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St. Louis Family History Research Guide

With the Louisiana Purchase St. Louis effectively became the gateway to the western frontier. After the purchase from France, many of the pre-1803 vital records and historical documents of the are were sent to the United States government, though some went to Spain and some to Cuba. Then in 1876 the city of St. Louis split itself off from the County of St. Louis, becoming an independent city with its own government. Understanding the history of the area is key to understanding the records available and where they may be found. St. Louis Family History Research Guide provides this vital background information and educates the reader to searching genealogical resources for the St. Louis area from its colonial founding by the French in 1764 through modern day records.

Understanding records and research options for St. Louis is the primary objective of this guide. Starting with a brief history of the area, county, and city, the book then discusses St. Louis neighborhoods. Chapter three discusses research facilities, even including the national park services. The bulk of the book examines just about every type of records of value to family historians, broken out by type, and vetted with descriptions, source locations, and other useful information.

Along with useful source information and outlined research techniques, this guide also illuminates the nature of available records. The reader will learn to interpret and analyze records, especially, their relationship to the sorted history of St. Louis City and County.

Author Ann Carter Flemming specialized in St. Louis research. She is both a Certified Genealogist as well as a Certified Genealogical Lecturer and serves in many positions with local and area genealogical associations. Flemming has also authored other publications related to family history research. Her more than 25 years experience comes to bear in this book and she clearly details records and resources for St. Louis, both city and county.

 

Table of Contents

History

  • St. Louis History

Communities & Neighborhoods

  • St. Louis City Neighborhoods
    • Selected City Neighborhoods
  • St. Louis County Municipalities & Communities
    • Selected County Municipalities & Communities

Research Facilities

  • St. Louis Area Repositories
    • St. Louis Government Centers
    • Research Repositories
    • Family History Centers
    • Repositories Outside St. Louis
    • Religious Repositories
    • National Archives and Records Administration
    • National Park Service
    • Adjoining Counties

Records

  • Academia in St. Louis
    • Selected Colleges and Universities
    • Selected High Schools
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, & Maps
    • Atlases
    • Gazetteers
    • Maps
  • Biographical Sources
    • Women of St. Louis
    • Men of St. Louis
    • Families of St. Louis
  • Birth & Adoption Records
    • Birth Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Baptismal Records
    • Bible Records
  • Business, Occupation, & Society Sources
    • Businesses
    • Occupations
    • Societies
  • Cemeteries in St. Louis
    • List of St. Louis City and County Cemeteries
  • Census: Federal, State, & Local
    • Federal Population Schedules
    • Federal Special Schedules
    • State and Territorial Censuses
    • City of St. Louis Census Records
  • Death Certificates, Funeral Homes, & Coroner Records
    • Deaths
    • Burial Permits
    • Religious Records
    • Social Security Death Index
    • Funeral Homes
    • Death Notices
    • Coroner Records
  • Directories: City, County, & Social
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Bohemia-Czech
    • Chinese
    • Creole
    • French
    • German
    • Irish
    • Italian
    • Jewish
    • Polish
    • Scandinavian
    • Scots
  • Government Records: Courts, Elections, & Taxes
    • Legal Vocabulary
    • Courts
    • Election
    • Taxes
  • Historic Homes, Museums, & Parks
    • Historic Buildings
    • Historic Homes
    • Museums & Buildings
    • Parks
  • Institutions: Hospitals, orphanages, Homes, & Prisons
    • Hospitals
    • Orphanages and Other Homes
    • Prisons
  • Land: Deeds, Grants, & Patents
    • French and Spanish Grants
    • Missouri Land Patents, 1831–1969
    • St. Louis County Land Records, 1804–1876
    • St. Louis City Land Records, 1877–Present
    • St. Louis County Land Records, 1877–Present
  • Marriage & Divorce Records
    • Marriage
    • Divorce
  • Migration, Immigration, & Naturalization
    • Migration
    • Immigration
    • Passenger Lists
    • Naturalization
  • Military Events & Records
    • Colonial Wars (Pre–1776)
    • American Revolution (1776–1783)
    • War of 1812 (1812–1815)
    • Indian Wars (1832–1837)
    • Mexican War (1847–1849)
    • Civil War (1861–1865)
    • Post Civil War Records
    • Spanish-American War (1898–1902)
    • Philippine Insurrection (1899–1902)
    • World War I (1916–1918)
    • World War II (1941–1945)
    • Subsequent Wars
  • Newspapers in St. Louis
    • Newspaper Indexes
    • St. Louis Newspapers
  • Religious in St. Louis
    • Baptist
    • Catholic
    • Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
    • Congregational
    • Episcopal
    • Evangelical
    • Jewish
    • Lutheran
    • Methodist
    • Presbyterian
    • United Church of Christ
    • Other Religious Congregations
  • Will & Probate Records
    • Wills
    • Probate Records

Appendix

  • Appendix A: Current Location of Records
  • Appendix B: Alphabetical Contact List

Index

  • Index

 

St. Louis Family History Research Guide is available from Family Root Publishing; Item #: FP001; Price: $29.35.

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The 1940 Census Makes Up 18 Terabytes of Hosted Data

The following infographic was received from Julie Hill at Archives.com:

1940 census archives.com

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MyHeritage Releases Mobile App For On-The-Go Discoveries

The following was received from MyHeritage:

World’s largest family network unveils new mobile experience for searching historical records, including the 1940 U.S. Census, on iPhone, iPad and Android

PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel – April 5, 2012: MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, today announced the ability to search billions of historical records, including the 1940 U.S. Census, on-the-go via a new version of the free MyHeritage Mobile App for iPhone, Android and iPad. The new version 1.2 of the MyHeritage App also searches more than 22 million family trees, helping users with their family history research. The move further extends MyHeritage’s leadership by offering an intuitive and exciting experience for families to discover more about the lives of their American relatives in 1940 and to trace their roots around the world, all on-the-go.

The MyHeritage Mobile App was first introduced in December 15, 2011 and has since amassed an install base of more than 500,000. In addition to searching historical content, it allows users to take their family tree on-the-go with an attractive display specially suited for mobile devices, capture family moments for future generations and stay in touch with family anytime, anywhere.

As millions of people rush to satisfy their curiosity and access the 1940 US census – one of the most significant sets of historical records ever to be released – MyHeritage is currently the only commercial player offering both a complete set of images from all US states and a preliminary searchable index, available via the new MyHeritage App and on www.myheritage.com/1940census. Access is completely free and no registration is required.

All 3.8 million images of the 1940 U.S. Census, and the initial collection of indexed records searchable by names, facts and other criteria, are now available to explore for free on the MyHeritage App, downloadable from the App Store or Google Play (formerly Android Market). The app can search the entire MyHeritage data collection of more than four billion records, many exclusive to MyHeritage, including birth, marriage, death, immigration and military records, census records, newspapers, yearbooks and much more. Available in more than 20 languages, the app enables family history lovers all over the world to explore their family’s history.

The company’s quick delivery and high quality searching and viewing experience of the 1940 U.S. Census prompted praise from some of the world’s leading genealogy opinion leaders:

  • Influential Geneablogger Pat Richley-Erickson commented yesterday on her popular blog, Dear Myrtle: “MyHeritage: 1st commercial site to post all 1940 census images […] All images from the 1940 US federal census are now live on the MyHeritage site. This was accomplished by jumping through hoops, technologically speaking. These images are free, and readily accessible. Ol’ Myrt here thinks you’ll like the image interface. Try it, you’ll like it.”
  • “MyHeritage has beaten the rest of the crowd,” wrote renowned Geneablogger Dick Eastman in Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, yesterday, while well-known reporter Ancestry Insider compared all companies and organizations working on the 1940 census, and summarized: “Today MyHeritage crossed the image finish line. Early in the day they finished loading all states. The online buzz about MyHeritage has been very positive. I declare them first place.”

The updated MyHeritage Mobile App is powered by the fastest and most powerful family history search engine, MyHeritage SuperSearch™. Packed with historical records obtained through the company’s acquisition of FamilyLink, and user-generated information in family trees on MyHeritage, SuperSearch™ is expected to be launched with full capabilities in mid-April, to help family history enthusiasts break through brick walls in their research.

“It has been encouraging to see the huge mainstream interest in the 1940 US census. Anticipating this demand, we have created a fantastic online and mobile experience for families to discover their roots and satisfy their curiosity for the 1940 U.S Census”, said MyHeritage Founder and CEO, Gilad Japhet. “Enabling discoveries via mobile puts us firmly on the map as a serious provider of historical content. Our successful publishing of the 1940 US census and the enhanced mobile app are only the beginning – watch this space!”

With more than 62 million registered users, billions of historical records, 22 million family trees and close to 1 billion profiles, MyHeritage has become the trusted home on the web for families wishing to explore their family history, share memories and stay connected.

About MyHeritage
MyHeritage is the most popular family network on the web. On MyHeritage, millions of families around the world enjoy having a private and free place to explore their history and share special family memories. Pioneers in making family history a collaborative experience for all the family, MyHeritage empowers its users with a unique mix of innovative social tools and a massive library of historical content. The site is available in 38 languages. The company is backed by Accel Partners and Index Ventures, the investors of Facebook and Skype. For more information visit www.myheritage.com. The 1940 U.S. Federal Census is available on www.myheritage.com/1940census.

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Ancestry Has Finished the Indexing of the 1940 Delaware & Nevada Censuses

The following was received from Mathew Deighton at Ancestry.com this afternoon:

Ancestry.com is proud to announce the first indexed states of the 1940 U.S. Census are now ready for searching. After 72 years being held from public view, the Nevada and Delaware 1940 Census is now available and searchable for free on Ancestry.com. While the remainder of the U.S. states are digitized and available for viewing, Delaware and Nevada can now be easily searched by name, opening a window into the time of the great depression and WWII. Information that can be found in this recently released census includes: name, address, value of home, occupation and employment status, income in 1939, education, marriage information and much more.

We are also in the final stage of uploading all 3.8 million images from the 1940 Census and that is slated to be completed by tomorrow morning (April 6). What’s more, to complement the launch of the 1940 Census, Ancestry.com is by providing free access to 1 billion hand-selected records from the 1940’s era through April 10.

For more information on the newly released 1940 U.S. Census, visit Ancestry.com/1940.

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The 1940 U.S. Census Now Being Indexed by the US Census Community Project – Delaware Finished

The following news release was received from FamilySearch:

4 April 2012: The 1940 U.S. Census is here and the 1940 US Census Community Project has kicked off to a great start! The excitement and enthusiasm for this project is far greater than anything previously seen in the six years that FamilySearch indexing has been available. Online volunteers completed the indexing for the state of Delaware in the first 24 hours. They are now indexing Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia!

It may take up to two weeks to make all of the states available for indexing, so check the current projects page or follow the feed on Facebook to stay up to date on the next states to be released.

Current and Completed Projects
To view a list of currently available indexing projects, along with their record language and completion percentage, visit the FamilySearch indexing updates page. To learn more about individual projects, view the FamilySearch projects page.

New Projects Added

  • Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Part 2 J]
  • U.S. 1940 Census—Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia
  • U.S., Arkansas—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918U.S., Georgia—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Indiana Steuben—County Marriages 1811-1959
  • U.S., Tennessee—County Marriages, 1790–1950 [Part G]
  • U.S., Texas—Deaths, 1890–1976 [Part C]

View the FamilySearch Projects page to see the full list of available projects and to learn more about how to participate.

Recently Completed Projects
(Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process. They will be published at familysearch.org in the near future.)

  • U.S., Alabama—County Marriages, 1809–1950 [Part C]
  • U.S., Alabama—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Missouri—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Ohio—Tax Records, 1800–1850 [Part 5]
  • U.S., Texas—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • UK, England and Wales—1871 Census for Lancashire and Yorkshire, and Durham [Part C]
  • U.S., Indiana, Morgan— County Marriages 1811-1959
  • U.S.—Index to Correspondence of the Record and Pension Office, 1889–1904

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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MyHeritage to Exhibit at the Houston and Albuquerque Family History Expos

As you most likely already know, MyHeritage was the first company to have all images of the 1940 Census fully available on their website. They did it in about 48 hours. MyHeritage will be exhibiting and presenting in person and live over the Internet at the Houston Family History Expo on Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, 2012 and again at the Albuquerque Family History Expo on April 13 and 14, 2012.

Family Roots Publishing will be exhibiting at both of these wExpos, so come out and see us!

These Expos will be a great place to get a leg up on the newly released 1940 census information. We hope you can arrange your schedule to join us. Invite a friend to join you.

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MyHeritage Publishes All 1940 US Census Images

MyHeritage clearly won the race to get the 1940 census up – and they are now busy producing indexes. See the following news release:

PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel – April 4, 2012: To satisfy the great demand for the 1940 U.S Census, MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, today announced that it has successfully published all 3.8 million images of the 1940 U.S. Census, available to search for free on www.myheritage.com/1940census. MyHeritage is the first commercial provider to successfully upload the entire 1940 Census image collection. MyHeritage was also first to provide an initial collection of indexed records from the 1940 US Census, searchable for free by names, facts and other criteria. As millions of people rush to satisfy their curiosity and access one of the most significant and meaningful sets of historical records ever to be released, MyHeritage is the only destination on the web currently offering both a complete set of images from all US states and a preliminary searchable index, all on www.myheritage.com/1940census.

Access is free and no registration is required. The first indexed records come from Bristol County in Rhode Island, with a deluge of additional records to be added by MyHeritage each day. MyHeritage is also the only provider to make the 1940 U.S. census searchable in 38 languages, enabling family history lovers all over the world to discover more about the lives of their American relatives during this transformative period in history. All census images are also currently available on the additional historical content sites owned by MyHeritage on www.worldvitalrecords.com/1940census and www.familylink.com/1940census – with initial searchable indexes expected to be live soon on these websites, and to grow throughout 2012. With the industry’s fastest and most powerful family history search engine and a sophisticated system for automatically matching records to family trees on the site,

MyHeritage aims to provide an easy, hassle-free and enjoyable way of discovering more about a family’s American legacy through the 1940 U.S. Census. MyHeritage will also enable a search of the 1940 U.S. Census on-the-go with a new version of the MyHeritage Mobile App for iPhone, iPad and Android, to be launched this week. With more than 62 million registered users, billions of historical records, 22 million family trees and close to 1 billion profiles, MyHeritage has become the trusted home on the web for families wishing to explore their family history, share memories and stay connected. About MyHeritage MyHeritage is the most popular family network on the web. On MyHeritage, millions of families around the world enjoy having a private and free place to explore their history and share special family memories. Pioneers in making family history a collaborative experience for all the family, MyHeritage empowers its users with a unique mix of innovative social tools and a massive library of historical content. The site is available in 38 languages. The company is backed by Accel Partners and Index Ventures, the investors of Facebook and Skype.

For more information visit www.myheritage.com. The 1940 U.S. Federal Census is available on www.myheritage.com/1940census. Press Contact Caroline Cohen, PR Manager for MyHeritage Phone: +44 2081231152 Email: caroline@myheritage.com

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FindMyPast Sets up Program to Find Our Ancestors and Notify Us as Soon as They are Indexed

FindMyPast.com is offering to find and notify us that they have located specific ancestors for us as soon as they have that ancestor’s state indexed. This sound like a good service for busy people (most of us!). Keep in mind that they will be notifying us once their index is produced for that state. There’s nothing saying that a competitor won’t already have that state indexed…

The following news release was received from FindMyPast.com:

Santa Monica, CA. April 4, 2012: The 1940 Census has finally been released and you can now browse the images online. But the waiting’s not over, since you still won’t be able to search the whole census by person until it’s fully indexed in several months.

Help, however, is at hand. Findmypast.com has come up with a way to make your search quicker and simpler – by offering to do the searching for you.

Findmypast.com is the new U.S. addition to the global network of findmypast family history websites, launched in a limited, early form in time for the 1940 Census. Its unique new, customized feature, created for the 1940 Census, is called “We’ll find them for you” and is now live.

All you have to do is to visit findmypast.com, submit the name of the person you’re searching for, plus some extra clues, and findmypast.com will email you as soon as the person’s records become available.

“We’re taking the hassle and delay out of searching”, says Brian Speckart, marketing manager of findmypast.com. “With this new feature, findmypast.com is going the extra mile to help you find your past as quickly and easily as possible.” While the whole census won’t be searchable for several months, the records of individual U.S. states will be made searchable earlier, one state at a time. A couple of them are likely to be done by mid-April.

Some genealogy sites are offering to alert users simply when a particular state has been indexed. “But we’re going further and finding the particular individual you’re looking for”, says Speckart.

You have to tell findmypast.com in which state the person was living at the time of the 1940 Census. “As soon as that state is indexed, we run a program against the data to find the individual you’re looking for you and then email you the links we find”, says Speckart.

The job of indexing states one by one is being done by an army of volunteers under the banner of the 1940 Community Project, of which findmypast.com is a proud member.

Visitors to findmypast.com will be able to use the site’s new “We’ll find them for you” feature to submit details of the person they want to find.

Supplying the person’s first and last name and state where they were living in 1940 is all that’s required but providing additional clues will help findmypast.com narrow down the search results. Other helpful information includes approximate year of birth, likely birth city, place of residence in 1940 and names of other household members.

The new service isn’t just limited to family members either. Users can submit details of celebrities or other public figures and ask findmypast.com to find them too. “So, if you happen to know that Marilyn Monroe’s real name was Norma Jean and which state she called home in 1940, we’ll find her for you too”, says Speckart.

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Stephen Morse’s One-Step Site gets 2,248,987 Hits on April 2, 2012

I just got the following note from Stephen Morse:

The stats are in for my One-Step site on the first day of the census. The site normally gets between 100,000 and 200,000 hits a day. Yesterday, April 2, it got 2,248,987 hits. And that doesn’t count the hits to the One-Step ED Finder tools that are now hosted on other sites, such as the National Archives.

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1940 US Census: MyHeritage Publishes 2 Million Images & Unveils the First Indexed Records for Free Searches

I just got off the phone with Gilad Japhet, the CEO of MyHeritage.com. He was calling from near Tel Aviv, Israel. He was calling about the fact that they now have 60% of the 1940 U.S. Census images posted on their websites (this was of as 2:20 MDT). They have already begun indexing, starting with Rhode Island. They figure they will have all of the Rhode Island indexes up by some time tommorrow. He told me that he hadn’t seen much of “home” the last few days, as all efforts have been in place to get the 1940 census up.

According to Gilad, they got the encripted data on a portable drive just after midnight the morning of April 2. By that time, all flights to Dallas (where their data center is located) had ceased for the night. The data was dispatched to Dallas on the first flight out, received at the Dallas Data Center, and they began uploading data as fast as possible. They are using about 100 new servers for the data, and were able to stay up all day on the second of April without crashing.

One of the things that Gilad revealed to me was that the search is empowered by a new search engine that I will being writing more about in the near future.

MyHeritage bought Fmilylink and WorldVitalRecords.com the lst of November, and they have seen a 53% growth in subscribers to those websites since the aquisition.

I did a screen shot of the Jones families found in Bristol County Rhode Island in 1940. See it at the end of this blog.

Following is a brand-new news release from MyHeritage.com:


World’s largest family network steps up to meet massive demand amidst 1940 U.S. Census frenzy

PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel – April 3, 2012: MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, today announced the availability of the first indexed records from the 1940 US Census, searchable for free by names, facts and other criteria, on www.myheritage.com/1940census. In addition, MyHeritage has published two million images of the 1940 U.S. Federal Census out of the total 3.8 million, with complete availability of all images expected in less than 24 hours.

The highly anticipated searchable indexed records and images are amongst the very first to appear on the internet as millions of people rush to satisfy their curiosity and access one of the most significant and meaningful sets of historical records ever to be released. The first indexed records come from Bristol County in Rhode Island, with a deluge of additional records to be added by MyHeritage each day. The images currently available on www.myheritage.com/1940census cover all of New York, California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, New Jersey, Virginia, Rhode Island, Missouri, Wyoming and Nevada. Images for additional states are added every hour.

“With a tidal wave of demand from the general public, MyHeritage is excited to be the first to provide a preliminary searchable index and more than half of the 1940 Census images, all for free. Now anyone can learn more about their loved ones, celebrities, and life in general in the USA in 1940.” said Chief Content Officer of MyHeritage, Russ Wilding. “We’ve been working hard for months and have built a huge new data center all in anticipation of enabling the masses to explore the 1940 U.S. Census on a rock-solid site. The overwhelming interest in the census is a great sign of the growing popularity of family history among mainstream audiences and we’re proud to be a part of this moment in history.”

As the largest and most recent U.S. census to be made publicly available, the 1940 Census opens a window into the lives of the generation that survived the Great Depression and lived through the Second World War, described as the Greatest Generation. Users will be able to use the 1940 Census to learn more about their parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and other close relatives.

Following the release of the 1940 U.S. Census past midnight on April 2, 2012 by the National Archives and Records Administration, the 1940 Census was in the top spot for the most popular Google searches in the USA for the entire day.

MyHeritage is the only provider to make the 1940 U.S. census searchable in 38 languages, enabling family history lovers all over the world to discover more about the lives of their American relatives during this transformative period in history. The census images are also currently available on the additional historical content sites owned by MyHeritage on www.worldvitalrecords.com/1940census and www.familylink.com/1940census - with initial searchable indexes expected to be live soon on these websites, and to grow throughout 2012.

With the industry’s fastest and most powerful family history search engine and a sophisticated system of automatically matching records to family trees on the site, MyHeritage aims to provide an easy, hassle-free and enjoyable way of discovering more about a family’s American legacy through the 1940 U.S. Census.
Building on its innovative lead in the family history industry, MyHeritage will also enable a search of the 1940 U.S. Census on-the-go with a new version of the MyHeritage Mobile App for iPhone, iPad and Android, to be launched this week.

With more than 62 million registered users, billions of historical records, 22 million family trees and close to 1 billion profiles, MyHeritage has become the trusted home on the web for families wishing to explore their family history, share memories and stay connected.

About MyHeritage
MyHeritage is the most popular family network on the web. On MyHeritage, millions of families around the world enjoy having a private and free place to explore their history and share special family memories. Pioneers in making family history a collaborative experience for all the family, MyHeritage empowers its users with a unique mix of innovative social tools and a massive library of historical content. The site is available in 38 languages. The company is backed by Accel Partners and Index Ventures, the investors of Facebook and Skype. For more information visit www.myheritage.com. The 1940 U.S. Federal Census is available on www.myheritage.com/1940census.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1940 Census

The following was received from my good friend, Dan Lynch:

It seemed only fitting that I should find President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1940 Census, enumerated exactly 72 years to the day from when he appears to have provided the information for his household. He was, after all, also one of the 132 million people living in the United States as of April 1, 1940. In the Population Schedule below, we find Franklin D. Roosevelt listed on line 19 and listed as the 58-year old head of household, born in New York. He reports his place of residence on April 1, 1935 (column 17) was ‘Same house’ and his occupation and industry is listed as ‘President of U.S.A. (columns 28 & 29). Also living in the home are wife Eleanor (55), Personal Secretary Marguerite A. LeHand(43), Cousin Elizabeth Henderson (22), Governess Elspetn Connochie (46), and four Negro Servants Ida M. Allen (35), Armstead H. Barnett (27), Ella F. Sampson (32), and George C. Fields (29).

[Research and transcription by Dan Lynch of Connecticut, with help from the wonderful 1940 One-Step Tools created by Steve Morse and Joel Weintraub of California, and a team of volunteers].

http://1940census.net/1940-census-president-franklin-d-roosevelt.php

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1940 Census: Chuck Norris tops “Class of 1940” – voted America’s favorite “fantasy relative”

The following news release was received from findmypast.com:

Chuck Norris tops “Class of 1940” – voted America’s favorite “fantasy relative”
Al Pacino second, Martin Sheen third in IBOPE Zogby poll for findmypast.com – marking the 1940 Census release April 2

Santa Monica, CA; April 2 2012: Chuck Norris is the most popular American born the year of the 1940 U.S. Census, suggests a national poll done to mark the Government’s release of the 1940 Census records April 2.

The martial artist, actor and action star is the 1940-born American who fellow Americans would most like to discover is a long-lost relative, reveals the poll conducted by IBOPE Zogby for genealogy website findmypast.com.

Al Pacino ranks second in the poll and fellow actor Martin Sheen third, while golfer Jack Nicklaus shares fourth place with musician Frank Zappa.

Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic politician, is the top-ranking woman, ahead of Raquel Welch and Dionne Warwick, and the 1940-born American who Democrats would most like to find is related.

But for Americans as a whole, Chuck Norris, American tough guy, is the landslide winner, polling over double anyone else.

“One of the joys of genealogy can be unearthing ‘trophy ancestors’ or famous relatives you never knew you had”, says Josh Taylor, genealogist and spokesperson for findmypast.com.

Thanks to the release of the 1940 Census records, many Americans will likely be making just such discoveries over the coming months.

“So, we thought we’d give folks the chance to warm up by picking their own ‘fantasy relative’”, explains Taylor. “You’ve heard of Fantasy Baseball; this is ‘Fantasy Genealogy’.”

What’s more, around 40 million U.S. citizens* – including Barack Obama – share Norris’s Irish roots, which means that many more Americans than currently know it, may, indeed, be somehow related to the action star.

1940 yielded not just a U.S. Census but also a bumper crop of great Americans.

Findmypast.com showed over 2,000 Americans a list of the 10 most famous fellow Americans born during 1940 and asked respondents to imagine they were suddenly to find out, via research into their family history, that they were related to one of these famous figures.

The question was: which one of them would they most like one day to find out was their relation?

“Chuck Norris did not just win”, says Taylor. “He pulverized the field. No-one else came close.”

One in five (19%) respondents picked Norris as their fantasy relative, while fewer than one in 10 picked Al Pacino (9%) in second place and Martin Sheen (8%) in third.

Although more men than women chose Norris, the latter was also the first pick of both genders.

“Perhaps everyone wishes they had a bit of ‘Walker, Texas Ranger’ in them”, says Taylor, referring to the role made famous by Norris in the hit TV show of that name.

Carlos Ray “Chuck” Norris was born March 10, 1940, just three weeks before the 1940 Census was taken on April 1. The 1940 Census records will show his hometown of Ryan, Oklahoma as having 1,115 residents, of which he may well have been the youngest.

That means that, unlike most of the other famous 1940-born Americans in the findmypast.com poll, he actually appears in the 1940 Census records.

While born in Oklahoma, Norris also has ancestors from states including Tennessee, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

“His ancestry appears to have been a mixture of Irish and Cherokee”, says Taylor. “It’s likely that at least one of his grandparents was of Cherokee descent.

“One of his ancestors was reportedly an Indian agent for William Penn in the first Quaker settlement in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, who became unhappy and, according to one source, ‘ran away and lived with the Indians’.”

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1940 U.S. Census Community Project Announces Call For Volunteers to Create Free, Searchble Database of 1940 U.S. Census Records

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 2, 2012) – The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project—a joint initiative between the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, and other leading genealogy organizations—announced today a national service project to create a free, high quality, searchable database of the 1940 U.S. census records. Through the indexing efforts of online volunteers across the U.S., records from the 1940 census that were closed by law for 72 years will be easier to find. These census records capture countless untold stories of those who lived through the Great Depression—great men and women who have been called “the greatest generation.”

With the support of NARA, the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is leading the digital transformation effort to create an index entirely by online volunteers. Fueled by the joy of discovering fascinating surprises from their own family history, volunteer indexers are excited to join many thousands of Americans in an online community effort to make the historic 1940 U.S. census readily searchable for others.

“Many of us living today know someone in the 1940 U.S. census, but we may not know much more than their name or the town in which they lived,” said David S. Ferriero, archivist of the United States. “The 1940 census will unlock some of these mysteries for us. We are delighted to join with the U.S. Census Community Project to produce an index which will make this census much more user-friendly.”

When complete, the index and images will also be available online for free through the sponsoring organizations’ websites. Those interested in lending a hand can learn more and sign up to be an official 1940 U.S. census volunteer indexer at the 1940 census website (the1940census.com). The project aims to make available to the public a fully functional, free, and searchable record database by the end of 2012.

“Many parallels exist between life in 1940 and 2012: international conflict, the political intrigue of an election year, and efforts to rebuild a flagging economy,” said Dan Lynch, spokesperson for 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “Our goal is that through the work of online volunteers across the nation, a fully digitized and searchable database of the 1940 census records can help strengthen connections between Americans, their families, and an important time in our collective history while bringing renewed understanding of the resolute courage past generations had in restoring America.”

The 1940 U.S. Federal Census is the largest, most comprehensive, and most recent record set available featuring the names of people living in the U.S. at the time. In fact, the census contains more than one million pages and features a depth of detail that paints a more complete portrait than was previously available of the 132 million people living in the U.S. during the Great Depression. From this new vantage point, we can learn about the life and times of our people living 72 years ago. Several new census questions appeared for the first time in 1940, including:

· Where people lived five years prior to the census
· Highest educational level achieved
· Detailed income and occupation

Perhaps more so than at any other time in American history, these individuals taught us lessons in hardship and survival. The Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and the subsequent New Deal programs have left an indelible footprint on American history. In addition, many of these men and women listed in the 1940 census went on to support the fight or actually fought in World War II. Helping index the census, for many, is a way of giving something back to this great generation and rightfully preserving their place in our nation’s history.

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Help Make a 1940 Census Index a Reality

The 1940 census was released today, 72 years after it was taken. Many different websites now have the images from the census available for review, but none come with an index. An index is not part of the release, nor is it part of the work conducted by the Natinal Archives in releasing the digitized images of the census. The process of creating an index falls to those individuals willing to volunteer a bit of time to help in the process. Interested in adding your mark to history?

If you want to participate, head on over to FamilySearch.org and join the community of volunteers working to make a full census index available to everyone for free. Just visit FamilySearch.org and click the “start now” button on the right side of the page. You can also learn more about the census from this page.

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My First Forage Into the 1940 Census

Well, the 1940 census opened today. I wasn’t ever able to get anywhere on the 1940census.arhcives.gov site, so this evening I tried seeing what I could find on Ancestry.com. They had a dozen states or so up tonight, so I decided locate my great-uncle, Grover Cornett, and his family in the Wilson’s Creek area of Grayson County, Virginia. Although I didn’t have an address, I did know that they live in Wilson’s Creek, and that narrowed the search sufficiently to allow me to look at just a few enumeration districts. I found them on the third one I looked at!
Following is a screen shot of the page:

One surprize was that my cousin, eighteen year old Grover Cornett Junior (June), was a truck driver with the CCC’s in 1940. That’s something I didn’t know.

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