New! – Muller/Mueller Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective

Got any Millers in your family tree? Silly question… Don’t we all? Family Roots Publishing recently teamed with Fred Siler to publish what we plan to be a series of books dealing the heraldry of Germanic families. Fred brought the idea to me some months back. At first I had no interest, as so much heraldry-related stuff is as phony as that proverbial $3 bill. Then, after consulting with others in the genealogy publishing business, and doing some research on Germanic heraldry, I realized that Mr. Siler was producing a product that we’d be proud to publish. Thus our first volume, titled Muller/Mueller Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective.

To celebrate the release of the new book, Family Roots Publishing is offering an introductory price of $23.76 – that’s 15% off the MSRP of $27.95 (plus $5.50 p&h). Click here, on the illustration, or on any of the links to order.

This volume deals with the Germanic heraldry of families whose name was one of the most common in Germany – that of Müller. In English, we’d write that Miller, Muller, or Mueller. Many surnames are occupational – with Müller being a prime example. A Müller was one who ground grain. “The origin of the name comes from Mühle meaning mill. The mill, whether powered by water, by wind, or occasionally animals, was an important center in every medieval settlement.”

“Because the Müller surname has become widespread, not only in German-speaking lands, but throughout central and eastern Europe, many different spellings have arisen over the centuries. In English and other European languages, including Yiddish and Dutch, the name is also spelled Mueller, Muller, Mueler, Muler, Miller, Moeller, Muellner, Milner, Molner, Moehle, Muehle, Muehler, Mullner, Mulder, Moller, Millner, Molnar, and much more.”

German heraldry is unlike British heraldry where a coat-of-arms is associated with one person. Siler’s book includes arms that originated as house marks, guild marks, and burgher arms that have been used by families for centuries. Also included are noble armorial bearings that have been granted to the children of an individual and have been passed down through descendants.

It should be noted that the volume is heavily footnoted, allowing the researcher to locate and examine the original source materials from which the author drew his information. An amazing place index is found at the rear of the book, allowing genealogists to often associate a specific place with Muller/Mueller families. It is the author’s belief that there is often a coat of arms that may be associated with one’s European ancestor. It may not be that of a direct ancestor or that of one’s ancestral family, but it could well be linked, if only by the proximity of geographical location.

This one-of-a-kind book is the first in a series exploring the heraldry and genealogy of common German surnames with a focus on the English-speaking family historian who seeks another fresh approach to their research. This is not another book about how to trace your German ancestors or a reprint of readily available information from old sources. Most family historians will concede that the research process begins to become more tedious when we attempt to deal with European historical locations and records written in a foreign language. Armed with this book, you will start to overcome barriers of language and shifting state boundaries. Learn how the following components can enhance the story of your Muller ancestors. Included in this particular volume are:

  • Over 2,200 historical and modern geographical locales of the Holy Roman, German and Austrian Empires, as well as Switzerland;
  • Supplementary material for major current and past political states and regions; with links to a catalog of genealogical records by FamilySearch;
  • Colorful illustrations of 35 coats-of-arms along with genealogical and geographical information on 94 Muller families.

The following is from the Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

CHAPTER 1 – Synthesizing Heraldry and Genealogy for a Practical Research Tool

  • What is Heraldry?
  • Common aspects of Genealogy
  • Heraldry and the family historian
  • Geography as a fundamental tool for integrating heraldry and genealogy
  • Associating a coat-of-arms with your ancestor

CHAPTER 2 – A Brief Introduction to German Heraldry

  • Historical Background of Germanic Heraldry
  • Components of the Germanic Coat-of-Arms
  • Modern German Heraldry

CHAPTER 3 – Heraldic Symbolism

  • Introduction to heraldic symbolism
  • Symbolism of the colors, furs, lines, divisions, and ordinaries
  • Symbolism of the common charges

CHAPTER 4 – An Introduction to the Müller Surname

  • Origins and meanings of the name
  • Variations of the Muller surname
  • Location and distribution of the surname
  • Some historical documentations of Müller

CHAPTER 5 – A Survey of Müller Armorial Bearings: Defining the Elements

  • Introduction to the geographical territory
  • Bearer(s) of the coat-of-arms
  • Particular geographical locale(s) associated with the bearer(s)
  • Description of the coat-of-arms
  • Interpreting the coat-of-arms
  • Other Muller arms bearers of this geographical territory
  • Additional geographical and genealogical resources

CHAPTER 6 – Müller Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective

  • Alsace-Lorraine
  • Austria
  • Baden-Württemberg
  • Bavaria
  • Berlin
  • Brandenburg
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • East Prussia
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • Germany
  • Hamburg
  • Hesse
  • Hungary
  • Latvia
  • Lower Austria
  • Lower Saxony
  • Mecklenburg-Vorpommeran
  • The Netherlands
  • North Rhine-Westphalia
  • Pomerania
  • Prussia
  • Rhineland-Palatinate
  • Saxony
  • Saxon-Anhalt
  • Schleswig-Holstein
  • Silesia
  • Styria
  • Switzerland
  • Thuringia
  • Tyrol
  • Upper Austria
  • Vienna
  • West Prussia

CHAPTER 7 – Interpreting the Heraldry of Müller

  • Charges associated with the meaning of the surname
  • Coats-of-arms that display symbols of the bearer’s religious faith
  • Armorial achievements that illustrate a military theme
  • Arms that address a significant accomplishment of the bearer
  • Charges that identify an occupation of the bearer or his ancestors
  • Symbols of honorable characteristics
  • Discerning marital union or inheritance
  • Curious and uncommon charges

APPENDIX A – Glossary of Heraldic Symbolism

APPENDIX B – Online Genealogy Research by Location

APPENDIX C – Gallery of Müller Coats-of-Arms

INDEX – Historical and Modern Geographical Locales

To purchase a copy at the Family Roots Publishing website, click on the link below:

Muller/Mueller Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective; by Frederick George Siler; 2017; 167 pp; 8.5×11; paperback; ISBN: 978-1-62859-130-9; Item #: FR0700.

New Series – Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers – Now Shipping Canton Bern & Zürich Volumes

This announcement is long time in coming, and I’m so excited to be able to announce that the Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers is now in publication! This project actually started last May, but it takes a while to get this big a project off the ground. So, we’re starting “big!”

Since the volumes for Canton Bern and Canton Zürich are fully written, their community indexes are included in the description of each book – and can be found at their respective pages at the Family Roots Publishing website. Click on their respective links above to find your Bern and Zürich places.

The Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers series is an out-growth of the very popular Map Guide to German Parish Registers project, which is still in process, but nearing completion. Over the years, we’ve been asked by numerous parties to extend the project to cover other German-speaking European countries. We did that with the publication of Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers in 2016. There are 26 current cantons in Switzerland. Many of them are small, so we plan to publish guides to multiple cantons in a number of the books. For this reason, we expect the entire series to be under 20 volumes.

Unlike American genealogical research, where the place to search is usually a civil registration (city, county, and state), European research is usually related to an ecclesiastical jurisdiction. In 18th and 19th century Switzerland, one must search the parish registers for births, christenings, marriages, deaths and burials. The historic boundaries for the Swiss cantons and amtsbezirke are quite well defined, and this volume lays them out in map form. Listings are given for both Catholic and Protestant parishes, along with what records are available and where to access them. Contact information, and the municipalities covered by each parish is found, making your Swiss research much easier to accomplish.

Each of the Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers does the following:

  • Includes an index of all the communities found within the Canton.
  • Identifies the major online resources for Swiss genealogical research.
  • Identifies each canton with amtsbezirke (districts), and the municipalities, bauerten (farming coalitions), and subsidiary locations.
  • Visually identifies church parishes within each amtsbezirk (district).
  • Provides an overview of Swiss genealogical records.
  • Identifies neighboring parishes, just in case your ancestor may have gone to an alternate parish.
  • Aids in conducting area searches, particularly across district and canton borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for your family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources.
  • Identifies important gazetteers and online dictionaries available to researchers.
  • To see the full list (both hard and soft bound) of the first five volumes, click here. Remember – books for Fribourg and Aargau are still in process, so the descriptions are not complete.

Dollarhide Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides AL-MI 80% Off! – NEW MN-WY Guides 20% Off! With FREE Downloads!

Bill Dollarhide started a series of what he called “Name List” guides in the Summer of 2013. He wrote steadily on them until sometime in 2015, when life caught up with him, and he had to put the project aside. Well, he went back at it several months ago, and completed new guides for all the rest of the states, alphabetically Minnesota through Wyoming. He also wrote a full book on the U.S. Territories. Finally, Bill went back and updated an earlier volume – choosing Indiana – to test whether enough changes had taken place to make it worthwhile to do Second Editions. Bill found that a number of URL addresses had changed, which he expected, and he found additional data that expanded the volume by another 10 pages.

So this weekend we are releasing all 29 NEW volumes Minnesota through Wyoming, plus U.S. Territories and Indiana Second Edition.

To celebrate, we’re pricing all of the new 2017 volumes at 20% off, making them $15.16 (or $10 for the PDF eBook alone). As before, we’re throwing in a FREE instantly downloadable PDF eBook version with any paperback book being purchased. See my Super-Saver shipping note below.

To clear out the earlier printed books, those written between 2013 and 2017, FRPC has discounted the price 80%! That makes them only $3.79 each! We will most likely do Second Editions for those volumes sometime in the Fall or Winter. Note that if you only desire the PDF eBook alone, we’ve discounted them, Alabama through Michigan, by 60%, making them just $5. Again – this is for all volumes Alabama through Michigan.

To make this offer even more attractive, we’re offering Super-Saver (USA Only) USPS shipping on all 53 printed books. That’s $4.50 for the first book, and only 50 cents for each thereafter.

With the completion of this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists, censuses, and census substitutes are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & Substitute Name Lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only do these this volumes give a detailed bibliography of Censuses and Substitute Names Lists available for each state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co. Click on the appropriate links to purchase.

Genetic Communities™ Beta: New Innovation from AncestryDNA

AncestryDNA is releasing a beta version of Genetic Communities™ today. The following is from Matt Deighton at Ancestry:

Today, we are pleased to share the roll-out of a new beta experience for AncestryDNA we call, Genetic Communities™. This new experience gives you a more detailed connection to the people, places, cultures, and stories that led to you.

Taking DNA testing to a whole new level

This new advancement is only possible through the millions of AncestryDNA members around the world who have chosen to participate in the Research Project as well as the massive collection of family trees, only available on Ancestry. The science behind this feature was recently published in one of the prominent scientific journals Nature Communications here).

At launch there will be over 300 Genetic Communities all around the world to go and explore, with many more on the horizon. We will compare you to all of them and list the ones you have a connection to based on your DNA. These Genetic Communities dot the globe and are often more specific than what’s possible to discover with an ethnicity estimate, providing a more recent connection to your past.

And, this is just the beginning. We are just scratching the surface of advancements in science and technology that will translate into faster, more insightful discoveries about who we are and where we come from. Genetic Communities is a very BIG and exciting step in this direction.

Watch the video by clicking on this link or the following illustration to see why we are so excited about this new experience.

For people considering purchasing the AncestryDNA test, you will get access to this new feature. For existing AncestryDNA customers, we are making this beta available for free in your results. It doesn’t matter if you tested 4 years ago or if you are waiting for your results to come out of the lab, your DNA can now give you even more details about your past—and present—with Genetic Communities.

Now it’s your turn. Head to your DNA results to check out Genetic Communities for yourself. It’s possible you may not have a Genetic Community yet, but stay tuned, we are finding new Genetic Communities to share in the future. Want to learn even more? Go to our help content here. Good luck and enjoy exploring!

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance – New and On Sale for 10% Off

Michael A. Ports – author of the groundbreaking series Georgia Free Persons of Color as well as numerous volumes of transcribed records from Baldwin, Elbert, and especially Jefferson County, Georgia – has applied his expertise in Georgia genealogy research to a “Genealogy at a Glance” guide. Like the other publications in the series, Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research is a four-page laminated folder that gives you all the useful information you’ll need to begin and proceed successfully with your research.

Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

Ports begins with a discussion of Georgia’s settlement background, beginning in 1732 when King George II granted a charter for the new colony – named in his honor – to James Oglethorpe and twenty other proprietors. County formation began in 1777 with the creation of Burke, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Richmond, and Wilkes counties, and ended in 1924 with the creation of Peach County. Many of the records most useful to genealogists are located at the county level. Therefore a general rule of thumb, Ports states, is to begin your research at the Georgia Archives, which houses original and microfilm copies of most county records, and he details the most critical of these records – marriage and divorce, birth and death, probate, and land lottery records.

Ports also gives an overview of two significant supplementary sources – land grant records and tax records – and identifies the major repositories and online resources with useful information for your Georgia family research. Along the way you’ll find research tips and references to key publications, making Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research the most helpful four pages you’ll ever read on Georgia genealogy.

The following is an annotated Table of Contents of my creation:

  • Quick Facts – A timeline from 1732 through 1870 dealing with ten important Georgia events.
  • Settlement Background – A history of Georgia from 1732 through 1805, important to Georgia researchers – includes two important further references.
  • Record Sources – An introduction, and two items for further reference – followed by sections on Marriage and Divorce Records; Birth and Death Records; Probate Records, and Land Lottery Records – includes several important internet links and eight further references, all to important lottery-related books.
  • Supplemental Sources – Includes sections on Land Grant Records (with an internet link), as well as Tax Records with one book listed as an important further reference.
  • Major Repositories – a listing of five repositories, with full addresses and contact information.
  • Online Resources – a listing of seven websites invaluable for those with Georgia ancestry.

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance; by Michael A. Ports; 2017; 4 pp; laminated; ISBN: 978-0-8063-2039-7; Item #: GPC4668

As noted above, Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians – 10% off thru April 4

As I’ve written before, GPC recently released a new guide from Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck. This softbound book is titled American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians.

We again offering this new book at 10% off – through April 4, 2017. Click on this link to order.

The book provides a synopsis of the original patterns of settlement and migration for the United States. Mr. Bockstruck discusses each of the 50 states, however, his emphasis is on the states and territories that were established between the colonial period and the middle of the nineteenth century. For each state the author examines pioneers’ places of origin, reasons for settlement, specific places of settlement in America, names of pioneering families, migrations within and between states, and more. Equally important, throughout the volume he names the key sources for further research.

The study of migration is inextricably intertwined with family history. By combining a knowledge of history and geography, therefore, the family historian can extend the family pedigree across the country. Every detail represents a potential clue to an elusive ancestor, from the name of a shipping line, port of embarkation, and clusters of fellow passengers, to the nature of soil available to the colonist, church membership, and status of roadways.

Some members of the family may not have ventured away from the ancestral home. Others went westward but did not continue as far as some of their kinfolk. They may have generated the records further inland that would enable the family historian to bridge an ancestral geographical gap. Finding earlier places of residence could enable one to determine the place of nativity of an ancestor. Following such paths could enable one to locate relatives who remained in the East or dropped off earlier along the migration route, thereby identifying the immigrant or colonist who founded the family in the New World and perhaps the ancestral home in the Old World as well.

The study of migration/immigration follows several principles. Firstly, one must understand the local history of one’s ancestral homes. For example, as late as 1950, the state possessing greatest percentage of residents of British descent was Utah. Why? Utah was settled by Mormons, and this relatively new religious group was mostly composed of New England Puritan stock. Moreover, that church’s first missionary efforts abroad were in conducted in the British Isles, and those converts joined them in Utah.

Secondly, migrations are also tied to similar climatic belts. Colonists and immigrants often sought out lands that were capable of growing the crops with which they were familiar, as in the case of Scandinavian settlement in Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Thirdly, migration rests upon forces that draw immigrants to a new home. It may also apply to those forces that drove them away from their home. In some instances both aspects may apply. For instance, more than 150,000 natives of Virginia were living in the states of the Old Northwest Territory in 1850—an area accessible to them and possessing terrain and soils with which they were familiar.

Still other factors impinging on migration and settlement include available modes of transportation, religious preference or ethnicity, economic factors such as famines and floods, and foreign wars, revolutions, and other aspects of statecraft. Bockstruck contrasts colonial migrations, for example, with those following American Independence. During the colonial period, individuals and groups moved from the southern colonies to the northern colonies, and vice versa. Until the 1750s, colonists utilized sailing ships as the primary mode of transportation between colonies. They did not move from the East to the West until after the French and Indian War, when the Braddock and Forbes roads were built to enable the military forces to go into the interior to challenge the French in the Ohio River Valley. Such roads were necessary to move heavy military equipment, such as canons, and materiel to the war front.

American Settlements and Migrations is arranged by region and thereunder by state. Each chapter outlines not only the events, persons, and forces that contributed to a state’s settlement but also offers untold clues to the reader’s own ancestors. Might an 18th-century South Carolina forebear have been part of the British expulsion of the French from Nova Scotia? Was your Welsh ancestor part of the Pennsylvania migration to work in the Knoxville, Tennessee mining industry? Your Irish Famine-era ancestor was living in Boston in 1860, but is the gap in his genealogy attributable to the fact that he might have entered North America through the Canadian Port of St. John, Newfoundland. These are just some of hundreds of possibilities Mr. Bockstruck gets you to consider. His new primer may be just the clue finder you have been looking for.

In my review of the volume, I found that virtually hundreds of resources are found within the text – all with full titles, and authors. This makes it easy for the genealogist to find the item with the publishers, or a nearby library genealogy collection. By the way, you can find books in libraries near you within seconds by typing the title into the search engine at http://www.worldcat.org/. Find the book, and click on it. Enter your location zip code (under Find a Copy in a Library). Bingo!

The only issue I have with the volume is that the font is a bit small for my old and tired eyes. But reading the volume in bright lighting made my reading pleasurable – and I learned many things that I didn’t know previously.

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

The following is from the Table of Contents – the abbreviations are mine:

  • Chapter One: American Settlements and Migrations in America
  • Chapter Two. New England – MA, CT, RI, Providence Plantations, VT, ME
  • Chapter Three. West Indies
  • Chapter Four. The Middle Colonies – NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD
  • Chapter Five. The Southern Colonies – VA, WV, NC, SC, GA
  • Chapter Six. The Impact of the Revolutionary War
  • Chapter Seven. Post Revolutionary War Settlements – FL, KY, TN
  • Chapter Eight. The Old Northwest – OH, IN, IL, MI, WI, MN
  • Chapter Nine. The Old Southwest – AL, MI, LA
  • Chapter Ten. The Trans-Mississippi West – IA, MO, AR
  • Chapter Eleven. The West – TX, KS, NE, OK, UT, NM. AZ, NV, CO, ND, SD, WY, ID
  • Chapter Twelve. The Pacific Coast – OR, WA, CA
  • Chapter Thirteen. Alaska, Hawaii and Canadian Settlements – AL, HI, QC, NS, ON

Order your book by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

Louisiana’s Archives in ‘state of emergency’

The following excerpt is an article updated March 24, 2017 at shreveporttimes.com:

Louisiana’s archival and historical records are in a state of emergency, whose destruction “would represent nothing less than a devastating and irreparable loss” of the state’s historical and cultural heritage, according to historians who recently gathered for the Louisiana Historical Association’s annual conference.

An executive summary of the Louisiana Historical Association presented at the conference called Louisiana’s historical archives “endangered treasures.”

“They are more than scraps of yellowed paper and tattered leather-bound journals,” the summary stated. “Losing them will sever us off from our past and impair our ability to remain informed citizens, so critical to the functioning of democracy.”

About 50 historians attended the plenary session of the conference that discussed the state of Louisiana’s archives, hailing from several parishes in Louisiana as well as from Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, Massachusetts and even Germany. More than 200 individuals registered for the total conference, according to James Wilson, the secretary-treasurer of the Louisiana Historical Association.

“We all love history, and we’re trying to protect it,” said Michelle Riggs, a panelist and archivist at LSU-Alexandria. “This is a call to arms. This is everyone’s history.”

Watch the video and read the full article.

Linkpendium is now Mobile-Freindly

Linkpendium is one of my favorite sites. Linkpendium is a 10,000,000+ resource directory to everything on the Web about families worldwide and genealogically-relevant information about U.S. states and counties. They cover both free and subscription sites, with a strong emphasis upon free resources provided by libraries, other government agencies, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals. The following was posted on their Facebook page last week.

San Luis Obispo, March 20, 2017. Linkpendium is proud to announce our first-ever press release.

Er. That’s not what we meant to say.

Linkpendium is proud to announce that our we are now mobile-friendly. Nobody old enough to order a beer may have any hope of reading one of those silly smartphones, but now you can go to: http://www.Linkpendium.com/ and have all our pages display sensibly on a 2-inch by 4-inch screen. The main link collection, all 10,159,184 links to genealogical data, is fully accessible on mobile devices.

And so is our very popular Family Discoverer search engine — the one that lets you search 2,804,127 pages of *FREE* genealogical data, much of which you cannot find using Google even if you are a certifiable wizard at building long, complex, and inscrutable query strings.

You can try the search engine at: http://www.Linkpendium.com/family-discoverer/

Group Cleans Up an Old Texas Cemetery

The following was posted March 25, 2017 at the Longview News-Journal website.

A group of volunteers met Saturday near Easton to clean up a cemetery dating back to the 1800s and that has fallen into disrepair.

Jeanne Collins, board member of the Gregg County Historical Commission and chairwoman of the commission’s Cemetery Preservation Committee, organized the cleanup in hopes of preserving history and learning about the people buried there.

“It’s important for the whole historical preservation of our society that we maintain cemeteries,” Collins said. “It’s history; it’s the state of Texas. These represent the genealogy of people that used to live in this area.”

Camden Cemetery is tucked away in the woods near Easton, where the former community of Camden, otherwise known as Walling’s Ferry, used to be.

Read the full article.

R.I.P. Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack – 1920-2017

The following excerpt is from the obituary of Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack – posted at the mailtribune.com website March 26, 2017.

Jean Elizabeth Nicholson Maack, 96, passed away peacefully March 5, 2017, with two of her sons and her primary caregiver nearby. Jean was born June 5, 1920, in the small town of Ossian, Iowa. After reading all the books in her school and many in a local lawyer’s library, she graduated from high school and went to the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana at age 16, staying with an uncle. She started out as a Chemistry major, graduated with a B.S. in Home Economics, and then earned an M.Sc. in Nutrition from the same university. In 1939, at age 19, she married Arthur C. Maack, a graduate student at the University. Their marriage lasted 50 years, until Arthur’s death December 19, 1989, and produced four sons…

Jean was for many years an ardent and skilled genealogist, tracing her own family’s Nicholson/Harvey ancestry back to the middle ages and publishing articles in genealogical journals. She served on the Board of the Rogue Valley Genealogical Society. There is a Jean Maack Collection in the Society’s Library.

Read the full obituary.

Arkansas SAR to Honor Revolutionary War Soldier, Asher Bagley Sr., April 8 2017

The following excerpt is from an article posted at arkansasonline.com

Members of two chapters of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will mark the grave of Revolutionary War soldier Asher Bagley Sr. on April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery in Saline County. Preparing for the memorial event are, from left, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud, Bagley’s third great-grandson, past state SAR president and past president of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter, SAR; Larry Hartzinger of Hot Springs Village, treasurer, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; Charles McLemore of Joplin in Montgomery County, president, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; and Jimmie Weber of Diamondhead, secretary, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter. Photo by: Matt Johnson.

Asher Bagley Sr. served in the American Revolution as a private in the first New Jersey Regiment. Following the war, he settled in Saline County in about 1828 near the community known as Bland. He is buried in the Old Union Cemetery in that community.

His third great-grandson, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud in White County, and other members of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will remember Bagley in a grave-marking ceremony at 11 a.m. April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery.

Descendants of Bagley and members of the public are invited to attend the event, which is co-sponsored by the Casimir Pulaski and DeSoto Trace chapters of the Arkansas Society SAR.

Read the full article.

Georgetown University Employee Learns the University Sold His Ancestor

The following teaser is from a must-read article posted at the New York Times website on March 24.

Jeremy Alexander, a Georgetown employee, recently discovered that his paternal great-great-great-grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at the university in 1838. Credit: Paul Jones/Georgetown University

As a Georgetown employee, Jeremy Alexander watched as the university grappled with its haunted past: the sale of slaves in 1838 to help rescue it from financial ruin.

He listened as Georgetown’s president apologized for its sins and looked for ways to make amends. And Mr. Alexander observed, with wonder, some of the slave descendants when they visited the campus.

What he did not know at the time: He was one of them.

Mr. Alexander’s paternal great-great-great grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at Georgetown for about $115,000, or $3.3 million in today’s dollars. She and her two young children were enslaved at a plantation in Ascension Parish, La.

Read the full article.

Two Lisa Louise Cooke Titles Bundled & Again Reduced 25% – Google Toolbox & Mobile Genealogy

FRPC has purchased a special shipment of Lisa Louise Cooke’s two most popular titles, and bundled them for quick sale. We’ve again reduced the price 25% on the bundle, making it just $33.71 (reg. $44.95). We’re again running the promo – this time through April 4, or until we run out of stock – whichever comes first.

The books are:

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page and click on this link or the illustration to order the bundle.

Need only one of them? Order either one at their respective site, and get 20% off on that item alone.

Following is the review of The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox that I wrote a while back.

I have used Lisa Louise Cooke’s 2011 first edition of The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox regularly in the last several years, and found it extremely helpful. The Second Edition is even more so. When it comes to tracing your family tree online, you need the right tools to get the job done. In The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, Lisa helps you stuff your genealogy toolbox with FREE state-of-the-art Internet tools that are built to search, translate, message, and span the globe. You’ll travel outside the genealogy community and straight to the folks who dominate the online world: Google. A lot has changed since the first edition was published in 2011 (see list at the bottom of this post), and it’s all documented step-by-step in this second Edition.

Following is a list of the chapters found in the volume:

  • Introduction, Getting Ready to build Your Family Tree Fast
  • Chapter 1: Search Tools
  • Chapter 2: Basic & Advanced Search
  • Chapter 3: Search Strategies for High-Quality Results
  • Chapter 4: Site Search & Resurrecting Websites
  • Chapter 5: Image Search
  • Chapter 6: Common Surname Searches
  • Chapter 7: Google Alerts
  • Chapter 8: Gmail
  • Chapter 9: Google Books
  • Chapter 10: Google News Archive
  • Chapter 11: Google scholar
  • Chapter 12: Google Patents
  • Chapter 13: Google Translate
  • Chapter 14: YouTube
  • Chapter 15: Google Earth: An Overview
  • Chapter 16: Google Earth: Ancestral Homes & Locations
  • Chapter 17: Google Earth: Organizing & Sharing
  • Chapter 18: Google Earth: Historic Images & Maps
  • Chapter 19: Google Earth: Plotting Your Ancestor’s Homestead
  • Chapter 20: Google Earth: Adding Family History Content
  • Chapter 21: Google Earth: Family History Tour Maps
  • Appendix: Find it Quick: The “How To” Index

I love this guidebook, and recommend it to anyone who wants to get more use of the online “tools” available to them. Check out the items that are new, expanded or updated in the Second Edition.

  • Google Search: Put an end to fruitless searches forever – UPDATED!
  • Searching Common Surnames – NEW!
  • Google Alerts: Your personal genealogy research assistant – UPDATED!
  • Gmail: Never lose another email – EXPANDED!
  • Google Books: The world’s history at your fingertips – UPDATED!
  • Google News Archives: Free digitized historic newspapers – UPDATED!
  • Google Patents: Research the inventor in your family – NEW!
  • Google Scholar: Explore the world’s most scholarly sources – NEW!
  • Google Translate: Explore foreign language websites – UPDATED!
  • YouTube: Build your own genealogy channel – NEW!
  • Google Earth: Rock Your Ancestor’s World – EXPANDED!

Following is a review of Mobile Genealogy, written some time ago…

Finally – we have a great new guide for those of us who use mobile devices! This book takes the place of Turn Your iPad into a Genealogy Powerhouse, written by Lisa Louise Cooke in 2012. The iPad volume was becoming dated, and mobile devices of all kinds have sprung up since the publication of that book. Not only are folks using iPads & iPhones for genealogy, but many of us are using devices that run Android operating systems. I never felt the need for an iPad, but I’ve been using the iPhone and Android smart phones for years. I’m currently using a Samsung Android smart phone that I’m very pleased with. I use it for all kinds of genealogy applications.

Mobile Genealogy’s coverage of Android as well as Apple, makes this book twice as valuable a guide as Lisa’s previous book. Think iOS as well as Android. And Lisa’s use of step-by-step instructions (for us computer tech dummies!), as well as a myriad of high-quality illustrations make the book an educational delight. I can honestly say that this volume is changing the way I use my devices, allowing me to find more ancestors, and other relatives – and it’s saving me TIME – something I have begun to value at my age. (grin)

Access the Computer On Your Desk at Home!
Chapter 15 covers using your mobile device to access your home computer. I’ll bet most of you never even considered connecting to your PC with your smart phone. Yes – it’s possible, and Lisa gives step-by-step instructions on how to do that too! So – whether you are using a tablet, or a smart phone, you can access stuff that’s 1000 miles away – or maybe just around the corner.

Screen Capture on my Smart Phone?!
Chapter 4 really gets into the nitty-gritty of better browsing with your mobile device. Although covered in Lisa’s 2012 iPad book, this chapter takes the subject to a whole new level. Her section on mobile web-clipping and screen capture was a great help to me. I’ve always had problems with screen capture and had basically given up on it. Now I know what to do!

Translation Strategies
Lisa’s section on translation strategies in Chapter 10 just opened up a world of new data for me – and it can for you. She explains how the Google Translate App from the App Store or Google Play can be used for capturing data on your ancestor from foreign-language books – translated into English so you can actually read it! Yes – we all know the shortcomings of translation programs, but I am happy to accept anything dealing with my ancestors, and the towns they lived in, even if the English is a bit messy. Think Google Books here folks – loaded with stuff on our ancestors, much of which we can’t read! You can even use your phone’s camera to capture, OCR, and translate any words or phrases! Lisa takes the reader step-by step through how to use the marvelous technology that’s resting in your hand!

Following is an expanded Table of Contents for the volume.

INTRODUCTION

  • A Few Tips for Using the Book

PART ONE: GETTING STARTED

  • Chapter One: The Tablet Mindset
    • Tablet Mindset Guidelines
    • App Consolidation
  • Chapter Two: Genealogy Task Wish List

PART TWO: APPS

  • Chapter 3: There’s An App for That!
    • App Store
    • Google Play Store
    • Staying Up to Date – App Resources
  • Chapter 4: Browsing
    • Safari
    • Chrome
    • Google
    • Dolphin
  • Chapter 5: Note Taking
    • Evernote
    • Notes
    • Pages
    • Microsoft Word
    • Google Docs
  • Chapter 6: File Storage & Management
    • Dropbox
    • Google Drive
    • iCloud
  • Chapter 7: Audio
    • Memos
    • Evernote
  • Chapter 8: Photos
    • Capturing Photos
    • Photomyne Pro – Album Scanner
    • Storing and Organizing Photos
    • iCloud Photo Library
    • Google Photos
    • Working with Photos
    • Adobe Photoshop Express
    • Color Splash for iPad
    • Android Alternative to Color Splash for iPad: Color Splash FX
    • Retype
    • Pocketbooth
  • Chapter 9: Reading
    • Reading Content from the Web
    • Flipboard
    • Feedly
    • Reading eBooks and Documents
    • GoodReader
    • Play Books
    • iBooks
  • Chapter 10: Collaboration & Communication
    • Facebook
    • Skype
    • FaceTime
    • Google Translate
  • Chapter 11: Travel
  • Chapter 12: Genealogy
    • Ancestry
    • MyHeritage
    • Reunion for iPad
    • RootsMagic
    • Families
    • Family Tree
    • FamilySearch Memories
  • Chapter 13: Education & Information
    • Podcasts (Audio)
    • Genealogy Gems
    • Video
  • Chapter 14: Captivating Non-Genealogists
    • Pic Collage
    • Google Earth
    • Pinterest
    • THIS DAY in My Family History
    • Little Family Tree

PART THREE: BECOME A POWER USER

  • Chapter 15: Power Boost Your Tablet: Remote Access
    • Chrome Remote Desktop
  • Chapter 16: Mobile Tips & Tricks
    • New Features
    • Keyboard and Gesture Tips and Tricks
    • Navigation Tips and Tricks
    • Voice Command
    • Functionality Tips and Tricks
    • App Related Tips and Tricks

PART FOUR: CONCLUSION

  • Chapter 17: Mobile Genealogy Means Adventurous Genealogy
  • About the Author

Many Irish Immigrants Lost Their Lives in the Building of the C&O Canal

The following excerpt is from an informative article dealing with Washington County, Maryland, and the Irish immigrants who worked on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, many settling in the area. Disease was not well understood in the early 19th-century, leading to the early demise of many immigrants who were just looking for a better life. Read the full article, from the Washington County Historical Society, to learn much more.

Even when we do reflect on the hardships faced by Irish immigrants to America, we tend to think mostly of places like Boston or New York City, where Irish heritage and culture have gained a lasting footprint. But Washington County was home to large groups of Irish immigrants, brought to the area specifically to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. This, to put it plainly, was a hard and often deadly life. Because of the hard labor and poor working conditions, daily life along the canal was filled with injury, disease and violence.

The process of building the C&O Canal was a struggle from the very beginning. This area had a bad reputation for ill health during the summers, and a lot of competition for labor from the agricultural sector. Finding workers to build the canal was a difficult and costly prospect, and so the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co. looked toward imported labor from Great Britain.

Read the full article at the heraldmailmedia.com website.