Reburying the Dead in Flood-Ravaged Louisiana

The following excerpts are from an article August 20, 2016 at the chieftain.com website.

ST. AMANT, La. — Louisiana continues to dig itself out from devastating floods, with search parties going door to door looking for survivors or bodies trapped by flooding so powerful in some cases it disturbed the dead and sent caskets floating from cemeteries.

In a uniquely Louisiana problem, some families are also trying to rebury relatives whose caskets were unearthed by the floods.

At least 15 cemeteries across seven parishes have had disruptions, the Louisiana Dept. of Health reported, although they don’t yet have an estimate of how many graves, tombs, and vaults have been damaged.

Read the full article.

The Louisiana State Archives Has Posted Tips For Saving Flood Damaged Documents & Photos

The following excerpt is from an August 17, 2016 article posted at TheAdvocate.com:

Louisiana-Flooding-2016_250pw

The [Louisiana] State Archives has offered several tips for Louisiana residents trying to save flooded documents and photographs.

Wide-spread flooding has left thousands of homes with damage across south Louisiana. Already, more than 65,000 disaster assistance claims have been filed with FEMA.

The State Archives, under the direction of the Secretary of State’s Office, says there are several steps people can take to try to save water-logged documents and photographs as they try to salvage items from flooded homes and other buildings.

Read the full article – which includes some greats ideas on what to do now!

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for February 16 & 22, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch Logo 2014

You will find new marriage records from Kansas and Maryland this week along with England Devon Bishop’s Transcripts 1558-1887, England Lancashire Oldham Cemetery Registers 1797-2004, and United States World War II Prisoners of War 1941-1945. I’ve also included updates from February 16 on the following list. Check out all of the marriage records from a variety of states, including New York, Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. Other highlights include New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957, California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949, Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920, and New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943. Find these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

California San Francisco Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving 1954- 1957 – 375,314 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
England Devon Bishop’s Transcripts 1558-1887 – 256,201 – 93,511 – New indexed records and images collection
England Lancashire Oldham Cemetery Registers 1797-2004 – 481,340 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Gary and East Chicago Crew Lists 1945-1956 – 17,094 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kansas County Marriages 1855-1911 – 148,676 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maryland Marriages 1666-1970 – 96,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Delayed and Corrected Vital Records 1753-1900 – 31,701 – 11,788 – New indexed records and images collection
United States World War II Prisoners of War 1941-1945 – 143,374 – 0 – New indexed records collection

BillionGraves Index – 227,783 – 227,783 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Canada British Columbia Marriage Registrations 1859-1932; 1937-1938 – 6,123 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949 – 22,858 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
England and Wales Census 1861 – 2,504,271 – 111,092 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
England Durham Diocese Marriage Bonds & Allegations 1692-1900 – 35,079 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Florida and South Carolina Airplane Arrival Manifests 1944-1945 – 0 – 127 – New browsable image collection.
Florida Knights Keys Passenger Lists 1908-1912 – 5,399 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Honduras Civil Registration 1841-1968 – 0 – 609 – Added images to an existing collection
Idaho Birth Index 1861-1911 – 60,430 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Idaho Death Certificates 1938-1961 – 118,152 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois Cook County Deaths 1878-1994 – 3,732,138 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Marriages 1811-2007 – 276,945 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Bergamo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1901 – 6,965 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 78,629 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 113,690 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Modena Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1942 – 67,474 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Prato Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1923 – 7,183 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Reggio Calabria Civil Registration (State Archive) 1784-1943 – 0 – 2,143,899 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Viterbo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1870-1943 – 90,051 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kansas County Marriages 1855-1911 – 311,857 – 2,333 – Added images to an existing collection
Kansas Marriages 1811-1911 – 185,068 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Liberia Marriage Records 1941-1974 – 24,625 – 24,406 – New browsable image collection.
Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957 – 46,810 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maine Crew List Arriving at Eastport 1949-1958 – 7,239 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maryland County Marriages 1658-1940 – 53,762 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Minnesota County Marriages 1860-1949 – 570,213 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Mississippi Tippah County Marriages 1858-1979 – 19,583 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Missouri County Marriage Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991 – 57,837 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York County Marriages 1847-1848; 1908-1936 – 252,052 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957 – 1,270,298 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island) 1891-1924 – 0 – 3,243,611 – New browsable image collection.
New York Passenger Lists 1820-1891 – 30,480 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943 – 0 – 971 – New browsable image collection.
North Carolina County Marriages 1762-1979 – 1,796 – 1,796 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Dakota Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals 1910-1952 – 11,631 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013 – 92,719 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio Washington County Court Records 1810-1930 – 0 – 6,421 – Added images to an existing collection
Oklahoma County Marriages 1890-1995 – 126,532 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ontario Births 1869-1910 – 125,109 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Crew Lists arriving at Erie 1952-1957 – 44,119 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Áncash Civil Registration 1888-2005 – 0 – 3,146 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Cajamarca Civil Registration 1938-1996 – 0 – 3,175 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984 – 180,213 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Poland Radom Roman Catholic Church Books 1587-1966 – 1,884 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Portugal Portalegre Catholic Church Records 1859-1911 – 4,441 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive) 1838- 1991 – 48,422 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Spain Province of Cádiz Municipal Records 1784-1956 – 0 – 57 – Added images to an existing collection
Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920 – 0 – 189,353 – Added images to an existing collection
Utah County Marriages 1887-1937 – 337,714 – 124,465 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Venezuela Archdiocese of Mérida Catholic Church Records 1654-2013 – 0 – 405,819 – Added images to an existing collection

Acadian-Cajun Timeline, 1603-1812

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide:

An historical timeline of events relating to the Acadians-Cajuns was extracted from the Maine Name Lists and Louisiana Name Lists books. The area of present Maine was at one time claimed by both the French colony of Acadia and the English colony of Massachusetts Bay. After the British-imposed expulsion of the Acadians, their final gathering point was concentrated in Spanish Louisiana. Upon the Louisiana Purchase, these new Americans were often called “Cajuns.” The timeline here reflects the history of the founding of French Acadia, their battles with the British, their expulsion, and their gathering in Louisiana.

1603. French nobleman Pierre DuGua (Sieur DeMonts) was granted exclusive rights to colonize the area he had named l’Acadie (Acadia), granted by French King Henry IV. The area of Acadia included all of present Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and most of Maine.

1604 Acadia. DeMonts established a French colony on St. Croix Island, at the mouth of the St. Croix River, now Maine. After surviving a bad Winter, the entire colony was moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port-Royal, now Nova Scotia.

1611. From his base in Port-Royal, Acadia, French Jesuit Priest Pierre Baird, crossed the Bay of Fundy to an island on the Penobscot River of present Maine, where he established an Indian mission.

1613. Father Baird and others attempted a new French mission on Mount Desert Island (present Maine), but soon after their arrival, they were arrested by English Captain Samuel Argall of the Jamestown Colony.

1689-1690. King William’s War. Soon after they were crowned, William III and Mary II joined a European alliance against France, and the subsequent battles became known as King William’s War. In 1689, several battles took place, including the French attack on Saco, Maine; followed by the English attack and destruction of the French Acadia capital of Port-Royal in 1690.

1696. During King Williams’s War, French forces from Pentagouet (present Castine, Maine) attacked and destroyed the English settlement at Pemaquid (present Bristol, Maine). Pemaquid was the northernmost community of New England, lying on the border with French Acadia. The French community of Pentagouet was the southernmost settlement of French Acadia. After the Siege of Pemaquid, the French forces continued north and destroyed virtually every English settlement in Newfoundland, and deported over 500 people back to England. In retaliation, the English attacked and destroyed more Acadian communities, including present Fredericton, New Brunswick.

1702. Queen Anne’s War. This was a decisive war in the series of conflicts between France and England. Battles took place in New England, Newfoundland, Québec and Acadia. One notable event was the brutal French/Indian raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1704, where the surviving English colonists were forced to march to Québec as hostages. The English Queen Anne succeeded to the throne after the death of Mary II, her older sister, and William III, who died in 1702 without issue. Queen Anne’s reign of 1702-1714 was about the same duration as the war that took her name. The English prevailed in most of the battles, and the war marked a turning point for the success of English interests over the French in North America.

1713. The Peace of Utrecht ended Queen Anne’s War. France ceded to Great Britain its claims to Newfoundland, Hudsons Bay, and the peninsular part of French Acadia, which the British had renamed Nova Scotia. The British took possession of the peninsula area and required the Acadians to swear allegiance to Britain or leave. The continental part of Acadia (including areas of present Maine and New Brunswick) remained in French control and a number of displaced Acadians from the British side moved across the Bay of Fundy to lands near the St. John and St. Croix rivers.

1718. La Nouvelle-Orleans (New Orleans) was founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne (Sieur de Bienville). It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orleans, the Regent of France. That year saw hundreds of French colonists arriving in Louisiana.

1719. Baton Rouge was established by the French as a military post.

1721 Arkansas Post. French and German colonists abandoned Arkansas Post, the largest settlement of all of French Louisiana. As a failed farming community, Arkansas Post was typical of the French efforts to colonize North America south of the Great Lakes. Arkansas Post continued as a trading post, and the French presence in the Mississippi Basin now became one of mostly single French fur trappers and traders paddling their canoes from one trading post to the next.

1721 German Coast. A group of German immigrants, who had first settled at Arkansas Post, acquired farm land on the east side of the Mississippi River north of New Orleans. Many of them were formerly of the German-speaking Alsace-Lorraine area of France. They easily adapted themselves to the French culture of Louisiana, and later intermarried with the French Acadians coming into the same area. Their main settlements were at Karlstein, Hoffen, Mariental, and Augsburg, all part of the German Coast. The farms they operated were to become the main source of food for New Orleans for decades.

1755-1758 Expulsion of the Acadians. At the beginning of the French and Indian War, the British completed their conquest of Acadia, and in 1755, began forcibly removing Acadians from their homes. (The British remembered the forced deportations imposed by the French against the English in Newfoundland back in 1696). The first expulsions were to the lower British colonies but in 1758 they began transporting Acadians back to France. Those Acadians who avoided deportation made their way to other French-speaking areas, such as present Québec, present New Brunswick, or present Maine. For an historical reference to the era, re-read Longfellow’s poem, “Evangeline,” which was based on the events of the Acadian expulsions.

1763. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended the French and Indian War (it was called the Seven Years War in Canada and Europe). France was the big loser, and lost virtually all of its remaining North American claims. The areas east of the Mississippi and all of Acadia/Nova Scotia and Québec were lost to Britain; the areas west of the Mississippi went to Spain. After the Treaty of Paris, George III issued a proclamation renaming the Province of Québec as the Province of Canada. He also issued the Proclamation Line of 1763, in which Indian Reserves were established west of the Appalachian Mountain Range, limiting western migrations by all of the British colonies. Soon after the treaty, all French military personnel left their North American posts. But, French civilian settlements continued in Lower Louisiana, such as New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Arkansas Post, and Natchez; and in Upper Louisiana, such as Prairie du Chien, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes. Spain did not take military control of Spanish Louisiana until 1766 (at New Orleans) and 1770 (at St. Louis).

1764-1765 Acadian Coast. Per terms of the Treaty of Paris, the British were given the right to remove the remaining French Acadians, but agreed to provide resettlement assistance. The destinations were not always clear, and the displaced Acadians were sometimes loaded onto ships headed to Boston, New York, Baltimore, Norfolk, Charleston, Savannah, or Mobile. After a few initial families made their way to New Orleans via Mobile in early 1764, several shiploads of Acadians arrived in New Orleans in early 1765. Their first settlements were on the west side of the Mississippi River, near the present areas of St. James and Ascension Parishes. That first area became known as the Acadian Coast. Today there are 22 parishes of Louisiana considered part of Acadiana, a modern description of the region of southern Louisiana west of the Mississippi River first settled by French Acadians. For more details on the first Acadians in Louisiana, visit the Acadian-Cajun Genealogy & History website. See www.acadian-cajun.com/hiscaj2b.htm.

1766. Antonio de Ulloa became the first Spanish governor of Louisiana, headquartered at New Orleans. He was a brilliant scientist (discoverer of the element Platinum), highly regarded by Spanish Royalty, but rose to his highest level of incompetence as a military leader.

1768. The Louisiana Rebellion of 1768 was an attempt by a combined armed force of French Acadians, French Creoles and German Coast settlers around New Orleans to stop the handover of French La Louisiane to Spain. The rebels forced Spanish Governor de Ulloa to leave New Orleans and return to Spain, but his replacement Alejandro O’Reilly was able to crush the rebellion. O’Reilly, an Irishman turned Cuban, was responsible for establishing military rule in Spanish Louisiana.

1777-1778. During the Revolutionary War, a number of French-speaking Acadians from Louisiana joined their counterparts from the leftover French settlements of Kaskaskia and Vincennes. They were added to the Virginia Militia force commanded by General George Rogers Clark. General Clark later noted that the fiercely anti-British fighters he gained from the French communities contributed greatly to his monumental victories against the British in the conquest of the Old Northwest.

1783 United States of America. The treaty of Paris of 1783 first recognized the United States as an independent nation, with borders from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, and from present Maine to Georgia. The treaty also reaffirmed the claims of Britain to present Canada; and Spain’s claim to East Florida, West Florida, New Spain (including Nuevo Mexico & Tejas), and Louisiana west of the Mississippi River.

1800-1802 Louisiana. In Europe, Napoleon defeated the Spanish in battle and gained title to Louisiana again after trading them a couple of duchies in Italy. However, Napoleon found that his troops in the Caribbean were under siege and unable to provide much help in establishing a French government in Louisiana. Several months later, when American emissaries showed up in Paris trying to buy New Orleans from him, Napoleon decided to unload the entire tract. – legally described as “the drainage of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.”

1803 Louisiana Purchase. President Thomas Jefferson urged Congress to vote in favor, and the U.S. purchased the huge area from France, doubling the size of the United States. But, disputed claims to areas of Lower Louisiana now existed between Spain and the U.S., in particular, the area between the Red River and Sabine River in present Louisiana; and the area of West Florida, east of the Mississippi River.

1804-1805. In 1804, Congress divided the Louisiana Purchase into two jurisdictions: Louisiana District and Orleans Territory. The latter had north and south bounds the same as the present state of Louisiana, but did not include its present Florida Parishes, and its northwest corner extended on an indefinite line west into Spanish Tejas. The first capital of Orleans Territory was New Orleans. For a year, Louisiana District was attached to Indiana Territory for judicial administration, but became Louisiana Territory with its own Governor on July 4, 1805. St. Louis was the first capital of Louisiana Territory.

1812. April 30th. The same area as old Orleans Territory became Louisiana, the 18th state in the Union. New Orleans became the first state capital.

1812. June 4th. Louisiana Territory was renamed Missouri Territory. For about five weeks in 1812, a
Louisiana Territory and a State of Louisiana existed at the same time.

Further Reading:
Maine Name Lists: Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes, 1623-2012, by William Dollarhide
Maine Name Lists (PDF)
Online Maine Name Lists, a 4-page laminated Insta-GuideTM
Online Maine Name Lists (PDF)
Louisiana Name Lists: Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes, 1679-2001, by William Dollarhide
Louisiana Name Lists (PDF)
Online Louisiana Name Lists, a 4-page laminated Insta-GuideTM
Online Louisiana Name Lists (PDF)

New FamilySearch Database Collections as of October 19, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Apart from a very significant addition to the Italy Napoli Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 collection, this week is predominantly about new, free US marriages and passenger lists collections. Search marriage records from 11 states, including Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957, New York County Marriages 1847-1848; 1908-1936, Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013, and Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950. Check out all of the new collections below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Italy Napoli Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 – 0 – 1,628,616 – Added images to an existing collection
Russia Tatarstan Church Books 1721-1939 – 0 – 2 – Added images to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Colorado County Marriages 1864-1995 – 129,976 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Iowa County Marriages 1838-1934 – 35,637 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky County Marriages 1797-1954 – 331,212 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Louisiana New Orleans Passenger Lists 1820-1945 – 1,340,028 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957 – 1,023,241 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New Hampshire Marriage Certificates 1948-1959 – 96,665 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York County Marriages 1847-1848; 1908-1936 – 474,679 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina County Marriages 1762-1979 – 794,839 – 424,145 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013 – 79,936 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Oklahoma County Marriages 1890-1995 – 49,517 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950 – 241,745 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1950 – 8,307 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Passport Applications 1795-1925 – 521,587 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Vermont St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings 1895-1924 – 110,120 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Washington County Marriages 1855-2008 – 328,604 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New FamilySearch Database Collections – September 28, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Generous updates for Colombia, France, Honduras, Italy, Spain, and the US (Passport applications, Mississippi and Georgia to note a few)! Many other domestic and international updates like England Warwickshire Parish Registers 1535-1984, Nicaragua Civil Registration 1809-2013, and Belgium East Flanders Civil Registration 1541-1912. See the following full list.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORD – DIGITAL RECORD – COMMENTS

Bahamas Civil Registration 1850-1959 – 34,858 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Barbados Church Records 1637-1887 – 67,852 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Belgium East Flanders Civil Registration 1541-1912 – 81,691 – 3,570 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Canada Prince Edward Island Death Card Index 1721-1905 – 16,778 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada Quebec Federation of Genealogical Societies Family Origins 1621-1865 (Web-Linking) – 5,996 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Chile Cemetery Records 1821-2013 – 0 – 65,853 – Added images to an existing collection
Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2014 – 0 – 301,994 – Added images to an existing collection
England Warwickshire Parish Registers 1535-1984 – 0 – 55,896 – Added images to an existing collection
France Dordogne Censuses 1876 – 499,219 – 10,250 – New indexed records and images collection
France Haute-Garonne Toulouse Censuses 1830-1831 – 31,145 – 608 – New indexed records and images collection
Germany Prussia Brandenburg and Posen Church Book Duplicates 1794-1874 – 151,802 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Honduras Catholic Church Records 1633-1978 – 700,756 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Udine Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1815 1871-1911 – 0 – 1,072,113 – Added images to an existing collection
Nicaragua Civil Registration 1809-2013 – 140,930 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Puno Civil Registration 1890-2005 – 172,315 – 4,944 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines La Union Diocese of San Fernando de La Union 1801-1984 – 0 – 3,192 – Added images to an existing collection
South Carolina Confederate Home Records 1909-1958 – 6,149 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Spain Province of Barcelona Municipal Records 1387-1950 – 0 – 764 – Added images to an existing collection
Spain Province of Barcelona Municipal Records 1387-1986 – 435,547 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Georgia Deaths 1914-1927 – 0 – 336,900 – Added images to an existing collection
Illinois Northern District Petitions for Naturalization 1906-1994 – 0 – 206,207 – Added images to an existing collection
Louisiana Orleans Parish Vital Records 1910 1960 – 17,605 – 1,383 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1626-2001 – 0 – 254,638 – Added images to an existing collection
Mississippi Enumeration of Educable Children 1850-1892; 1908-1957 – 7,153,911 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Missouri County Marriage, Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991 – 0 – 5,386 – Added images to an existing collection
Missouri State and Territorial Census Records 1732-1933 – 0 – 161 – Added images to an existing collection
Utah Death Certificates 1904-1964 – 69,621 – 13,456 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Passport Applications 1795-1925 – 1,008,828 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

St. Martinville, Louisiana is Celebrating 250 Years of Acadian Ancestry

The following teaser is from the July 31, 2015 edition of the TheRecord.com:

250-years-acadian

“A 250 year event doesn’t happen often,” says Ron Jackson of Bridge City. Jackson and Judge Carl Thibodeaux, along with their families and friends will attend the Fete Dieu du Teche on August 15, 2015.

They look forward to sharing their experience with others. Judge Thibodeaux notes the Fete Dieu du Teche “is important for Cajuns as well as the Catholic church.” Thibodeaux says he looks forward to spending the time with friends and family because, “well, it is a Cajun thing: you are always happiest among friends.” Jackson notes “a significant Acadian ancestry in Southeast Texas,” and this event celebrates the fortitude and faith of the Cajun and Catholic people who endured Le Grand Derangement, The Great Expulsion, which began in 1755.

Jackson recounts, “people of French ancestry were exiled by the British because of Catholicism,” as the English pushed for allegiance to the King of England despite the objections of the French. The French settlers had created viable land in areas where it had formerly been unusable. Land was confiscated, families were separated, and belongings were abandoned as the exiled boarded ships. While some ships sailed to France, others set out in search of American colonies that would accept them.

Click on the link for more information.

Read the full article.

New FamilySearch Collections Posted the Week of July 13, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Family historians hungry for historic Irish records will enjoy FamilySearch’s new collection, Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912. These indexed court documents bring 22 million records to your fingertips. These records were originally filmed at the National Archives of Ireland and the index was created by findmypast.com. See the table below for additions to over 60 historical record collections, including 46 million US obituaries. Click on the collection’s link to start your discovery.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Australia New South Wales Census (fragment) 1891 – 0 – 21,315 – Added images to an existing collection
Belgium Antwerp Civil Registration 1588-1910 – 0 – 1,670 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 0 – 164,642 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 1,642,660 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863 – 970 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Saxony Dresden Citizens’ Documents and Business Licenses 1820- 1962 – 0 – 855,956 – Added images to an existing collection
India Bihar Koilukh Pandit Kirtinand Jha Maithil Brahmin Genealogical Records 1750-1990 – 0 – 175,363 – Added images to an existing collection
India Hindu Pilgrimage Records 1194-2015 – 2,782,487 – 2,843,557 – New indexed records and images collection
Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 – 21,833,839 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 0 – 318 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Cremona Civil Registration (State Archive) 1744-1942 – 0 – 1,325,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 0 – 393,814 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943 – 0 – 111,837 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Pesaro Civil Registration (State Archive) 1808-1813 1861- 1865 – 0 – 75,456 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Urbino Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1942 – 0 – 709,381 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Ragusa Civil Registration (State Archive) 1900-1940 – 0 – 111,281 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Toscana Civil Registration (State Archive) 1804-1874 – 0 – 80,833 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Baja California and Baja California Sur Catholic Church Records 1750-1984 – 0 – 363 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Chihuahua Catholic Church Records 1632-1958 – 0 – 195 – New browsable-image collection.
Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984 – 0 – 1,077 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Hidalgo Catholic Church Records 1546-1971 – 0 – 574 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Michoacán Catholic Church Records 1555-1996 – 0 – 2,758 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Tamaulipas Catholic Church Records 1703-1964 – 0 – 1,294 – Added images to an existing collection
Peru Callao Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 42,583 – Added images to an existing collection
Perú Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 111,769 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Negros Occidental Roman Catholic Diocese of Bacolod Parish Registers 1755-1976 – 0 – 95,820 – New browsable-image collection.
Spain Province of Valencia Miscellaneous Records 1251-1950 – 0 – 850,597 – Added images to an existing collection
Sweden Halland Church Records 1615-1904; index 1615-1860 – 0 – 972 – Added images to an existing collection

Canada: Newfoundland Vital Records 1840-1949 – 347,134 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Births 1864-1877 – 0 – 6,103 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Deaths 1864-1877 – 0 – 20,661 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Marriages 1864-1918 – 0 – 15,831 – Added images to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index – 1,513,553 – 1,513,553 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

United States Records

United States Census 1790 – 1,606 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Census 1800 – 20 – 18,454 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Hospital and Medical Records 1865-1872 – 4,641 – 44,734 – New Indexed records and images collection
United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 – 46,769,836 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Index to Service Records War with Spain 1898 – 123,334 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California Death Index 1905-1939 – 2,086,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Delaware Vital Records 1680-1971 – 624,395 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Marriages 1811-1950 – 83,822 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 504,033 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1915 – 0 – 9,802 – Added images to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1925 – 5,573,816 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky Vital Record Indexes 1911-1999 – 9,865,944 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Louisiana First Registration Draft Cards compiled 1940-1945 – 39,967 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Boston Passenger Lists Index 1899-1940 – 1,577,127 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1627-2001 – 0 – 182 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Births 1867-1902 – 0 – 1,428 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries 1820-2006 – 1,389,458 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Probate Records 1735-1970 – 0 – 1,952 – Added images to an existing collection
South Dakota School Records 1879-1970 – 2,807,212 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1950 – 3,024,053 – 1,831,660 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database 1847-1868 – 58,333 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Utah Uintah County Discharge Records 1893-2009 – 0 – 2,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Land and Property Records 1888-2004 – 0 – 195,963 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Marriage Records 1888-2015 – 0 – 8,687 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Naturalization and Citizenship Records 1888-1929 – 0 – 409 – New browsable-image collection.
Vermont St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings 1895-1924 – 6,696,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Vermont Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1732-2005 – 0 – 458,533 – Added images to an existing collection

Help Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

FamilySearch Adds Over 3.7 Million Indexed Records & Images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 3.7 million indexed records and images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 2,807,806 indexed records from the England, London Electoral Registers, 1847–1913 collection; 190,879 indexed records from the US, Texas, Brownsville Passenger and Crew List of Airplanes, 1943–1964 collection; and 137,815 images from the Philippines, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1900–1952 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600–1913 – 79,444 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, Liège, Civil Registration, 1621–1914 – 67,410 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, West Flanders, Civil Registration, 1582–1910 – 8,560 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

England, London Electoral Registers, 1847–1913 – 2,807,806 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Germany, Hesse, Stadtkreis Darmstadt, Darmstadt District, Civil Registration, 1876–1925 – 0 – 70,510 – Added images to an existing collection.

Philippines, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1900–1952 – 0 – 137,815 – New browsable image collection.

US, Florida, Pensacola, Passenger Lists, 1900–1945 – 0 – 1,937 – New browsable image collection.

US, Louisiana World War I Service Records, 1917–1920 – 0 – 27,210 – New browsable image collection.

US, Maine, Bath, Seamen’s Proofs of Citizenship, 1833–1868 – 0 – 3,516 – New browsable image collection.

US, Massachusetts, Salem and Beverly Crew Lists and Shipping Articles, 1797–1934 – 0 – 33,017 – New browsable image collection.

US, Michigan, South Haven Crew Lists, 1957–1959 – 0 – 61 – New browsable image collection.

US, Minnesota, Duluth and Wisconsin, Superior Crew Lists, 1922–1958 – 0 – 26,368 – New browsable image collection.

US, Montana, Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals and Departures, 1923–1956 – 0 – 38,373 – New browsable image collection.

US, New York, New York, Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted, 1917–1957 – 0 – 119,753 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Southern District Naturalization Index, 1852–1991 – 83,982 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Oregon, Portland, Index and Register of Vessels, 1949–1955 – 0 – 88 – New browsable image collection.

US, Pennsylvania, Landing Reports of Aliens, 1798–1828 – 0 – 636 – New browsable image collection.

US, Rhode Island, Davisville, Melville, Newport, and Quonset Point, Airplane Passenger and Crew Lists, 1955–1957 – 0 – 387 – New browsable image collection.

US, South Carolina, Charleston U.S. Citizens Passenger Lists, 1919–1948 – 0 – 775 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, Brownsville Passenger and Crew List of Airplanes, 1943–1964 – 190,879 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Texas, Houston Arrival Manifests of Airplanes, 1946–1954 – 0 – 4,360 – New browsable image collection.

Acadian-Cajun Timeline, 1603-1805

Early-LA-Map-250pw

The following historical timeline of events relating to the Acadians-Cajuns was extracted from the Maine Name Lists and Louisiana Name Lists books, written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. The area of present Maine was at one time claimed by both the French colony of Acadia and the English colony of Massachusetts Bay. After the British-imposed expulsion of the Acadians, their final gathering point was concentrated in Spanish Louisiana. Upon the Louisiana Purchase, these new Americans were often called “Cajuns.” The timeline here reflects the history of the founding of French Acadia, their battles with the British, their expulsion, and their gathering in Louisiana.

1603. French nobleman Pierre DuGua (Sieur DeMonts) was granted exclusive rights to colonize the area he had named l’Acadie (Acadia), granted by French King Henry IV. The area of Acadia included all of present Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and most of Maine.

1604 Acadia. DeMonts established a French colony on St. Croix Island, at the mouth of the St. Croix River, now Maine. After surviving a bad Winter, the entire colony was moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port-Royal, now Nova Scotia.

1611. From his base in Port-Royal, Acadia, French Jesuit Priest Pierre Baird, crossed the Bay of Fundy to an island on the Penobscot River of present Maine, where he established an Indian mission.

1613. Father Baird and others attempted a new French mission on Mount Desert Island (present Maine), but soon after their arrival, they were arrested by English Captain Samuel Argall of the Jamestown Colony.

1689-1690. King William’s War. Soon after they were crowned, William III and Mary II joined a European alliance against France, and the subsequent battles became known as King William’s War. In 1689, several battles took place, including the French attack on Saco, Maine; followed by the English attack and destruction of the French Acadia capital of Port-Royal in 1690.

1696. During King Williams’s War, French forces from Pentagouet (present Castine, Maine) attacked and destroyed the English settlement at Pemaquid (present Bristol, Maine). Pemaquid was the northernmost community of New England, lying on the border with French Acadia. The French community of Pentagouet was the southernmost settlement of French Acadia. After the Siege of Pemaquid, the French forces continued north and destroyed virtually every English settlement in Newfoundland, and deported over 500 people back to England. In retaliation, the English attacked and destroyed more Acadian communities, including present Fredericton, New Brunswick.

1702. Queen Anne’s War. This was a decisive war in the series of conflicts between France and England. Battles took place in New England, Newfoundland, Québec and Acadia. One notable event was the brutal French/Indian raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1704, where the surviving English colonists were forced to march to Québec as hostages. The English Queen Anne succeeded to the throne after the death of Mary II, her older sister, and William III, who died in 1702 without issue. Queen Anne’s reign of 1702-1714 was about the same duration as the war that took her name. The English prevailed in most of the battles, and the war marked a turning point for the success of English interests over the French in North America.

1713. The Peace of Utrecht ended Queen Anne’s War. France ceded to Great Britain its claims to Newfoundland, Hudsons Bay, and the peninsular part of French Acadia, which the British had renamed Nova Scotia. The British took possession of the peninsula area and required the Acadians to swear allegiance to Britain or leave. The continental part of Acadia (including areas of present Maine and New Brunswick) remained in French control and a number of displaced Acadians from the British side moved across the Bay of Fundy to lands near the St. John and St. Croix rivers.

1718. La Nouvelle-Orleans (New Orleans) was founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne (Sieur de Bienville). It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orleans, the Regent of France. That year saw hundreds of French colonists arriving in Louisiana.

1719. Baton Rouge was established by the French as a military post.

1721 Arkansas Post. French and German colonists abandoned Arkansas Post, the largest settlement of all of French Louisiana. As a failed farming community, Arkansas Post was typical of the French efforts to colonize North America south of the Great Lakes. Arkansas Post continued as a trading post, and the French presence in the Mississippi Basin now became one of mostly single French fur trappers and traders paddling their canoes from one trading post to the next.

1721 German Coast. A group of German immigrants, who had first settled at Arkansas Post, acquired farm land on the east side of the Mississippi River north of New Orleans. Many of them were formerly of the German-speaking Alsace-Lorraine area of France. They easily adapted themselves to the French culture of Louisiana, and later intermarried with the French Acadians coming into the same area. Their main settlements were at Karlstein, Hoffen, Mariental, and Augsburg, all part of the German Coast. The farms they operated were to become the main source of food for New Orleans for decades.

1755-1758 Expulsion of the Acadians. At the beginning of the French and Indian War, the British completed their conquest of Acadia, and in 1755, began forcibly removing Acadians from their homes. (The British remembered the forced deportations imposed by the French against the English in Newfoundland back in 1696). The first expulsions were to the lower British colonies but in 1758 they began transporting Acadians back to France. Those Acadians who avoided deportation made their way to other French-speaking areas, such as present Québec, present New Brunswick, or present Maine. For an historical reference to the era, re-read Longfellow’s poem, “Evangeline,” which was based on the events of the Acadian expulsions.

1763. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended the French and Indian War (it was called the Seven Years War in Canada and Europe). France was the big loser, and lost virtually all of its remaining North American claims. The areas east of the Mississippi and all of Acadia/Nova Scotia and Québec were lost to Britain; the areas west of the Mississippi went to Spain. After the Treaty of Paris, George III issued a proclamation renaming the Province of Québec as the Province of Canada. He also issued the Proclamation Line of 1763, in which Indian Reserves were established west of the Appalachian Mountain Range, limiting western migrations by all of the British colonies. Soon after the treaty, all French military personnel left their North American posts. But, French civilian settlements continued in Lower Louisiana, such as New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Arkansas Post, and Natchez; and in Upper Louisiana, such as Prairie du Chien, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes. Spain did not take military control of Spanish Louisiana until 1766 (at New Orleans) and 1770 (at St. Louis).

1764-1765 Acadian Coast. Per terms of the Treaty of Paris, the British were given the right to remove the remaining French Acadians, but agreed to provide resettlement assistance. The destinations were not always clear, and the displaced Acadians were sometimes loaded onto ships headed to Boston, New York, Baltimore, Norfolk, Charleston, Savannah, or Mobile. After a few initial families made their way to New Orleans via Mobile in early 1764, several shiploads of Acadians arrived in New Orleans in early 1765. Their first settlements were on the west side of the Mississippi River, near the present areas of St. James and Ascension Parishes. That first area became known as the Acadian Coast. Today there are 22 parishes of Louisiana considered part of Acadiana, a modern description of the region of southern Louisiana west of the Mississippi River first settled by French Acadians. For more details on the first Acadians in Louisiana, visit the Acadian-Cajun Genealogy & History website. See www.acadian-cajun.com/hiscaj2b.htm.

1766. Antonio de Ulloa became the first Spanish governor of Louisiana, headquartered at New Orleans. He was a brilliant scientist (discoverer of the element Platinum), highly regarded by Spanish Royalty, but rose to his highest level of incompetence as a military leader.

1768. The Louisiana Rebellion of 1768 was an attempt by a combined armed force of French Acadians, French Creoles and German Coast settlers around New Orleans to stop the handover of French La Louisiane to Spain. The rebels forced Spanish Governor de Ulloa to leave New Orleans and return to Spain, but his replacement Alejandro O’Reilly was able to crush the rebellion. O’Reilly, an Irishman turned Cuban, was responsible for establishing military rule in Spanish Louisiana.

1777-1778. During the Revolutionary War, a number of French-speaking Acadians from Louisiana joined their counterparts from the leftover French settlements of Kaskaskia and Vincennes. They were added to the Virginia Militia force commanded by General George Rogers Clark. General Clark later noted that the fiercely anti-British fighters he gained from the French communities contributed greatly to his monumental victories against the British in the conquest of the Old Northwest.

1783 United States of America. The treaty of Paris of 1783 first recognized the United States as an independent nation, with borders from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, and from present Maine to Georgia. The treaty also reaffirmed the claims of Britain to present Canada; and Spain’s claim to East Florida, West Florida, New Spain (including Nuevo Mexico & Tejas), and Louisiana west of the Mississippi River.

1800-1802 Louisiana. In Europe, Napoleon defeated the Spanish in battle and gained title to Louisiana again after trading them a couple of duchies in Italy. However, Napoleon found that his troops in the Caribbean were under siege and unable to provide much help in establishing a French government in Louisiana. Several months later, when American emissaries showed up in Paris trying to buy New Orleans from him, Napoleon decided to unload the entire tract. – legally described as “the drainage of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.”

1803 Louisiana Purchase. President Thomas Jefferson urged Congress to vote in favor, and the U.S. purchased the huge area from France, doubling the size of the United States. But, disputed claims to areas of Lower Louisiana now existed between Spain and the U.S., in particular, the area between the Red River and Sabine River in present Louisiana; and the area of West Florida, east of the Mississippi River.

1804-1805. In 1804, Congress divided the Louisiana Purchase into two jurisdictions: Louisiana District and Orleans Territory. The latter had north and south bounds the same as the present state of Louisiana, but did not include its present Florida Parishes, and its northwest corner extended on an indefinite line west into Spanish Tejas. The first capital of Orleans Territory was New Orleans. For a year, Louisiana District was attached to Indiana Territory for judicial administration, but became Louisiana Territory with its own Governor on July 4, 1805. St. Louis was the first capital of Louisiana Territory.

1812. April 30th. The same area as old Orleans Territory became Louisiana, the 18th state in the Union. New Orleans became the first state capital.

1812. June 4th. Louisiana Territory was renamed Missouri Territory. For about five weeks in 1812, a Louisiana Territory and a State of Louisiana existed at the same time.

For Further Reading:

A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists

A little over a year ago, William Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing created a new series of guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists. The series, titled A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide, now includes several titles, including:

Online Louisiana Name Lists - A GenealogistAdding to these great titles, Dollarhide and FRPC have released several new guides focused on Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. These new guides include A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists.

This new guide lists websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of Louisiana were extracted from Dollarhide’s Louisiana Name Lists, 1679-2001.

Like all Insta-Guides, this guide comes either as a four-page, color, printed and laminated guide sheet or in electronic format, PDF file. In the PDF version, every website is hot linked for quick, one-click access to each site.

Contents of Online U.S. Names Lists

The 164 databases listed here include censuses and census substitutes, i.e., name lists from Louisiana’s early censuses, court records, directories, histories, land records, militia lists, tax lists, vital records or voter lists.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or order just the electronic format.

The Louisiana Digital Media Archives Launches with 1600 Digital Video Clips

The following teaser is from the March 12, 2015 edition of theadvocate.com:

LA-Digital-Archives

One video at a time, Louisiana Public Broadcasting and the Secretary of State’s Office are preserving the past.

Federal marshals escorting Ruby Bridges as she integrated New Orleans public schools; President John F. Kennedy’s assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald distributing information on Bourbon Street; footage of the devastation left by Hurricane Camille all along the Gulf Coast — these historic videos and hundreds more are now available for anyone to see at ladigitalmedia.org.

Five years in the making, the Louisiana Digital Media Archive was launched last month with 1,600 digitized video clips from LPB’s and the State Archives’ collections. An ongoing project and the first such partnership between a public television station and a state agency, the number of clips contained on the website will continue to grow.

Read the full article.

Go directly to the Louisiana Digital Media Archive, and browse the video.

Thanks to Dick Eastman for the heads-up.

Check out William Dollarhide’s new Louisiana Name Lists volume at the FRPC website.

Louisiana Names Lists – Published & Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 – Sale Extended Thru March 19

Louisiana-Name-Lists-Cover-200pw

Louisiana Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook. The Name List book is 99 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

Sale for 25% off Extended Through Midnight EST Thursday, March 19, 2015

See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

To celebrate the publication of both this Louisiana book, as well as a Kentucky volume, Family Roots Publishing extended their promotion and has discounted ALL the Name Lists books by 25% through Midnight EDT Thursday March 19, 2015 – that includes the pdf eBooks as well as the printed volumes. The printed volumes are $14.21 (reg. 18.95), and the PDF eBook alone is $9.38 (reg. $12.50).

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

Contents

    Contents

    • Preface
    • Map: Indian Cessions – Louisiana.
    • Map: 1810 Louisiana Parishes & Current Counties
    • Map: 18110 West Florida Annexation
    • Louisiana Name Lists
    • Louisiana Historical Timeline, 1673-1865
    • Online Databases at the Louisiana State Archives
    • Louisiana State Vital Records Registry
    • Louisiana Historical Center
    • New Orleans Public Library’s Louisiana Div. & City Archives
    • Searchable Online Databases, New Orleans Public Library Website
    • Online Genealogy Guides at the Louisiana Division
    • Bibliography of Louisiana Name Lists, 1679-2001
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

New Orleans’ Oldest Cemetery to Be Closed to the General Public Due to Vandalism

The following excerpt is from the January 27, 2015 edition of Reuters.com:

Saint_Louis_Cemetery_Num_1-200pw

Reuters – New Orleans’ oldest cemetery will soon be closed to visitors without an official escort or familial ties to the deceased, the result of a spate of vandalism that has included the tomb of voodoo queen Marie Laveau.

Vandalism is not a new problem at Laveau’s tomb and others at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, which dates to the late 1700s and is perhaps the most famous graveyard in a city whose above-ground burial plots are among its defining characteristics.

But the defacement, which includes Xs written in marker on the Laveau tomb as part of a local ritual for good luck that appears to have been encouraged by unofficial tour guides, has accelerated in recent months, said Sarah McDonald, spokeswoman for the Archdiocese of New Orleans, which owns the cemetery.

Read the full article.

PBS Series Genealogy RoadShow Features New Orleans Feb. 3

The following excerpt is from the January 30, 2014 website of the Philadelphia Tribune:

New-Orleans-Genealogy-Roadshow-2015

The PBS series “Genealogy Roadshow,” now in its second season, continues at 8 p.m., Feb. 3 on WHYY, with an engrossing episode emanating from the New Orleans Board of Trade.

“Genealogy Roadshow” stars genealogists Kenyatta D. Berry, Joshua Taylor and Mary Tedesco and features participants with “unique claims and storylines.”

In this intriguing installment, the team of genealogists are in The Big Easy uncovering fascinating stories from the residents of one of America’s most multicultural cities…

Read the full article.