And the controversy continues…

The following is from an extensive article written by Howard Berkes, and posted at the kuhg Houston Public Radio website.

He wasn’t Jewish and he wasn’t a victim of the Holocaust, but the discovery of Jan Karski‘s name on Mormon proxy baptism records has angered those already upset about posthumous Mormon baptisms of prominent Jews and Holocaust victims.

Jan Karski was a Catholic whose mission for the Polish resistance during World War II included sneaking into the Warsaw ghetto, where he witnessed executions and naked bodies piled in the streets. Then he disguised himself as a Ukrainian guard and infiltrated a concentration camp.

Karski biographer E. Thomas Wood credits the former Polish diplomat with providing the first detailed descriptions of the systematic extermination of Jews to Allied leaders in London.

Wood heard last week’s news about the father and grandfather of Holocaust survivor and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel, whose names were discovered on genealogical records used to identify candidates for the Mormon practice of posthumous baptism.

The week before, the Simon Wiesenthal Center denounced the appearance of the names of Wiesenthal’s parents on Mormon baptism records.

So, Wood asked genealogical researcher Helen Radkey to check the records for Karski’s name, and was shocked to find a baptism and other “ordinances” that confirm the Mormon faith of the deceased.

“I know what his faith meant to him, and I know he would be outraged at this effort to appropriate his mortal soul for another religion,” Wood wrote in a letter to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “This act will bring pain to his Roman Catholic and Jewish friends and admirers around the world, among others.”

Wood called on Mormon leaders to remove Karski’s name from church records.

Read the full article.