Early Bird Discount for the 2016 NGS Conference in Ft. Lauderdale Ends March 31

The following news release is from the National Genealogical Society:

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ARLINGTON, VA, 18 MARCH 2016—Register early for the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Family History Conference in Ft. Lauderdale and take advantage of its early bird discount. Not only will you save money, you will also be able to order a printed syllabus or flash drive version of the syllabus. Your registration must be received online or postmarked by 31 March 2016. After that date, the NGS member price will increase from $205 to $240 for all four days and the non-NGS member price will increase from $240 to $275.

The Conference will feature more than 180 lectures from basic to advanced genealogical research, including four days of BCG Skillbuilding lectures and twelve lectures on genetic genealogy. Diversity is another focus of this year’s conference. Eighteen lectures discuss African-American genealogical research, five focus on Jewish genealogy, two on Cuban genealogy, and nine on women. Floridians and those with ancestors from Florida will want to consider the nine lectures that focus on Florida’s rich archival history. In addition, the conference will provide a number of lectures on European ancestors, including French, Spanish, Scandinavian, Italian, Scots-Irish, and others.

The NGS Conference will be held at the Greater Ft. Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center and will run from 4-7 May. For conference information and to register, go to the 2016 NGS Family History Conference.

Social Events, Luncheons, and the NGS Banquet
Participating organizations sponsor several luncheons at which guest speakers address many fascinating presentations such as

  • “Lost Eyes, Whipping Posts, and Wife Swapping: Lessons from Yesteryear”
  • “To the Rescue: 10 Times A Local Society has Saved My Bacon”
  • “Genetic Surprises, DNA and ’Non-paternity‘ Events”

The NGS Banquet is an event not to be missed! Guest speaker David E. Rencher, AG, CGSM, FIGRS, FUGA, will discuss what matters most to genealogists and family historians. Registration for all meals and social events closes on 22 April 2016. Tickets for social events will not be sold on-site. Be sure to the sign up as quickly as possible. The Florida State Genealogical Society Host Event, “Taste of Florida,” is $42; luncheons are $32; and the banquet is $45. Menus are in the registration brochure.

Society Roundup
On Wednesday, 4 May 2016, many of Florida’s genealogical and historical societies will be available in the Convention Center’s Exhibit Hall Lobby from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. to answer questions about local repositories and resources, discuss their group’s activities, and sell their publications.

Local Area Tours
There’s still time to sign up for two exciting tours on Tuesday, 3 May 2016, prior to the NGS Family History Conference. For more information, please see Local Area Tours. Registration for the tours closes on 22 April 2016.

Add Items to an Existing Registration
To add meals, tours, and pre-conference events to your current registration, log on to the NGS website, click on My Account, select My Events, and then click to Add Sessions.

We hope to see you in Ft. Lauderdale in May!

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

National Genealogical Society Seeks Managing Editor for NGS Magazine

The National Genealogical Society is looking for a Managing Editor for NGS Magazine. This looks like it will be a fun job for someone. I wish I had more free time… I’d love to edit the publication. Oh, well… The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

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Arlington, VA, 1 March 2016—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) is seeking qualified candidates for the managing editor, contractor position for NGS Magazine.

NGS Magazine is published quarterly; each issue contains informative articles that provide readers with resources and helpful direction to accomplish more effective genealogical research. Editorial is contributed by leading experts in the field. Content includes articles on records, repositories, case studies, technology, genetic genealogy, family history writing as well as book reviews.

The managing editor is responsible for the overall production and editorial content of NGS Magazine and produces four (4) issues per year during the calendar year, in February, May, August and November. Applicants should have previous experience in genealogical research, writing, editing, and publishing. Proficient knowledge of grammar and writing standards is essential. The effective date for this position is 1 July 2016. The successful candidate will be responsible for producing the November 2016 issue.

Applications must be received by 1 April 2016. For more information on the application process and the position, a full job description can be viewed at the NGS website by navigating to About NGS > Careers or visiting http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/magazinemanagingeditor.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

NGS Announces a New Cloud-Based Course: Researching Your World War I Ancestors

The following is from NGS:

NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, 01/27/2016 — The National Genealogical Society (NGS) announces the release of its newest Continuing Genealogical Studies course, Researching Your World War I Ancestors. In this cloud-based, nine-module, self-paced course, genealogists obtain an introduction to WWI research. Modules cover topics such as “Locate and Understand Records of Units,” “Serial Numbers and Unit Identification,” and “Obtaining Copies of World War I Personnel Records.” Also included are examples, citations, references, self-graded quizzes, and a comprehensive glossary.

Craig Roberts Scott, CGSM, FUGA, developed Researching Your World War I Ancestors for NGS. A nationally recognized lecturer, educator, and genealogical and historical researcher, he has more than thirty years’ experience and specializes in the diverse military records at the National Archives.

Researching Your World War I Ancestors is one of a number of cloud-based NGS courses that offers the convenience of completing a genealogy course over a period of months at any location and at any time. It is available for $45.00 for members and $70.00 for nonmembers. For further information or to purchase the course, visit NGS Continuing Genealogical Studies.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

NGS Launches Its Newest Course – Genetic Genealogy: Autosomal DNA Course

The following news release is from the National Genealogical Society:

NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, 9 DECEMBER, 2015— The National Genealogical Society (NGS) proudly announces the release of its newest Continuing Genealogical Studies course, Genetic Genealogy:Autosomal DNA.

Autosomal DNA comprises twenty-two of the twenty-three pairs of chromosomes, excluding the one pair of sex chromosomes. These matched pairs of chromosomes are called autosomes and contain a comprehensive record of a person’s genetic ancestry. Genetic Genealogy:Autosomal DNA is a seven-module, cloud-based course that focuses primarily on concepts and techniques for genetic genealogy. It also introduces the concepts covering the analysis of the data, no matter how the data is accessed or which tools are used to analyze the data.

The course was developed byDebbie Parker Wayne, cgsm, a nationally recognized lecturer, educator, and full-time researcher experienced in using DNA analysis and traditional techniques for genealogical research. Her DNA research focuses on client projects and on research into her own family project that includes Y‑DNA, mtDNA, X‑DNA, and autosomal DNA studies. Her traditional genealogical research focuses on Texas, the Southwest, and the Southern U.S.

In addition to being a full-time board-certified genealogist, Wayne is a trustee for the BCG Education Fund and is the Texas State Genealogical Society’s DNA Project Chair. Her publications include a column in NGS Magazine on using DNA analysis for genealogical research. She coordinates and teaches comprehensive, interactive genetic genealogy courses on how to interpret and apply DNA test results to genealogical research at the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP) and the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR).

Genetic Genealogy:Autosomal DNA is available for $60.00 for members and $85.00 for nonmembers. For further information or to purchase the course, visit NGS Continuing Genealogical Studies.

NGS courses are cloud-based courses that offer you the convenience of completing a genealogy course at your own pace, at any location, at any time. The Continuing Genealogical Studies courses help you expand your knowledge of specific subjects, including:

  • Genetic Genealogy, the Basics
  • Introduction to Civil War Research
  • Researching Your Revolutionary War Ancestors
  • NGS American Genealogical Studies offers a comprehensive program of courses structured to help you develop essential research skills. These include:

    • The Basics
    • Guide to Documentation and Source Citation
    • Beyond the Basics

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

    [1]“CG”, “Certified Genealogist”, “CGL”, and “Certified Genealogist Lecturer” are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, and are used under license by authorized associates following periodic, peer-reviewed competency evaluations. The board name is registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office.

    NGS Research in the States Series: South Carolina

    ngs16

    “Let there be no illusions: Southern genealogy is difficult–especially in remote areas and among ‘plain folk’ who resisted paper trails as fiercely as they did meddling governments. Add to this problem a legion of burned courthouses. … In truth, evidence does often exist; it just come in forms one does not expect and is found through research methods one hopes to avoid.”

     

    This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: South Carolina; written by Janice Walker Guilmore.

     

    “Many genealogists, both professional and amateur, find research in South Carolina daunting. Sometimes referred to as ‘the black hole’ of genealogical research, South Carolina does present challenges. The state suffered heavy count record losses at the close of the Civil War and the late advent of circuit districts caused many of our upcountry ancestors to forego the recording of instruments or the filing of lawsuits, crating a clear dearth of records for that area.”

    On a positive note, this guide will help you around as many obstacles as possible by providing a clear list of available resources. Each resource type is described along with specific sources and how to access those materials. For example, under the heading Land Records, you will find the following:

    “Land records are the crown jewel of genealogical resources in South Carolina–which has, arguably, the most complete set of any of the North American colonies. From the first settlers, who received headrights, to the present day, land has been plentiful and cheap; and as a result most free South Carolinians from any period created land records. There are four important types of land records…”

    In the guide, the land records description continues with more specifics on available records and where to find them. Each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available an where to find them.

    About the Series

    Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

    About the Author

    Though born raised in Oregon, Janis Walker Gilmore has lived in South Carolina for 25 years. She began working with genealogy in 1986, but got far more serious about Genealogy in 2006 when she began coursework at the National Institute for Genealogical Research, the Salt Lake Institute for Genealogy, and the Institute for Genealogical Research. She also earned a certificate through Boston University Genealogical Research courses.

    More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

    “Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

    “Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with teh abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

    Table of Contents

    Early History and Settlements

    • Topographical and Cultural Divisions
    • Early Government of the Colony

    Archives, Libraries, and Societies

    • South Carolina Department of Archives and History
    • South Carolina Library, University of South Carolina
    • South Carolina Historical Society
    • Other Respositories
    • State and Local Genealogical and Historical Societies

    Major Resources

    • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
    • Bible Records
    • Biographical Sources
    • Business and Organizational Records
    • Cemetery Records
    • Census Records
      • Colonial Censuses
      • State Censuses
      • Federal Censuses
    • Church Records
    • County or Other Jurisdictional Formation
      • Dates of Major Jurisdictional Change
    • Court Records
      • Grand Council/His Majesty’s Council
      • Court of Chancery (Later the Court of Equity)
      • Courts of Common Pleas (Civil) and Court of General Sessions (Criminal)
      • Court of Ordinary (Probate)
      • Court of Appeals (Supreme Court)
      • Jurisdictional Maps
      • Federal Courts
    • Directories
    • Ethnic Records
      • African Americans
      • French Huguenots
      • Germans
      • Irish, Scots, and Scots-Irish
      • Native Americans
    • Genealogical and Historical Periodicals
      • Institution Records
      • State Mental Institution
      • Department of Corrections
    • Land Records
      • Land Grants: From the Colony or State to the Private Owner
      • Mesne Conveyance: From Private Owner to Private Owner
      • Land Memorials
      • North Carolina Grants in South Carolina
    • Military Records
      • Colonial War
      • Revolutionary War
      • War of 1812
      • Indian Wars
      • Mexican War, 1846
      • Civil War, 1861-1865
      • Spanish American War, 1898-1899
      • World Wars
    • Naturalization and Immigration Records
    • Newspapers
    • Probate Records and Wills
    • Reconstruction
    • State Records
    • Tax Records
    • Vital Records
      • Birth, Death and Marriage Records Prior to State-wide Registration
    • Voter Records
    • Women
    • Conclusion

    These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: South Carolina are available from Family Roots Publishing.

    Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

    NGS Research in the States Series: California

    ngs20I doubt anyone would question the fact that California is a unique state. Third largest in territory, largest in population, known around the world, for good or bad, for entertainment, earthquakes, technology, agriculture, and much more. California offers some of the most unique natural features from the redwoods to Yosemite; from Mt. Whitney to Death Valley; and even the ability to surfing in the morning and snow ski away the afternoon. Yet, the people of California bring even more diversity than the state’s resources. The state is a true melting pot of cultural, ethnic, economic, and political diversity.

    The NGS Research in the States Series: Californiaby Sheila Benedict, provides the insight needed to research the diversity that is California, its people, and their histories. This guide shows it’s difference from other guides by including sections like the 1906 San Francisco quake and the Movie Industry. Not typical to sections found in similar guides. Of course, the “normal” sections are included as well; such as, information on vital records collections, newspapers, census records, etc. California is big enough that it takes 7 pages, out of this 48 page guide, just to list the major genealogical/historical societies and major library collections (by county).

    Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state.

    About the author:

    Sheila Benedict is a dedicated, self-employed, genealogists with an education and background in history, writing, and forensic genealogy. She spent 10 years as the administrator of Old Mission Santa Inés, and continues today as a part-time archivist. Benedict is also a life member and former board member of the National Genealogical Society, of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the Society of California Archivists, and other similarly important societies and organizations dedicated to genealogy and historical research and preservation.

     

    Table of Contents

    History and Settlement

    Archives, Libraries, and Societies

    • California State Archives
    • California State Library
    • California Historical Society
    • National Archives (NARA) Regional Centers
    • National Archives at Riverside
      • National Archives at San Francisco
      • Bureau of Indian Affairs
    • California State Genealogical Alliance

    Major Resources

    • Aids to Research
      • Online Archive of California
      • Calisphere, California Digital Library
    • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
    • Biographical Sources
    • Cattle Brands
    • Cemetery Records
    • Census Records
      • 1890 Census Substitute
    • City and County Records
      • California County Record Offices
    • Courts and Court Records
      • Superior Courts
      • Appeals Courts
      • Federal Courts
    • Directories
    • Ethnic Records
      • Chinese
      • Japanese
      • Native Americans
      • Spanish/Mexican
      • Other Ethnicities
    • Land Records / Land Grants
      • Spanish and Mexican Land Grants
      • Federal Land Grants
    • Military Records
    • Mining
    • Mission System
    • Movie Industry
    • Newspapers
    • Probate Records
    • Railroads
    • Religious Records
      • Baptist
      • Catholic
      • Episcopal
      • Jewish
      • Lutheran
      • Methodist
      • Presbyterian
      • Quakers
    • 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
    • Tax Records
      • Personal Property Tax Records
    • Vital Records
      • Birth Records
      • Death Records
      • Marriage Records
      • Divorce Records
      • Adoptions
      • Name Changes
      • California State Clerk-Recorder
    • Women
    • Genealogical and Historical Societies/Museums
    • County by County Listing of Genealogical/Historical Societies & Major Library Collections
    • Other Societies and Research Repositories

    These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: California are available from Family Roots Publishing.

    NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska

    ngs23“Early native inhabitants roamed the tall-grass prairie, establishing camp villages along the clear streams and leaving behind anthropologic traces of their homes. The wide Platte River carried the early fur traders and foreign explorers, and the nineteenth-century pioneer wagon trains traveled along its grassy banks.

    Agriculture has led Nebraska’s economy since the state’s beginning. Ranching is dominant in the sandy-prairie central and western regions, while farming has thrived in the eastern third of the state. In the larger towns and cities manufacturing has become the second-leading economic activity. Tourism, which showcases the state’s natural river scenic byways, historic sites, parks, and outdoor trails, has also become an important economic activity. Nebraska’s rural community societies and museums, county courthouses, historical sites, and library districts welcome the visitor with records still largely intact and accessible.”

    Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska was written by Roberta King, and is summarized here:

    Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on Nebraska begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. Understanding the largely rural nature of the state, the reader comes to understand the value of rural research skills needed in finding ancestral data within the state.

    The guide outlines and describes the expected resources available for research, from libraries and archives, to courthouses and vital records. There is also a list of biographical sources and information on Ethnic records. Ethnic information not only includes several Indian tribes, as would be expected, but also major European ethnic groups found in the state, including, Czech, German, Irish, and Jewish information. See the Table of Contents below for a complete list of information found in the book.

    About the Author

    Roberta ‘Bobbi’ King is a native Nebraskan (3rd generation), with extensive experience in researching rural and small town courthouse records. She has authored many articles on homestead research and continues to teach and write on rural research from her current home in Colorado.

    Table of Contents

    History and Settlement

    Geography and Early History

    Archives, Libraries, and Societies

    • Nebraska State Historical Society Library and Archives (NSHS)
    • National Archives at Kansas City, Missouri
    • Nebraska State Genealogical Society
    • American Historical Society of Germans from Russia
    • Other Libraries
    • Museums and Historical Societies
    • Other Societies and Museums

    Major Resources

    • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
    • Biographical Sources
    • Brands
    • Cemeteries
    • Censuses and Census Substitutes
      • Territorial Census
      • Federal Census
      • State Census
      • City Census
    • City and County Directories
    • County Research
    • Court Records
    • Judicial System
    • Ethnic Records
      • African American
      • Czech
      • German
      • Irish
      • Jewish
      • Native Americans
    • Land Records
      • Preemption Records
      • Homestead Records
      • Late Land Records
    • Military Records
      • Military Forts in Nebraska
      • Civil War
      • Spanish-American War
      • World War I
      • World War II
    • Naturalization Records
    • Newspapers
    • Probate Records
    • Religious Records
      • Baptists
      • Catholic (Roman)
      • Congregational
      • Lutheran
      • Mennonite
      • Methodist
      • Presbyterian
    • School Records
    • Vital Records
      • Birth and Death Records
      • Marriage Records
      • Divorce Records
    • Women of Nebraska
    • Conclusion

     

    These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska are available from Family Roots Publishing.

    NGS Releases Two-minute Video To Promote 2016 Conference

    The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

    NGS-2015-Conference-Hotel-250pw

    ARLINGTON, VA, 30 September 2015 — The National Genealogical Society releases today a video promoting its 2016 Family History Conference, which will be held 4–7 May 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Produced in collaboration with Playback Now, the video is available on the NGS YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/_4QAMgx8mHw.

    Utilizing clips from the 2015 NGS Family History Conference, the video highlights the wide scope of educational and networking opportunities that the conference offers attendees. The video’s featured speakers are Angie Bush, MS, member of the NGS Board of Directors and chair of the Genetic Genealogy Committee; Elizabeth Shown Mills, CGSM, CGLSM, FASG, FUGA, FNGS, and Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS, both of whom are well-known speakers in the genealogy community.

    With well more than a hundred sessions and a hundred exhibitors, the 2016 NGS Family History Conference promises to be one of the best genealogical conferences ever.

    Registration for conference opens on December 1st, but you may make your hotel reservations now at the main conference hotel, the Hilton Ft. Lauderdale Marina, or at the Renaissance Fort Lauderdale Cruise Port Hotel or the Fort Lauderdale Embassy Suites. Details are available at conference.ngsgenealogy.org.

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

    NGS Announces a New Course in the American Genealogical Studies Series: Beyond the Basics

    The following is from NGS:

    NGS

    ARLINGTON, VA, August 17, 2015: The National Genealogical Society proudly announces the release of its newest American Genealogical Studies course, Beyond the Basics. This course joins The Basics and Guide to Documentation and Source Citation in the series of online courses developed by NGS to help those interested in discovering their roots.

    Beyond the Basics offers advanced genealogical training. During the course, you will learn how to conduct a more systematic genealogical investigation as you build your family tree. Its modules are designed to challenge you as you learn how to read, write, decipher, and cite numerous genealogical documents. You will expand your proficiency by collecting, interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating genealogical information. You also will hone your skills as you write genealogical reports.

    The course contains five modules that contain information, videos, examples, self-correcting quizzes, a glossary, a topic reference list, and a final written assignment, which is graded by a professional genealogist. The modules are:

    • Module 1 – Evidence Analysis
    • Module 2 – The Library: A Research Repository
    • Module 3 – The Federal Population Schedules
    • Module 4 – FamilySearch.org
    • Module 5 – Civil Registration Records

    Beyond the Basics is the third course in the American Genealogical Study series. Registration requires students to successfully complete both The Basics and Guide to Documentation and Source Citation within the year before signing up for Beyond the Basics.

    Beyond the Basics is available for $175.00 for members and $200.00 for non-members. The Basics andGuide to Documentation and Source Citation are available individually or as a bundle. For further information or to view the syllabus, visit the NGS website at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/ags_beyondthebasics .

    The courses of the NGS American Genealogical Studies are presented through anonline cloud-based learning management system. To take advantage of this system, you need either a computer or tablet with an internet connection and an updated standard browser. Please refer to the NGS website for specific computer and software needs.

    National Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast

    The following news release is from the National Genealogical Society:

    NGS

    ARLINGTON, VA, 6 July 2015 — The National Genealogical Society (NGS) has made a special arrangement with Findmypast (FMP), one of the leading genealogical records companies, to provide NGS members a free, one-year subscription to Findmypast US and Canada collection.

    Members can use this opportunity to extend their own FMP US and Canada subscriptions beyond their current expiration date. Also available to NGS members is a one-year subscription to Findmypast World collection at a significantly discounted rate.

    Current and new NGS members are encouraged to visit the NGS website for additional details and to take advantage of this limited-time offer.

    Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogical research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes more than two billion family history records—from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a valuable resource for building family trees and making family connections through its historical records and advanced search tools.

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

    More details can be found online at www.ngsgenealogy.org

    2015 William Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship Awarded to Scott Holl at the NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri

    The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

    Scott Holl
    Scott Holl

    ARLINGTON, VA, 19 May 2015—The National Genealogical Society’s William Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship is presented yearly to a librarian whose primary focus is genealogy and local history and who is employed in a public, academic, or special library. The 2015 award was given at the National Genealogical Society’s Librarian Day, one of several special events at their Family History Conference in St. Charles, Missouri. The award and a $1,000 prize underwritten by ProQuest, went to Scott Holl, MLIS, the manager of the History and Genealogy Department at St. Louis County Library. Prior to coming to St. Louis, Holl started his library career at the Newberry Library in Chicago and worked as the archivist and librarian at Eden Theological Seminary for the United Church of Christ.

    Since he began his tenure at St. Louis County Library in 2007, Holl has undertaken many new initiatives to enhance genealogical research. He is the creator and editor of the History and Genealogy Department’s electronic monthly publication, PastPorts. This free, online publication not only helps local patrons, but also out-of-town researchers. He designed and edited the state, country, and topic research guides, which are available online making all cited records more useful. He also created a one-of-a-kind, how-to finding aid for using the Deutsche Gechlechterbuch collection, a series of German lineage books of non-noble families.

    Holl has dedicated considerable time and effort to develop a strong European collection. When a donor stepped forward ready to buy new material for the library in honor of his family members, William C. E., & Bessie Becker, he located an available collection of German and French records from Canton Bern, Switzerland, consisting of 847 rolls of film featuring birth, marriage, and death information ranging from the 16th to 19th centuries. Today, St. Louis County Library and the Family History Library are the only known U.S. facilities to hold this collection. He also played a major role when Picton Press owner, Lewis Bunker Rohrbach, decided to donate his private library of more than 11,000 books and journals to St. Louis County Library, thus expanding the resources for Maine, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, as well as for England, Wales, and Scotland.

    His efforts have been the driving force for the library’s acquisition of Ortssippenbücher books (local family genealogy registers) and Deutsches Familienarchiv books used by genealogists across the country. These collections join the Yizkor books, which memorializes destroyed Jewish communities in Europe.

    After the library discovered the availability of original records from Centenary Methodist Church in downtown St. Louis, Holl organized the collection and indexing process, all the while preserving historical records and making the index available online.

    Holl’s unique input to collection development and his ability to envision, organize, and execute projects of value to researchers has enhanced the research experience for those who visit the department, use its website, or interact with the staff, including researchers using the National Genealogical Society’s Book Loan Collection, which makes it’s home at the library.

    About ProQuest (http://www.proquest.com)
    ProQuest connects people with vetted, reliable information. Key to serious research, the company’s products are a gateway to the world’s knowledge including dissertations, governmental and cultural archives, news, historical collections and ebooks. ProQuest’s technologies serve users across the critical points in research, helping them discover, access, share, create and manage information.

    The company’s cloud-based technologies offer flexible solutions for librarians, students and researchers through the ProQuest®, Bowker®, Dialog®, ebrary® and EBL™ businesses – and notable research tools such as the Summon® discovery service, the Flow® collaboration platform, the Pivot® research development tool and the Intota™ library services platform. The company is headquartered in Ann Arbor, Michigan, with offices around the world

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

    Excellence in Genealogy Scholarship & Service Honored by National Genealogical Society Awards

    The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

    ARLINGTON, VA, 19 May 2015—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) held its annual banquet on Friday evening, 15 May, at the NGS 2015 Family History Conference in Saint Charles, Missouri, to present awards that acknowledge and honor genealogical scholarship and service. Each year, these awards are presented to organizations and individuals who have made outstanding contributions to NGS programs or have performed outstanding work in the field of genealogy, history, biography, or heraldry. This year, twelve awards were presented.

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    National Genealogical Society Hall of Fame
    Inaugurated in 1968, the National Genealogical Society Hall of Fame has honored outstanding genealogists whose achievements have had a significant impact on the field of American genealogy. Nominations are solicited annually from genealogical organizations. Those nominated must have been actively engaged in genealogy for a minimum of ten years and have been deceased for at least five years. Their contributions must have been substantially unique, pioneering, or exemplary as an author of books or articles, as a model of genealogical research or writing, or by making source records more readily available. Nominees could also have been a teacher or lecturer, or contributed to the field through their leadership in a genealogical organization or a periodical. Entries are judged by a panel of genealogists from various parts of the United States.

    This year, Donald Arleigh Sinclair, nominated by The Genealogical Society of New Jersey, was elected to the NGS Hall of Fame. The main body of his work consists of more than fifty articles about his transcriptions of cemetery and bible records of New Jersey families that were published in The Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey. Other notable publications include A Guide to Manuscript Diaries and Journals in the Special Collections Department, Rutgers University (1980); New Jersey Family Index: A Guide to the Genealogical Sketches in New Jersey Collective Sources (1991); and A New Jersey Biographical Index: Covering Some 100,000 Biographies and Associated Portraits in 237 New Jersey Cyclopedias, Histories, Yearbooks, Periodicals, and Other Collective Biographical Sources Published to About 1980 (1993).

    Fellow of the National Genealogical Society (FNGS)
    Fellowship in the National Genealogical Society recognizes those who have been of outstanding service to NGS. The 2015 Fellow was posthumously awarded to Patricia Shawker. Shawker served on the NGS Board from 2003–2006 as treasurer and lectured at a number of NGS conferences. She wrote Research in Maryland, a NGS Research in the States series publication; authored several guides published in the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal; and was a long time contributing editor to The Prince Georges County Genealogical Society Bulletin. Shawker served on the board of the Maryland Genealogical Society for several years, including one term as treasurer. She became the registrar of the Prince George’s County Genealogical Society in 1998, a position she still held at her death. She had been a volunteer staff aid at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) since 2005 and served as a mentor for the ProGen 6 study group. She will be remembered for her expertise, generosity, ready smile, and remarkably broad career. Her specialties were Maryland research, federal records, lineage applications, and methodology. She was widely known as the Director of the National Institute of Genealogical Research (NIGR) for the past seven years, guiding hundreds of attendees during their first research endeavors at NARA in Washington, D.C.

    NGS Award of Merit
    The Award of Merit is presented to an individual or non-profit genealogical or historical organization in recognition of exceptional contributions to the field of genealogy that have significantly aided research or increased interest in genealogy over a period of five or more years. The 2015 Award of Merit was presented to Reginald Washington of Upper Marlboro, Maryland.

    Washington’s contributions to the study and preservation of African-American records is truly exceptional. For three decades, he has introduced researchers to many little-known, but incredibly rich, record collections that are now staples for genealogical research. His labors have given researchers online access to a half-million documents from the files of the Southern Claims Commission and more than a million from the Freedmen’s Bureau and the Freedman’s Savings & Trust Company. Washington has taught at the National Institute for Genealogical Research and has been a popular draw at NGS conferences for two decades. He has published articles in the NGS Quarterly, in Prologue (the scholarly journal of the National Archives), and in popular magazines such as Ancestry. He authored the National Archives’ guide, Black Family Research … At the National Archives; created instructional videos for occasions such as the 150th Anniversary celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation; and was a featured expert in the BYU television series Ancestors.

    The Shirley Langdon Wilcox Award for Exemplary Volunteerism
    The Shirley Langdon Wilcox Award for Exemplary Volunteerism recognizes a volunteer whose generosity of spirit and time has greatly benefited NGS, as well as the genealogical community, over a period of years. David Rencher of Riverton, Utah, was the recipient of this year’s award.

    Rencher has had many professional and volunteer roles in the field of genealogy. He is one of a small number of genealogists who are both accredited and certified. He serves as the Chief Genealogical Officer for Family Search and is a well-known, respected, and sought-after lecturer. The award was given in recognition of Rencher’s service as a volunteer, including his support of NGS and many other non-profit genealogical organizations. He has served as the president of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and of the Utah Genealogical Association. He was a visionary chairman of RPAC, the Records Preservation and Access Committee, which is a joint operation of NGS, FGS, and the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. Rencher has also voluntarily provided his substantial assistance to preserve and make genealogical records accessible when there were access or preservation issues in Virginia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Georgia, and many other places in the United States and internationally.

    Distinguished Service Award
    The Distinguished Service Award recognizes an individual’s dedication to the work of NGS. Recipients must have been a member of the society for at least one year. The Award may be presented to an individual more than one time. This year, the NGS Board of Directors has awarded Barbara Ann Renick of Brea, California, its 2015 Distinguished Service Award.

    Renick has been a tireless advocate and enthusiastic supporter of NGS and its programs. She served NGS as a board member and Secretary. In addition to being a respected speaker and workshop leader in the application of technology to genealogical research, Renick has been a volunteer at NGS booths at many conferences around the country, as well as at NGS conferences. She has extended the outreach of NGS in tangible and intangible ways through her appearances at AARP, FamilyHistory Expos around the west, and state and local conferences and events in California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and Nevada. Renick did this on her own initiative, and usually at her own expense. Her work contributed to a rise in the visibility of NGS and of membership in NGS in the western states.

    Family History Writing Contest
    The winner of the Family History Writing Contest was William Cox of Austin, Texas, with his entry, From Slavery to Society: The Jerry Moore Family of Pennsylvania. This award was created to encourage NGS members to write family histories that cover at least three generations and not more than four generations of their family.

    National Genealogical Society Quarterly’s Award for Excellence
    National Genealogical Society Quarterly’s Award for Excellence is presented for an outstanding article published in the NGSQ in the previous calendar year. For 2014, the editors have chosen “Goggins and Goggans of South Carolina: DNA Helps Document the Basis of an Emancipated Family’s Surname,” by Morna Lahnice Hollister, published in the September 2014 issue of the NGSQ.

    The Award for Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources
    The Award for Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources’s recipient was Robert Anderson of Jaffrey, New Hampshire. The title of his entry was Elements of Genealogical Analysis. This award is for a specific, significant single contribution in the form of a book, an article, or a series of articles that discuss genealogical methods and sources, which serves to foster scholarship and/or advances or promotes excellence in genealogy.

    The Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History Book
    The Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History Book’s recipient was Christopher C. Child of Boston, Massachusetts. The title of his entry was The Nelson Family of Rowley, Massachusetts. This award is for a specific, significant single contribution in the form of a family genealogy or family history book published in the past five years. Entries serve to foster scholarship and/or otherwise advance or promote excellence in genealogy.

    The Senior Rubincam Youth Award and Junior Youth Award

    The Senior Rubincam Awards were established in 1986 to honor Milton Rubincam, cgsm, fasg, fngs, for his many years of service to the National Genealogical Society and to the field of genealogy. The awards encourage and recognize our youth as the next generation of family historians.

    The Senior Rubincam Youth Award (for students in grades 10–12 or between the ages of 16 and 18) was presented to Erin Rose O’Hara of Collegeville, Pennsylvania. The title of her entry was The Maternal Ancestry of Erin Rose O’Hara, The first five generations.

    The Junior Rubincam Youth Award (for students in grades 7–9 or between the ages of 13 and 15) was presented to Adam Wickham of New York, New York. The title of his entry was Landon H. Wickham: Family is Key.

    The John T. Humphrey, CG Memorial Scholarship
    Formerly the Home Study Scholarship, The John T. Humphrey, CG Memorial Scholarship was renamed in 2013 to honor John T. Humphrey, cg, for his many years of service to both the field of genealogy and the National Genealogical Society. Julie L. Bartimus of Naperville, Illinois, was the winner of this year’s award. Bartimus received the award for demonstrating her serious interest in pursuing a career in genealogy. In addition to her membership in NGS, she attended genealogy conferences and subscribed to various genealogical publications.

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

    On the Way Home from the NGS Conference

    Bill Dollarhide and I are currently on the road heading back to Orting, Washington, having spent much of last week at the NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri.

    On Sunday we drove from St. Charles to Fort Collins, Colorado. This morning we are meeting with my neice and cousin, then going to see my sister, Erma Lamb. Looking forward to seeing them all! Then on to Salt Lake City, where we will stay at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel tonight.

    We plan to see my son, Lee and his family, pick up books at Schaffer Bindery and go on home. Should arrive there mid-day on Wednesday.

    The NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri

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    Bill Dollarhide and I drove about 2200 miles to arrive in St. Charles, Missouri just in time to set up as a booth in the exhibit hall at the NGS conference. Family Roots Publishing has only one booth this year, exhibiting mostly our books – Hansen’s German Map Guide books, Minert’s German Place Name Indexes, and Dollarhide’s Name List books, and other titles.

    Come by and see us in booth 518 – right next to the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel booth in the 500 aisle.

    NGS 2016 Family History Conference Call for Papers Closes 1 April 2015

    The following is from the National Genealogical Society:

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    ARLINGTON, VA, 26 MARCH 2015 — Time is running out to submit lecture proposals for the NGS 2016 Family History Conference. Speakers and sponsoring organizations must submit their proposals by 1 April 2015. The conference, entitled Exploring the Centuries: Footprints in Time, will be held 4–7 May 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

    The ethnic makeup of Florida is, and always has been, diverse. Native Americans—including Miccosukees, Choctaw, Creek, Timucua, and Calusa—lived throughout the area, which became known as La Florida after the arrival of Ponce de León in 1513. The Spanish were followed by other groups such as the French, British, Irish, German, and Greeks. The importation of African slaves also affected society in Florida as did the formation of the Seminole alliance. All of these people have left many footprints in time and a rich repository of records to trace our ancestry.

    NGS will consider lectures covering the following topics: Florida history (especially early settlements), records, repositories, ethnic and religious groups, neighboring areas (i.e., the Caribbean, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, North Carolina, and South Carolina), and migration to, from, and within Florida. The Society will also consider regional topics of interest, including land and military records, especially those pertaining to the Revolutionary War, Indian wars, Civil War, and World War I. Additionally, proposals may cover broader genealogical categories, including federal records, the law as it relates to genealogy, methodology, genetic genealogy, analysis and problem solving, and technology.

    Interested individuals and organizations should adhere to NGS guidelines. Speakers may submit up to eight proposals electronically through the NGS website. Organizations wishing to sponsor a lecture or track of lectures should review the details and sponsor requirements. All proposals must be submitted by 1 April 2015.

    Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.