Dollarhide Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides AL-KS 80% Off! – NEW AL & KY-WY Guides 25% Off! With FREE Downloads!

FRPC ran a sale on these books last June, and we’re again running a deep-discount sale for Christmas 2017 – bumping up the discount on the new volumes published since 2015 to 25% – with the older 2013 and 2014 discounted at 80% during the sale.

Bill Dollarhide started a series of what he called “Name List” guides in the Summer of 2013. He wrote steadily on them until sometime in 2015, when life caught up with him, and he had to put the project aside. Well, he went back at it in 2017, and completed new guides for all the rest of the states, alphabetically Minnesota through Wyoming. He also wrote a full book on the U.S. Territories. Finally, Bill went back and updated an earlier volume – choosing Indiana – to test whether enough changes had taken place to make it worthwhile to do Second Editions. Bill found that a number of URL addresses had changed, which he expected, and he found additional data that expanded the volume by another 10 pages. Since that time, Bill also produced a Second Edition for Alabama.

Bill has also released 37 NEW volumes from 2015 through 2017 – Alabama and Minnesota through Wyoming, plus U.S. Territories and Indiana Second Edition.

To celebrate the Christmas season, we’re pricing all of the 2015 to 2017 print volumes at 25% off, making them $14.21. They cover Kentucky through Wyoming, as well as an Alabama volume, an Indiana volume, and one on the U.S. Territories. As before, we’re throwing in a FREE instantly downloadable PDF eBook version with any paperback book being purchased. See my Super-Saver shipping note below.

To clear out the earlier printed books (Alabama through Kansas), those written in 2013 and 2014, FRPC has discounted the price 80%! That makes them only $3.79 each! We will most likely do Second Editions for those volumes sometime in the 2018.

To make this offer even more attractive, we’re offering Super-Saver (USA Only) USPS shipping on all 53 printed books. That’s $4.50 for the first book, and only 50 cents for each thereafter.

With the completion of this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists, censuses, and census substitutes are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & Substitute Name Lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only do these this volumes give a detailed bibliography of Censuses and Substitute Names Lists available for each state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co. Click on the appropriate links to purchase.

Early Maryland Timeline, 1629-1715

The following article is by my good friend, William Dollarhide:

An historical timeline of events relating to the founding and early development of the Province of Maryland was extracted from the Maryland Censuses & Substitute Name Lists book. The history begins with the time of George Calvert’s petitions for a proprietary colony in the Chesapeake Bay area, and continues up to the restoration of the Calvert proprietorship in 1715.

1629. George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, founder of the Avalon Colony of Newfoundland, arrived in Virginia. Calvert was a former Secretary of State in the government of King James I. He was not well received in Virginia, partly because of his Catholic beliefs, but also because of his known desire to start a colony in an area north of Jamestown claimed by the Virginia Company. George Calvert had been raised a Catholic, but during his political career, held several offices that required loyalty oaths to the Church of England. He resigned all his government duties in 1625, publicly declared his Catholic faith, and began planning for an English colony in North America that could be a haven for the persecuted Catholics of England.

1631. Claiborne Colony. William Claiborne was a successful planter, trader, and prominent leader of the Virginia Colony. He was a rival of George Calvert for obtaining rights for a colony north of Jamestown on Chesapeake Bay. Claiborne was a councilor and received backing by the Virginia council for a fur trading operation with the Indians. On a trip to London, Claiborne received a royal trading commission from King Charles I that essentially granted him rights to settle any part of North America not previously granted. In 1631, Claiborne recruited a group of indentured servants in London and established a small plantation on Kent Island (present Kent County, Eastern Shore of Maryland).

1632. Province of Maryland. George Calvert was successful in petitioning King Charles I for a royal charter, but died five weeks before the charter was signed. The Maryland Proprietorship was granted to his son, Cecilius (Cecil) Calvert, 2nd Lord Baltimore. The colony was named Maryland after Henrietta Maria of France, the Catholic Queen Consort of Protestant English King Charles I. Cecil Calvert managed the Province of Maryland from his home, Kiplin Hall, in North Yorkshire, England. The area of the royal charter included most of the Chesapeake peninsula (now Delmarva Peninsula), including all present Delaware, and extended north from the Potomac River to the 40th Parallel.

1633. William Claiborne’s claims that the Virginia colony still had jurisdiction over his Kent Island settlement went to the Privy Council in London. The Council ruled against Claiborne, and he lost jurisdiction of the settlement to the new Maryland colony.

1634. The Ark and The Dove were hired by Cecil Calvert to transport the first settlers to the Province of Maryland. In early 1634, the two ships carrying over 120 settlers arrived at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. After exploring the area of the Potomac River, on March 25, 1634 the settlers went ashore on St. Clement’s Island. Soon after, they purchased land from the Indians and established the first settlement of St. Mary’s City. One of the passengers was 28-year old Leonard Calvert, who was named the colonial governor of the colony by his older brother, the Proprietor Governor, Cecil Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore. About half of the first settlers were known to be Roman Catholics. The Province of Maryland, led by the Catholic Calvert family, allowed religious freedom for all who came. The uniqueness of the Maryland freedoms might be compared with the Massachusetts Bay Colony, that had a law against being a Catholic (or the wrong kind of Protestant). The penalty in 1634 Massachusetts for being a Quaker or a Catholic was a death sentence. Regardless of their religious beliefs, the first settlers to the Maryland colony discovered some the world’s most perfect soil and climate for raising bumper crops of tobacco. Because of that fact, the colony was successful immediately.

1635. General Assembly. The first session of the General Assembly of the Province of Maryland was held at St. Mary’s City. Patterned after the House of Commons of England, the legislators were freemen (land owners) selected from the parishes and hundreds prior to the formation of counties. Lord Baltimore, as the proprietor and original owner of all land in the colony, had the right to appoint any number of delegates.

1635. Headright System and Indentured Servants. As a proprietary colony, all land within the Province of Maryland was owned outright by the Lords Baltimore. Although Cecil Calvert issued several Maryland land grants as early as 1633 from his base in England, the first land grants issued in Maryland began in 1635, undertaken personally by Leonard Calvert, the colonial governor. The land grant system employed was identical to the Virginia system, often called the Headright System. The granting of land was based on the number of persons transported into the colony. A man transporting himself received land, and if he added others in the transportation, he would receive a certain number of acres of land “per head.” The key element in the Headright System was that all persons (including convicts) transported to the colony were also entitled to receive land grants. But, if the transported person could not repay the one who paid for his passage, he would be compelled to serve a period of servitude for several years to repay the debt, after which he could receive his land grant. The contract between the Master and the Servant was done on a single sheet of parchment, written twice, then torn in half with copies given to each party. The manner of tearing the paper was to use jagged edges, or in Latin, dentils, so rejoining the two halves would have to be an exact fit. The document, copied into the county court records, became known as an Indenture, and the person going into servitude became known as an Indentured Servant. The Headright system was the main method of obtaining workers for the tobacco plantations of Maryland until the early 1680s, and the use of slave labor eventually replaced the Headright system

1637. Saint Mary’s County was formed, the first county in the Province of Maryland. The original area included present Saint Mary’s, Anne Arundel, and Howard counties. The county seat and first capital of the Province of Maryland was at St. Mary’s City.

1642. Kent County was established, encompassing William Claiborne’s original Kent Island settlement of 1631, as well as the area of present Kent and Talbot counties. The first county seat was at New Yarmouth, later moved to Chestertown. The first settlers in the county were mostly Puritans.

1642. English Civil War. Since taking the throne in 1625, King Charles I had purged most of the Puritans from the Church of England. To deal with a Parliament opposing his every move, in 1629, Charles disbanded Parliament and ruled England on his own. That action canceled over 400 years of liberties gained by Parliament since the Magna Carta. When Parliament was restored in 1640, it quickly became dominated by the same Puritans who Charles had removed from the Church of England. Beginning in 1642, Royalist supporters were forced to fight the armies of the Puritan Parliament in the English Civil War. The supporters of Charles I did not fare well against them.

1645. Maryland. Captain Richard Ingle, an English privateer and supporter of the Puritan side in England, led a revolt against the Royalist government of Maryland. He joined with William Claiborne, another Puritan/Parliamentarian, who was looking for any opportunity to take back Kent Island. With a single ship, Captain Ingle attacked the Maryland capital St. Mary’s City in the name of Parliament. He imprisoned leaders of the colony, but Governor Leonard Calvert escaped to Virginia. Calvert returned with an armed force and took back his colony in August 1646. Though most of his men were granted amnesty, Ingle was specifically exempted from it and executed. Claiborne continued to fight the Calverts in any way he could.

1645. England. After his defeat and capture in 1645, Charles I refused to accept his captors’ demands for a constitutional monarchy, and briefly escaped captivity in 1647. While recaptured, his son, Prince Charles, marshalled Scottish forces for the king. However, by 1648, Oliver Cromwell had consolidated the English opposition. King Charles I was tried, convicted, and executed for high treason in January 1649. The Civil War continued until 1651.

1647-1648. Maryland. In June 1647, Leonard Calvert was stricken with a sudden illness and died at the age of 41 years. On his death-bed he appointed Thomas Greene as the 2nd Colonial Governor of Maryland. Greene was a Royalist and Roman Catholic, like Leonard Calvert. In 1648, Cecil Calvert replaced him with William Stone, a Protestant and supporter of Parliament. The Province of Maryland had many Catholics, but they were now slightly outnumbered by Protestants, and Cecil Calvert may have tried to appease the Protestants with his appointment of William Stone. Meanwhile, Calvert’s nemesis, William Claiborne, tried to get the Puritan-controlled Parliament to revoke the Maryland charter from the Calverts, saying they could not be trusted. Parliament disagreed, and the Calverts retained their Maryland charter. Claiborne did manage to get Parliament to grant him a commission to suppress any Royalist uprisings in the Chesapeake region.

1649. Maryland. The English colonies were still divided between the Puritans/Parliamentarians and the Royalists. The New England colonies were probably 85-90% Puritan, and the Virginia colony was probably 60-65% Royalist. The Maryland colony was about 55% Puritan. In 1649, Maryland’s Governor, William Stone, invited any Puritans of Virginia to settle in Maryland. Also in that year, all Maryland settlers were granted religious freedom by the official Maryland Act of Religious Toleration.

1650. Anne Arundel County. The third county in the Province of Maryland was Providence County, established in 1650. The earliest settlers were mostly Puritans from Virginia who had been lured to Maryland with land grants offered by Governor William Stone. In 1658, Providence was renamed Anne Arundel to honor the wife of Cecil Calvert (she had died in 1649). The original county area was taken from the bounds of Saint Mary’s County, and included present Howard County.

1651-1658. Commonwealth of England. Prince Charles had lived in exile after the execution of his father, Charles I. In 1649, the Scots had proclaimed Charles the King of Scotland. But, the Puritan leader, Oliver Cromwell, defeated his army in 1651, and Charles fled to France. Cromwell was to become the Lord Protectorate of the Commonwealth of England, with a puritan-controlled Parliament. During this time, William Claiborne made attempts to have the Kent Island settlement restored to the Virginia Colony. In denying Claiborne’s requests, Parliament reinforced its support for the Calvert charter and the Maryland Colony. But taking on a role as a leader of the Puritan revolt, Claiborne led several armed attacks against the Maryland Colony, including the burning down of all the original Catholic churches of southern Maryland. After Cromwell died in 1658, the English people became dissatisfied with the government that Cromwell had established.

1660. England. In 1660, Parliament invited Charles to return and declared him king. Charles II was restored to the throne as King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was to become one of the most effective English monarchs of all time. He ruled until his death in 1685, and during his reign, the English colonials forced out the remaining pockets of Atlantic settlements made earlier by the Dutch, Swedes, and Danes. Charles II saw the Atlantic colonies as a source of trade and commerce, supported development, and granted several more charters for settlement. All the English colonies thrived as a result. He was the first monarch to recognize the potential for the North American colonies to become a contiguous, viable commonwealth. He encouraged the development of post roads, and a regular communication between the Governors. Charles II was responsible for setting the tone of self-government, religious tolerance, and individual freedoms in the English colonies that were to become American institutions.

1661. Charles Calvert arrived in St. Mary’s City as the new Deputy Governor of the Maryland colony. He was the 24-year old son and heir of Cecil Calvert, the proprietor of the Maryland colony.

1675. Cecil Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, died at the age of 70 years at his home, Kiplin Hall, in North Yorkshire. He was succeeded by his son, Charles Calvert, who was living in Maryland at the time.

1684. Charles Calvert, the 3rd Baron Baltimore, left Maryland and arrived at his Kiplin Hall home in England. He was never to return to Maryland. A few years after his return to England, he saw the loss of his title to Maryland; the end of the Calvert family’s proprietorship; and the establishment of the replacement Royal Colony of Maryland.

1685. England. After the death of King Charles II, who died without issue, his brother, the Duke of York, became King James II. Parliament was suspicious of his religious beliefs, and thought he was too tolerant with Catholics. In 1686, James II was successful in establishing the Dominion of New England, an administrative union of colonies, encompassing the area from the Delaware River to the Penobscot River. The Dominion installed religious tolerance in the colonies of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, New Haven, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Massachusetts Bay, but the reforms were short-lived.

1688. The Glorious Revolution. After James II had declared his Catholic beliefs, he was deposed in 1688. His Protestant daughter, Mary, was declared the legal heir to the throne. She had married her cousin, William of Orange, the Stadtholder/Ruler of Holland, and Europe’s most staunch Protestant leader. Because of William’s stature as the leader of the Protestant insurrection which had overthrown the Catholic James II, Parliament asked both William and Mary to rule England jointly. The Protestant-controlled Parliament considered the skirmish a holy war, and later gave the insurrection the name of Glorious Revolution. The Dominion of New England was dissolved in 1689, and the concept of religious tolerance reverted to the prohibition of Catholics to hold public office in all the English colonies. James was exiled to France, where he died in 1701.

1689. Maryland. The Protestant Revolution of 1689, sometimes called “Coode’s Rebellion” after one of its leaders, John Coode, took place in the Province of Maryland when Puritans, by then a majority in the colony, revolted against the proprietary government, led by the Roman Catholic Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore. The rebellion followed the “Glorious Revolution” in England of 1688, which saw the Protestant Monarchs William and Mary replace the Catholic King James II. In Maryland, the Lords Baltimore lost control of their proprietary colony and for the next 25 years Maryland would be ruled directly by the English Crown. The Protestant Revolution also saw the effective end of Maryland’s early experiments with religious toleration, as Catholicism was outlawed and Roman Catholics forbidden from holding public office. Religious toleration would not be restored in Maryland until after the American Revolution.

1689. The Jacobites. After the English Revolution of 1688, a political party of supporters of deposed King James II was established in England They became known as Jacobites (derived from Jacobus, Latin for James). Parliament, however, was under control of the political party called the Whigs who saw the Jacobites as their mortal enemy and fought them in battle during and after the 1688 Revolution. In the first armed Jacobite Rising of 1689, they were quickly defeated; but they continued to oppose the Whigs for decades after the Revolution. The Whigs dominated Parliament from the 1680s to the 1760s. They were made up of Puritans, Non-conformists, and other anti-Catholic sects. The Jacobites were Roman Catholics or liberal Protestants. At the hands of the Whigs, the Jacobites experienced forced evacuations from Scotland and England as part of the Whigs penal policies. After the second Jacobite Rising of 1715, many of the expelled Jacobites were transported to the Province of Maryland.

1692. William III and Mary II declared Maryland to be a royal colony. The first official royal governor appointed was Sir Lionel Copley.

1695. The capital of the Province of Maryland was moved from mostly Catholic St. Mary’s City to mostly Protestant Annapolis.

1707. During the reign of Queen Anne, the United Kingdom of Great Britain was established after the Union with Scotland Act passed the English Parliament in 1706; and the Union with England Act passed the Parliament of Scotland in 1707.

1715-1788. After the death of Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore, his 36-year old son, Benedict Calvert became the 4th Baron Baltimore. Benedict had spent most of his adult life trying to get the king to restore the Maryland Proprietorship to the Calvert family, but after he attained his title, he died two months later, making his son, Charles Calvert, the 5th Baron Baltimore at the age of fifteen years. Young Charles benefited from the petitions of his father, who had assured the king that he was willing to convert to the Anglican faith. After declaring a sworn oath that he was renouncing Roman Catholicism and joining the Church of England, young Charles Calvert was granted the restored proprietorship of the Province of Maryland by King George I. Charles Calvert came of age in 1721 and then assumed personal control of Maryland, now a proprietary colony again with the Church of England as its official church. The Calvert family continued as the proprietors of the Province of Maryland until the province became the state of Maryland in 1788.

Further Reading:
Maryland Censuses & Substitute Name Lists, 1633-2013, by William Dollarhide
Maryland Censuses & Substitute Name Lists, 1633-2013 (PDF eBook)
Online Maryland Censuses & Substitutes, a 4-page laminated Insta-GuideTM
Online Maryland Censuses & Substitutes (PDF eBook)

Many Irish Immigrants Lost Their Lives in the Building of the C&O Canal

The following excerpt is from an informative article dealing with Washington County, Maryland, and the Irish immigrants who worked on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, many settling in the area. Disease was not well understood in the early 19th-century, leading to the early demise of many immigrants who were just looking for a better life. Read the full article, from the Washington County Historical Society, to learn much more.

Even when we do reflect on the hardships faced by Irish immigrants to America, we tend to think mostly of places like Boston or New York City, where Irish heritage and culture have gained a lasting footprint. But Washington County was home to large groups of Irish immigrants, brought to the area specifically to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. This, to put it plainly, was a hard and often deadly life. Because of the hard labor and poor working conditions, daily life along the canal was filled with injury, disease and violence.

The process of building the C&O Canal was a struggle from the very beginning. This area had a bad reputation for ill health during the summers, and a lot of competition for labor from the agricultural sector. Finding workers to build the canal was a difficult and costly prospect, and so the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co. looked toward imported labor from Great Britain.

Read the full article at the heraldmailmedia.com website.

Washington County (Maryland) Historical Society Opens New Genealogy Center

The following teaser is from heraldmailmedia.com:

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Washington County [Maryland] Historical Society Board President Evelyn Williams, a native Floridian, said the past few days — with Hurricane Matthew pounding the state’s eastern coast — weighed heavy on her mind.

Joined by supporters and local dignitaries, Williams and fellow historical society officials cut a ribbon to officially open the center, a first-of-its-kind resource for residents looking to trace their family lineage.

The event also served as a weekend kickoff for more family-friendly genealogical activities today and Sunday.

“It was a dream of the board of directors for about the last 18 months we’ve been working on this,” said Carol Miller-Schultz, a genealogist who teaches at Hagerstown Community College and is a historical society board member.

Read the full article.

For more information, see the society’s website.

FamilySearch Databases Added or Updated From June 28 through August 8, 2016

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The following databases have been added or updated at FamilySearch.org from June 28, 2016 to August 8, 2016

Location – Number of Indexed Records – Date Posted or Updated

Australia, Tasmania, Migrant Files, 1945-1968 – Browse Images – 20 Jul 2016
Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541-1914 – 426,542 – 28 Jul 2016
Czech Republic Land Records, 1450-1889 – Browse Images – 05 Aug 2016
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – Browse Images – 02 Aug 2016
Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 481,724 – 15 Jul 2016
El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1990 – 723,047 – 30 Jun 2016
England and Wales Census, 1851 – 18,369,674 – 03 Aug 2016
France, Seine-Maritime, Rouen, Indexes to Church Records, 1680-1789 – 38,020 – 22 Jul 2016
Hungary Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 469,259 – 05 Jul 2016
Italy, Agrigento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1820-1865 – Browse Images – 26 Jul 2016
Italy, Benevento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1810-1942 – Browse Images – 12 Jul 2016
Italy, Cremona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1744-1942 – 361,876 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Forlì-Cesena, Forlì, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1800-1815, 1866-1930 – 139,112 – 19 Jul 2016
Italy, Nuoro, Nuoro, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1915 – 18,865 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Savona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1813, 1838-1936 – 154,198 – 18 Jul 2016
Norway, Probate Index Cards, 1640-1903 – 194,981 – 01 Aug 2016
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 487,853 – 02 Aug 2016
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 556,500 – 14 Jul 2016
Russia, Tver Church Books, 1722-1918 – 574,803 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1956 – 314,094 – 11 Jul 2016
Spain, Diocese of Cartagena, Catholic Church Records, 1503-1969 – 74,313 – 29 Jun 2016
Spain, Province of Córdoba, Municipal Records, 1509-1947 – 2,131,675 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Málaga, Municipal Records, 1760-1956 – 308,744 – 28 Jul 2016
Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1734-1920 – 2,564,491 – 15 Jul 2016

UNITED STATES DATABASES

United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of Freedmen’s Complaints, 1865-1872 – 140,985 – 03 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Ration Records,1865-1872 – 154,587 – 02 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education, 1865-1872 – 145,374 – 01 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Claim Records, 1865-1872 – 273,418 – 29 Jul 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Records of Persons and Articles Hired, 1865-1872 – 34,998 – 28 Jul 2016

Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957 – 1,785,018 – 28 Jun 2016
District of Columbia, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872 – 90,597 – 03 Aug 2016
Georgia World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945 – 839,636 – 05 Jul 2016
Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950 – 779,774 – 20 Jul 2016
Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967 – 1,069,456 – 19 Jul 2016
Illinois, DeKalb County Land Records, 1838-1927 – 57,179 – 01 Aug 2016
Indiana, Civil Marriages, 1828-1957 – 10,571 – 29 Jun 2016
Indiana Marriages, 1780-1992 – 1,008,158 – 28 Jun 2016
Iowa, Armed Forces Grave Registrations, ca. 1835-1998 – 147,078 – 20 Jul 2016
Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979 – 1,532,533 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky Deaths and Burials, 1843-1970 – 627,320 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954 – 1,317,764 – 05 Jul 2016
Maine Vital Records, 1670-1907 – 1,421,557 – 19 Jul 2016
Maryland County Marriages, 1658-1940 – 106,686 – 11 Jul 2016
Maryland Marriages, 1666-1970 – 227,204 – 05 Jul 2016
Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001 – 2,405,620 – 19 Jul 2016
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 533,517 – 08 Aug 2016
Michigan Probate Records, 1797-1973 – Browse Images – 30 Jun 2016
Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860-1949 – 870,856 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota Marriages, 1849-1950 – 438,331 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota, Clay County, School Census Records, 1909-1962 – 586,237 – 08 Aug 2016
Missouri, Civil Marriages, 1820-1874 – 4,883 – 28 Jun 2016
Missouri, Reports of Separation Notices, 1941-1946 – 316,539 – 07 Jul 2016
Missouri State and Territorial Census Records, 1732-1933 – 109,803 – 21 Jul 2016
Montana, Chouteau County Records, 1876-2011 – 9,505 – 15 Jul 2016
New Jersey, State Census, 1855 – 73,030 – 08 Aug 2016
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 5,487,573 – 03 Aug 2016
New York, Church and Civil Marriages, 1704-1995 – 23,819 – 11 Jul 2016
New York Marriages, 1686-1980 – 767,083 – 11 Jul 2016
North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1979 – 1,207,804 – 19 Jul 2016
North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 – 3,457,243 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio, Summit County, Veteran Burial Cards, 1700-1941 – 5,535 – 28 Jun 2016
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 – 4,709,143 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958 – 2,198,000 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003 – 4,107,607 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962 – 2,548,575 – 19 Jul 2016
Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950 – 2,255,061 – 28 Jun 2016
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages, 1677-1950 – 209,880 – 27 Jul 2016
Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950 – 4,802,418 – 28 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965 – 1,724,715 – 30 Jun 2016
Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1837-1910 – 4,575,333 – 21 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977 – 1,575,573 – 19 Jul 2016
Texas Marriages, 1837-1973 – 1,695,783 – 19 Jul 2016
Utah, Tremonton and Garland Obituaries, 1959-2013 – 18,360 – 03 Aug 2016

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798-1937 – 5,794,949 – 08 Aug 2016

CEMETERIES – WORLDWIDE

BillionGraves Index – 18,780,474 – 28 Jul 2016
Find A Grave Index – 146,748,413 – 11 Jul 2016

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update as of March 14, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:

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There are 25 new collections updated time! Check out Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928, Maryland Church Records 1668-1995, North Carolina Civil Marriages 1763-1868, United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815, United States Freedmen’s Bureau Marriages 1861-1872, and Utah LDS Missionary Registers 1860-1937. Search these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 204,849 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California San Pedro Immigration Office Special Inquiry Records 1930-1936 – 2,736 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Denmark Deeds and Mortgages 1572-1928 – 0 – 2,993,164 – Added images to an existing collection
England Cornwall and Devon Parish Registers 1538-2010 – 11,418 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hawaii Index to Filipino Arrivals to Honolulu 1946 – 7,408 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois Church Marriages 1805-1985 – 9,190 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois Civil Marriages 1833-1889 – 8,975 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 179,181 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Marriages 1811-2007 – 0 – 16,771 – Added images to an existing collection
Maryland Church Records 1668-1995 – 137,984 – 27,644 – New indexed records and images collection
Maryland Piney Point Crew Lists 1950-1956 – 5,429 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Michigan County Marriages Index 1820-1937 – 1,012 – 0 – New indexed records collection
New Jersey Church Records 1675-1970 – 1,144 – 613 – New indexed records and images collection
New Jersey State Census 1865 – 0 – 3,646 – New browsable image collection.
New York New York Soundex to Passenger and Crew Lists 1887-1921 – 5,800 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Civil Marriages 1763-1868 – 53,614 – 4,567 – New indexed records and images collection
Ohio Marriages 1800-1942 – 3,567 – 785 – New indexed records and images collection
Peru Junín Civil Registration 1881-2005 – 87,987 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Spain Province of Cádiz Municipal Records 1784-1956 – 0 – 155,324 – Added images to an existing collection
Tennessee Civil Marriages 1838-1888 – 5,946 – 1,079 – New indexed records and images collection
Texas and Arizona Arrivals 1903-1910 – 59,299 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Marriages 1861-1872 – 34,323 – 599 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records 1812-1815 – 1,130,851 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Utah LDS Missionary Registers 1860-1937 – 48,207 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Virginia Alexandria Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels 1946-1957 – 6,669 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for February 16 & 22, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch Logo 2014

You will find new marriage records from Kansas and Maryland this week along with England Devon Bishop’s Transcripts 1558-1887, England Lancashire Oldham Cemetery Registers 1797-2004, and United States World War II Prisoners of War 1941-1945. I’ve also included updates from February 16 on the following list. Check out all of the marriage records from a variety of states, including New York, Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. Other highlights include New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957, California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949, Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920, and New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943. Find these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

California San Francisco Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving 1954- 1957 – 375,314 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
England Devon Bishop’s Transcripts 1558-1887 – 256,201 – 93,511 – New indexed records and images collection
England Lancashire Oldham Cemetery Registers 1797-2004 – 481,340 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Gary and East Chicago Crew Lists 1945-1956 – 17,094 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kansas County Marriages 1855-1911 – 148,676 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maryland Marriages 1666-1970 – 96,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Delayed and Corrected Vital Records 1753-1900 – 31,701 – 11,788 – New indexed records and images collection
United States World War II Prisoners of War 1941-1945 – 143,374 – 0 – New indexed records collection

BillionGraves Index – 227,783 – 227,783 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Canada British Columbia Marriage Registrations 1859-1932; 1937-1938 – 6,123 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California San Francisco Airplane Arrival Card Index 1936-1949 – 22,858 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
England and Wales Census 1861 – 2,504,271 – 111,092 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
England Durham Diocese Marriage Bonds & Allegations 1692-1900 – 35,079 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Florida and South Carolina Airplane Arrival Manifests 1944-1945 – 0 – 127 – New browsable image collection.
Florida Knights Keys Passenger Lists 1908-1912 – 5,399 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Honduras Civil Registration 1841-1968 – 0 – 609 – Added images to an existing collection
Idaho Birth Index 1861-1911 – 60,430 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Idaho Death Certificates 1938-1961 – 118,152 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Illinois Cook County Deaths 1878-1994 – 3,732,138 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Indiana Marriages 1811-2007 – 276,945 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Bergamo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1901 – 6,965 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 78,629 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 113,690 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Modena Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1942 – 67,474 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Prato Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1923 – 7,183 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Reggio Calabria Civil Registration (State Archive) 1784-1943 – 0 – 2,143,899 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Viterbo Civil Registration (State Archive) 1870-1943 – 90,051 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kansas County Marriages 1855-1911 – 311,857 – 2,333 – Added images to an existing collection
Kansas Marriages 1811-1911 – 185,068 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Liberia Marriage Records 1941-1974 – 24,625 – 24,406 – New browsable image collection.
Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957 – 46,810 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maine Crew List Arriving at Eastport 1949-1958 – 7,239 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maryland County Marriages 1658-1940 – 53,762 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Minnesota County Marriages 1860-1949 – 570,213 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Mississippi Tippah County Marriages 1858-1979 – 19,583 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Missouri County Marriage Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991 – 57,837 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York County Marriages 1847-1848; 1908-1936 – 252,052 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York New York Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted 1917-1957 – 1,270,298 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island) 1891-1924 – 0 – 3,243,611 – New browsable image collection.
New York Passenger Lists 1820-1891 – 30,480 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1943 – 0 – 971 – New browsable image collection.
North Carolina County Marriages 1762-1979 – 1,796 – 1,796 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Dakota Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals 1910-1952 – 11,631 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013 – 92,719 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio Washington County Court Records 1810-1930 – 0 – 6,421 – Added images to an existing collection
Oklahoma County Marriages 1890-1995 – 126,532 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ontario Births 1869-1910 – 125,109 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Crew Lists arriving at Erie 1952-1957 – 44,119 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Áncash Civil Registration 1888-2005 – 0 – 3,146 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Cajamarca Civil Registration 1938-1996 – 0 – 3,175 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984 – 180,213 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Poland Radom Roman Catholic Church Books 1587-1966 – 1,884 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Portugal Portalegre Catholic Church Records 1859-1911 – 4,441 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive) 1838- 1991 – 48,422 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Spain Province of Cádiz Municipal Records 1784-1956 – 0 – 57 – Added images to an existing collection
Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920 – 0 – 189,353 – Added images to an existing collection
Utah County Marriages 1887-1937 – 337,714 – 124,465 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Venezuela Archdiocese of Mérida Catholic Church Records 1654-2013 – 0 – 405,819 – Added images to an existing collection

NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland

“and then on the 3 of March came into Chesapeake bay, at the mouth of the Patomecke, this baye is the most delightfull water I ever saw, between two seet lande, with a channel, 4:5:6:7: and 8 fathoms deepe, some 10 leagues broad, at time of yeare full of fish, yet it doth yeild to Patomecke, which we have made St. Gregories; this is teh sweetest and greatest river have seene, so that the Thames is but a little finder to it, there are noe marshes or swampes about it, but solid firme ground.” — Father Andrew White, S.J.

ngs04This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland; written by Patricia O’Brien Shawker.

“The Chesapeake Bay described by Father White dominates Maryland… At the time of Maryland’s founding, it was increadibly rich in fish and shellfish, a magnet attracting the Europeans…

“Knowledge of the history of Maryland and the nature of the record keeping is essential when conducting genealogical research. As one of the original thirteen colonies, Maryland had 140 years of colonial history and has one of the most complete collections of colonial records.”

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Women of Maryland, you will find the following:

“The Maryland State Archives has three online research aids for women. One is the Women Legislators of Maryland, another is the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame, and the third is Maryland Women Citizen; Women’s History at the Maryland State Archives. All three of these have biographical and genealogical information about women in Maryland. There are more than one hundred items useful for researching women in the Archives’ special collections including the records of women’s clubs in Maryland (minutes and reports) and the records of the Young Women’s Christian Association (directories, minutes, and reports). Other useful records are city directories (which usually list them as a widow), wills, marriage, divorce, church, land, and military pension records. The Maryland Room at the Hornbake Library of the University of Maryland has a resource guide for women, which includes the Female Writer’s of Maryland, Biographies of Women from Maryland, and Maryland Women’s History.”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Authors

Patricia O’Brien Shawker is a professional genealogist and lecturer. She served as the Director of the National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) and has served as the treasurer for the National Genealogical Society.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Enoch Pratt Free Library
  • Maryland Genealogical Society
  • Maryland Historical Society
  • Maryland State Archives
  • Maryland State Law Library
  • National Archives — College Park
  • Other Facilities
  • Other Libraries and Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Archives of Maryland
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Directories
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Census
    • Federal Census
  • City and County Directories
  • County Records
  • Court Records
    • Colonial
    • Post-Colonial
    • After 1851
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Germans American
    • Irish American
    • Jewish American
    • Native American
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Land Grants
    • State Land Grants
    • Subsequent Land Records Transactions – County and Baltimore City Land Records
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Colonial Wars
    • American Revolution
    • War of 1812
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Spanish American War
    • World War I
    • World War II
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
    • Colonial Tax Records
    • Later Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Maryland
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland, are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

New Volumes now Available on White Slave Children in Colonial Maryland & Virginia – Bundled at 15% Off!

White-Slave-Children-bundle-250pw
As I blogged in 2014, soon after Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips wrote his first book on the topic, if you’ve got Maryland or Virginia Colonial roots, you really need to see the results of his research. He’s just written two new books on White Slave Children – many of whom many be our ancestors! Following are descriptions of the three books now in print. Since the first book was so popular, we’ve bundled the 3 volumes at 15% off. This sale runs through Tuesday, January 26. If you only need one or two of the books, you can get them at 10% off. Just click on the links.

Wondering if your ancestors might have been white slave children? As I did in 2014, I will personally check the index for surnames for you. As before, email me with the surname in the subject line of the email. Please – just the surname, no more. I will reply with just one word – yes or no. If Yes – I’ll note which book or books the surname is found in. Those requesting a surname search should note that I will not be able to reply on Saturday or Sunday, but will make the reply on Monday. Send index checking requests to me at Lmeitzler@gmail.com .

GPC-4608-White-Slave-Children
Picking up where he left off in his ground-breaking book Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips has now taken the story back even further – back to the scenes of the original crimes-kidnapping of children to be sold into slavery (ca. 1660-1720). This new book is entitled White Slave Children Of Colonial Maryland And Virginia: Birth And Shipping Records.

In his original book, which I found to be most helpful, Dr. Phillips identified 5,290 “servants” without indentures, transported against their will. He culled that evidence from the Court Order Books of colonial Maryland and Virginia, where the county courts were authorized to examine the children, adjudge their ages, and sentence them to slavery for a number of years. The younger the child, the longer the sentence. In this book, compiled from shipping records found in the Library of Congress, the Bristol [England] Record Office, and elsewhere, the author has identified 170 ships that carried white slave children to the plantations of colonial Maryland and Virginia. The shipping records itemize the unfortunate kids as “cargo” and specify the import duties paid to the Royal Naval Officers for each child. The white slave ships sailed from no fewer than seventeen ports of departure in England.

The places from which the children were taken and their adjudged ages on the dates of their court appearances have enabled Dr. Phillips to conduct a targeted search of the birth and baptismal records. In all, he has matched more than 1,400 children with the parish or town records. The book also contains an exposé of the colonial shipping industry. Among the child traffickers were the Mayors of Bristol and Bideford and the Governor of Virginia.

Birth and Shipping Records – which begins with a detailed discussion of the author’s sources and detective-like methodology and concludes with a surname index – is arranged according to the localities in the British Isles from which the victims were confiscated. It is a volume that will help researchers trace their white slave heritage back even further than before, and it cries out for correctives to be written in American history books regarding our colonial origins and our treatment of one another.

Click here to order at 10% off. Sale runs through January 26.

Click here to order a bundle of the three books at 15% off, plus a $2 shipping savings. Sale runs through January 26.

—–
GPC4609-White-Slave-children-Charles-County-200pw
Also brand new from Dr. Phillips is White Slave Children Of Charles County, Maryland: The Search For Survivors. In this second companion volume to Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (see also White Slave Children of Colonial Maryland and Virginia: Birth and Shipping Records), Dr. Richard Hayes Phillips takes the story forward–examining the treatment of children kidnapped and sold into slavery, and identifying those who survived.

In his original book Dr. Phillips identified 5,290 “servants” without indentures, transported against their will to places in Virginia and Maryland, including Charles County. For this book Dr. Phillips has indexed seventy-five years of handwritten records from Charles County, Maryland (1658-1733). The records are nearly complete and most have never been transcribed before–872 “servants” without indentures were brought to this county, and 333 were owned by the judges on the very court that sentenced them to slavery.

This book contains three indexes–with detailed abstracts–to Charles County servants with or without indentures (recaptured runaways, petitions for freedom, complaints of abuse or neglect), and six indexes to all residents of the county (vital records, witnesses who stated their ages, grantee index to deeds, gifts of livestock, deaths and estates, and orphan children). Most of these records have been microfilmed, scanned, and posted online by the Archives of Maryland. With brief citations, the reader is steered to online images of actual handwritten records.

All nine new indexes have been cross-checked with Dr. Phillips’ master list of 872 “servants” without indentures, from which he has compiled an Encyclopedia of Survivors. This section of the work, one of the longest, assembles all that is known about the lives of the children following their release from servitude. Many of these biographical sketches trace descendants for several generations, refer to acquisitions of land, and contain other details useful to genealogists. The alphabetically arranged chapter entitled Vital Records is a godsend for anyone tracing Charles County roots, whether or not your ancestor suffered white enslavement. Dr. Phillips has also included full-fledged biographies of three of the worst abusers of child labor among the county officials, an exposé of how the system of white slavery operated, and instances of resistance by the survivors. Thus begins the dark era of white slavery on the North American continent.

Click here to order at 10% off. Sale runs through January 26.

Click here to order a bundle of the three books at 15% off, plus a $2 shipping savings. Sale runs through January 26.

——–

As most of my readers know, Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records, is one of my favorite source books. It was published in 2013, and I refer to it regularly when researching my Maryland and Virginia families. Following is a review I did of the book when it first appeared:

Every parent has the fear that their child might disappear. And I can tell you that grandparents also have the same fear. As a grandparent of 3 small children, when they are under my care, I watch them like the proverbial hawk.

Believe it or not, based on an English law passed in 1659, minor children could be kidnapped by justices of the peace if they happened to be begging, or just seemed to be vagrant. These children were shipped to the plantations as servants without indentures. According to the author of “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Viginia),” the younger the child, the longer the sentence, and the county courts were the judges of their ages. The judges decided their age – and many of the kids were placed in servitude to the very judges who sentenced them.

Over 5000 children were picked up in Ireland, Scotland, England and New England, and shipped to Virginia and Maryland between 1660 to 1720. The names of these kids, their assigned age, the owner, and the date they appeared in court are found in Richard Phillips brand new book, “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Virginia).” The book also contains an index to ships and their captains that imported the children. A surname index is included.

Without-Indentures

I got really excited about the volume when, on page, 88, I found an entry for Charles County, Maryland that reads thus: Cornute, Hendrick, 14 June 1670, age 20, John Okeane. I’ve got to wonder, is this possibly a progenitor, sibling or cousin pertaining to my Cornute/Cornett family line? This Cornute is on of the earliest I’ve seen in America. This is a lead I didn’t have before.

Exacting information is given in the book as to where to locate digitized, microfilmed and in some cases original copies of the County Court books from where to the information for this book was taken. Now I can take the next step and view the original document. In my Cornute case mentioned above, the data is actually digitizing and available online!

The following is from the table of contents:

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for October 5, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Major additions this week to the United States World War II Draft Registration Cards 1942, Brazil Sao Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980, Colombia Catholic Church Records 1576-2014, Italy Asti Civil Registration (State Archive) 1803-1814 1911-1935, Maryland Baltimore Passenger Lists 1820-1948, Massachusetts Boston Crew Lists 1811-1921, and New Zealand Archives New Zealand Probate Records 1843-1997 collections. Twelve additional collections were also updated this week. See the table below for details.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 991,910 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 0 – 13,738 – Added images to an existing collection
Colombia Catholic Church Records 1576-2014 – 0 – 1,377,861 – Added images to an existing collection
Honduras Civil Registration 1841-1968 – 178,391 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Asti Civil Registration (State Archive) 1803-1814 1911-1935 – 0 – 279,461 – New browsable image collection
New Zealand Archives New Zealand Probate Records 1843-1997 – 0 – 724,182 – Added images to an existing collection
Nicaragua Civil Registration 1809-2013 – 0 – 17,580 – Added images to an existing collection
Peru Cusco Civil Registration 1889-1997 – 176,344 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
California San Diego Airplane Passenger and Crew Lists 1929-1954 – 47,380 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Idaho County Birth and Death Records 1883-1929 – 33,063 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky Confederate Pension Applications 1912-1950 – 25,786 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Maryland Baltimore Passenger Lists 1820-1948 – 873,918 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Boston Crew Lists 1811-1921 – 424,219 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Missouri County Marriage Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991 – 29,690 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Missouri County Marriage Naturalization and Court Records 1800-1991 – 3,961 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Montana Cascade County Records 1880-2009 – 79,821 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Montana Teton County Records 1881-2012 – 11,394 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Utah Weber County Marriages 1887-1939 – 94,859 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Headstone Applications for U.S. Military Veterans 1925-1949 – 352,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States World War II Draft Registration Cards 1942 – 1,067,147 – 1,067,143 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Maryland Genealogies, in Two Volumes — 15% OFF

cf3735Maryland Genealogies, a two volume set, contains all the family history articles published in the Maryland Historical Magazine from its inception through 1976. The magazine was produced by the Maryland Historical Society. The families found in these articles “arrived, for the most part, in the early colonial period,” but are not limited to just British families. There are also know German and French families, along with some Jewish families.

“Most of the articles begin with the first member of the family in Maryland and trace descendants in the male line down to the early eighteenth century. “While most of the articles reprinted here are family lineages, tracing all lines of descent in the male line from a common ancestor, there are other types of articles as well. For example, there are Bible records…A few articles discuss in great detail the various theories concerning the origin of the immigrant ancestor…A third type of article deals with families from the same locality who are closely related through a series of marriages.”

According to Robert Barnes, author of the introduction, “since they have been largely inaccessible to the researcher, we have excerpted these articles in entirety and rearranged them in this comprehensive two-volume work, adding an introduction by a noted Maryland genealogist and personal name indexes.”

The consolidated articles–nearly 100 in number–now form a reference work of a type long needed in Maryland genealogy, with the range and scholarly authority demanded by the researcher. Based on the index, the names listed below are just some of the surnames found in the books, with an estimated 14,000 total names listed.

 

Copies of this two volume set, Maryland Genealogies, are available from Family Roots Publishing. Now, 15% OFF for a Limited Time

 

Following is a list of the families named in the titles to the various articles:

  • Abington
  • Auld
  • Ball
  • Bartlett
  • Belt
  • Berry
  • Bladen
  • Blakistone
  • Bonvile
  • Brengle
  • Briscoe
  • Brooke
  • Caile
  • Calvert
  • Chew
  • Christison
  • Churchill
  • Clements
  • Cohen
  • Coplestone
  • Croker
  • Cromwell
  • Dent
  • Dixon
  • Dorsey
  • Dunn
  • Egerton
  • Ellicot
  • Elliott
  • Emory
  • Fairfax
  • Faris
  • Fox
  • Foxworthy
  • Frisby
  • Fritchie
  • Frith
  • Gary
  • Gerard
  • Gist
  • Goldsborough
  • Gordon
  • Gough-Carroll
  • Hall
  • Harrison
  • Harwood
  • Haskins
  • Hausil
  • Hawley-Halley
  • Highland
  • Hollyday
  • Hungerford
  • Hynson
  • Jones
  • Kemp
  • Key
  • Lambdin
  • Lane
  • LeCompte
  • Lee
  • Levis
  • Linthicum
  • Lloyd
  • Loockerman
  • Lowe
  • Lowndes
  • MacKeeles
  • Marsh
  • Merryman
  • Monroe
  • Morgan
  • Murdock
  • Neale
  • Owens-Owings
  • Pearce-Levy
  • Pennock
  • Plater
  • Poe
  • Price
  • Pritchett
  • Randall
  • Ridgely
  • Rigbie
  • Rockhold
  • Sewall
  • Sharpe
  • Skinner
  • Smallwood
  • Smith
  • Snead
  • Sparrow
  • Sprigg
  • Stansbury
  • Stevens
  • Stewart
  • Sweetser
  • Tasker
  • Taylor
  • Tilghman
  • Todd
  • Webb
  • Weems
  • West
  • Winchester-Owens-Owings-Price
  • Wise
  • Wrightson
  •  Young-Woodward-Hesselius

FamilySearch Adds Over 3.7 Million Indexed Records & Images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch adds more than 3.7 million indexed records and images to Australia, Canada, Isle of Man, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,395,009 images from the Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993 collection; the 396,405 images and 396,405 indexed records from the US, BillionGraves Index collection; and the 389,387 indexed records from the South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Australia, New South Wales, Census (fragment), 1841 – 1,385 – 2,249 – New browsable image collection.

Canada, Nova Scotia Probate Records, 1760–1993 – 0 – 1,395,009 – New browsable image collection.

Isle of Man, Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598–2009 – 0 – 44,050 – Added images to an existing collection.

South Africa, Church of the Province of South Africa, Parish Registers, 1801–2004 – 389,387 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, BillionGraves Index – 396,405 – 396,405 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, California, San Mateo County, Colma, Italian Cemetery Records, 1899–2011 – 0 – 91 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Idaho, Lincoln County Records, 1886–1972 – 0 – 1,232 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Kentucky Death Records, 1911–1961 – 173,963 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, Orleans Court Records, 1822–1880 – 0 – 7,376 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, Orleans Parish Will Books, 1805–1920 – 0 – 1,829 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Louisiana, State Penitentiary Records, 1866–1963 – 0 – 78 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999 – 0 – 17,565 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, New Hampshire, Cheshire County, Probate Estate Files, 1886–1900 – 0 – 3,926 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Ohio, Crawford County Church Records, 1853–2007 – 0 – 695 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932 – 0 – 152,511 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Ohio, Licking County, Hartford Township Records, 1881–1962 – 0 – 989 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Northern District, Eastern Division, Naturalization Index, 1855–1967 – 0 – 196,148 – New browsable image collection.

US, Tennessee, Cocke County Records, 1860–1930 – 0 – 3,659 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Utah, Cache County Records, 1861–1955 – 0 – 3,045 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009 – 328,371 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Virginia, Isle of Wight County Records, 1634–1951 – 0 – 115 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Washington, County Marriages, 1855–2008 – 0 – 202,454 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Washington, Pierce County Marriage Returns, 1891–1950 – 0 – 732 – Added images to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 10M Indexed Records & Images for Canada, Czech Republic, Ukraine, & USA

The following was received from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch has added more than 10 million indexed records and images to collections from Canada, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, New Zealand, South Korea, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 3,427,354 indexed records from the Canada Census, 1911, collection; the 1,334,575 image records from the Czech Republic, Censuses, 1800–1945, collection; and the 2,545,965 indexed records from U.S., Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864–2007 , collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Canada Census, 1911 – 3,427,354 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Czech Republic, Censuses, 1800-1945 – 0 – 1,334,575 – Added images to an existing collection.

Dominican Republic, Civil Registration, 1801–2010 – 0 – 199,481 – Added images to an existing collection.

New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records, 1848–1991 – 145,146 – 145,146 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

South, Korea, Collection of Genealogies, 1500–2012 – 0 – 143,281 – Added images to an existing collection.

Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1840–1845 – 386,265 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Idaho, Southeast Counties Obituaries, 1864–2007 – 2,545,965 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Idaho, Southern Counties Obituaries, 1943–2013 – 585,880 – 52,677 – New indexed records and images collection.

U.S., Maine, State Archive Collections, 1718–1957 – 0 – 83,424 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Maryland, Register of Wills Records, 1629–1999 – 0 – 70,174 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Mormon Migration Database, 1840–1932 – 143,658 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., New York, Queens County Probate Records, 1785–1950 – 0 – 241,319 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813–1932 – 0 – 221,657 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Utah Obituary Index – 372,279 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., Utah, Obituaries from Utah Newspapers, 1850–2005 – 511,361 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

U.S., Virginia, African-American Funeral Programs, 1920–2009 – 0 – 22,727 – New browsable image collection.

Genealogy at a Glance: Maryland Genealogy Research

Maryland-At-a-Glance-200pwThe new guide,Genealogy at a Glance: Maryland Genealogy Research, by Michael A. Ports offers a lengthy background compared with many similar guides. Lengthy, of course, is relative. Here it means four paragraphs and just less than half a page. Small as it is, the background still provides great information and insight on who settled this key colony and how it grew.

Maryland was a rapid growing colony, due in large part to religious tolerance. It grew as colonists from multiple countries and multiple beliefs migrated to Maryland. These peoples created a wide variety of records. This guide offers a summerization of key resources and record types. Additional reading suggestions offer the reader many additional sources for looking in greater depth at given resources. There are also author tips spread throughout the guide.

Like many of the guides, this one begins with some quick facts relevant to the subject, which include:

  • King Charles I granted the charter for all of the lands between the fortieth parallel and the south bank of the Potomac River to George Calvert in 1632, and Maryland thus became the first proprietary colony in North America
  • Religious toleration officially ended with a Puritan revolt in 1654-1658

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color limited brochure meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research. In this guide, Humphrey provides plenty of additional tips and further references to please the most avid researcher.

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Settlement Background

Record Sources

  • Vital Records
  • Court Records before 1776
  • Criminal Records
  • Land Records
  • Probate Records
  • Military Records

Supplementary Resources

  • Divorce Records
  • Adoption Records
  • Naturalization Records

Major Repositories

Online Resources

Additional Reading

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Maryland Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing.

FamilySearch Adds Over 4.1 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Belgium, Canada, Portugal, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 4.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Belgium, Canada, Portugal, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 799,816 images from the new U.S., Maryland, Baltimore Passenger Lists Index, 1820-1897, collection, the 579,177 images from the new U.S., Massachusetts, Boston Passenger Lists Index, 1899-1940, collection, and the 532,591 images from the new U.S., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Passenger Lists Index, 1800-1906, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Namur, Civil Registration, 1800-1912 – 0 – 12,786 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, Saskatchewan Provincial Records, 1879-1987 – 0 – 273,641 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Santarém, Catholic Church Records, 1544-1911 – 0 – 593,036 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Idaho, Elmore County Records, 1889-1972 – 0 – 26,811 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Maine, Nathan Hale Cemetery Collection, ca. 1780-1980 – 0 – 350,478 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Maryland, Baltimore Passenger Lists Index, 1820-1897 – 0 – 799,816 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Massachusetts, Boston Passenger Lists Index, 1899-1940 – 0 – 579,177 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Massachusetts, Worcester County, Probate Files, 1731-1881 – 0 – 142,050 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Montana, Toole County Records, 1913-1960 – 0 – 79,300 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., New Hampshire, Death Certificates, 1938-1959 – 0 – 90,827 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Ohio, Cuyahoga County Probate Files, 1813-1917 – 0 – 220,787 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Ohio, Trumbull County Court Records, 1795-2010 – 0 – 78,845 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Oregon, Grant County Records, 1851-1992 – 0 – 199,385 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Oregon, Harney County Records, 1870-1991 – 0 – 111,750 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Passenger Lists Index, 1800-1906 – 0 – 532,591 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Wisconsin, Milwaukee Naturalization Index, 1848-1990 – 71,819 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.