Family History Research Has Grown in the USA by 14 Times in the Past Decade

The following News Release is from Marketwired and Ancestry.com:

PROVO, UT–(Marketwired – November 19, 2014) – Over the past decade, online family history research has grown in the United States by 14 times, with two-thirds (63%) of respondents in a recent study reporting that family history has become more important than ever. They also say that this growth is motivated by a belief that knowing more about the past is a key part of understanding who we are.

Announced today by Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, the new findings are part of the first chapter in its Global Family History Report, a multi-country study that examined trends in the family — both past and present — across six developed countries: the U.S., UK, Canada, Australia, Germany and Sweden.

According to the study, the relationships between younger and older family members have strengthened, with relationships between grandparents and their grandchildren growing closer in the past 50 years.* Nearly three-quarters (72%) of respondents reported feeling closer to older relatives, with half of older relatives saying they had drawn closer to young relatives as a result of learning more about their family.

“This shift back to vertical family structure is really interesting,” said Michelle Ercanbrack, family historian at Ancestry. “Vertical family structure, meaning multiple generations interacting with one another, was common historically because nuclear families often lived under the same roof. The rise in multigenerational relationships today has everything to do with advances in technology and medicine. As grand- and great-grandparents live longer and stay connected with social media, there are now unprecedented opportunities to engage with younger generations and pass on family stories.”

Younger people are among those inspired most to learn more about their family history through talking with older family members (55% overall). And the family knowledge held by older generations has expanded when compared to what their parents knew about their ancestors. A generation ago, the average family history stretched back 149 years, but today this has grown in the U.S. to 184 years.

Among those who have researched their ancestry in ways other than speaking to family, three of the most commonly used resources in the U.S. are photographs (81%), birth, marriage and death records, (66%) and letters (45%). Uncovering a strong family narrative and culture, however, emerges when family dinnertime conversations and historical records meet.

“The holidays are the perfect time to connect with family. If you are lucky enough to still have a living patriarch or matriarch in your family, take the time to sit with them and listen,” said Ercanbrack. “Whenever I visit Grandma, I love snapping pictures of family photos hanging on the wall or printing off census records from her life to start her talking and then recording the conversation we have with my smartphone. You’ll be amazed at what you learn about their life and gain some context to what led to your own unique circumstances.”

Capturing and sharing your family history is easy on-the-go with a mobile phone. The Ancestry mobile app is free and can help you discover, preserve and share your family history no matter where you are. Similarly, Shoebox by Ancestry is a great mobile app used to scan old paper photos and save them to your family tree. To download either or both before heading out for your holiday gatherings, visit http://www.ancestry.com/mobile and http://shoebox.ancestry.com/.

* The number of grandchildren with a close relationship with a grandparent has increased from 60 percent in the 1950s-1960s to 78 percent today, an increase of 30 percent.

Methodology:In March 2014, Ancestry approached the Future Foundation to pursue an original program of research focusing on the growing phenomenon of online family history research in six of the world’s largest economies: the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Sweden. A number of desk research resources have been consulted to compile the findings, these include previous survey research from Ancestry, census data from each of the six countries, nVision Global trend data and forecasts for internet uptake, use of social networking and other online activities, in each of thesix countries, and Ancestry’s extensive genealogical archives.A total of 6,024 10-15 minute interviews were carried out with adults aged 18+ in the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Sweden (1,000+ adults aged 18+ per country) as part of its original quantitative research. In each country, interlocking age and gender quotas and broad income-group quotas were set to ensure the sample was representative of the general population by age and gender. Interviews were carried out online, using panel respondents recruited by Research Now, during June 2014.In instances where we believe our sample of online panel respondents to be representative of the general population (i.e., non tech-related matters such as ancestors, extended family, etc.), we interpret results as representative of the adult population in general.In other instances, where appropriate (e.g. when giving the percentage of all adults who have used the Internet for online family history), we have mapped survey results against other sources of data listed above (e.g., on the percentage of adults aged 18+ who are internet users in each country) and adjusted findings accordingly.

About Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com is the world’s largest online family history resource with approximately 2.7 million paying subscribers across all its websites. More than 15 billion records have been added, and users have created more than 60 million family trees to the core Ancestry websites, including its flagship site www.ancestry.com and its affiliated international websites. Additionally, Ancestry.com offers a suite of online family history brands, including Archives.com, Fold3.com, Newspapers.com, as well as the AncestryDNA product, sold by Ancestry.com DNA, LLC, which, along with its core Ancestry websites, are all designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include a variety of factors, some of which are beyond the Company’s control. In particular, such risks and uncertainties include the size of our total addressable market and the Company’s ability to provide value to satisfy customer demand. Information concerning additional factors that could cause events or results to differ materially is contained under the caption “Risk Factors” in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended September 30, 2014, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 3, 2014, and in discussions in other of our Securities and Exchange Commission filings. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements.

A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900

a0131By an Act of Congress in 1907 and “In order to permanently to preserve the valuable but vanishing census records which still remain, relating to the first year of constitutional government, and in response to urgent requests from many patriotic societies…Congress authorized…the publication, by the Director of the Census, of the names of heads of families returned at the First Census.”

After publication of multiple volumes it was determined a final volume was needed. This final volume was to act as historical reference to the First Census and present statics regarding change since the 1790 census up to 1900. The task fell to W. S. Rossiter, chief clerk of the Census. The results were A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900. The latest printing was done in 1989 by Heritage Quest Press – and while technically out-of-print, a very few copies are still available.

This reference title relates histories of censuses that were taken in the United States, beginning in 1790. It reports population in the Colonial and Continental periods, population of counties and their subdivisions, white and black population, and proportion of children in white population. A Century of Population Growth also contains information on surnames of the white population in 1790, nationality as indicated by names of heads of families reported at the first census, interstate migration, foreign born population, statistics of slaves, and occupations and wealth.

One of the most interesting parts of the book runs from pages 227 through 270 – found under the heading of General Tables, and Nomenclature, Dealing With Names Represented by at Least 100 White Persons, By States and Territories, at the First Census, 1790. This section lists the surnames and their variations (some with a dozen or more variations) of white folks with a least 100 persons in the census. It shows the average size of the families, and how many heads of families, as well as how many other family members were enumerated. – then it breaks down how many families were to be found per state.

This book is a treasure trove of information about censuses and provides a unique perspective through statical analysis. The book is filled with tables, charts, and maps making review and comparison quick and easy.

Table of Contents

Population in the Colonial and Continental Periods

  • Census procedure in colonial and continental periods
  • Population prior to 1790
  • Recent estimates of early population
  • Population of cities
  • Changes in urban population, 1710–1900

The United States in 1790

  • Boundaries and area
  • Currency
  • Transportation
  • The postal service
  • Industries
  • Education
  • Newspapers and periodicals
  • Slavery
  • Indians

The First Census of the United States

  • The First Census Act
  • Debates in the Congress
  • Provisions of the Act
  • Execution of the law
  • The enumeration
  • The returns
  • The enumerator’s schedules

Area and Total Population

  • Area
  • Population
  • Population by areas of enumeration
  • By states and territories
  • Density of population

Population of Counties and Their Subdivisions

  • County areas made comparable
  • Population of minor civil divisions
  • Names of towns not returned separately at the First Census
  • Population of cities

White and Negro Population

  • Survivors of 1790
  • Whites and negroes in total populations
  • In four principal cities
  • Comparison of increase in the United States and Europe
  • Increase by immigration
  • Natural increase
  • Of whites
  • Of negroes
  • Summary

Sex and Age of the White Population

  • Decrease in proportion of males
  • In proportion of each sex under 16 years
  • Influence of immigration
  • Of modern sanitary science

Analysis of the Family

  • Average size of private families
  • Slaveholding and nonslaveholding families
  • Proportion of children
  • Dwellings

Proportion of Children in the White Population

  • Ratio of white adults of self-supporting age to white children
  • Of white children to adult white females
  • Effect of changes in the proportion of children

Surnames of the White Population in 1790

  • Approximate number
  • Nomenclature
  • Preponderance of English and Scotch names
  • Unusual and striking surnames
  • Distribution of surnames
  • Concentration of population under certain names
  • Absence of middle names

Nationality as Indicated by Names of Heads of Families Reported at the First Census

  • Nationality in states for which schedules exist
  • In those for which schedules are missing
  • Composition of population of typical counties in 1900
  • Slaveholding by nationality

Interstate Migration

  • Analysis of population according to geographic division of residence and of birth
  • Decrease in contribution of original area of population of added area

Foreign Born Population

  • Proportions contributed by original and added areas
  • Change in character of population
  • Small proportion of foreign born in Southern States
  • Country of birth

Statistics of Slaves

  • Number of slaves in United States
  • In original and added areas
  • Slaveholding families
  • Number of white persons directly or indirectly connected with slaveholding
  • Ration of slaves to whites
  • Value of slaves

Occupations and Wealth

  • Occupations
  • Of heads of families in Philadelphia and Southwark in 1790
  • In United States in 1850 and 1900
  • Approximate wealth in 1790
  • Industry and wealth, 1850 and 1900

Order a copy of A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900 for yourself or your library from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $44.10.

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 represents an exhaustive research project to extract population data for the area encompassed by the  United State as represented in 1790. Data was gathered from previous research studies, government studies, and independent research. The population lists, which are of paramount importance to the genealogist, include poll lists, tax lists, taxables, militia lists, and censuses, and were originally drawn up for purposes of taxation and local defense. Gleaned from archives in Britain and the U.S. and from a wide range of published sources, their itemization in this work puts colonial population records, and those other areas covered in this book, in a handy framework for research.

The author acknowledges that some of the statics may have greater value than others, based predominately on the source. While some data comes from official government enumerations, others statistics are little more than official estimates. While some of the sources are just estimates, every effort was made to verify statistics for accuracy. Many estimates by secondary authorities were omitted to limit the introduction of unnecessary bias. To help the reader appraise the value of various counts, the specific source is indicated for each item.

Reading these population counts is like reading history by the numbers. Seeing how different areas grew and at what rates gains perspective when compared to the first federal census of 1790 and, perhaps even more so when compared to today’s population counts in the same areas. Such information is both insightful as it is simply interesting.

 

Content

Bibliography

Notes of Methods of Calculation

Abbreviations

General Estimates of the Thirteen Colonies as a Whole

New England

Plymouth

Massachusetts

  • General
  • Local

Connecticut

  • General
  • Local

Rhode Island

  • General
  • Local

New Hampshire

  • General
  • Local

Vermont

  • General
  • Local

New York

  • General
  • Local

New Jersey

  • General
  • Local

Pennsylvania

  • General
  • Local

Delaware

  • General
  • Local

Maryland

  • General
  • Local

Virgina

  • General
  • Local

North Carolina

  • General
  • Local

South Carolina

  • General
  • Local

Georgia

  • General
  • Local

The Northwest

  • The Illinois Country

The Southwest

  • Kentucky
  • Tennessee

Western Indians

  • Northern Department
  • Southern Department

Index

 

Order American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC2345, Price: $30.87.

Famous Relative? A New Book Will Examine How People Are Related in the Modern World

A friend of Leland’s, Megan Smolenyak, has an interesting new book coming out in February. A recent article in the Chicago Tribune gives us an early peek at this fun new book.

We’re all (likely) related to stars

A genealogist explains why we’re all likely to have celebrity relatives, albeit distantly

By Katherine Skiba, Chicago Tribune reporter
WASHINGTON ——

The news stories invariably raise eyebrows: Barack Obama is related to Brad Pitt. Madonna and Ellen DeGeneres are cousins. John Edwards and Britney Spears are cousins, too.

How can it be?

Genealogist Megan Smolenyak explains it in a new book, which features chapters on Barack and Michelle Obama. If a person goes back 10 generations, he or she will have 1,024 direct ancestors, she says.

The result is that each of us is bound to have “millions of cousins — and a few of them are going to be famous,” Smolenyak says.

The genealogist, who traced Obama’s roots to the Emerald Isle, which the president visited amid fanfare last May, notes that socioeconomic and cultural factors contribute to the mind-boggling blood ties.

In her book, “Hey, America, Your Roots are Showing,” due out in February, Smolenyak notes that 200 years ago, few people lived in cities and transportation options were scant.

Click here to read the full article.

Confusing Family Connections Simplified

“He’s my semi half brother. He shares three of the same mothers as me.” [Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy movie] Have you ever felt like identifying your family connections was as confusing as this quote? Was that my second cousin, or first cousin once removed? What is the great-grandchild of my third great-grandmother on my father’s side to me? Fortunately, G. H. Amber came up with an easy way for us to reference our family connections over seven generations. Amber’s two-sided wall chart Kinship Connections features 222 family relationships and blood lines. Amber refers to the chart as “A universal ‘family bush’ which illustrates every type of relationship, by consanguinity (blood) and affinity (marriage), for seven generations”

Side one of the chart features a full-color, 222 person “family bush.” The charts examines the connections for an individual stretching in both directions three generations. Using the information from the chart you can easily figure out the family connections in additional generations. The chart features the following color connections:

  • red = direct blood kin
  • orange = collateral blood kin (e.g. brother or sister)
  • yellow = in-laws, direct affines
  • blue =kin laws, secondary affines
  • green =co-laws, collateral affines
  • purple =kith-laws, extended affines
  • white =kith, unrelated acquaintances
  • brown =one’s spouse
  • gray =one, from whom relationships extend

If you are not sure what all of this means, no worries, one look at the chart and it will all fill into place.

Side two also helps make things clear with three additional, but small, charts. Each one explains family connections through both figures as well as bulleted facts. These are the additional figures:

  • Figure 2: Direct Blood and their collateral relationships
  • Figure 3: Double Cousins
  • Figure 4: Affine Kin Scheme of typical extended family

This great wall sized chart folds up to an approximate 6″ x 7″ making it easy to manage and carry with you as a reference.

Don’t lose track of your family lineage, order Kinship Connections from Family Roots Publishing, Item #: EV0010.

 

Canadian Genealogist Needed for Research Project at Carleton University

Carleton University is conducting a survey and needs the input from Canadian Genealogists. The following article from the Morning Post Exchange details the project:

Carleton Researchers Conducting Canadian Genealogy Survey

Ottawa – Calling all genealogy buffs: Carleton University researchers want you!

A team of Carleton researchers is seeking family historians to complete an online survey detailing how and why they conduct their genealogical research. This is the first national survey of its kind and aims to capture the effects of digitization and the impact of the Internet on family history research. Over 2,100 surveys have already been completed but the researchers are making one last push before the Nov. 30 deadline.

A multibillion-dollar industry, the practice of genealogy is growing exponentially and the Canadian Genealogy Survey investigates who is doing the digging.

Read the rest of the article at the Morning Post Exchange website.

Genealogical Charts for Research or Fun

Sometimes you need to inject a little fun into your research. Filling in a giant wall chart is one way you can have some fun and learn a little as well. The Genealogist’s Historiograph set is one such educational and relaxing activity. The package provides a two-part set, with each chart sizing in at 22” x 35”. Chart one covers the years 1620 to 1810, with chart two running 1811 to 2000.

These charts provide a way for you to identify historical influences to your own family history. The first column is for the names of your ancestors. The other columns include pre-selected statistics and historical facts. Columns exist for Population, Reigns and Administration, Famous Births & Deaths, Wars and Disasters, and Other Historical Events. None of these columns are completely filled in. Gaps are left where you can include items of interest directly related to your own family. For example, if you ancestors come from a particular town or city, you might research the population of that town for the given dates and include that information. Perhaps you considers a particular ancestor of worthy note in the Famous Births & Deaths column.

Pick up a set of the Genealogist’s Historiograph and the next time you need a break from your research, pull it out and fill in a few lines. You might be surprised at both how fun it can be as well as how much you will learn about your family when viewed in chart form.

Order your Genealogist’s Historiograph set today, from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: AC0020.

Examining U.S. Population Growth 1790–1900

By an Act of Congress in 1907 and “In order to permanently to preserve the valuable but vanishing census records which still remain, relating to the first year of constitutional government, and in response to urgent requests from many patriotic societies…Congress authorized…the publication, by the Director of the Census, of the names of heads of families returned at the First Census.”

After publication of multiple volumes it was determined a final volume was needed. This final volume was to act as historical reference to the First Census and present statics regarding change since the 1790 census up to 1900. The task fell to W. S. Rossiter, chief clerk of the Census. The results were A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900. The latest printing was done in 1989 by Heritage Quest Press – and while technically out-of-print, a very few copies are still available.

This reference title relates histories of censuses that were taken in the United States, beginning in 1790. It reports population in the Colonial and Continental periods, population of counties and their subdivisions, white and black population, and proportion of children in white population. A Century of Population Growth also contains information on surnames of the white population in 1790, nationality as indicated by names of heads of families reported at the first census, interstate migration, foreign born population, statistics of slaves, and occupations and wealth.

One of the most interesting parts of the book runs from pages 227 through 270 – found under the heading of General Tables, and Nomenclature, Dealing With Names Represented by at Least 100 White Persons, By States and Territories, at the First Census, 1790. This section lists the surnames and their variations (some with a dozen or more variations) of white folks with a least 100 persons in the census. It shows the average size of the families, and how many heads of families, as well as how many other family members were enumerated. – then it breaks down how many families were to be found per state.

This book is a treasure trove of information about censuses and provides a unique perspective through statical analysis. The book is filled with tables, charts, and maps making review and comparison quick and easy.

Table of Contents

Population in the Colonial and Continental Periods

  • Census procedure in colonial and continental periods
  • Population prior to 1790
  • Recent estimates of early population
  • Population of cities
  • Changes in urban population, 1710–1900

The United States in 1790

  • Boundaries and area
  • Currency
  • Transportation
  • The postal service
  • Industries
  • Education
  • Newspapers and periodicals
  • Slavery
  • Indians

The First Census of the United States

  • The First Census Act
  • Debates in the Congress
  • Provisions of the Act
  • Execution of the law
  • The enumeration
  • The returns
  • The enumerator’s schedules

Area and Total Population

  • Area
  • Population
  • Population by areas of enumeration
  • By states and territories
  • Density of population

Population of Counties and Their Subdivisions

  • County areas made comparable
  • Population of minor civil divisions
  • Names of towns not returned separately at the First Census
  • Population of cities

White and Negro Population

  • Survivors of 1790
  • Whites and negroes in total populations
  • In four principal cities
  • Comparison of increase in the United States and Europe
  • Increase by immigration
  • Natural increase
  • Of whites
  • Of negroes
  • Summary

Sex and Age of the White Population

  • Decrease in proportion of males
  • In proportion of each sex under 16 years
  • Influence of immigration
  • Of modern sanitary science

Analysis of the Family

  • Average size of private families
  • Slaveholding and nonslaveholding families
  • Proportion of children
  • Dwellings

Proportion of Children in the White Population

  • Ratio of white adults of self-supporting age to white children
  • Of white children to adult white females
  • Effect of changes in the proportion of children

Surnames of the White Population in 1790

  • Approximate number
  • Nomenclature
  • Preponderance of English and Scotch names
  • Unusual and striking surnames
  • Distribution of surnames
  • Concentration of population under certain names
  • Absence of middle names

Nationality as Indicated by Names of Heads of Families Reported at the First Census

  • Nationality in states for which schedules exist
  • In those for which schedules are missing
  • Composition of population of typical counties in 1900
  • Slaveholding by nationality

Interstate Migration

  • Analysis of population according to geographic division of residence and of birth
  • Decrease in contribution of original area of population of added area

Foreign Born Population

  • Proportions contributed by original and added areas
  • Change in character of population
  • Small proportion of foreign born in Southern States
  • Country of birth

Statistics of Slaves

  • Number of slaves in United States
  • In original and added areas
  • Slaveholding families
  • Number of white persons directly or indirectly connected with slaveholding
  • Ration of slaves to whites
  • Value of slaves

Occupations and Wealth

  • Occupations
  • Of heads of families in Philadelphia and Southwark in 1790
  • In United States in 1850 and 1900
  • Approximate wealth in 1790
  • Industry and wealth, 1850 and 1900

Order a copy of A Century of Populations Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900 for your self or your library from Family Roots Publishing, Item #: A0131.

Take the Casefile Clues Survey

My friend, Michael John Neill, genealogist and operator of casefileclues.com, is taking a survey of genealogists. He invited me to have a go at it, and I found his questions to be insightful, and even a bit thought-provoking. I’m not a survey kind of guy, but will say that I enjoyed taking this one.

I invite my readers to take a shot at it at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GQZNK63

Enjoy…

Dick Eastman Reports on the Response to “Please Tell Us About Your Experiences”

On September 15, Dick Eastman wrote an article entitled, Survey: Please Tell Us About Your Experiences. He asked the readers of his newsletter to answer an online questionnaire about their genealogy interests, genealogy software, their computers and their Internet connections.

Dick posted a compilation of the responses today. Amazingly enough, 2,113 newsletter readers answered the questions. I just finished reading Dick’s compilation of the data, and I found it very interesting. I think you will too.