The First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut

ne39The First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut in a New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) publication. The book is a reprint of A Catalogue of the Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut; with the Time of Their Arrival in the Colony, and Their Standing in Society, Together with Their Place of Residence, as far as can be Discovered by the Records; originally published in 1846. Gratefully, the NEHGS shortened the title for their reprint. The reprint contains a foreward by Christopher C. Child, Senior Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press.

This book was compiled by Royal R. Hinman, who served as the Secretary of the State of Connecticut between 1835 and 1842. His primary focus in records gathering was on seventeenth century settlers who arrived before the Union of the Colonies of New Haven and Connecticut in 1665.

Several New England states have had “genealogical dictionaries” created to represent their earliest settlers. Hinman followed that style in part, but really produced something more akin to a variety of lists with other items. The majority of this book is represented in two lists, “First Settlers of the Colony,” running pages 12 to 109 in alphabetical order, with pages 110 to 159 containing additions and corrections. The second list is a continuation of settlers, listed alphabetical by surname, running through page 247. There are a variety of smaller lists that follow, bringing the page count to 336, not including the index.

This book as great value to researcher of early colonial settlers, as described in Child’s own words:

“The volume reprinted here serves as a very useful reference, in conjunction with primary sources. The overview of early Connecticut genealogy and history makes First Puritan Settlers a good first stop for anyone with Nutmeg State ancestry.”

 

Copies of The First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut can be obtained from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Complete Surname List (as found in the Index):

  • Abbe
  • Abbernatha
  • Abby
  • Abbott
  • Abel
  • Abell
  • Acerly
  • Ackley

Continue reading “The First Puritan Settlers of Connecticut”

New FamilySearch Database Collections as of December 6, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

There were 18 new, free historic record collections added or updated this week at FamilySearch.org. Some highlights include the Australia New South Wales Census 1891, Connecticut District Court Naturalization Indexes 1851-1992, United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 with nearly 15 million new records, Massachusetts Revolutionary War Index Cards to Muster Rolls 1775-1783, North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1979, Brazil Rio de Janeiro Immigration Cards 1900-1965, Germany Hesse Frankfurt Civil Registration Deaths Indexes 1928-1978,and Italy Taranto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1926. Explore these and many others by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Australia New South Wales Census 1891 – 326,076 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Australia Tasmania Miscellaneous Records 1829-1961 – 88,059 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil Rio de Janeiro Immigration Cards 1900-1965 – 2,213,292 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Colombia Catholic Church Records 1576-2014 – 0 – 403,033 – Added images to an existing collection
Germany Hesse Frankfurt Civil Registration Deaths Indexes 1928-1978 – 567,031 – 16,700 – New indexed records and images collection
Italy Taranto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1926 – 220,095 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Manitoba Probate Records 1871-1930 – 51,868 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Switzerland Bern Civil Registration 1792-1876 – 16,590 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Connecticut District Court Naturalization Indexes 1851-1992 – 261,034 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hawaii Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu 1900-1952 – 137,926 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Revolutionary War Index Cards to Muster Rolls 1775-1783 – 0 – 641,406 – New browsable image collection.
North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1979 – 25,757 – 580,366 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Ohio Passenger and Crew Lists arriving at Ashtabula and Conneaut 1952-1974 – 85,006 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio Trumbull County Records 1795-2010 – 0 – 133,347 – Added images to an existing collection
Wisconsin Crew Lists of Ship Arrivals 1925-1956 – 4,352 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Wisconsin Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at Manitowoc 1925-1956 – 4,231 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Wisconsin Milwaukee Passenger and Crew Lists 1922-1963 – 66,627 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 – 0 – 14,934,757 – Added images to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Free Cemetery Records Databases at AmericanAncestors.org October 30 through November 7, 2015

The following was received from NEHGS:

Cemetery-Databases-Free-NEHGS-2015-350pw

October 30, 2015 — Boston, Massachusetts — “Your ancestors have been dying for you to uncover them. NEHGS has opened the cemetery gates so you can start digging!”

Just in time for the Halloween celebrations and to add some fun to ancestral research this holiday, AmericanAncestors.org and New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) have made their complete collection of American cemetery databases accessible for FREE to guest users on their data-rich website.

The collection of more than 100 databases comprising more than one million records is accessible FREE from Friday, October 30, through midnight on Saturday, November 7. The collection includes cemetery transcriptions from New England and other states and was compiled from many different sources to create a unique group of cemetery offerings.

Registration at AmericanAncestors.org is required as a FREE Guest Member to gain access to these valuable resources. Guest User accounts allow web visitors to use a limited suite of databases on AmericanAncestors.org and to access web content such as making purchases from the NEHGS online store. Unlimited access to more than one billion online records on the website and to other benefits is through membership at NEHGS.
Family historians may start digging for their ancestors in these historic American cemeteries at: http://www.americanancestors.org/free-cemetery-databases.

The cemetery databases included in this special offering and FREE Access event are:

  • American Jewish Historical Society – New England Archives: Jewish Cemeteries in Massachusetts
  • Boston, MA: Old Cemeteries of Boston
  • Brooklyn, NY: Cemetery Inscriptions, 1686-1882
  • Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections
  • Charleston, SC: Inscriptions in Old Jewish Cemeteries, 1762-1903
  • Dedham, MA: Church and Cemetery Records 1638-1845
  • Gloucester, MA: Burials in Gloucester Cemeteries
  • New York: Long Island Cemetery Inscriptions, 1652-1910
  • North Andover, MA: Burials in Ridgewood Cemetery, 1848-1950
  • Northampton, MA: West Farms Cemetery
  • Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries Database Index
  • Sharon, MA: Sharon Memorial Park Cemetery
  • Sterling, MA: Leg Cemetery Records
  • Westbrook, CT: Cemetery Inscriptions
  • Western Massachusetts: Jewish Cemeteries of Western Massachusetts

About American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society
The founding genealogical society in America, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) was established in 1845. Today it has a national collecting scope and serves more than 130,000 constituents through an award-winning website, AmericanAncestors.org.

NEHGS’s resources, expertise, and service are unmatched in the field, and their leading staff of on-site and online genealogists includes experts in early American, Irish, English, Scottish, Italian, Atlantic and French Canadian, African American, Native American, Chinese, and Jewish research. The NEHGS library and archive, located at 99–101 Newbury Street in downtown Boston, is home to more than 28 million items, including artifacts, documents, records, journals, letters, books, manuscripts, and other items dating back hundreds of years.

50% Off! $hide Name List-Census Substitute #Genealogy Books AL-KS with Free eBook & Super-Saver USA Shipping

Illinois-Name-Lists-200pw

To celebrate the Christmas Season, FRPC is discounting all seventeen Dollarhide Name List printed books by 50%, making them just $9.48 each (including a FREE immediate download of the eBook). The eBooks themselves are also discounted 40%, making them just $7.50 (with no shipping charges). We’ve also put together a Super-Saver USA shipping arrangement for these books. The first book in an order ships for just $4 – and each book thereafter is only 50 cents each! Order 2 Name List books, shipping is $4.50; three books, just $5; four books, just $5.50. Mix or match your Name List books. All 17 books currently in print are included in the sale with no limits on numbers to be ordered. Dealer purchases are welcome. Sales are subject to books in stock and on hand, as reprinting of the volumes will take too long for Christmas sales. This offer is good through Christmas Eve, December 24, 2014.

Sorry – this offer is for USA sales only.

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of a PDF eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

These books are also available in an electronic PDF format also. See below – 40% off for this sale!

See Bill Dollarhide’s article, “What Are Name Lists?

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co., and are being offered at 50% OFF FOR THIS CHRISTMAS 2014 PROMOTION:

  • Alabama

 

 

Connecticut State Library Digitizing WWI History

The following excerpt is from an article by David Drury, posted at courant.com:

The now century-old conflict known to its contemporaries as the Great War left an indelible imprint on Connecticut.

For those who lived through it, on the battlefield or the home front, it was a life-defining event, and the Connecticut State Library wants to assure that family-held memories and mementos will be preserved and available to historians, students, genealogists or the simply curious.

Beginning later this month, state library officials will hold a series of community events at which local residents are urged to bring in family letters, photographs, diaries, recorded stories and other objects from the World War I period.

Those materials will be processed and digitally scanned on site by volunteers….

In conjunction with the project, a new website, http://www.CTinWorldWar1.org, launched this fall that provides a platform for sharing historical material from local libraries and institutions about Connecticut wartime experience at home and abroad…

Upcoming sessions of the Connecticut State Library’s digitalization project will be held at the Middletown Library Service Center, Oct. 22, 6 to 9 p.m.; Willimantic Library Service Center, Oct. 25, 1 to 4 p.m.; the Connecticut State Library, Nov. 8, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Read the full article.

Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors – Webinar on CD-ROM

Legacy Family Tree offers some of their popular webinars on CD. Their series of webinars, presented by professional genealogists, provide expert advice on areas from traditional genealogical research to make use of the latest technologies both for research and for the maintenance of critical family data. Here are some of the webinars on CD we have recently reviewed on this site:

This review looks at another webinar on CD, Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors presented by Marian Pierre-Louis. From this presentation, the viewer will “learn how to research your Connecticut ancestors. Discover what records are available, where they are located and how to put them to the best use.”

Topics on this CD include:

  • Important archives
  • Major portals
  • Census records and substitutes
  • City directories
  • Vital records
  • Land records
  • Probate records
  • Military records
  • Cemetery records
  • Manuscript collections
  • Neighboring states and migration
  • African Americans

As I have previously mentioned in other reviews, web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars. A large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on September 21, 2011; including, the complete Question and Answer session. The class runs 1 hour 29 minutes, plus a link to download four pages of handouts.

Get your own copy of Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: LEGweb6, Price: $12.69. Enjoy the presentation again and again on your own computer.

All 14 Dollarhide Name List books – Print & PDF eBooks Are On Sale for 20% Off – Sale extended through January 6

Florida Name Lists

FRPC has extended the sale of all 14 of the new Dollarhide Name Lists books, which are on sale for 20% off thorugh January 6. The sale includes both the printed volumes, as well as the PDF eBooks. Normally $18.95, the printed volumes are just $15.16, and include a FREE immediately downloadable PDF eBook of the same. The PDF eBooks alone normally sell for $12.50 – and are on sale for $10.00 each! All printed books currently come with a FREE download of the PDF eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 14 days within the United States.

After downloading the eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

The sale ends at midnight EST (not MST) January 6, 2014.

Books are now available for the states of Alabama through Illinois.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are both censuses and census substitutes, and are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

 Not only do these volumes give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co., the printed volumes, as well as the PDF eBooks alone all at a 20% discount with an immediately available PDF eBook during this sale: 

A Genealogist’s Historical Timeline for Connecticut, 1524 – 1788

The following aricle is excerpted from William Dollarhide’s new book, Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present, an annotated bibliography of published and online name lists.
Connecticut Name Lists
For genealogical research in Connecticut, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical and genealogical point of view:

1524. Italian Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed up the Atlantic coast in sight of present New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Maine, and wrote of his travels to his sponsor, King Francis I of France. While he encountered very friendly natives near Connecticut and Rhode Island, Maine’s natives were less welcoming. They greeted Verrazzano’s men from the height of a cliff, refused to approach the shore, and would only trade by lowering items on a rope. When they were finished trading, Verrazzano wrote that they “showed their buttocks and laughed immoderately.” For this, Verrazzano named the area, terra onde la mala gente, or “the land of the bad people.”

1558. Elizabeth I became Queen of England. All of the great explorations of North America took place during her 45-year reign, the Elizabethan Era. When Elizabeth I was crowned, England was nearly bankrupt, but during her reign, the British Empire expanded and thrived, and British culture flourished in Literature, Theatre, Music, and Architecture.

1559 Norumbega. Englishman David Ingram was New England’s earliest real estate promoter. He claimed to have traveled the length of the Atlantic seaboard from present Florida to Maine, and on his return to England, he told stories of what he saw on that journey. Ingram said he had visited the wealthy city of Norumbega, somewhere between present Connecticut and Maine, where the streets were “far broader than any street in London,” the men were bedecked with gold and silver bracelets, and the women with gold plates and pearls as big as thumbs. He told of houses with pillars of gold, silver, and crystal, and spoke of how he could grab fist-sized nuggets of gold from the streams. Though Ingram may have exaggerated a bit, he did spark an interest in the New England region, and more fortune seekers followed during the latter half of the 16th Century, searching for Ingram’s mythical land of Norumbega.

1603 England. James I (James VI of Scotland since 1566), became King of England, the first monarch to rule both England and Scotland. He was also the first English King to publicly assert that he was blessed with “the divine right of Kings,” meaning he was the voice of God on earth, at least in England and Scotland. Although James I was most remembered for commissioning a Bible translation, during his reign, the first permanent British colonies of North America were established in Virginia and New England, including Connecticut. James I was in power when England acquired possession of Northern Ireland, and was an advocate for the transportation of thousands of clan people living along the Scottish-English border to Ulster Province. After about 120 years in Northern Ireland, many of these “Scots-Irish” were to migrate to the interior of New England via the Connecticut River.

1614. English Captain John Smith (of the Jamestown Colony) visited the shores of present Connecticut to Maine, then wrote his Description of New England, which encouraged Englishmen to settle there. Smith was credited as the first to call the area New England, which had previously been known as Norumbega or Virginia. Back in England, Christopher Jones was one seafarer who was known to have read Smith’s description of New England, and often remarked that he would like to go there. He got his wish as the master of the Mayflower in 1620.

1614 Connecticut. Dutchman Adriaen Block sailed up the present Connecticut River and claimed the region as part of the New Netherland colony. He named the river “Fresh River,” The Dutch were famous for trading a few beads and baubles for large tracts of land from the natives.

1620 Plymouth Colony. The Mayflower dropped anchor off Cape Cod, and soon after Plymouth Colony was founded by a small group of Pilgrims/Separatists, who had fled England for Holland a year earlier. Unlike the Puritans, the Pilgrims did not want to purify the Church of England, they just wanted to get away from the church’s Prayer Book, and have their own method of worship.

1623. Fort House of Good Hope. The Dutch built a fortified trading post on the present site of Hartford, but the Dutch were asked to leave by the British in a few years.

1625 England. Charles I became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Charles believed in the same principles his father, James I had espoused, i.e., that as King, he was the infallible interpreter of God’s will on earth. Soon after taking office, Charles began to note a large number of non-conformists among his subjects. Along with his Archbishop, William Laud, the King began a campaign to purge his church of the largest group of non-conformists, the so-called Puritans, a militant Calvinist religious sect attempting to purify the Church of England. Unfortunately, Charles I took on a job that led to civil war in England as well as the loss of his head. But, his campaign can be credited as the main cause for the founding of English settlements in New England.

1629. The Great Migration to New England began. As a result of the Charles I campaign to purge non-conformists from the Church of England, 1629-1640, large groups of people were disenfranchised. Charles I disbanded Parliament and ruled England alone for eleven years. The Puritans referred to this era as “the eleven years of tyranny.” It was during these eleven years that about 80,000 Puritans felt compelled to leave England. About a fourth of them moved to Holland; another fourth of them to Ireland; a fourth to the West Indies, particularly the islands of Barbados, Nevis, and St. Kitts; and the final group, some 21,000 Puritan immigrants, established the Massachusetts Bay Colony of British North America.

1632. Edward Winslow of the Plymouth Colony visited the Connecticut River, and noted a point on the river as a good place for a settlement.

1633. Plymouth Colony sent William Holmes to found the settlement at Windsor, the first permanent settlement in present Connecticut.

1634. Puritans from the Massachusetts Bay Colony founded Wethersfield in present Connecticut.

1636 Connecticut Colony. The British settlements of Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor were formed as the Connecticut Colony. The name was based on Mohegan/Algonquin Indian words for a “long tidal river,” which the French had earlier corrupted into Quinetucket.

1637 – The Pequot War. The Pequot Indians of Connecticut were defeated by the Connecticut colonists in alliance with the Narragansetts and Mohegans.

1638. New Haven Colony was formed as an independent colony, separate from Connecticut Colony.

1641. The Great Migration to New England ended. It was also the beginning of the Civil War in England, and by 1649, Charles I and William Laud were beheaded; Oliver Cromwell, a Puritan, became Lord Protectorate, ruling England for the next decade. The group of Royalists who supported Charles I were now out of power, the Puritans were in control (and there was no need to send any more Puritans to New England, in fact many of the “purged” Puritans return to England). Instead of Puritans to New England, another English migration began, this time to Virginia by the opponents of the Puritans—Loyalists of the king who were known as Cavaliers.

1643 New Haven Colony. The coastal settlements of Branford, Guilford, Milford, Stamford, plus Southold (on Long Island), all joined the New Haven Colony.

1646. The settlement of New London was founded by John Winthrop, Jr.

1660 England. Charles II was restored to the throne as King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He had lived in exile after the execution of his father, Charles I. In 1649, the Scots had proclaimed Charles the king of Scotland. But the Puritan leader Oliver Cromwell defeated his army in 1651, and Charles fled to France. After Cromwell died in 1658, the English people became increasingly dissatisfied with the government that Cromwell had established. In 1660, Parliament invited Charles to return and declared him king. He ruled until his death in 1685, and during his reign, the British colonials forced out the remaining pockets of Atlantic settlements made earlier by the Dutch, Swedes, Danes and French. Charles II saw the Atlantic colonies as a source of trade and commerce, supported development, and granted several more charters for settlement (including one to William Penn in 1681). All of the British colonies thrived as a result. He was the first monarch to recognize the potential for the North American colonies to become a contiguous, viable commonwealth. He encouraged the development of post roads, and a regular communication between the Governors. Charles II was responsible for setting the tone of self-government, religious tolerance, and individual freedoms in the British colonies that were to become American institutions.

1665 Connecticut Colony. New Haven Colony and Connecticut Colony merged into one chartered colony, retaining the name Connecticut.

1674. The English asked the Dutch to leave New York and Connecticut. Outnumbered, the Dutch complied, not by leaving, but by moving out of their town halls and political offices. The Dutch communities remained, kept their own churches and culture, and continued to be a factor in the development of the Hudson and Connecticut River valleys.

1701. The Collegiate School was authorized by the Connecticut General Assembly.

1717. The Collegiate School was moved to New Haven; became Yale College the following year.

1754. French and Indian War began. France and Britain fought for several years over the territory of Canada, the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi River Valley down to New Orleans. In Europe it was called the Seven Years War. Connecticut was a main supplier of militia to aid the British effort against the French. It was estimated that a forty percent of the adult males of Connecticut were directly involved in the French and Indian War.

1763. The Treaty of Paris was signed by France, Spain, and Britain, ending the French and Indian War. France was the loser, and was divested of virtually all of its North American lands, except the town of New Orleans and some small islands and fishing rights off Newfoundland. The British now held all the territory east of the Mississippi River from Florida to the Great Lakes; the Hudson’s Bay Company’s Rupert’s Land; the Province of Quebec; and all lands of the present Maritime Provinces of Canada. The British claims became known officially as “British North America.” Spain took from France all of Louisiana west of the Mississippi, and added to its previous possession of Mexico, now held all North American lands west of the Mississippi to the Continental Divide. Because a large part of Connecticut’s population was involved in the French and Indian War, there exists today several good-sized name lists of militiamen who participated in various battles of the war.

1775-1781 Revolutionary War. Several thousand Connecticut men rushed to answer the “Lexington Alarm.” Connecticut troops were instrumental in the planning and seizure of Ft. Ticonderoga. British raids in Connecticut included New Haven, Fairfield, and Norwalk, and turncoat Benedict Arnold led British attacks on New London and Groton.

1788. Jan. 9th. Connecticut ratified the U.S. Constitution and became the 5th state of the original 13 colonies.

Find out more about William Dollarhide’s new book, Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present, an annotated bibliography of published and online name lists.

Connecticut Name Lists 1600s-2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

fr0221What’s in the Connecticut edition?

Continuing our review for each of William Dollarhide’s name lists books, we detail the contents of Connecticut Name Lists 1600s-2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present. Currently, there are nine new names lists books, and we are providing details on each.

In this book, names lists are detailed in the following database categories (with 351 total links for the state of Connecticut):

  • Colonial & Local Census Records
  • State and Town Court Records
  • Directories
  • State Militia Lists
  • State Veterans & Pensioners Lists
  • Tax Lists
  • Vital Records
  • Voter Lists

The contents of the Connecticut section of the guide include:

  • Connecticut Names Lists
  • Historical Timeline for Connecticut, 1524-1788
  • Introduction to Connecticut’s Colonial, Local & Statewide Name Lists
  • Bibliography of Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s-2001

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

National Names Lists information included with every volume:

The National Names Lists have these categories (244 entries in all):

  • Federal Census Records
  • Immigration Lists
  • U.S. Military Lists
  • U.S. Veterans Records
  • U.S. Pension Records
  • National Vital Record

There are also a number of maps, including:

  • 1899 Alaska & Klondike Region
  • 1880-1940 Alaska Census Jurisdictions
  • 1763 British North America
  • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
  • 1790 United States
  • 1800 United States
  • 1810 United States
  • 1820 United States
  • 1830 United States
  • 1840 United States
  • 1850 United States
  • 1860 United States
  • 1870-1880 United States
  • 1890-1940 United States

This new series is bound to be a big hit with genealogists. Don’t forget, the introductory offer. If you order a print copy of the book you not only get 15% off, but you also will receive a FREE copy of the eBook version in  .PDF (Adobe Acrobat) format. The .PDF version is fully hyperlinked to take you quickly to each site, and can be viewed on any device or computer supporting Acrobat files, which is virtually every computer, laptop, tablet, and smart device on the market.

Order your copy of Connecticut Name Lists 1600s-2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present while the deals are good, from Family Roots Publishing; Temporary Price: $16.11 for both the paper and electronic versions together. Or, get the eBook version alone for just $12.50.

9 New Dollarhide Research Guides (AL – DC) Now Available at Introductory Prices with FREE PDF eBook & Nearly 50% Savings!

Connecticut Name Lists
With this new exciting series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

As of today, there are currently nine new volumes in print, each coverng a different state. Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, and the District of Columbia are in print. Others will follow as published.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

To celebrate the introduction of these new research guides, Family Roots Publishing is, for a LIMITED TIME, offering them to the public at 15% off (Reg. $18.95 ea.) with a FREE fully-hyperlinked pdf eBook of the guide or guides available by download immediately upon purchase. That’s a savings of nearly 50% for the book and PDF eBook combined! Start your Name List research in any of these 9 states now! No waiting for the book itself to arrive!

Internet hyperlinks alone for each of the volumes is as follows:

  • Alabama – 400 links
  • Alaska – 270 links
  • Arizona – 298 links
  • Arkansas – 424 links
  • California – 415 links
  • Colorado – 351 links
  • Connecticut – 336 links
  • Delaware – 307 links
  • District of Columbia – 380 links

The National Name List portion of each book includes 244 links.

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased today from Family Roots Publishing Co. Note that the pdf eBook link alone follows the listing for the book itself & a FREE pdf (download link sent immediately).

Click on the links below to read more about each book, including a table of contents, and/or to make a purchase. – or click on this link to go directly to the Dollarhide Name Lists section of Family Roots Publishing.

Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Arizona Name Lists 1684 – 2003, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Arizona Name Lists 1684 – 2003, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Arkansas Name Lists, 1686 – 2005, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Arkansas Name Lists, 1686 – 2005, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

California Name Lists, 1700 – 2011, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: California Name Lists, 1700 – 2011, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Colorado Name Lists, 1858 – 1998, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Colorado Name Lists, 1858 – 1998, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Delaware Name Lists, 1609-1992, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Delaware Name Lists, 1609-1992, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

District of Columbia Name Lists, 1600s – 1997, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: District of Columbia Name Lists, 1600s – 1997, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Note that PDF eBooks alone are available above at a total cost of $12.50 each – with immediate download available upon purchase.

Connecticut Lawmakers Want to Seal Children’s Death Records

The following excerpt is from an article posted in the February 21, 2013 edition of newstimes.com:

Blaming overzealous members of the media as well as those seeking to disprove that the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School occurred, three state lawmakers representing Newtown testified in Hartford on Wednesday in support of a bill that would seal the death certificates of children.

Reps. DebraLee Hovey, R-Monroe; Dan Carter, R-Bethel; and Mitch Bolinsky, R-Newtown; and Newtown Town Clerk Debbie Aurelia told the Legislature’s Public Health Committee that the proposed law is intended to protect the privacy of the Sandy Hook families and others when release of the information is likely to cause “undue hardship” to families.

Read the full article.

Archives.com Expands U.S. Vital Records Collections by 58 Million

The following information is from Julie Hill at Archives.com:

With the holidays behind us, it’s time to dig into finding more ancestors and Archives.com is here to help. We recently added more than 58 million United States vital records. These 27 new collections contain birth, death, or marriage information from 21 states.

To learn more about these collections and to begin your search, please visit the Collections page.

Highlights Include:

Connecticut Town Marriage Records and Connecticut Town Death Records (popularly known as the Barbour Collection) cover pre-1870 marriages and deaths and are considered a standard Connecticut reference.

Georgia Death Records covers 1919 through 1998. Information includes the person’s name, birth date, death date, and place of death.

Indiana Marriage Records covers marriages from 1800 through 1941. This will be indispensable for researching your ancestors in the Hoosier State.

New Jersey Birth Index includes births from 1660 through 1931. Records vary in content, but could include not only the parents’ names, but also the names of the grandparents.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Death Index will help your research in a state that can be difficult. This collection contains deaths from 1803 through 1915. Depending on who gave the information, records could contain parents’ names, the spouse’s name, and place of burial.

Visit the Archives.com Collections page anytime to stay up-to-date on recent additions! You can also watch this blog, follow us on Twitter (@archivescom), or “like” us on Facebook.

Genealogical Notes, First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts

Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts is a reprint of a volume originally published in 1856. The book represents the compiled notes of an early American Genealogist, Nathaniel Goodwin. This collection is a effectively a descendants report, with extensive notes by Goodwin, on forty seventeenth-century families from Connecticut and Massachusetts. Many of these lists extend five to six generations.

This book provides organized information on the family heritage of hundreds of individuals. It would be nearly impossible to estimate the thousands, or tens of thousands or more, descendants living today. Even when written in 1833, Goodwin did not intend this book as a complete genealogy of certain families, but rather as “genealogical notes to assist others in tracing out their family histories.”

Goodwin’s notes fills in gaps and names along with other tidbits. Take this short example given for one David Hollister, born November 21, 1681:

“Settled in Glastenbury. Mr. David Hollister, died December 27, 1753, in the 76th year of his age. His widow, Mrs. charity Hollister, died January 12, 1786, in the 89th year of her age. Children,—Six, named in his will”

Besides the obvious value of naming a wife, along with marriage and death date, is the positive indication that there was a will and that it names his children. Something the researcher can look for, knowing it at least existed at that time. Most notes offer similar extended family information beyond the names and birth years of direct descendents for each family.

 

Contents

Memoir of Nathaniel Goodwin

Genealogy of the Goodwin Family

Adam Blakeman of Stratford, CT

Leonard Chester of Wethersfield, CT

Daniel Clark of Windsor, CT

John Dwight of Dedham, MA

William Edwards of Hartford, CT

William Goodrich of Wethersfield, CT

John Goodrich of Wethersfield, CT

William Gurley of Northampton, MA

John Hollister of Wethersfield, CT

John Hopkins of Hartford, CT

John Ingersoll of Hartford, CT and of Northampton, MA

Lewis Jones of Watertown, MA

William Judson of Concord, MA and of Stratford and New Haven, CT

John Kent of Suffield, CT

Richard Mather of Dorchester, MA

Michael Metcalf of Dedham, MA

Joseph Mygatt of Hartford, CT

John Nott of Westhersfield, CT

John Porter of Windsor, CT

Robert Sedgwick of Charlestown, MA

Rev. Henry Smith of Wethersfield, CT

Jared Spencer of Cambridge and Lynn, MA and of Haddam, CT

Thomas Spencer of Harford, CT

Rev. Samuel Stone, Harford, CT

Samuel Storrs of Mansfield, CT

Samuel Terry of Springfield, MA and of Enfield, CT

Stephen Terry of Windsor, CT

Matthias Treat of Wethersfield, CT

Richard Treat of Westhersfield, CT

Andre Ward of Wethersfield, Stamford, and Fairfield, CT

Governor John Webster of Harford, CT and Hadley, MA

Governor Thomas Welles of Harford, CT

Nicholas Worthington of Hatfield, MA

Appendix

John Case of Windsor and Simsbury, CT

Edwards Family

Goodrich Family

William Spencer of Cambridge, MA and Hartford, CT

Family of Richard Treat

William Whiting of Hartford, CT

John Lord of Hartford, CT

Errata

Index

 

Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts is available from Family Roots Publishers, Price: $24.45.

Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors — Webinar on CD

Legacy Family Tree offers some of their popular webinars on CD. Their series of webinars, presented by professional genealogists, provide expert advice on areas from traditional genealogical research to make use of the latest technologies both for research and for the maintenance of critical family data. Here are some of the webinars on CD we have recently reviewed on this site:

This review looks at another webinar on CD, Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors presented by Marian Pierre-Louis. From this presentation, the viewer will “learn how to research your Connecticut ancestors. Discover what records are available, where they are located and how to put them to the best use.”

Topics on this CD include:

  • Important archives
  • Major portals
  • Census records and substitutes
  • City directories
  • Vital records
  • Land records
  • Probate records
  • Military records
  • Cemetery records
  • Manuscript collections
  • Neighboring states and migration
  • African Americans

As I have previously mentioned in other reviews, web seminars, or “Webinars,” have quickly become one of the most popular ways for professionals and companies to share information with large groups of individuals from across the country, or even around the world, without the high cost of travel. Webinars are just like seminars. A large group of “attendees” can come and watch a presentation at a given time. Webinars are nice, since they are usually recorded and can be watched again at a later time. The only real downside to webinars is the video stream can be slow for some people. Depending in large part on the viewer’s own personal Internet connection speed, video may or may not play well. The age of a person’s computer may also contribute to slow playback. To counter these playback problems, some individuals and companies offer the option to buy their webinars on CD. CD’s offer the opportunity to play these webinars on almost any computer at anytime, without the worry of connection issues.

This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on September 21, 2011; including, the complete Question and Answer session. The class runs 1 hour 29 minutes, plus a link to download four pages of handouts.

Get your own copy of Researching Your: Connecticut Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: LEGweb6, Price: $12.69. Enjoy the presentation again and again on your own computer.

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 represents an exhaustive research project to extract population data for the area encompassed by the  United State as represented in 1790. Data was gathered from previous research studies, government studies, and independent research. The population lists, which are of paramount importance to the genealogist, include poll lists, tax lists, taxables, militia lists, and censuses, and were originally drawn up for purposes of taxation and local defense. Gleaned from archives in Britain and the U.S. and from a wide range of published sources, their itemization in this work puts colonial population records, and those other areas covered in this book, in a handy framework for research.

The author acknowledges that some of the statics may have greater value than others, based predominately on the source. Some statistics are little more than official estimates. Though some sources contain estimates, every effort was made to verify statics for accuracy. Many estimates by secondary authorities were omitted to limit the introduction of unnecessary bias. There are plenty of accurate counts as well. To help the reader appraise the value of various counts, the specific source is indicated for each item.

Reading these population counts is like reading history by the numbers. Seeing how different areas grew and at what rates gains perspective when compared to the first federal census of 1790 and, perhaps even more so when compared to today’s population counts in the same areas. Such information is both insightful as it is simply interesting.

 

Content

Bibliography

Notes of Methods of Calculation

Abbreviations

General Estimates of the Thirteen Colonies as a Whole

New England

Plymouth

Massachusetts

  • General
  • Local

Connecticut

  • General
  • Local

Rhode Island

  • General
  • Local

New Hampshire

  • General
  • Local

Vermont

  • General
  • Local

New York

  • General
  • Local

New Jersey

  • General
  • Local

Pennsylvania

  • General
  • Local

Delaware

  • General
  • Local

Maryland

  • General
  • Local

Virgina

  • General
  • Local

North Carolina

  • General
  • Local

South Carolina

  • General
  • Local

Georgia

  • General
  • Local

The Northwest

  • The Illinois Country

The Southwest

  • Kentucky
  • Tennessee

Western Indians

  • Northern Department
  • Southern Department

Index

 

Order American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC2345, Price: $30.87.