason for this as it stands out in our collection in a couple of ways. First, this book is the biggest dictionary in the group, at 6″ x 9″ and 350 pages. This is also the only book to list all entries paragraph style, instead of using columns. The book feels a bit more like an encyclopedia than it does a standard dictionary. Most entries provide more than just a standard definition. Rather, entries provide an explanations, examples, and observations. Take this example from all three dictionaries for the word maiden:

  • A to Zax defines maiden – 1) a ship’s first trip after construction is referenced as the “maiden voyage;” 2) a fortress which has never fallen to an enemy.
  • Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary defines maiden — 1: a young unmarried woman; 2: a Scottish guillotine used for beheading criminals.
  • What Did They Mean defines maiden – a young adult woman, not necessarily a virgin, at least not in the eyes of the criminal law, e.g., “Anna’s indictment in Vermont for adulterous conduct referred to her as a maiden.”

While still a relatively short entry, What Did They Mean clearly had the longest entry and is the only one to provide an example. Note also, each book add different definitions for the same word. One doesn’t even reference a woman. This example not only shows the longer style in What Did They Mean, but also shows how different each dictionary is.

This dictionary has other unique features as well. What Did They Mean By That is the only book in the group to include pictures. While not on every page, the pictures do provide both an element of interest as well as prove educational. Some of the images are pictures and some are document samples. There is also a small chart at the beginning showing a comparison between Saxon and English alphabets.

As I said, this is by far the top seller among our dictionaries. The easy reading style and completeness are clearly contributors. This book is perhaps the best in the group as a desk reference, while the other two perhaps make better field companions, due to size and more concise nature of entries.

Together, the four books discussed in this blog series provides the Genealogist with a fantastic reference set to words and symbols found in genealogical research: in both the field of study as well as in documents and records studied. While there is some overlap found between these books, there is plenty more unique to each.

 

To order copies of each book, please visit Family Roots Publishing. Or, get all four as a set and get 20% off:

Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide For Family Historians (Revised 2nd Edition); Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP269.

A-Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary For Genealogists And Historians – 3rd Edition; Family Roots Publishing Item #: GE138.

What Did They Mean By That? A Dictionary of Historical and Genealogical Terms, Old and New; Family Roots Publishing Item #: HBD7169.

Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary; Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP06X.


20% off the complete set:

Complete Genealogical Terms & Phrases Reference Set (all four of the above listed books) at 20% off. Family Roots Publishing Item #: REF001. ***Must order the set in order to receive the discount***

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What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; Part 2 of 4

This week we are reviewing four great books designed to help the family historian overcome a common research stumbling block. Reading vital records, court documents, certificates, court records, and so on are a common part of genealogical research. But, how often does the researcher find words, abbreviations, or acronyms for which they are unsure of the means. These four great books can help with the genealogical research language barrier.

To read parts two and three follow these links:

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 1 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 3 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 4 of 4

 

In this blog, we review A to Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists and Historians, by Barbara Jean Evans.

Like all three of the dictionaries in this blog, A to Zax has thousands of words which are either “old fashioned” or are little used today. This dictionary includes terms in areas including:

  • medical
  • geographical
  • foreign
  • historical
  • legal
  • relational
  • occupational
  • household
  • religious
  • colloquial
  • monetary
  • ethnic

This book also sets itself apart by including nicknames and a list of Dutch given names. While there are many terms and abbreviations defined in the book, some of the entries provide an encyclopedia type entry. For example, one entry lists the Kings, Queens, and other rulers of England from 802 to 1952 broken down by house or ruling group.

A to Zax comes in at 304 pages, with two columns per page, giving a traditional dictionary style feel to the book.

Together, the four books discussed in this blog series provides the Genealogist with a fantastic reference set to words and symbols found in genealogical research: in both the field of study as well as in documents and records studied. While there is some overlap found between these books, there is plenty more unique to each.

 

To order copies of each book, please visit Family Roots Publishing. Or, get all four as a set and get 20% off:

Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide For Family Historians (Revised 2nd Edition); Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP269.

A-Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary For Genealogists And Historians – 3rd Edition; Family Roots Publishing Item #: GE138.

What Did They Mean By That? A Dictionary of Historical and Genealogical Terms, Old and New; Family Roots Publishing Item #: HBD7169.

Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary; Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP06X.


20% off the complete set:

Complete Genealogical Terms & Phrases Reference Set (all four of the above listed books) at 20% off. Family Roots Publishing Item #: REF001. ***Must order the set in order to receive the discount***

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What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; Part 1 of 4

This week we are reviewing four great books designed to help the family historian overcome a common research stumbling block. Reading vital records, court documents, certificates, court records, and so on are a common part of genealogical research. But, how often does the researcher find words, abbreviations, or acronyms for which they are unsure of the means. These four great books can help with the genealogical research language barrier.

To read parts two and three follow these links:

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 2 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 3 of 4

What Do They Mean? Understanding Abbreviations, Words, and Acronyms in Research; 4 of 4

 

In this blog, we review Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide for Family Historians, by Kip Sperry.

“All fields of study have their own unique abbreviations, acronyms, alphabetic symbols, contractions, and shortening of words,” says Sperry in his introduction. Genealogy and history research are no different. In the practice of genealogical research there seems to be no end to the number of acronyms created in the field. Just knowing some of the larger societies and organizations looks like an can of alphabet soup: NGS, FGS, DAR, SAR/NSSAR, DUP, SUP, OGS, FFHS, FEEFHS, and so on. There is a good chance these same acronyms are used with different meanings in other fields of study and research.

Documents and papers studied in the process of genealogical and historical research also bring forth an plethora of new abbreviations, symbols, and acronyms uncommon to modern writing and speech. Shortening of names in records gives us examples like mart for Martin and Xper/XR/Xpofer for Christopher. Acronyms for organizations one’s ancestors may have belonged to like KWM or Knights of Wise Men are less common today but will appear in research. Abbreviations like hldr for householder or hlg for hireling are common in census, occupation, and similar records.

Abbreviations and Acronyms was compiled to provide the family historian and other historical researchers with a quick reference to the partial words and acronyms they are likely to come across in their work. This book also includes an appendix with references for symbols, numbers, and measurements.

Together, the four books discussed in this blog series provides the Genealogist with a fantastic reference set to words and symbols found in genealogical research: in both the field of study as well as in documents and records studied. While there is some overlap found between these books, there is plenty more unique to each.

 

To order copies of each book, please visit Family Roots Publishing. Or, get all four as a set and get 20% off:

Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide For Family Historians (Revised 2nd Edition); Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP269.

A-Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary For Genealogists And Historians – 3rd Edition; Family Roots Publishing Item #: GE138.

What Did They Mean By That? A Dictionary of Historical and Genealogical Terms, Old and New; Family Roots Publishing Item #: HBD7169.

Ancestry’s Concise Genealogical Dictionary; Family Roots Publishing Item #: TP06X.


20% off the complete set:

Complete Genealogical Terms & Phrases Reference Set (all four of the above listed books) at 20% off. Family Roots Publishing Item #: REF001. ***Must order the set in order to receive the discount***

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