Dollarhide Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides AL-MI 80% Off! – NEW AL & MN-WY Guides 20% Off! With FREE Downloads!

Bill Dollarhide started a series of what he called “Name List” guides in the Summer of 2013. He wrote steadily on them until sometime in 2015, when life caught up with him, and he had to put the project aside. Well, he went back at it several months ago, and completed new guides for all the rest of the states, alphabetically Minnesota through Wyoming. He also wrote a full book on the U.S. Territories. Finally, Bill went back and updated an earlier volume – choosing Indiana – to test whether enough changes had taken place to make it worthwhile to do Second Editions. Bill found that a number of URL addresses had changed, which he expected, and he found additional data that expanded the volume by another 10 pages. Since that time, Bill also produced a Second Edition for Alabama.

So we have now released 30 NEW volumes – Alabama and Minnesota through Wyoming, plus U.S. Territories and Indiana Second Edition.

To celebrate, we’re pricing all of the new 2017 volumes at 20% off, making them $15.16 (or $10 for the PDF eBook alone). As before, we’re throwing in a FREE instantly downloadable PDF eBook version with any paperback book being purchased. See my Super-Saver shipping note below.

To clear out the earlier printed books, those written between 2013 and 2017, FRPC has discounted the price 80%! That makes them only $3.79 each! We will most likely do Second Editions for those volumes sometime in the Fall or Winter. Note that if you only desire the PDF eBook alone, we’ve discounted them, Alabama through Michigan, by 60%, making them just $5. Again – this is for all volumes Alabama through Michigan.

To make this offer even more attractive, we’re offering Super-Saver (USA Only) USPS shipping on all 53 printed books. That’s $4.50 for the first book, and only 50 cents for each thereafter.

With the completion of this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists, censuses, and census substitutes are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & Substitute Name Lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only do these this volumes give a detailed bibliography of Censuses and Substitute Names Lists available for each state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co. Click on the appropriate links to purchase.

New England Timeline, 1603-1718

The following article was written by my good friend, by William Dollarhide:

The founding of the first English colonies in North America happened in an area known simply as Virginia. They happened in the early 1600s, during an era of intense religious turmoil going on in England. Without that turmoil, there would have been no need for the Great Migration of Puritans to New England. Therefore, a timeline of events relating to New England must include the historical events of England. The players and events leading up to the Great Migration to New England, and the events thereafter are identified below, from the discoveries of New England to the arrival of the first Scots-Irish immigrants to Boston Harbor.

1602 Cape Cod & Martha’s Vineyard. English Privateer Bartholomew Gosnold led an expedition to present Massachusetts, named Cape Cod and discovered an island south of Cape Cod, that he named Martha’s Vineyard. Gosnold had planned on planting a small settlement in the Cape Cod area, but the settlers chose to return to England due to a lack of provisions. Gosnold went on to become one of the founders of the Jamestown Colony.

1603 England. James I became King of England, the first monarch to rule both England and Scotland. (He was James VI of Scotland since 1566). He was also the first English monarch to publicly assert that he was blessed with “the divine right of Kings,” meaning he was the voice of God on earth, at least in England, Scotland, or Ireland. Although James I was most remembered for commissioning a Bible translation, during his reign the first permanent English colonies were established in Virginia and New England. James I also led the English takeover of Northern Ireland, and was the first advocate for the transportation of thousands of clan people living along the Scottish-English border to Ulster Province, Northern Ireland.

1603. English Captain Martin Pring led an expedition to present Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. He was the first European to ascend the Piscataqua River, and was the first to erect a small fort on Cape Cod (now Truro, MA).

1603-1604. French nobleman Pierre DuGua (Sieur DeMonts) was granted exclusive rights to colonize the area he had named l’Acadie (Acadia), granted by French King Henry IV. The area of Acadia included allof present Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and most of Maine. In 1604, DeMonts established a French colony on St. Croix Island, at the mouth of the St. Croix River, now Maine. After surviving a bad Winter, the entire colony was moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port-Royal, now Nova Scotia.

1606. Two joint stock companies were founded in 1606, both with royal charters issued by King James I, for the purpose of establishing colonies in North America. The Virginia Company of London was given a land grant between Latitude 34o (Cape Fear) and Latitude 41o (Long Island Sound). The Virginia Company of Plymouth was founded with a similar charter, between Latitude 38o (Potomac River) and Latitude 45o (St. John River), which included a shared area with the London Company between Latitude 38o and 41o. The first leader of the Plymouth Company was Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who was given official sanction for starting colonies in North America.

1607. May. Led by John Smith and his cousin, Bartholomew Gosnold, the London Company established the first permanent English settlement in North America – the Jamestown Colony. It was followed in August 1607 by the Sagadahoc Colony led by George Popham, established by the Plymouth Company, near the mouth of the Kennebec River (present Phippsburg, Maine). The Sagadahoc colony was abandoned after just one year, due to a lack of confidence in a change of leadership. Thereafter, the Plymouth Company dissolved until it was revived in 1620 as the Plymouth Council for New England.

1609. The 2nd Virginia Charter of 1609 extended the jurisdiction of the London Company to include the former shared area with the original Plymouth Company, and the language of the new charter now included the words, “sea to sea.” (James I was assured that the Pacific Ocean was just a bit west of the Appalachian Mountains).

1614. New England. English Captain John Smith, a leader of the Jamestown Colony, visited the coast of present Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Maine; then wrote his Description of New England, which encouraged Englishmen to settle there. Smith was credited as the first to call the area New England. Back in England, Christopher Jones was one seafarer who was known to have read Smith’s Description of New England, and remarked that he would like to go there. He got his wish as the master of the Mayflower in 1620.

1620. Plymouth Colony. A new Royal Charter was issued by King James I to the Plymouth Council for New England (formerly the Virginia Company of Plymouth) to establish colonial settlements in New England. The area was from Latitude 40o to Latitude 45o (“sea to sea”). In that same year, the Mayflower dropped anchor off Cape Cod, and Plymouth Colony was founded by a small group of Separatists/Pilgrims, who had fled England for Holland a few years earlier. Unlike the Puritans, the Pilgrims did not want to purify the Church of England, they wanted to get away from the church’s Prayer Book, and have their own method of worship.

1622-1623. Province of Maine. In 1622, the Plymouth Council of New England granted rights of lands to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Captain John Mason. The lands were between the Merrimack and Kennebec rivers, an area which included parts of present New Hampshire and Maine. Gorges was the first to use the name Maine to describe the area. In 1623, English Captain Christopher Levett obtained grants of land from the Plymouth Council to establish colonies in New England. Levett’s first Casco Bay settlement was the Colony of York, at the site of present Portland, Maine, but the small group of people Levett had left there were gone when he returned a few months later. Then in 1623, the Levett colony at the mouth of the Piscataqua River (now Kittery) was successful, as was a second York colony on the York River. Piscataqua/Kittery and York were the first permanent English settlements in the Province of Maine.

1625 England. Charles I became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. Charles believed in the same principles his father, James I had espoused, i.e., that as King, he was the infallible interpreter of God’s will on earth. Soon after taking office, Charles began to note a large number of non-conformists among his subjects. Along with his Archbishop, William Laud, the King began a campaign to purge his church of the largest group of non-conformists, the so-called Puritans, a militant Calvinist religious sect attempting to purify the Church of England. Unfortunately, Charles I took on a job that led to civil war in England as well as the loss of his head. But, his campaign can be credited as the main cause for the founding of the largest English settlement in North America.

1628. The Massachusetts Bay Company was granted a royal charter for an English colony to be established in North America within the bounds of the Plymouth Council of New England. It was said that King Charles I was misled as to the religious leanings of the Massachusetts Bay Company leaders, all prominent Puritans, not Pilgrims, as he had surmised. The language of the Royal Charter essentially removed the Plymouth Council from the picture, and the Massachusetts Bay Company managed to acquire legal interest in the area from Latitude 410 to Latitude 450, except for any previous grants in the same area.

1629. New Hampshire. Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Captain John Mason agreed to split their grants at the Piscataqua River, with Mason retaining the land west of the river as the Province of New Hampshire.

1629. The Great Migration to New England begins. As a result of Charles I’s campaign to purge non-conformists from the Church of England, 1629-1640, large groups of people were alienated. Charles I disbanded Parliament and ruled England alone for eleven years. The Puritans referred to this era as “the eleven years of tyranny.” It was during these eleven years that about 80,000 Puritans felt compelled to leave England. About a fourth of them moved to Holland; another fourth of them to Ireland; a fourth to the West Indies, particularly the islands of Barbados, Nevis, and St. Kitts; and the final group, some 20,000 Puritan immigrants, established the Massachusetts Bay Colony of North America.

1630. Massachusetts Bay Colony. The colonial government was organized, with the first General Court at Charlestown and the creation of the first three counties of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex. They happened to be the same names as the three East Anglia counties of England from whence the majority of the Puritans had lived before coming to America.

1634. The Massachusetts Bay colony began annexing areas of present Maine. The original grants issued to Sir Ferdinand Gorges and Captain Christopher Levett were overlapped by grants of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, which began selling land in any unsettled areas just across the Piscataqua River in present Maine. As soon as settlements were established, Massachusetts Bay formally annexed those areas as part of their territory.

1635-1637. In 1635, religious dissident Roger Williams was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In 1637, Anne Hutchinson, a charismatic religious leader opposed to the Puritans, was put on trial (in the Church Court), excommunicated, and banished.

1636. Connecticut Colony. The English settlements of Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor were formed as the Connecticut Colony. First known as the River Colony, it was a recognized organization for a Puritan congregation established by the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1637. King Charles I, now keenly aware of the fact that the Massachusetts Bay Colony was an enclave of non-conformist Puritans, turned their charter over to Sir Ferdinand Gorges, a loyal supporter of the king, and the original leader of the Plymouth Company. However, the official transfer document with the king’s seal was on board a ship that sank en route to Boston. The Puritans, believing it to be an Act of Providence, ignored the king’s edict.

1638. Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, and more dissidents, founded the Providence Plantations (later Rhode Island and Providence Plantations).

1638-1643. In 1638, New Haven Colony was formed as an independent colony, separate from Connecticut Colony. In 1643, the coastal settlements of Branford, Guilford, Milford, Stamford, plus Southold (on Long Island), all joined the New Haven Colony.

1642. English Civil War. Since taking the throne in 1625, King Charles I had purged most of the Puritans from the Church of England. To deal with a Parliament opposing his every move, in 1629, Charles disbanded Parliament and ruled England on his own. That action canceled over 400 years of liberties gained by Parliament since the Magna Carta. When Parliament was restored in 1640, it quickly became dominated by the same Puritans who Charles had removed from the Church of England. Beginning in 1642, Royalist supporters were forced to fight the armies of the Puritan Parliament in the English Civil War. The supporters of Charles I did not fare well against them.

1645-1651. England. After his defeat and capture in 1645, Charles I refused to accept his captors’ demands for a constitutional monarchy, and briefly escaped captivity in 1647. While recaptured, his son, Prince Charles, was able to marshal Scottish forces for the king. However, by 1648, Oliver Cromwell had consolidated the English opposition. King Charles I was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The Civil War continued until 1651.

1651-1658. Commonwealth of England. Prince Charles had lived in exile after the execution of his father, Charles I. In 1649, the Scots had proclaimed Charles the King of Scotland. But, the Puritan leader, Oliver Cromwell, defeated his army in 1651, and Charles fled to France. Cromwell was to become the Lord Protectorate of the Commonwealth of England, with a puritan-controlled Parliament.

1656. The first Quakers in New England, Mary Fisher and Ann Austin, arrived at Boston Harbor and were immediately arrested.

1658. Massachusetts had always expressed a claim to Maine, based on the language of their 1628 Royal Charter (which had defined their northern bounds as the St. John River). After several partial annexations beginning in 1634, all of Maine was annexed as frontier territory by the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1658. The Maine communities were allowed to vote on the final annexations, and all were in favor of joining Massachusetts.

1659. After being convicted by the Church Court in Salem, Mary Dyer was hanged for the crime of being a Quaker.

1660. England. Oliver Cromwell had died in 1658. Soon after, the English people became dissatisfied with the government that Cromwell had established. In 1660, Parliament invited Prince Charles to return and declared him king. Charles II was restored to the throne as King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was to become one of the most effective English monarchs of all time. He ruled until his death in 1685, and during his reign, the English colonials forced out the remaining pockets of Atlantic settlements made earlier by the Dutch, Swedes, and Danes. Charles II was the first monarch to recognize the potential for the North American colonies to become a contiguous, viable commonwealth.

1661. March. The last Quaker was hanged in Boston. In April, King Charles II ordered the Massachusetts Bay Colony to end the practice.

1665 Connecticut Colony. New Haven Colony and Connecticut Colony merged into one chartered colony, retaining the name Connecticut.

1685-1688. Charles II died in 1685 without issue. His brother, the Duke of York was crowned as King James II. After James II declared his Catholic beliefs, he was deposed in 1688. His Protestant daughter, Mary, was declared the legal heir to the throne. She had married her cousin, William of Orange, the Stadtholder/Ruler of Holland, and Europe’s most staunch Protestant leader. Because of William’s stature as the leader of the Protestant insurrection which had overthrown the Catholic James II, Parliament asked both William and Mary to rule England jointly. The Protestant-controlled Parliament considered the skirmish a holy war, and later gave the insurrection the name of Glorious Revolution. James was exiled to France, where he died in 1701.

1691.Province of Massachusetts Bay. The province was formed after merging the Plymouth Colony and the Massachusetts Bay Colony. About this time, the term District of Maine, was used to describe that area as part of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

1692. The Salem Witch Trials took place, culminating in over 170 arrests and 20 executions.

1707. During the reign of Queen Anne, the United Kingdom of Great Britain was established after the Union with Scotland Act passed the English Parliament in 1706; and the Union with England Act passed the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The English Colonies were now the British Colonies.

1714. After Queen Anne died without issue, her 2nd cousin, George I was crowned King of Great Britain and Ireland. Although there were several English heirs closer to Queen Anne than George I, he was the closest Protestant heir, a great-grandson of English King James I. George I was the first of the House of Hanover to rule Great Britain. He left his home in Hanover infrequently, never learned to speak English, and sanctioned the creation of the first Prime Minister and Cabinet Government in Great Britain. During the reign of a mostly absent George I, the British colonies were invaded by the first wave of Scots-Irish immigrants.

1718. The arrival of the first Scots-Irish immigrants to New England was via Boston Harbor. The so-called Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) were former border clan people who had lived near the Scottish-English border for centuries. A good number of them had moved into areas of Northern Ireland in the early 1600s, and a mass migration to most of the British colonies of America began in about 1717. Generally, the Scots-Irish did not care for civilization that much, and usually leap-frogged over any Atlantic settlements en route to the higher, wilderness areas of America. They did this in New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. The first Scots-Irish who came to New England were to immediately head west into central Massachusetts or north into New Hampshire. Soon after the first New England arrivals, a number of Scots-Irish discovered the coastal areas of Maine. By 1775, the Scots-Irish in America outnumbered (by three times) the other three founding colonial English groups (Puritans, Royalists/Cavaliers, and Quakers).

Further reading:

FindMyPast Adds 6.7 Million Exclusive Records to Their USA Marriage Collection

Findmypast continues to release millions of marriage records every quarter and aims to complete the entire digitization project by the end of 2017. The following is their latest news release:

5th May 2017: Leading family history website, Findmypast, has announced today the release of an additional 6.7 million United States Marriage records in partnership with Family Search International.

Covering 127 counties across 18 states, the new additions mark the latest step in Findmypast’s efforts to create the largest single online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. The collection was first launched in February 2016 and has received regular monthly updates ever since.

This is the first time that any of the records included in this update have been released online and all 6.7 million of them will only be available to search online at Findmypast. The new additions cover;

· Alabama
· Arkansas
· Connecticut
· Delaware
· Georgia
· Iowa
· Kentucky
· Maine
· New Hampshire
· New Jersey
· North Carolina
· Ohio
· Oregon
· Rhode Island
· Utah
· Vermont
· Washington
· West Virginia

Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America. More than 60 per cent of which will have never before been published online. When complete, the collection will only be found in its entirety exclusively on Findmypast. The records include marriage date, the names of both bride and groom , birthplace, birth date, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

The millions of new U.S. records will complement Findmypast’s massive collection of British and Irish data, allowing them to provide many more connections and a more comprehensive experience to family historians in the US and beyond. Customers with family trees on Findmypast will also benefit from leads connecting relatives on their trees with the marriage records, thus generating a whole new source of research.

For more information, visit: http://www.findmypast.com/marriages

Lakeview Cemetery on North Avenue in Burlington, Vermont

The following teaser is from an article about Lakeview Cemetery that was posted at the Burlington Free Press website.

Lakeview-Cemetery-350-pw

Lakeview Cemetery on North Avenue in Burlington was established in 1867 with the city of Burlington’s $3,500 purchase of 23 acres from H.B. Sawyer.

It was designed in the popular park-cemetery style. Seven additional acres were purchased from J. A. Arthur for $2,000 in 1868. The cemetery was officially consecrated in 1871. Planned in the style of a well laid-out park at the outskirts of the city and end of the trolley line, Lakeview, with its meandering roads and specimen trees, was more than a burial ground.

As was common during the period, it became a place to picnic while visiting loved ones’ graves. The peace and tranquility provided in such a beautiful setting was completed with sweeping views of Lake Champlain to the west.

Meandering through the cemetery today offers a glimpse into Burlington’s past. Notable war veterans, from the Civil War up to the present day, include a number of members of the Civil War Massachusetts 54th regiment, profiled in the award winning movie “Glory.”

Read the full article.

New FamilySearch Collections Posted the Week of July 13, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Family historians hungry for historic Irish records will enjoy FamilySearch’s new collection, Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912. These indexed court documents bring 22 million records to your fingertips. These records were originally filmed at the National Archives of Ireland and the index was created by findmypast.com. See the table below for additions to over 60 historical record collections, including 46 million US obituaries. Click on the collection’s link to start your discovery.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Australia New South Wales Census (fragment) 1891 – 0 – 21,315 – Added images to an existing collection
Belgium Antwerp Civil Registration 1588-1910 – 0 – 1,670 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 0 – 164,642 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 1,642,660 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863 – 970 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Saxony Dresden Citizens’ Documents and Business Licenses 1820- 1962 – 0 – 855,956 – Added images to an existing collection
India Bihar Koilukh Pandit Kirtinand Jha Maithil Brahmin Genealogical Records 1750-1990 – 0 – 175,363 – Added images to an existing collection
India Hindu Pilgrimage Records 1194-2015 – 2,782,487 – 2,843,557 – New indexed records and images collection
Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 – 21,833,839 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 0 – 318 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Cremona Civil Registration (State Archive) 1744-1942 – 0 – 1,325,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 0 – 393,814 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943 – 0 – 111,837 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Pesaro Civil Registration (State Archive) 1808-1813 1861- 1865 – 0 – 75,456 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Urbino Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1942 – 0 – 709,381 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Ragusa Civil Registration (State Archive) 1900-1940 – 0 – 111,281 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Toscana Civil Registration (State Archive) 1804-1874 – 0 – 80,833 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Baja California and Baja California Sur Catholic Church Records 1750-1984 – 0 – 363 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Chihuahua Catholic Church Records 1632-1958 – 0 – 195 – New browsable-image collection.
Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984 – 0 – 1,077 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Hidalgo Catholic Church Records 1546-1971 – 0 – 574 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Michoacán Catholic Church Records 1555-1996 – 0 – 2,758 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Tamaulipas Catholic Church Records 1703-1964 – 0 – 1,294 – Added images to an existing collection
Peru Callao Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 42,583 – Added images to an existing collection
Perú Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 111,769 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Negros Occidental Roman Catholic Diocese of Bacolod Parish Registers 1755-1976 – 0 – 95,820 – New browsable-image collection.
Spain Province of Valencia Miscellaneous Records 1251-1950 – 0 – 850,597 – Added images to an existing collection
Sweden Halland Church Records 1615-1904; index 1615-1860 – 0 – 972 – Added images to an existing collection

Canada: Newfoundland Vital Records 1840-1949 – 347,134 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Births 1864-1877 – 0 – 6,103 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Deaths 1864-1877 – 0 – 20,661 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Marriages 1864-1918 – 0 – 15,831 – Added images to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index – 1,513,553 – 1,513,553 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

United States Records

United States Census 1790 – 1,606 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Census 1800 – 20 – 18,454 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Hospital and Medical Records 1865-1872 – 4,641 – 44,734 – New Indexed records and images collection
United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 – 46,769,836 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Index to Service Records War with Spain 1898 – 123,334 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California Death Index 1905-1939 – 2,086,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Delaware Vital Records 1680-1971 – 624,395 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Marriages 1811-1950 – 83,822 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 504,033 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1915 – 0 – 9,802 – Added images to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1925 – 5,573,816 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky Vital Record Indexes 1911-1999 – 9,865,944 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Louisiana First Registration Draft Cards compiled 1940-1945 – 39,967 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Boston Passenger Lists Index 1899-1940 – 1,577,127 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1627-2001 – 0 – 182 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Births 1867-1902 – 0 – 1,428 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries 1820-2006 – 1,389,458 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Probate Records 1735-1970 – 0 – 1,952 – Added images to an existing collection
South Dakota School Records 1879-1970 – 2,807,212 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1950 – 3,024,053 – 1,831,660 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database 1847-1868 – 58,333 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Utah Uintah County Discharge Records 1893-2009 – 0 – 2,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Land and Property Records 1888-2004 – 0 – 195,963 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Marriage Records 1888-2015 – 0 – 8,687 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Naturalization and Citizenship Records 1888-1929 – 0 – 409 – New browsable-image collection.
Vermont St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings 1895-1924 – 6,696,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Vermont Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1732-2005 – 0 – 458,533 – Added images to an existing collection

Help Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Locating Vermont Death Records

Robin Foster wrote a good article on finding Vermont Death Records in her column for the Examiner this last week. Included are links to records found at FamilySearch, as well as Ancestry, and Find a Grave. Following is a teaser.

Are you trying to document the death of your ancestor in Vermont? You may not be aware of the different places to look for resources. Below, you may be able to find one or more resources that will help you:

Vermont vital records online

Vermont, Deaths and Burials, 1871-1965 (free) – This is an index of deaths. You will want to order the original on microfilm to see if it contains more information. If you do not find your ancestor, check to make sure the database contains records from your ancestor’s locality: Record Coverage.

Both of the following collections contain deaths for Vermont as well as births and marriages. Neither collection is complete….

Read the full column by Robin Foster.

FamilySearch Adds Over 7.4 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from England, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Peru, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 7.4 million indexed records and images to collections from Belgium, England, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Peru, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 4,140,062 images from the new U.S., Vermont, St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings, 1895-1924, collection; the 900,127 indexed records from the Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996, collection; and the 718,769 images from the United States, Passport Applications, 1795-1925, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Brabant, Civil Registration, 1582-1912 – 0 – 21,753 – Added images to an existing collection.

England, Dorset, Parish Registers, 1538-1936 – 0 – 10,378 – Added images to an existing collection.

Germany, Hesse, Stadtkreis Darmstadt, Darmstadt District, Civil Registration, 1876-1925 – 8,420 – 8,172 – New indexed records and images collection.

Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Pati, Naturalization Records, 1960-2013 – 0 – 188,329 – New browsable image collection.

Italy, Cuneo, Alba, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1941 – 0 – 133,283 – Added images to an existing collection.

Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997 – 111,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Mexico, Coahuila, Civil Registration, 1861-1998 – 20,582 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Mexico, Guerrero, Civil Registration, 1833-1996 – 1,267 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Peru, Arequipa, Civil Registration, 1860-1976 – 61,136 – 26,976 – New indexed records and images collection.

Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1890-2005 – 83,312 – 154,812 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996 – 900,127 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Iowa, Non-Population Census Schedules, 1850-1880 – 0 – 23,397 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., New York, Bronx Probate Estate Files, 1914-1931 – 0 – 771,828 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Seamen’s Proofs of Citizenship, 1791-1861 – 0 – 67,977 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Vermont, St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings, 1895-1924 – 0 – 4,140,062 – New browsable image collection.

United States, Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 0 – 718,769 – Added images to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 2.7 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Brazil, Colombia, England, Portugal, & the USA

FamilySearch.org

The following was information received from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added more than 2.7 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, Colombia, England, Portugal, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,061,590 indexed records and images from the U.S., Vermont, Vital Records, 1760-1954, collection; the 322,922 images from the Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1600-2012, collection; and the 592,385 images from the new U.S., Ohio, Hamilton County Records, 1791-1994, collection . See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Santa Catarina, Catholic Church Records, 1714-1977 – 14,801 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1600-2012 – 0 – 322,922 – Added images to an existing collection.

England, Bristol Parish Registers, 1538-1900 – 25,351 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Portugal, Viana do Castelo, Catholic Church Records, 1537-1911 – 0 – 141,541 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., California, San Francisco Area Funeral Home Records, 1835-1979 – 69,297 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Massachusetts, Deaths, 1841-1915 – 0 – 11,450 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1627-2001 – 0 – 468,272 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Michigan, Deaths, 1867-1897 – 0 – 235 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Hamilton County Records, 1791-1994 – 0 – 592,385 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Vermont, Vital Records, 1760-1954 – 459,155 – 602,435 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Vermont Needed Swedes Who Could Withstand the Rigors of Vermont Rural Living

The following teaser is from an interesting article about a little-known program to get Swedes to immigrate to Vermont.

EAST DUMMERSTON, VT. — Until recently, Earl Cavanagh didn’t know that many of his ancestors came to Vermont from Sweden as part of a short-lived state-run program to help repopulate the abandoned hill farms with people accustomed to the rigors of living and working in a challenging rural environment.

Cavanagh learned how his Swedish ancestors came to Vermont from Lyndon State College history professor Paul Searls, who is researching a book on the topic….

Searls stumbled onto the Swedish immigration project while writing another book, and he saw newspaper articles from across the country on the Swedish immigration program. Now, he’s writing a book on the program.

Read the full article.

Vermont State Archives Opens State Hospital Records

Vermont State Hospital
More than 40 cubic feet of records from the Vermont State Hospital, formerly located at Waterbury, have been opened for public research. According to the Secretary of State, Jim Condos, these records run from 1891 through 2005.

The State Hospital was closed in 2011 after suffering damage in Tropical Storm Irene.

for more information, see the short AP article in the July 3, 2013 edition of the Brattleboro Reformer.

Vermont State Archives Releasing Court Records for Caledonia County

According to an AP article posted at fox44abc22yourvoice.com, the State Archives in Middlesex, Vermont has completed the processing of Caledonia County, VT Court Records running from 1794 to 1945. The Orleans County Court Records were released for research in July of 2012. Lamoille County, VT Court Records are to be completed this summer, and released to the public.

To find out more, see the AP article.

FamilySearch Adds 18 New Collections Including Germany, Italy, Netherlands, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch, dated Februry 15, 2013:

Included in this week’s records update are 18 new collections; seven from Napoli, Italy, seven from the United States, four from Germany, and one from Netherlands. Among these collections are the United States Draper Manuscript Collection from 1740-1960 (more information can be found here), the Germany, Brandenburg, Bernau bei Berlin Jewish Records from 1688-1872, and the United States Revolutionary War Rolls from 1775-1783. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Germany, Brandenburg, Bernau bei Berlin, Jewish Records, 1688-1872 – 0 – 2,058 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Prussia, Saxony, Various Protestant Church Records, 1594-1936 – 0 – 4,056 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Westfalen, Minden, Index to Funeral Sermons, 1580-1740 – 0 – 33,073 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Württemberg, Schwäbisch Hall, Probate Records, 1803-1925 – 0 – 36,814 – New browsable image collection.
Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 0 – 1,811 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Napoli, Fontana, Parocchia di Santa Maria della Mercede – La Sacra, Catholic Church Records, 1641-1929 – 0 – 2,660 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Grumo Nevano, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 18,810 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Lacco Ameno, Parrocchia di SS. Annunziata in Santa Maria delle Grazie, Catholic Church Records, 1630-1929 – 0 – 3,193 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Marano di Napoli, Civil Registration (Comune), 1839-1929 – 0 – 18,199 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Sant’Angelo, Parocchia di San Michele Arcangelo, Catholic Church Records, 1905-1929 – 0 – 77 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Sant’Antimo, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 24,177 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Serrara, Parocchia di Santa Maria del Carmine, Catholic Church Records, 1659-1929 – 0 – 2,714 – New browsable image collection.
Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1553-1909 – 0 – 672,330 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Cádiz, Civil Registration Records, 1870-1960 – 0 – 37,980 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Sevilla, Municipal Records, 1903-1918 – 0 – 159,510 – Added images to an existing collection.
Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1840-1845 – 520,550 – 146,178 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
U.S., California, Cemetery Transcriptions – 0 – 17,138 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Georgia, Elbert County Records, 1790-2002 – 0 – 63,290 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Mississippi, Confederate Records, 1889-1942 – 0 – 2,740 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Ohio, Cleveland Cemetery Interment Records, 1824-2001 – 346,248 – 10,585 – New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., Ohio, County Records, 1841-2003 – 0 – 92 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Vermont, Orange County, Bradford District Estate Files, 1780-1915 – 0 – 75,694 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Draper Manuscript Collection, 1740-1960 – 0 – 84,177 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914 – 0 – 41,172 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Remarried Widows Index to Pension Applications, 1887-1942 – 52,939 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Revolutionary War Pension Payment Ledgers, 1818-1872 – 0 – 8,955 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 – 0 – 93,048 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933 – 852,027 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds New Collections from Canada, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Peru, & the United States


FamilySearch added an additional 6.4 million new, free indexed records and images this week to its collection. Notable additions include the 1,034,803 records for the Netherlands, Zeeland Province, Church Records from 1527-1907, the 1,436,121 added from Italy Civil Registrations from 1824-1941, and the 1,069,308 added to the new Saskatchewan, Canada, collections from 1846-1957. Other new searchable collections online were added this week for Canada, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Peru, and the United States. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

BillionGraves Index – 189,206 – 189,206 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
Brazil, Civil Registration, 1870-2012 – 0 – 6,272 – Added images to an existing collection.
Brazil, Mato Grosso, Civil Registration, 1890-2012 – 0 – 2,218 – Added images to an existing collection.
Canada, Manitoba, Church Records, 1800-1959 – 0 – 6,567 – New browsable image collection.
Canada, Prince Edward Island, Church Records, 1777-1985 – 0 – 22,448 – Added images to an existing collection.
Canada, Saskatchewan, Catholic Church Records, 1846-1957 – 0- 286,132- New browsable image collection.
Canada, Saskatchewan, Judicial District Court Records, 1891-1954 – 0 – 783,176 – Added images to an existing collection.
Chile, Santiago, Cementerio General, 1821-2011 – 0 – 222,010 – Added images to an existing collection.
China, Collection of Genealogies, 1500-2010 – 0 – 23,375 – Added images to an existing collection.
Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1600-2010 – 0 – 116,239 – Added images to an existing collection.
Czech Republic, Censuses, 1843-1921 – 0 – 82,847 – Added images to an existing collection.
Czech Republic, Land Records, 1450-1889 – 0 – 144,111 – Added images to an existing collection.
England, Cheshire Parish Registers, 1538-2000 – 31,521 – 0 – Added index records to and existing collection.
England, Northumberland, Miscellaneous Records, 1570-2005 – 0 – 525 – Added images to an existing collection.
Estonia, Population Registers, 1918-1944 – 0 – 142,722 – Added images to an existing collection.
Germany, Hesse, Civil Registration, 1874-1927– 0 – 75,875 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Prussia, Pomerania Church Records, 1544-1945 – 0 – 457,603 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Bologna, Bologna, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1941 – 0 – 292,511 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1824-1910 – 0 – 483,804 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Matera, Matera, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929 – 0 – 237,814 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Pescara, Pescara, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1865-1910 – 0 – 421,992 – New browsable image collection.
Netherlands, Zeeland Province, Church Records, 1527-1907 – 0 – 1,034,803 – Added images to an existing collection.
New Zealand, Probate Records, 1860-1961 – 0 – 13,622 – New browsable image collection.
Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 0 – 110,620 – Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 0 – 230,734 – New browsable image collection.
South Africa, Cape Province, Western Cape Archives Records 1796-1992 – 0 – 99,777 – Added images to an existing collection.
South Africa, Eastern Cape, Estate Files, 1962-2000 – 0 – 10,749 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Lérida, Municipal Records, 1319-1940 – 0 – 40,869 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Idaho, Lemhi County Records, 1868-1964 – 0 – 14,934 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Idaho, Minidoka County Records, 1913-1961 – 0 – 1,283 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Illinois, Northern District (Eastern Division), Naturalization Index, 1926-1979 – 0 – 223,919 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Indiana, Marriages, 1811-1959 – 32,901 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
U.S., Iowa, Fayette County Probate Records, 1851-1928 – 0 – 144,006 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., New Jersey, Calvary United Methodist Church Records, 1821-2003 – 0 – 2,631 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., New York, Buffalo, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Records, 1812-1970 – 0 – 3,240 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Ohio, Jefferson County Court Records, 1797-1940 – 0 – 20,040 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Vermont, Franklin County Probate Records, 1796-1921 – 0 – 15,731 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Washington, County Records, 1856-2009 – 0 – 21,799 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Mexican War Pension Index, 1887-1926 – 51,991 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
United States, New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787-1906 – 0 – 51,124 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States Social Security Death Index – 113,216 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.

From FamilySearch.org – December 14, 2012.

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790

American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 represents an exhaustive research project to extract population data for the area encompassed by the  United State as represented in 1790. Data was gathered from previous research studies, government studies, and independent research. The population lists, which are of paramount importance to the genealogist, include poll lists, tax lists, taxables, militia lists, and censuses, and were originally drawn up for purposes of taxation and local defense. Gleaned from archives in Britain and the U.S. and from a wide range of published sources, their itemization in this work puts colonial population records, and those other areas covered in this book, in a handy framework for research.

The author acknowledges that some of the statics may have greater value than others, based predominately on the source. Some statistics are little more than official estimates. Though some sources contain estimates, every effort was made to verify statics for accuracy. Many estimates by secondary authorities were omitted to limit the introduction of unnecessary bias. There are plenty of accurate counts as well. To help the reader appraise the value of various counts, the specific source is indicated for each item.

Reading these population counts is like reading history by the numbers. Seeing how different areas grew and at what rates gains perspective when compared to the first federal census of 1790 and, perhaps even more so when compared to today’s population counts in the same areas. Such information is both insightful as it is simply interesting.

 

Content

Bibliography

Notes of Methods of Calculation

Abbreviations

General Estimates of the Thirteen Colonies as a Whole

New England

Plymouth

Massachusetts

  • General
  • Local

Connecticut

  • General
  • Local

Rhode Island

  • General
  • Local

New Hampshire

  • General
  • Local

Vermont

  • General
  • Local

New York

  • General
  • Local

New Jersey

  • General
  • Local

Pennsylvania

  • General
  • Local

Delaware

  • General
  • Local

Maryland

  • General
  • Local

Virgina

  • General
  • Local

North Carolina

  • General
  • Local

South Carolina

  • General
  • Local

Georgia

  • General
  • Local

The Northwest

  • The Illinois Country

The Southwest

  • Kentucky
  • Tennessee

Western Indians

  • Northern Department
  • Southern Department

Index

 

Order American Population Before the Federal Census of 1790 from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC2345, Price: $30.87.

Vermont State Archives opens court records for research

Vermont State Archives release the follow press release, as found on VTDigger.org:

For Immediate release
Contact: Jim Condos, 802.828.2148

PRESS RELEASE
Vermont State Archives Opens Court Records for Research

Montpelier, VT – Secretary of State Jim Condos announced today the successful completion of the first phase of an ongoing initiative to preserve and improve access to archival court records. Orleans County court records are now open for research by the public at the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration (VSARA) in Middlesex. The records depict 145 years of Vermont court history, documenting changes in civil and criminal jurisdiction; shifts in penal practice; the development of the judiciary and the legal profession; and legal rights that persist today.

Secretary Condos noted that, “This perhaps is the first time since these records were created that they are together in one place where the public can easily research them.” Archivists at VSARA have been working since January to accession, organize, and describe the 152 cubic feet of dockets, record books and case files dating from 1800 to 1945.

The records document all three courts that operated at the county level in Vermont until the late twentieth century: the county court, the supreme court, and the court of chancery. Beyond their importance in documenting the judicial branch of state government, the records offer a richly detailed view of the lives of ordinary Vermonters. “They show the experiences of a diverse cross-section of society — farmers and businessmen, paupers and property owners, men and women – throughout their personal and professional lives,” Condos said.

Court records are a valuable resource for researching the larger social and economic history of Orleans County and its communities, as well as the experiences of individuals and families. A sampling of historical details revealed by the records include the prevalence of divorce in the early 1800’s; 19th century counterfeiting; trade and population movement between Orleans County and the border region of Canada; types of business speculation in rural Vermont; the massive wave of Depression foreclosures; and early battles over water rights and water pollution.

Archivists at VSARA have now begun work on the second phase of the project which will focus on Caledonia County court records. Those records are expected to be completed and open for research by the end of 2012. The project will wind up in 2013 with the processing of Lamoille County records, preparation of a guide for researchers, and the launch of an online exhibit.

In 2011 VSARA was awarded a grant of $118,078 from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) to preserve and improve access to archival court records from Orleans, Caledonia, and Lamoille Counties. VSARA intends to build upon the experience of this initial project to eventually address the archival needs of all of Vermont’s court records.

The NHPRC, a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), supports a wide range of activities to preserve, publish, and encourage the use of documentary sources, created in every medium ranging from quill pen to computer, relating to the history of the United States.

Jim Condos is Vermont’s Secretary of State.

Click here to read the press release of vtgigger.org.