New Volumes now Available on White Slave Children in Colonial Maryland & Virginia – Bundled at 15% Off!

White-Slave-Children-bundle-250pw
As I blogged in 2014, soon after Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips wrote his first book on the topic, if you’ve got Maryland or Virginia Colonial roots, you really need to see the results of his research. He’s just written two new books on White Slave Children – many of whom many be our ancestors! Following are descriptions of the three books now in print. Since the first book was so popular, we’ve bundled the 3 volumes at 15% off. This sale runs through Tuesday, January 26. If you only need one or two of the books, you can get them at 10% off. Just click on the links.

Wondering if your ancestors might have been white slave children? As I did in 2014, I will personally check the index for surnames for you. As before, email me with the surname in the subject line of the email. Please – just the surname, no more. I will reply with just one word – yes or no. If Yes – I’ll note which book or books the surname is found in. Those requesting a surname search should note that I will not be able to reply on Saturday or Sunday, but will make the reply on Monday. Send index checking requests to me at Lmeitzler@gmail.com .

GPC-4608-White-Slave-Children
Picking up where he left off in his ground-breaking book Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips has now taken the story back even further – back to the scenes of the original crimes-kidnapping of children to be sold into slavery (ca. 1660-1720). This new book is entitled White Slave Children Of Colonial Maryland And Virginia: Birth And Shipping Records.

In his original book, which I found to be most helpful, Dr. Phillips identified 5,290 “servants” without indentures, transported against their will. He culled that evidence from the Court Order Books of colonial Maryland and Virginia, where the county courts were authorized to examine the children, adjudge their ages, and sentence them to slavery for a number of years. The younger the child, the longer the sentence. In this book, compiled from shipping records found in the Library of Congress, the Bristol [England] Record Office, and elsewhere, the author has identified 170 ships that carried white slave children to the plantations of colonial Maryland and Virginia. The shipping records itemize the unfortunate kids as “cargo” and specify the import duties paid to the Royal Naval Officers for each child. The white slave ships sailed from no fewer than seventeen ports of departure in England.

The places from which the children were taken and their adjudged ages on the dates of their court appearances have enabled Dr. Phillips to conduct a targeted search of the birth and baptismal records. In all, he has matched more than 1,400 children with the parish or town records. The book also contains an exposé of the colonial shipping industry. Among the child traffickers were the Mayors of Bristol and Bideford and the Governor of Virginia.

Birth and Shipping Records – which begins with a detailed discussion of the author’s sources and detective-like methodology and concludes with a surname index – is arranged according to the localities in the British Isles from which the victims were confiscated. It is a volume that will help researchers trace their white slave heritage back even further than before, and it cries out for correctives to be written in American history books regarding our colonial origins and our treatment of one another.

Click here to order at 10% off. Sale runs through January 26.

Click here to order a bundle of the three books at 15% off, plus a $2 shipping savings. Sale runs through January 26.

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GPC4609-White-Slave-children-Charles-County-200pw
Also brand new from Dr. Phillips is White Slave Children Of Charles County, Maryland: The Search For Survivors. In this second companion volume to Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (see also White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and Shipping Records), Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips takes the story forward–examining the treatment of children kidnapped and sold into slavery, and identifying those who survived.

In his original book Dr. Phillips identified 5,290 “servants” without indentures, transported against their will to places in Virginia and Maryland, including Charles County. For this book Dr. Phillips has indexed seventy-five years of handwritten records from Charles County, Maryland (1658-1733). The records are nearly complete and most have never been transcribed before–872 “servants” without indentures were brought to this county, and 333 were owned by the judges on the very court that sentenced them to slavery.

This book contains three indexes–with detailed abstracts–to Charles County servants with or without indentures (recaptured runaways, petitions for freedom, complaints of abuse or neglect), and six indexes to all residents of the county (vital records, witnesses who stated their ages, grantee index to deeds, gifts of livestock, deaths and estates, and orphan children). Most of these records have been microfilmed, scanned, and posted online by the Archives of Maryland. With brief citations, the reader is steered to online images of actual handwritten records.

All nine new indexes have been cross-checked with Dr. Phillips’ master list of 872 “servants” without indentures, from which he has compiled an Encyclopedia of Survivors. This section of the work, one of the longest, assembles all that is known about the lives of the children following their release from servitude. Many of these biographical sketches trace descendants for several generations, refer to acquisitions of land, and contain other details useful to genealogists. The alphabetically arranged chapter entitled Vital Records is a godsend for anyone tracing Charles County roots, whether or not your ancestor suffered white enslavement. Dr. Phillips has also included full-fledged biographies of three of the worst abusers of child labor among the county officials, an exposé of how the system of white slavery operated, and instances of resistance by the survivors. Thus begins the dark era of white slavery on the North American continent.

Click here to order at 10% off. Sale runs through January 26.

Click here to order a bundle of the three books at 15% off, plus a $2 shipping savings. Sale runs through January 26.

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As most of my readers know, Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, is one of my favorite source books. It was published in 2013, and I refer to it regularly when researching my Maryland and Virginia families. Following is a review I did of the book when it first appeared:

Every parent has the fear that their child might disappear. And I can tell you that grandparents also have the same fear. As a grandparent of 3 small children, when they are under my care, I watch them like the proverbial hawk.

Believe it or not, based on an English law passed in 1659, minor children could be kidnapped by justices of the peace if they happened to be begging, or just seemed to be vagrant. These children were shipped to the plantations as servants without indentures. According to the author of “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Viginia),” the younger the child, the longer the sentence, and the county courts were the judges of their ages. The judges decided their age – and many of the kids were placed in servitude to the very judges who sentenced them.

Over 5000 children were picked up in Ireland, Scotland, England and New England, and shipped to Virginia and Maryland between 1660 to 1720. The names of these kids, their assigned age, the owner, and the date they appeared in court are found in Richard Phillips brand new book, “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Virginia).” The book also contains an index to ships and their captains that imported the children. A surname index is included.

Without-Indentures

I got really excited about the volume when, on page, 88, I found an entry for Charles County, Maryland that reads thus: Cornute, Hendrick, 14 June 1670, age 20, John Okeane. I’ve got to wonder, is this possibly a progenitor, sibling or cousin pertaining to my Cornute/Cornett family line? This Cornute is on of the earliest I’ve seen in America. This is a lead I didn’t have before.

Exacting information is given in the book as to where to locate digitized, microfilmed and in some cases original copies of the County Court books from where to the information for this book was taken. Now I can take the next step and view the original document. In my Cornute case mentioned above, the data is actually digitizing and available online!

The following is from the table of contents:

NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia

ngs13“Research in Virginia is a never-ending search for new sources, new names, and new family connections. Discovering the role of one’s family in the long panorama of Virginia’s past is a challenge to genealogists–often frustrating, frequently rewarding. Researchers will confront many successes if they give careful attention to the records and to their historical and legal context.”

Virginia was the first and largest English colony in North America. As such, many American can trace their ancestral roots to Virginia. More than 400 years have passed since the first settlement, time for records to be moved, found, lost, destroyed, preserved, and treated in every manner possible. The centuries make puzzles out of written histories and records. Guides like NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia help researchers uncover clues to help find their ancestors with an historical perspective.

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia was written by Eric G. Grundset.

Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on Virginia begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. A separate useful section, Jurisdictional Changes, covers border changes over the years. All the other standard information can be found, court, probate, land, religious, tax records, etc.

“Not everyone can descend from Pocahontas, from a Lee, or from a Byrd, but then, those individuals and families were not the only ones who built Virginia and created her history…While one may lament the great record losses of the past, one can also focus on the rich surviving documentary heritage of the Commonwealth and work to bring new information to light. Research on Virginia families is a challenge, but a challenge that rarely loses its appeal and excitement for anyone seeking an understanding of their ancestor’s lives in the Old Dominion.”

About the Author

Eric G. Grundset is a native Virginian, born in Prince George County. An early interest in Virginia’s history led to a degree in history from James Madison University and a MLS from Catholic University. He has worked for over 35 years in genealogical libraries. Grundset is a past president of the Virginia Genealogical Society and previously served as vice president of the NGS.

Table of Contents

Research in Virginia

  • History and Settlement
  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • The Library of Virginia (LVA)
    • Published Guides, Online Finding Aides, Catalogs and Other Records
    • Microfilm Collection
    • Original Records of Counties and Cities
    • Work Progress Administration Records
  • Virginia Historical Society (VHS)
  • Virginia Department of Historic Resources (VDHR)
  • Other Virginia Libraries
  • Libraries Outside Virginia with Major Virginia Holdings
  • State and Local Genealogical and Historical Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Genealogical and Historical Periodicals
  • Atlases and Maps
    • County and City Highway Maps and Topographic Maps
    • Historical Maps
  • Gazettes
  • Biographical Sources, Personal Papers, and Manuscripts
  • Bible Records
  • Business and Organizational Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Early Censuses and Substitutes
    • Federal Population Schedules
  • Colonial and State Government Records
  • County and City Records
    • County Formation and Local Records
    • Independent Cities
  • Court Records
  • Directories
  • Ethnic Records
    • Native Americans in Virginia
    • European Virginians
    • African American Virginians
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Period
    • Local Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Colonial Period
    • American Revolution
    • Military Records, 1783-1812, and the War of 1812
    • Military Records, 1815-1860
    • Civil War, 1861-1865
    • Wars of the Late Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate  and Will Records
  • Religious Records
  • Tax and Financial Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1853-1869 Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1896-1912 Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1912-1939, 1939 to Present
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Women in Virginia
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia are available from Family Roots Publishing.

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for the Week of September 21, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Check out the Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950, Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013, and Virginia Richmond City Birth Index 1870-1912 additions this week. Millions more records were also added for Italy (Potenza, Rieti, and Trapani) and Colombia. Search for these new records and more by selecting the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

BillionGraves Index – 2,764,124 – 2,764,124 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012 – 0 – 868,609 – Added images to an existing collection
England and Wales Census 1841 – 309 – 224,532 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
France Haute-Garonne Toulouse Censuses 1872 and 1886 – 952 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Potenza Civil Registration (State Archive) 1697-1923 – 0 – 3,139,547 – New browsable image collection.
Italy Rieti Civil Registration (State Archive) 1840-1945 – 0 – 394,525 – New browsable image collection.
Italy Trapani Civil Registration (State Archive) 1906-1928 – 0 – 229,704 – New browsable image collection.

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013 – 289,532 – 19,171 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950 – 0 – 1,117,101 – New browsable image collection.
Utah Applications Indian War Service Medals 1905-1912 – 11,658 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Utah Eureka and Payson Births and Deaths 1898-1903 – 4 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Virginia Richmond City Birth Index 1870-1912 – 53,488 – 53,470 – New indexed records and images collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Virginia Vital Records Now Available at Ancestry.com

The following teaser is from an article by Margaret Linford, published in the June 23, 2015 edition of swvatoday.com:

There has been quite a bit of excitement in the lives of Virginia genealogists this month. On June 2, Governor McAuliffe announced that a project to digitize and preserve the vital records of Virginia was complete. This was a “two-year, public-private collaboration between the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) and Ancestry.com that fully digitized the state’s vital records.” As part of this project, more than 16 million records were digitized and indexed.

Regarding this monumental project, Governor Terry McAuliffe said, “Having all Virginia vital records digitized means millions of public birth, death, marriage and divorce records are now more easily accessed for genealogy and family history research. This project also provides a long-term conservation solution for preserving the rich history of Virginia’s people.

The release of these records has been eagerly anticipated by genealogists in Virginia for quite some time. Up until now, a portion of the records could be researched by accessing microfilm records at the Library of Virginia or by requesting a copy from the Virginia Department of Health. These methods were time-consuming and involved a small cost. Now, the records are easily accessible on Ancestry.com.

Read the full article.

Central Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane of Petersburg, VA Records to be Digitized

Central State Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane

April 8, 2015 – AUSTIN, Texas — Three faculty members at The University of Texas at Austin’s School of Information have received a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to develop and field test a digital infrastructure for preserving and managing the historical public records from the Central Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane in Petersburg, Virginia.

King Davis, Patricia Galloway and Unmil Karadkar will use the $763,000 to develop methods and tools for critical policy analysis, digital technology and archival preservation methods to increase access to historical mental health records and documents while still protecting privacy.

The project is expected to begin this month and end in 2018.

“Families and scholars have requested access to these records for many years to enable them to conduct genealogical and academic research. However, most states limit access to such records based in part on historical precedents and concerns about stigma and privacy,” said Davis, a former commissioner of mental health for the Commonwealth of Virginia and current professor of research in the School of Information and professor emeritus in African and African Diaspora Studies.

The asylum was established in 1868 and was the first of its kind in the United States. It has maintained over 800,000 public records that detail the origins of the hospital and the racially segregated services provided for almost 100 years.

Galloway will work with postdoctoral students and families of the institution’s patients to ensure that the new digital library is easy to access.

“Providing possible solutions to both mental health providers and archival custodians of these records can both help guarantee their preservation and enable their lawful release for research by scholars and families,” Galloway said. “However, opening access to families and scholars must still abide by the prevailing state and federal laws on privacy.”

Read the full press release.

FamilySearch Adds Over 3.7 Million Indexed Records & Images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch adds more than 3.7 million indexed records and images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,395,009 images from the Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993 collection; the 396,405 images and 396,405 indexed records from the US, BillionGraves Index collection; and the 389,387 indexed records from the South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Australia, New South Wales, Census (fragment), 1841 – 1,385 – 2,249 – New browsable image collection.

Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993 – 0 – 1,395,009 – New browsable image collection.

Isle of Man, Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598–2009 – 0 – 44,050 – Added images to an existing collection.

South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004 – 389,387 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, BillionGraves Index – 396,405 – 396,405 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, California, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899–2011 – 0 – 91 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Idaho, Lincoln County Records, 1886–1972 – 0 – 1,232 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Kentucky Death Records, 1911–1961 – 173,963 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, Orleans Court Records, 1822–1880 – 0 – 7,376 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Will Books, 1805–1920 – 0 – 1,829 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, State Penitentiary Records, 1866–1963 – 0 – 78 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999 – 0 – 17,565 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, New Hampshire, Cheshire County, Probate Estate Files, 1886–1900 – 0 – 3,926 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Ohio, Crawford County Church Records, 1853–2007 – 0 – 695 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932 – 0 – 152,511 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Ohio, Licking County, Hartford Township Records, 1881–1962 – 0 – 989 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Northern District, Eastern Division, Naturalization Index, 1855–1967 – 0 – 196,148 – New browsable image collection.

US, Tennessee, Cocke County Records, 1860–1930 – 0 – 3,659 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Utah, Cache County Records, 1861–1955 – 0 – 3,045 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009 – 328,371 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634–1951 – 0 – 115 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Washington, County Marriages, 1855–2008 – 0 – 202,454 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Washington, Pierce County Marriage Returns, 1891–1950 – 0 – 732 – Added images to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 10M Indexed Records & Images for Canada, Czech Republic, Ukraine, & USA

The following was received from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch has added more than 10 million indexed records and images to collections from Canada, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, New Zealand, South Korea, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 3,427,354 indexed records from the Canada Census, 1911, collection; the 1,334,575 image records from the Czech Republic, Censuses, 1800–1945, collection; and the 2,545,965 indexed records from U.S., Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864–2007 , collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Canada Census, 1911 – 3,427,354 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Czech Republic, Censuses, 1800-1945 – 0 – 1,334,575 – Added images to an existing collection.

Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010 – 0 – 199,481 – Added images to an existing collection.

New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848–1991 – 145,146 – 145,146 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

South, Korea, Collection of Genealogies, 1500–2012 – 0 – 143,281 – Added images to an existing collection.

Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1840–1845 – 386,265 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864–2007 – 2,545,965 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Idaho, Southern Counties Obituaries, 1943–2013 – 585,880 – 52,677 – New indexed records and images collection.

U.S., Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718–1957 – 0 – 83,424 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999 – 0 – 70,174 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Mormon Migration Database, 1840–1932 – 143,658 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., New York, Queens County Probate Records, 1785–1950 – 0 – 241,319 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932 – 0 – 221,657 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Utah Obituary Index – 372,279 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., Utah, Obituaries from Utah Newspapers, 1850–2005 – 511,361 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009 – 0 – 22,727 – New browsable image collection.

A History of Shenandoah County Virginia – on sale for 50% off thru Thursday, May 15

A while back, Family Roots Publishing acquired a quantity of the beautiful book, A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. The book 894 page hard-cover is technically out-of-print, and FRPC has just a few left. FRPC is again offering this volume as an Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is has been extended and is now good through midnight MDT Thursday, May 15, 2014.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.

Following is a book review of this terrific volume.

gpc6175Some 10,000 names is reason enough for any genealogist to find some interest in A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia, by John W. Wayland. First published in 1927, this book reaches back to the earliest exploration of the area in 1670, to the first permanent settlers around 1728, through the establishment of the county in 1772, and up to the year 1926.

Page upon page the history of the Shenandoah Valley and County is revealed, along with the people who lived its history. From prominent figures to the names of children and families, this book provided genealogical data by the droves. Within these pages you will find lists of names, property owner, short biographies, head of families and civic leaders.

This history also provides great details on landmarks and buildings, both those gone forever and imaginably plenty that are still standing. Take the Solomon’s Church, located “about four miles southwest of Pine Church, near Forestville…This is also an old establishment and was for many years held in common by the Reformed and the Lutherans.” Such seemingly small details are just what genealogists often need to help track down names and missing records, cemeteries, and other vital pieces of the genealogy puzzle.

The book has been reprinted a few times, but is provided as a copy of the original. It is impossible to describe the wealth of detail found in nearly 800 pages of history, but I can say great value comes from the over 100  page index listing over 10,000 entries, most of which are names, listed by surname.

 

Outline of Contents

List of Maps and Illustrations
Table of Dates (1,000 Items of Interest Arranged in Chronological Order)

  1. By Way of Introduction
  2. The Fairfax Line
  3. Explorations and Early Settlements
  4. Indians and Indian Raids
  5. Angels Unawares
  6. A County With Two Names
  7. Among the Early Records
  8. Towns and Villages of Shenandoah County
  9. The Forest and the Fort
  10. Famous Landmarks
  11. The Outbreak of the Revolution
  12. The Conquest of the Northwest
  13. Heads of Families in 1785
  14. Iron-Making and Iron-Masters
  15. The War of 1812
  16. The Long Gray Trail
  17. First Citizens of 1833
  18. The Forties and the Fifties
  19. The Early Years of the Civil War
  20. The Later Years of the Civil War
  21. Since 1865
  22. The Memorable Years of 1870 and 1876
  23. Echoes of The World War
  24. Old Churches and New
  25. Old Shenandoah Homesteads
  26. Schools and Schoolmasters
  27. Literary Activities and Associations
  28. Some Notable Incidents
  29. Distinguished Sons and Daughters
  30. A Pageant of the Golden West
  31. Pack-Saddles and Hame-Bells
  32. Fairy Palaces
  33. Genealogical Scrap-Bag
  34. Appendix
  35. Historical bits and Pieces
  36. Shenandoah County Since 1927
  37. Table of Dates (Continued)
  38. Index

A copy of A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia await the curious and avid historian and genealogist alike. FRPC is again offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is has been extended and is now good through midnight MDT Thursday, May 15, 2014.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.

National Park Service Adds Arlington National Cemetery to National Register of Historic Places

The following announcement is from the National Park Service:

Washington: April 15, 2014 – The National Park Service today announced that Arlington National Cemetery Historic District, which includes the famed military cemetery among 69 contributing features, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places, the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation.

The historic district was determined to be nationally significant in the following ways: 1) as America’s most sacred national cemetery and as a national memorial to the military history of the United States; 2) it contains the burials of persons of national importance, including presidents, Supreme Court justices and countless military heroes; and 3) as the final resting place of service men and women from the Civil War to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, it continues to serve as a national monument to the America’s war dead.

“For 150 years, Arlington National Cemetery has defined how America commemorates and memorializes those who have fought for the freedom of its citizens,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “We are proud to provide this formal recognition of its historical significance to our nation and to those who have served so proudly and sacrificed for our nation in the armed forces.”

Arlington National Cemetery was established during the Civil War as a final resting place for Union soldiers on approximately 200 acres of Mary Custis Lee’s 1,100 acre Arlington estate. The property was also used as a military camp and Freedman’s Village during and after the end of the Civil War. It took shape as a picturesque rural cemetery with the planting of trees, shrubs, and other landscaping, and the addition of roads through the property. Much of the planning and design of the cemetery is attributable to the direction of Quartermaster General Montgomery Meigs during the first decades of Arlington National Cemetery’s existence. Several memorials, beginning with the Tomb of the Civil War Unknowns in 1866, were erected during his tenure.

The commemorative use of Arlington National Cemetery continued to grow throughout the 20th century. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, placed in 1921, strongly emphasized the memorial nature of the cemetery, and the burial of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, with a monument and eternal flame on his gravesite, escalated the commemorative use of the cemetery. Today, Arlington National Cemetery continues to serve as an active cemetery and is the final resting place of more than 400,000 military personnel, their family members and other dignitaries. The Department of the Army administers Arlington National Cemetery, overseeing all burial and maintenance services, and accommodating the more than three million visitors who pay their respects annually.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archeological resources. It is one of dozens of programs administered by the National Park Service that preserve nature and historic sites and improve access to outdoor recreation in local communities around the country.

For additional information about the National Register of Historic Places, including the full nomination form for Arlington National Cemetery Historic District, visit http://www.nps.gov/nr.

Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox Opens Veteran’s Exhibit

The following excerpt is from an excellent article by Katrina Koerting, published in the March 7, 2014 edition of newsadvance.com.

Visitors browse artifacts on display in the new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox, Va., March 6, 2014. (Photo by Parker Michels-Boyce/The News & Advance)
Visitors browse artifacts on display in the new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox, Va., March 6, 2014. (Photo by Parker Michels-Boyce/The News & Advance)

Many people can recite facts about battles or describe the cultural environment during the Civil War, but not as much is shared about the men after the war.

These are the stories told in the first new exhibit at the Museum of the Confederacy in Appomattox. The exhibit, entitled, “When Johnny Came Marching Home: Veterans in the Postwar South,” shows visitors what the veterans faced after returning home, touching on the human cost of war, trying to reconcile what happened and the legacy the veterans and their descendants left behind.

“This is somewhat of a universal story to tell,” exhibit historian John Coski said.

This exhibit depicts what it was like for veterans during the late 1800s and early 1900s, Linda Lipscomb, the site’s director, said.

Read the full article.

Prince George (VA) Regional Heritage Center Transforming Old Clerk’s Office Into Genealogical Research Facility

The following excerpt is from an article by Vanessa Remmers posted in the MArch 3, 2014 edition of progress-index.com.

Carol Bowman of the Prince George Regional Heritage Center discusses the rehabilitation of the former clerk's office Thursday, Feb. 20. It will house an exhbit and genealogical research space.
Carol Bowman of the Prince George Regional Heritage Center discusses the rehabilitation of the former clerk’s office. It will house an exhbit and genealogical research space.

PRINCE GEORGE – Virginia – A building that held Prince George County records in the late 1800s will soon become the site of a new exhibit center celebrating the county’s cultural heritage.

The Prince George Regional Heritage Center is working to raise funds for a $100,000 project that will transform the Old Clerk’s Office into an exhibit and genealogical research space.

Some of the exhibit costs will be covered by a $50,000 grant from the Cabell Foundation. The grant requires $50,000 in matching funds from the Prince George Regional Heritage Center.

Carol Bowman, executive director of the heritage center, wasn’t sure how much more needed to be raised, but did say the center is still actively raising funds.

When completed, the exhibits will reveal chapters in the county’s history and heritage.

Read the full article.

Jamestown People To 1800: Landowners, Public Officials, Minorities, And Native Leaders

gpc35062013’s newborns become teenagers in 2026. That same year the United States will celebrate its Sestercentennial birthday. To a child twelve more years may seem a lifetime, to us adults, such years come with increasing speed. Yet, even with our nation’s 250th year in sight, the first, permanent English settlement established on this continent is already over 400 years old. Approaching its 400th year in 2007, the National Parks Service commissioned a “collaborative study know as the Jamestown Archeological Assessment.” This wide-spread, multidisciplinary study involved scientists, historians, librarians, and technologists form a wide field of studies. This study provided the first comprehensive ‘reconstruction of property ownership and land use from the first decade of establishment’ through modern times. Martha W. McCartney was an active participant in this study. Using information gathered from the study, she has put together Jamestown People to 1800: Landowners, Public Officials, Minorities, and Native Leaders.

This books contains a comprehensive  collection of short biographies on the people living in and doing business with Jamestown, from its establishment through 1800. The biographies fall into two main categories, landowners and residents (slave or free) of Jamestown, and public officials. Officials include “governors, members of the Council of State, and burgesses, and Native American leaders who visited Jamestown through 1699.”  These collective biographies contain more than 100 Native American leaders, plus another 100 plus Africans and African Americas. Many were slaves.

Here is a sample of a short entry:

Thomas Crust: Thomas Crust came to Virginia in 1620 and on January 24, 1625, was an indentured servant living in household of John Southern in urban Jamestown (VI&A 237)

A longer sample:

John Curtis (Curtys): In August 165 John Curtis, a surveyor and resident of Lancaster County, took the required oath. Throughout the 1660s he performed surveys for county residents and began speculating in real estate, sometime generating income by leasing his land to tenants. By 1656 Curtis had commenced serving as a justice in Lancaster County’s monthly court, an office he held for many years. He made numerous court appearances as the late Abraham Moone’s administrator, and in 1657 he became a Lancaster Parish vestryman. In May 1659 Curtis was elected to the assembly and represented Lancaster County in both sessions that were held in 1660. In September 1660 he and his wife, Anne, disposed of a piece of land, and the following year he sold a large parcel in Westmoreland Count. In 1669 John Curtis obtained from the Lancaster County court a license that allowed him to keep a tavern. When applying, he noted that he lived on a major road. Curtis died intestate sometime prior to September 13, 1671, at which time Richard Robinson began serving as administrator of his estate (LEO 36; Lancaster County Deeds &c 1652-1657:253, 284; 1654-1661:141, 147; 1661-1702:382-383, 390; 1656-1661: 81, 129; Order Book 1656-1666:1; 1666-1680:1, 104, 200, 206; Northumberland County Order Book 1652-1665:315; Westmoreland County Deeds and Wills No. 1[1653-1671]:199-200).

These short biographies go on and on, for 465 pages, plus an index.

McCartney’s gained access in her research to obscure records few know about or have access to. Her research covers both public and government records, as well as private archives. Together, these records were used to create a rich and detailed description of the population in early Jamestown.

About the Author

“The author of the acclaimed Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers, 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary, Martha W. McCartney is the recipient of the Daughters of the American Revolution’s National History Award. Her prize-winning history, Jamestown: An American Legacy was published by the National Park Service in 2001. In 2010 her book Hanover County, Virginia: Nature’s Bounty and Nation’s Glory was nominated for the Library of Virginia’s Virginia Literary Award for best nonfiction work.”

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Sources and Abbreviations

Glossary

Jamestown’s History

Biographical Dictionary

Index

 

This fascinating volume, Jamestown People to 1800: Landowners, Public Officials, Minorities, and Native Leaders, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $39.15

100 Years of Virginia’s Central State Hospital Records to be Posted Online

The following excerpt is from University of Texas at Austin:
Central-State-Hospital-Female-Patients-Courtesy of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis

Newswise — AUSTIN, Texas – A century’s worth of historical records from Central State Hospital in Virginia – the world’s first black mental hospital – will soon be available online in a digital archive created by King Davis, director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis, and an interdisciplinary team of researchers from The University of Texas at Austin.

Established in 1868, Central State Hospital, formerly Central State Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane, was created in response to the newly freed slaves after the Civil War. The mounds of forgotten materials offer a rare glimpse into what life was like for African Americans following the Civil War to the post-civil rights era. Without Davis’ intervention, the documents would have been shredded due to confusion over Virginia’s records retention laws.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Museum of the Confederacy & the American Civil War Center to Construct $30 Million Museum in Richmond

Wow! This is big news! The following teaser is from an AP article posted at the siouxcityjournal.com:
Museum-of-the-Confederacy

December 01, 2013 -Steve Szjotak – AP
RICHMOND, Virginia
| One museum has among its vast Confederate-centric collection Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s sword and the flag that flew at Robert E. Lee’s headquarters. The other museum strives to tell the story of the American Civil War through the eyes of Northerners and Southerners, freed and enslaved blacks, soldiers and civilians.

Now the Museum of the Confederacy and the American Civil War Center are joining forces to build a $30 million museum in Richmond with the goal of creating the top Civil War museum in the nation 150 years after the deadliest conflict fought on U.S. soil from 1861-65 between the Northern states and the secessionist, pro-slavery Southern states.

American-Civil-War-Center
Read the full article.

A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia – on sale for 50% Off Thru Friday

Family Roots Publishing just acquired a quantity of the beautiful book, A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. The book 894 page hard-cover is technically out-of-print, but the truth is that FRPC has the last of them. FRPC is offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is good until midnight EST (Not MST) Friday, Nov. 22, 2013.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.

Following is a book review of this terrific volume.

gpc6175Some 10,000 names is reason enough for any genealogist to find some interest in A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia, by John W. Wayland. First published in 1927, this book reaches back to the earliest exploration of the area in 1670, to the first permanent settlers around 1728, through the establishment of the county in 1772, and up to the year 1926.

Page upon page the history of the Shenandoah Valley and County is revealed, along with the people who lived its history. From prominent figures to the names of children and families, this book provided genealogical data by the droves. Within these pages you will find lists of names, property owner, short biographies, head of families and civic leaders.

This history also provides great details on landmarks and buildings, both those gone forever and imaginably plenty that are still standing. Take the Solomon’s Church, located “about four miles southwest of Pine Church, near Forestville…This is also an old establishment and was for many years held in common by the Reformed and the Lutherans.” Such seemingly small details are just what genealogists often need to help track down names and missing records, cemeteries, and other vital pieces of the genealogy puzzle.

The book has been reprinted a few times, but is provided as a copy of the original. It is impossible to describe the wealth of detail found in nearly 800 pages of history, but I can say great value comes from the over 100  page index listing over 10,000 entries, most of which are names, listed by surname.

 

Outline of Contents

List of Maps and Illustrations
Table of Dates (1,000 Items of Interest Arranged in Chronological Order)

  1. By Way of Introduction
  2. The Fairfax Line
  3. Explorations and Early Settlements
  4. Indians and Indian Raids
  5. Angels Unawares
  6. A County With Two Names
  7. Among the Early Records
  8. Towns and Villages of Shenandoah County
  9. The Forest and the Fort
  10. Famous Landmarks
  11. The Outbreak of the Revolution
  12. The Conquest of the Northwest
  13. Heads of Families in 1785
  14. Iron-Making and Iron-Masters
  15. The War of 1812
  16. The Long Gray Trail
  17. First Citizens of 1833
  18. The Forties and the Fifties
  19. The Early Years of the Civil War
  20. The Later Years of the Civil War
  21. Since 1865
  22. The Memorable Years of 1870 and 1876
  23. Echoes of The World War
  24. Old Churches and New
  25. Old Shenandoah Homesteads
  26. Schools and Schoolmasters
  27. Literary Activities and Associations
  28. Some Notable Incidents
  29. Distinguished Sons and Daughters
  30. A Pageant of the Golden West
  31. Pack-Saddles and Hame-Bells
  32. Fairy Palaces
  33. Genealogical Scrap-Bag
  34. Appendix
  35. Historical bits and Pieces
  36. Shenandoah County Since 1927
  37. Table of Dates (Continued)
  38. Index

A copy of A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia await the curious and avid historian and genealogist alike. FRPC is offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is good until midnight EST (Not MST) Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. Following is a book review of this terrific volume.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.