Group Cleans Up an Old Texas Cemetery

The following was posted March 25, 2017 at the Longview News-Journal website.

A group of volunteers met Saturday near Easton to clean up a cemetery dating back to the 1800s and that has fallen into disrepair.

Jeanne Collins, board member of the Gregg County Historical Commission and chairwoman of the commission’s Cemetery Preservation Committee, organized the cleanup in hopes of preserving history and learning about the people buried there.

“It’s important for the whole historical preservation of our society that we maintain cemeteries,” Collins said. “It’s history; it’s the state of Texas. These represent the genealogy of people that used to live in this area.”

Camden Cemetery is tucked away in the woods near Easton, where the former community of Camden, otherwise known as Walling’s Ferry, used to be.

Read the full article.

R.I.P. Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack – 1920-2017

The following excerpt is from the obituary of Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack – posted at the mailtribune.com website March 26, 2017.

Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack, 96, passed away peacefully March 5, 2017, with two of her sons and her primary caregiver nearby. Jean was born June 5, 1920, in the small town of Ossian, Iowa. After reading all the books in her school and many in a local lawyer’s library, she graduated from high school and went to the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana at age 16, staying with an uncle. She started out as a Chemistry major, graduated with a B.S. in Home Economics, and then earned an M.Sc. in Nutrition from the same university. In 1939, at age 19, she married Arthur C. Maack, a graduate student at the University. Their marriage lasted 50 years, until Arthur’s death December 19, 1989, and produced four sons…

Jean was for many years an ardent and skilled genealogist, tracing her own family’s Nicholson/Harvey ancestry back to the middle ages and publishing articles in genealogical journals. She served on the Board of the Rogue Valley Genealogical Society. There is a Jean Maack Collection in the Society’s Library.

Read the full obituary.

Arkansas SAR to Honor Revolutionary War Soldier, Asher Bagley Sr., April 8 2017

The following excerpt is from an article posted at arkansasonline.com

Members of two chapters of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will mark the grave of Revolutionary War soldier Asher Bagley Sr. on April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery in Saline County. Preparing for the memorial event are, from left, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud, Bagley’s third great-grandson, past state SAR president and past president of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter, SAR; Larry Hartzinger of Hot Springs Village, treasurer, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; Charles McLemore of Joplin in Montgomery County, president, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; and Jimmie Weber of Diamondhead, secretary, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter. Photo by: Matt Johnson.

Asher Bagley Sr. served in the American Revolution as a private in the first New Jersey Regiment. Following the war, he settled in Saline County in about 1828 near the community known as Bland. He is buried in the Old Union Cemetery in that community.

His third great-grandson, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud in White County, and other members of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will remember Bagley in a grave-marking ceremony at 11 a.m. April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery.

Descendants of Bagley and members of the public are invited to attend the event, which is co-sponsored by the Casimir Pulaski and DeSoto Trace chapters of the Arkansas Society SAR.

Read the full article.

Georgetown University Employee Learns the University Sold His Ancestor

The following teaser is from a must-read article posted at the New York Times website on March 24.

Jeremy Alexander, a Georgetown employee, recently discovered that his paternal great-great-great-grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at the university in 1838. Credit: Paul Jones/Georgetown University

As a Georgetown employee, Jeremy Alexander watched as the university grappled with its haunted past: the sale of slaves in 1838 to help rescue it from financial ruin.

He listened as Georgetown’s president apologized for its sins and looked for ways to make amends. And Mr. Alexander observed, with wonder, some of the slave descendants when they visited the campus.

What he did not know at the time: He was one of them.

Mr. Alexander’s paternal great-great-great grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at Georgetown for about $115,000, or $3.3 million in today’s dollars. She and her two young children were enslaved at a plantation in Ascension Parish, La.

Read the full article.

Two Lisa Louise Cooke Titles Bundled & Again Reduced 25% – Google Toolbox & Mobile Genealogy

FRPC has purchased a special shipment of Lisa Louise Cooke’s two most popular titles, and bundled them for quick sale. We’ve again reduced the price 25% on the bundle, making it just $33.71 (reg. $44.95). We’re again running the promo – this time through April 4, or until we run out of stock – whichever comes first.

The books are:

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page and click on this link or the illustration to order the bundle.

Need only one of them? Order either one at their respective site, and get 20% off on that item alone.

Following is the review of The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox that I wrote a while back.

I have used Lisa Louise Cooke’s 2011 first edition of The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox regularly in the last several years, and found it extremely helpful. The Second Edition is even more so. When it comes to tracing your family tree online, you need the right tools to get the job done. In The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, Lisa helps you stuff your genealogy toolbox with FREE state-of-the-art Internet tools that are built to search, translate, message, and span the globe. You’ll travel outside the genealogy community and straight to the folks who dominate the online world: Google. A lot has changed since the first edition was published in 2011 (see list at the bottom of this post), and it’s all documented step-by-step in this second Edition.

Following is a list of the chapters found in the volume:

  • Introduction, Getting Ready to build Your Family Tree Fast
  • Chapter 1: Search Tools
  • Chapter 2: Basic & Advanced Search
  • Chapter 3: Search Strategies for High-Quality Results
  • Chapter 4: Site Search & Resurrecting Websites
  • Chapter 5: Image Search
  • Chapter 6: Common Surname Searches
  • Chapter 7: Google Alerts
  • Chapter 8: Gmail
  • Chapter 9: Google Books
  • Chapter 10: Google News Archive
  • Chapter 11: Google scholar
  • Chapter 12: Google Patents
  • Chapter 13: Google Translate
  • Chapter 14: YouTube
  • Chapter 15: Google Earth: An Overview
  • Chapter 16: Google Earth: Ancestral Homes & Locations
  • Chapter 17: Google Earth: Organizing & Sharing
  • Chapter 18: Google Earth: Historic Images & Maps
  • Chapter 19: Google Earth: Plotting Your Ancestor’s Homestead
  • Chapter 20: Google Earth: Adding Family History Content
  • Chapter 21: Google Earth: Family History Tour Maps
  • Appendix: Find it Quick: The “How To” Index

I love this guidebook, and recommend it to anyone who wants to get more use of the online “tools” available to them. Check out the items that are new, expanded or updated in the Second Edition.

  • Google Search: Put an end to fruitless searches forever – UPDATED!
  • Searching Common Surnames – NEW!
  • Google Alerts: Your personal genealogy research assistant – UPDATED!
  • Gmail: Never lose another email – EXPANDED!
  • Google Books: The world’s history at your fingertips – UPDATED!
  • Google News Archives: Free digitized historic newspapers – UPDATED!
  • Google Patents: Research the inventor in your family – NEW!
  • Google Scholar: Explore the world’s most scholarly sources – NEW!
  • Google Translate: Explore foreign language websites – UPDATED!
  • YouTube: Build your own genealogy channel – NEW!
  • Google Earth: Rock Your Ancestor’s World – EXPANDED!

Following is a review of Mobile Genealogy, written some time ago…

Finally – we have a great new guide for those of us who use mobile devices! This book takes the place of Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse, written by Lisa Louise Cooke in 2012. The iPad volume was becoming dated, and mobile devices of all kinds have sprung up since the publication of that book. Not only are folks using iPads & iPhones for genealogy, but many of us are using devices that run Android operating systems. I never felt the need for an iPad, but I’ve been using the iPhone and Android smart phones for years. I’m currently using a Samsung Android smart phone that I’m very pleased with. I use it for all kinds of genealogy applications.

Mobile Genealogy’s coverage of Android as well as Apple, makes this book twice as valuable a guide as Lisa’s previous book. Think iOS as well as Android. And Lisa’s use of step-by-step instructions (for us computer tech dummies!), as well as a myriad of high-quality illustrations make the book an educational delight. I can honestly say that this volume is changing the way I use my devices, allowing me to find more ancestors, and other relatives – and it’s saving me TIME – something I have begun to value at my age. (grin)

Access the Computer On Your Desk at Home!
Chapter 15 covers using your mobile device to access your home computer. I’ll bet most of you never even considered connecting to your PC with your smart phone. Yes – it’s possible, and Lisa gives step-by-step instructions on how to do that too! So – whether you are using a tablet, or a smart phone, you can access stuff that’s 1000 miles away – or maybe just around the corner.

Screen Capture on my Smart Phone?!
Chapter 4 really gets into the nitty-gritty of better browsing with your mobile device. Although covered in Lisa’s 2012 iPad book, this chapter takes the subject to a whole new level. Her section on mobile web-clipping and screen capture was a great help to me. I’ve always had problems with screen capture and had basically given up on it. Now I know what to do!

Translation Strategies
Lisa’s section on translation strategies in Chapter 10 just opened up a world of new data for me – and it can for you. She explains how the Google Translate App from the App Store or Google Play can be used for capturing data on your ancestor from foreign-language books – translated into English so you can actually read it! Yes – we all know the shortcomings of translation programs, but I am happy to accept anything dealing with my ancestors, and the towns they lived in, even if the English is a bit messy. Think Google Books here folks – loaded with stuff on our ancestors, much of which we can’t read! You can even use your phone’s camera to capture, OCR, and translate any words or phrases! Lisa takes the reader step-by step through how to use the marvelous technology that’s resting in your hand!

Following is an expanded Table of Contents for the volume.

INTRODUCTION

  • A Few Tips for Using the Book

PART ONE: GETTING STARTED

  • Chapter One: The Tablet Mindset
    • Tablet Mindset Guidelines
    • App Consolidation
  • Chapter Two: Genealogy Task Wish List

PART TWO: APPS

  • Chapter 3: There’s An App for That!
    • App Store
    • Google Play Store
    • Staying Up to Date – App Resources
  • Chapter 4: Browsing
    • Safari
    • Chrome
    • Google
    • Dolphin
  • Chapter 5: Note Taking
    • Evernote
    • Notes
    • Pages
    • Microsoft Word
    • Google Docs
  • Chapter 6: File Storage & Management
    • Dropbox
    • Google Drive
    • iCloud
  • Chapter 7: Audio
    • Memos
    • Evernote
  • Chapter 8: Photos
    • Capturing Photos
    • Photomyne Pro – Album Scanner
    • Storing and Organizing Photos
    • iCloud Photo Library
    • Google Photos
    • Working with Photos
    • Adobe Photoshop Express
    • Color Splash for iPad
    • Android Alternative to Color Splash for iPad: Color Splash FX
    • Retype
    • Pocketbooth
  • Chapter 9: Reading
    • Reading Content from the Web
    • Flipboard
    • Feedly
    • Reading eBooks and Documents
    • GoodReader
    • Play Books
    • iBooks
  • Chapter 10: Collaboration & Communication
    • Facebook
    • Skype
    • FaceTime
    • Google Translate
  • Chapter 11: Travel
  • Chapter 12: Genealogy
    • Ancestry
    • MyHeritage
    • Reunion for iPad
    • RootsMagic
    • Families
    • Family Tree
    • FamilySearch Memories
  • Chapter 13: Education & Information
    • Podcasts (Audio)
    • Genealogy Gems
    • Video
  • Chapter 14: Captivating Non-Genealogists
    • Pic Collage
    • Google Earth
    • Pinterest
    • THIS DAY in My Family History
    • Little Family Tree

PART THREE: BECOME A POWER USER

  • Chapter 15: Power Boost Your Tablet: Remote Access
    • Chrome Remote Desktop
  • Chapter 16: Mobile Tips & Tricks
    • New Features
    • Keyboard and Gesture Tips and Tricks
    • Navigation Tips and Tricks
    • Voice Command
    • Functionality Tips and Tricks
    • App Related Tips and Tricks

PART FOUR: CONCLUSION

  • Chapter 17: Mobile Genealogy Means Adventurous Genealogy
  • About the Author

Many Irish Immigrants Lost Their Lives in the Building of the C&O Canal

The following excerpt is from an informative article dealing with Washington County, Maryland, and the Irish immigrants who worked on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, many settling in the area. Disease was not well understood in the early 19th-century, leading to the early demise of many immigrants who were just looking for a better life. Read the full article, from the Washington County Historical Society, to learn much more.

Even when we do reflect on the hardships faced by Irish immigrants to America, we tend to think mostly of places like Boston or New York City, where Irish heritage and culture have gained a lasting footprint. But Washington County was home to large groups of Irish immigrants, brought to the area specifically to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. This, to put it plainly, was a hard and often deadly life. Because of the hard labor and poor working conditions, daily life along the canal was filled with injury, disease and violence.

The process of building the C&O Canal was a struggle from the very beginning. This area had a bad reputation for ill health during the summers, and a lot of competition for labor from the agricultural sector. Finding workers to build the canal was a difficult and costly prospect, and so the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co. looked toward imported labor from Great Britain.

Read the full article at the heraldmailmedia.com website.

Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Second Edition – Offer extended at 15% Off – both Print & eBook

Following eight years of sales, Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists has been updated and revised in a new Second Edition. Written by William Dollarhide, and initially published in 2009, this book has consistently been a best seller for Family Roots Publishing. This new edition was much needed and after months of work, Bill got the book revised and it’s now available.

This new Second Edition contains many updates. Since the first edition in 2009, over 200 of the 265 Internet addresses alone within the volume changed! Virtually every state section of the book had to be updated and revised. Another major change of many pages within the book dealt with the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), which is now found exclusively at FindMyPast.org.

To celebrate the launch of the new book, Family Roots Publishing is discounting it 15% and making it available as not only a printed volume, but as a PDF eBook besides. The earlier sale of the book – allowing 15% off on the print, as well as the PDF eBook edition has been renewed. Purchase your copy today!

Click here to purchase the Printed Book. Just $29.71 (plus $5.50 p&h) – Reg. $34.95 (plus $5.50 p&h).

Click here to purchase the PDF eBook, with an immediate download. Just $20.36 – Reg. $23.95.

Most genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. This new volume by William Dollarhide identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories are identified within this book:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories
  • The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

Online Resources

Libraries & Archives

Order this new volume by clicking on the illustration or the link below.
Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists – Second Edition; by William Dollarhide; 2017; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp; ISBN#: 9781933194455; Item # FR0113

Defending the Israelite Ancestry of Ethiopian Jews

The following excerpt is from the March 21, 2017 article posted at OnlineEthiopia.net:

The Ethiopian Jews, who primarily relocated from Ethiopia to Israel through Israeli rescue missions in the 1980s, form a unique minority of today’s Israeli population. Back In Ethiopia, they were known as Falasha, meaning “strangers”, and have referred to themselves as Beta Israel, or “the house of Israel”. Their settlements were scattered in the northwestern area of Ethiopia and the border zone with the Sudan.

The approach and methodology of the conventional theory on the origins of the Ethiopian Jewry, as proposed by James Quirin, rejects the existence of an ancestral connection between the contemporary Ethiopian Jewish community and the ancient Israelite-Jews. Proponents of this theory trace the origins of the group to what they perceive as a local Ethiopian separatist movement within Christianity in the 14th-to-16th century.

Read the full article.

Cellular Research Institute Ventures into Ancestry Testing with the Launch of CRI Genetics

The following news release is from ABNewsWire:

Cellular Research Institute has recently introduced CRI Genetics, the organization’s Genetics division dedicated to helping individuals find out key information pertaining to their ancestry. Led by seasoned researcher Alexei Fedorov, CRI Genetics is now offering the most advanced DNA testing kit on the market.

March 25th, 2017 – Cellular Research Institute, a team of researchers dedicated to providing accurate information about research, medicine, and the environment, has recently introduced their Genetics division. Operating under the name CRI Genetics, this new division is now offering a DNA testing kit to help people find out their detailed family history based on Genealogy and Anthropology.

CRI Genetics is headed by Alexei Fedorov, an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Director of Bioinformatics Lab at The University of Toledo. With over thirty-five years of experience in the field of human genome behind him, Dr. Fedorov now helps people understand their ancestry in the most personal way possible.

The personal DNA testing kit from CRI Genetics comes with detailed instructions. The users are only required to gently rub their cheek with the provided cotton swab, seal it in the provided bag, register it online, and mail it to CRI Genetics. The samples are tested in a CILA accredited laboratory using patented DNA analysis software. The reports containing the users’ BioGeographical ancestry can be accessed online after 6-8 weeks.

Some key attributes of CRI Genetics DNA testing kits are:

• CRI Genetics’ primary service is an Autosomal DNA test where each sample is tested against thousands of DNA samples from populations all around the world to determine an individual’s BioGeographical Ancestry. This is done on the basis of 176 relevant genetic markers.
• Customers need not pay any monthly subscription fee for using CRI Genetics’ DNA testing kit. CRI Genetics also provides an Efficiency Guarantee, offering customers a complete refund if the reports are not available within eight weeks.

Within a very short period of time, many men and women have used CRI Genetics’ DNA testing kit with great satisfaction. Highlighting his experience, a highly impressed user mentioned, “CRI Genetics has helped me make incredible discoveries about my family that I never would have known before. I grew up thinking that that family was French and found out that were actually German.”

To find out more about CRI Genetics and their DNA testing kit, please visit http://crigenetics.com/

About CRI Genetics:

CRI Genetics is a team of Geneticists, Anthropologists, and Social Scientists, who work together to deliver an accurate estimation of people’s ancestry. A division of Cellular Research Institute, CRI Genetics is headed by noted researcher and human genome specialist Alexei Fedorov.

FREE 5-Day Western European Family History Conference – Both Online and On-Site in Salt Lake City

Oh, Wow! FamilySearch is doing another week-long series of FREE classes – all dealing with Western European research. It looks like classes are being offered dealing with research in Germany, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands, and Switzerland. Check out the class titles below. If you can make the time, I’d highly advise stopping and taking those classes that look interesting to you. These classes are available as streaming webinars, or as on-site classes in the classrooms at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Patty and I took a series of similar classes when they were offered last fall, and learned all kinds of things. The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (26 March 2017), FamilySearch’s world-renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be offering its free Western European Family History Conference, May 15 to May 19, 2017. Guests can attend classes in person or online. The conference will focus exclusively on select Western European research and is intended for beginning and intermediate researchers. Classes are free, but registration is required due to class size and webinar bandwidth limitations. For more information or to register, go to FamilySearch Wiki. Easily find and share this news release online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

Classes will be taught by the Family History Library’s staff of experts and guest genealogists. Content will focus primarily on how to research records from Germany, France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Belgium. Topics addressed will include census, church, immigration, and vital records.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Use the following links to register for deisired conference classes online or in the library: in-person guests or webinar guests.

DATE / TIME – CLASS (SKILL LEVEL) – WEBINAR | CLASSROOM

  • Mon, 15-May, 9:00 AM – Finding German Places of Origin (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 10:15 AM – Spelling Variations in German Given and Place Names (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 11:30 AM – Meyers German Gazetteer Now Online, Indexed and Fully Searchable (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 2:00 PM – German Church Records and Beyond: Deepen Your Research – Using a Variety of Town Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Mon, 15-May, 3:15 PM – Elusive Immigrant: Methods of Proving Identity (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 9:00 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 1 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 10:15 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 2 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 11:30 AM – Finding Your French Ancestors Online Part 3 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 2:00 PM – Out of the Ashes of Paris (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Tue, 16-May, 3:15 PM – Research in Alsace-Lorraine (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 9:00 AM – Latin for Researchers (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 10:15 AM – Calendar Changes in France, Germany, Switzerland, and the Low Countries (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 11:30 AM – Gazetteers and Maps for Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 2:00 PM – Beginning Research in Luxembourg (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Wed, 17-May, 3:15 PM – Beginning Research in Belgium (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 9:00 AM – Names in Belgium and the Netherlands (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 10:15 AM – WieWasWie, Past the Index: What to do Next (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thur, 18-May, 11:30 AM – Dutch Provincial and City Research (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thurs, 18-May, 2:00 PM – Dutch Research Before 1811 (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Thu, 18-May, 3:15 PM – Finding Your Family in the Amazing Online Amsterdam City – Archives (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 9:00 AM – Beginning Swiss Research Part 1 (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 10:15 AM – Beginning Swiss Research Part 2 (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 11:30 AM – Swiss Archives Online Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 2:00 PM – Swiss Census Records (Beginner) – Webinar| Main B/C
  • Fri, 19-May, 3:15 PM – Swiss Chorgericht Records (Intermediate) – Webinar| Main B/C

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of March 20, 2017


The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (March 25, 2017), Hundreds of thousands of free indexed records from all over Italy are featured in these newly published online collections. Additionally, find newly searchable records from Canada, Ecuador, Germany, The Netherlands, Peru, Sweden and the United States. Search these new free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 73,853 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1800-1870 – 39,041 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Prato, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1923 – 15,463 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Rieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1840-1945 – 1,525 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Enna, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1944 – 108,603 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Grosseto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1851-1907 – 155 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Viterbo, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1870-1943 – 168 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496-1906 – 0 – 111,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 2,532,170 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869 – 42,862 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 28,563 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 2,668 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Norrbotten Church Records, 1612-1923; index 1658-1860 – 6,531 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Kopparberg Church Records, 1604-1900; index 1628-1860 – 7,194 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index – 3,390,197 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Alaska, Vital Records, 1816-1959 – 18,844 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866 – 72,842 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York State Census, 1865 – 18,804 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Pennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-1931 – 61,584 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

R.I.P. Elizabeth Lapointe

Elizabeth Lapointe, a friend and fellow genealogy blogger, passed away on Monday, March 13, 2017. Elizabeth was a terrific genealogist, specializing in Canadian genealogy. She wrote a column for Heritage Quest Magazine years ago, and that’s how I got to know her. Elizabeth was currently the editor of the Ontario Genealogical Society’s Families, having just completed the Spring 2017 issue prior to her passing. Her blog, Genealogy Canada, was always helpful and informative.

We will miss her.

For more information, see John D. Reid’s blog of March 14.

FindMyPast Offers FREE Access to Their Entire Irish Collection Thru March 17

To coincide with St Patrick’s Day 2017, Findmypast is making their entire collection of more than 116 million Irish records free for a limited time!

Through 17 March 2017, you can access the largest collection of Irish records online for FREE!

Unique records from World War 1 and the Easter Rising, extensive travel and migration collections, as well as detailed Irish court and prison registers are all available to help you add colour to your users’ discoveries.

Access Findmypast’s Irish records for FREE through March 17 – Saint Patrick’s Day! Click on the appropriate link below for access.

You can get free access to the following:

  • Over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers
  • Over 9.5 million Census records including the 1901 and 1911 censuses
  • Over 22 million Petty Sessions Court Registers
  • Over 33 million Irish newspaper articles spanning the years 1708 to 1956
  • Over 7.3 million Dog Licenses
  • Over 24 million Irish Passenger Lists
  • Over 2.4 million workhouse & poor law records
  • 4 million Irish Quaker records
  • Over 131,000 Easter Uprising & Ireland Under Martial Law
  • Prison Registers, featuring over 3.5 million names
  • Landed Estates Court records featuring details of over 500,000 tenants residing on estates all over Ireland
  • The complete Griffith’s Valuation
  • The most comprehensive set of national directories, dating back to 1814
  • Indexes to Irish wills dating from 1270 – 1858
  • Over 400,000 gravestones and church memorials

Click on the appropriate link above to access the FREE databases. REMEMBER – the offer ends at the end of the day March 17.

FREE Access to All Irish Resources on AmericanAncestors.org from March 15-22

The following news release is from NEHGS:

Unique Databases, Boston Catholic Records, “How-to” Irish Research Guides, a Webinar, and More Resources Available with Free Guest Registration

AmericanAncestors.org/Irish

March 14, 2017 — Boston, Massachusetts—Honor your Irish heritage this St. Patrick’s Day by researching your Irish ancestry on AmericanAncestors.org, the award-winning website of New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS). Learn the essential concepts and techniques for Irish research, and find out which manuscripts, collections, and sources are used by genealogists at American Ancestors to crack the toughest research cases.

Irish resources will be free and open from Wednesday, March 15, through midnight (EDST) on Wednesday, March 22. Access requires a free, brief sign-up on AmericanAncestors.org.

The Only Online Source for Boston’s Catholic Records
Browse record images of baptisms, marriages, and more from Boston’s oldest parishes, including the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Holy Trinity. NEHGS is digitizing parish records from 1789 to 1900, a period of significant growth for both Boston’s Catholic Church and the Irish immigrant population.

Find Your Irish Ancestors in FREE Databases on AmericanAncestors.org
Search unique collections such as Irish Immigrant Advertisements, 1831-1920, and the NEHGS-exclusive database The Annals of Beara, The Session Book of Aghadowey, 1702-1725, plus many more.

Break Through Your Irish Brick Wall
With expert resources from NEHGS, found exclusively on AmericanAncestors.org, learn tips for navigating the sometimes challenging course of finding Irish ancestors. This Irish-themed promotion from American Ancestors includes an hour-long webinar on NEHGS Irish Resources, an online subject guide to locate key resources and records in Irish genealogy, and popular articles from our American Ancestors magazine with fascinating insights about Irish and Irish American genealogy.

NEHGS offers FREE access to all of its Irish databases and resources via AmericanAncestors.org from March 15 through midnight (EDST) on March 22. Access requires registration as a FREE Guest User at AmericanAncestors.org/Irish.