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On the Way Home from the NGS Conference

Bill Dollarhide and I are currently on the road heading back to Orting, Washington, having spent much of last week at the NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri.

On Sunday we drove from St. Charles to Fort Collins, Colorado. This morning we are meeting with my neice and cousin, then going to see my sister, Erma Lamb. Looking forward to seeing them all! Then on to Salt Lake City, where we will stay at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel tonight.

We plan to see my son, Lee and his family, pick up books at Schaffer Bindery and go on home. Should arrive there mid-day on Wednesday.

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Baden & Wuerttemberg German Map Guides Back in Print

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Both the Baden and Wuerttemberg Schwarzwaldkreis German Map Guides went out-of-print a short time ago. I am thrilled to announce that they are both back in print and now shipping at the FRPC website.

Following are links to the five volumes covering Baden and Wuerttemberg:

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 2 – Baden (2nd Edition)

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 5 – Württemberg I – Jagstkreis

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 6 – Württemberg II -Neckarkreis & Hohenzollern Province

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 7 – Württemberg III – Schwarzwaldkreis

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol 8 – Württemberg IV – Donaukreis

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The NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri

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Bill Dollarhide and I drove about 2200 miles to arrive in St. Charles, Missouri just in time to set up as a booth in the exhibit hall at the NGS conference. Family Roots Publishing has only one booth this year, exhibiting mostly our books – Hansen’s German Map Guide books, Minert’s German Place Name Indexes, and Dollarhide’s Name List books, and other titles.

Come by and see us in booth 518 – right next to the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel booth in the 500 aisle.

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Acadian-Cajun Timeline, 1603-1805

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The following historical timeline of events relating to the Acadians-Cajuns was extracted from the Maine Name Lists and Louisiana Name Lists books, written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. The area of present Maine was at one time claimed by both the French colony of Acadia and the English colony of Massachusetts Bay. After the British-imposed expulsion of the Acadians, their final gathering point was concentrated in Spanish Louisiana. Upon the Louisiana Purchase, these new Americans were often called “Cajuns.” The timeline here reflects the history of the founding of French Acadia, their battles with the British, their expulsion, and their gathering in Louisiana.

1603. French nobleman Pierre DuGua (Sieur DeMonts) was granted exclusive rights to colonize the area he had named l’Acadie (Acadia), granted by French King Henry IV. The area of Acadia included all of present Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and most of Maine.

1604 Acadia. DeMonts established a French colony on St. Croix Island, at the mouth of the St. Croix River, now Maine. After surviving a bad Winter, the entire colony was moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port-Royal, now Nova Scotia.

1611. From his base in Port-Royal, Acadia, French Jesuit Priest Pierre Baird, crossed the Bay of Fundy to an island on the Penobscot River of present Maine, where he established an Indian mission.

1613. Father Baird and others attempted a new French mission on Mount Desert Island (present Maine), but soon after their arrival, they were arrested by English Captain Samuel Argall of the Jamestown Colony.

1689-1690. King William’s War. Soon after they were crowned, William III and Mary II joined a European alliance against France, and the subsequent battles became known as King William’s War. In 1689, several battles took place, including the French attack on Saco, Maine; followed by the English attack and destruction of the French Acadia capital of Port-Royal in 1690.

1696. During King Williams’s War, French forces from Pentagouet (present Castine, Maine) attacked and destroyed the English settlement at Pemaquid (present Bristol, Maine). Pemaquid was the northernmost community of New England, lying on the border with French Acadia. The French community of Pentagouet was the southernmost settlement of French Acadia. After the Siege of Pemaquid, the French forces continued north and destroyed virtually every English settlement in Newfoundland, and deported over 500 people back to England. In retaliation, the English attacked and destroyed more Acadian communities, including present Fredericton, New Brunswick.

1702. Queen Anne’s War. This was a decisive war in the series of conflicts between France and England. Battles took place in New England, Newfoundland, Québec and Acadia. One notable event was the brutal French/Indian raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1704, where the surviving English colonists were forced to march to Québec as hostages. The English Queen Anne succeeded to the throne after the death of Mary II, her older sister, and William III, who died in 1702 without issue. Queen Anne’s reign of 1702-1714 was about the same duration as the war that took her name. The English prevailed in most of the battles, and the war marked a turning point for the success of English interests over the French in North America.

1713. The Peace of Utrecht ended Queen Anne’s War. France ceded to Great Britain its claims to Newfoundland, Hudsons Bay, and the peninsular part of French Acadia, which the British had renamed Nova Scotia. The British took possession of the peninsula area and required the Acadians to swear allegiance to Britain or leave. The continental part of Acadia (including areas of present Maine and New Brunswick) remained in French control and a number of displaced Acadians from the British side moved across the Bay of Fundy to lands near the St. John and St. Croix rivers.

1718. La Nouvelle-Orleans (New Orleans) was founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne (Sieur de Bienville). It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orleans, the Regent of France. That year saw hundreds of French colonists arriving in Louisiana.

1719. Baton Rouge was established by the French as a military post.

1721 Arkansas Post. French and German colonists abandoned Arkansas Post, the largest settlement of all of French Louisiana. As a failed farming community, Arkansas Post was typical of the French efforts to colonize North America south of the Great Lakes. Arkansas Post continued as a trading post, and the French presence in the Mississippi Basin now became one of mostly single French fur trappers and traders paddling their canoes from one trading post to the next.

1721 German Coast. A group of German immigrants, who had first settled at Arkansas Post, acquired farm land on the east side of the Mississippi River north of New Orleans. Many of them were formerly of the German-speaking Alsace-Lorraine area of France. They easily adapted themselves to the French culture of Louisiana, and later intermarried with the French Acadians coming into the same area. Their main settlements were at Karlstein, Hoffen, Mariental, and Augsburg, all part of the German Coast. The farms they operated were to become the main source of food for New Orleans for decades.

1755-1758 Expulsion of the Acadians. At the beginning of the French and Indian War, the British completed their conquest of Acadia, and in 1755, began forcibly removing Acadians from their homes. (The British remembered the forced deportations imposed by the French against the English in Newfoundland back in 1696). The first expulsions were to the lower British colonies but in 1758 they began transporting Acadians back to France. Those Acadians who avoided deportation made their way to other French-speaking areas, such as present Québec, present New Brunswick, or present Maine. For an historical reference to the era, re-read Longfellow’s poem, “Evangeline,” which was based on the events of the Acadian expulsions.

1763. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 ended the French and Indian War (it was called the Seven Years War in Canada and Europe). France was the big loser, and lost virtually all of its remaining North American claims. The areas east of the Mississippi and all of Acadia/Nova Scotia and Québec were lost to Britain; the areas west of the Mississippi went to Spain. After the Treaty of Paris, George III issued a proclamation renaming the Province of Québec as the Province of Canada. He also issued the Proclamation Line of 1763, in which Indian Reserves were established west of the Appalachian Mountain Range, limiting western migrations by all of the British colonies. Soon after the treaty, all French military personnel left their North American posts. But, French civilian settlements continued in Lower Louisiana, such as New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Arkansas Post, and Natchez; and in Upper Louisiana, such as Prairie du Chien, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes. Spain did not take military control of Spanish Louisiana until 1766 (at New Orleans) and 1770 (at St. Louis).

1764-1765 Acadian Coast. Per terms of the Treaty of Paris, the British were given the right to remove the remaining French Acadians, but agreed to provide resettlement assistance. The destinations were not always clear, and the displaced Acadians were sometimes loaded onto ships headed to Boston, New York, Baltimore, Norfolk, Charleston, Savannah, or Mobile. After a few initial families made their way to New Orleans via Mobile in early 1764, several shiploads of Acadians arrived in New Orleans in early 1765. Their first settlements were on the west side of the Mississippi River, near the present areas of St. James and Ascension Parishes. That first area became known as the Acadian Coast. Today there are 22 parishes of Louisiana considered part of Acadiana, a modern description of the region of southern Louisiana west of the Mississippi River first settled by French Acadians. For more details on the first Acadians in Louisiana, visit the Acadian-Cajun Genealogy & History website. See www.acadian-cajun.com/hiscaj2b.htm.

1766. Antonio de Ulloa became the first Spanish governor of Louisiana, headquartered at New Orleans. He was a brilliant scientist (discoverer of the element Platinum), highly regarded by Spanish Royalty, but rose to his highest level of incompetence as a military leader.

1768. The Louisiana Rebellion of 1768 was an attempt by a combined armed force of French Acadians, French Creoles and German Coast settlers around New Orleans to stop the handover of French La Louisiane to Spain. The rebels forced Spanish Governor de Ulloa to leave New Orleans and return to Spain, but his replacement Alejandro O’Reilly was able to crush the rebellion. O’Reilly, an Irishman turned Cuban, was responsible for establishing military rule in Spanish Louisiana.

1777-1778. During the Revolutionary War, a number of French-speaking Acadians from Louisiana joined their counterparts from the leftover French settlements of Kaskaskia and Vincennes. They were added to the Virginia Militia force commanded by General George Rogers Clark. General Clark later noted that the fiercely anti-British fighters he gained from the French communities contributed greatly to his monumental victories against the British in the conquest of the Old Northwest.

1783 United States of America. The treaty of Paris of 1783 first recognized the United States as an independent nation, with borders from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, and from present Maine to Georgia. The treaty also reaffirmed the claims of Britain to present Canada; and Spain’s claim to East Florida, West Florida, New Spain (including Nuevo Mexico & Tejas), and Louisiana west of the Mississippi River.

1800-1802 Louisiana. In Europe, Napoleon defeated the Spanish in battle and gained title to Louisiana again after trading them a couple of duchies in Italy. However, Napoleon found that his troops in the Caribbean were under siege and unable to provide much help in establishing a French government in Louisiana. Several months later, when American emissaries showed up in Paris trying to buy New Orleans from him, Napoleon decided to unload the entire tract. – legally described as “the drainage of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.”

1803 Louisiana Purchase. President Thomas Jefferson urged Congress to vote in favor, and the U.S. purchased the huge area from France, doubling the size of the United States. But, disputed claims to areas of Lower Louisiana now existed between Spain and the U.S., in particular, the area between the Red River and Sabine River in present Louisiana; and the area of West Florida, east of the Mississippi River.

1804-1805. In 1804, Congress divided the Louisiana Purchase into two jurisdictions: Louisiana District and Orleans Territory. The latter had north and south bounds the same as the present state of Louisiana, but did not include its present Florida Parishes, and its northwest corner extended on an indefinite line west into Spanish Tejas. The first capital of Orleans Territory was New Orleans. For a year, Louisiana District was attached to Indiana Territory for judicial administration, but became Louisiana Territory with its own Governor on July 4, 1805. St. Louis was the first capital of Louisiana Territory.

1812. April 30th. The same area as old Orleans Territory became Louisiana, the 18th state in the Union. New Orleans became the first state capital.

1812. June 4th. Louisiana Territory was renamed Missouri Territory. For about five weeks in 1812, a Louisiana Territory and a State of Louisiana existed at the same time.

For Further Reading:

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Wright Brothers Newspapers to Be Posted Online

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My father was proud of the fact that he was born before the Wright brothers made their famous “first flight” – being born October 11, 1903. He commented on it often. Of course, by December, the Wright brothers had made history, and dad hadn’t done much yet, but that’s beside the point.

The Wright brothers are not remembered for their printing business, but between 1899 and 1899, they printed a number of publications and newspapers. This was before they started their bicycle business.

“Special Collections and Archives in the Wright State University Libraries and the Dayton Metro Library have partnered together to create an online archive of the most complete run of Wright Brothers newspapers available to date. Both the Dayton Metro Library and WSU’s Special Collections and Archives house original issues of the Wright Brothers newspapers. By combining the two collections in an online archive, this valuable resource will be available in a readily accessible format worldwide.”

“…the Wright Brothers’ newspapers will be available in digital format on both Wright State’s CORE Scholar and on the Dayton Metro Library’s Dayton Remembers digital image site, thus making the newspapers accessible in not one, but two, online locations.”

Read the Wright State University announcement of May 11, 2015 about the digitization project.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

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New Canadian History Digital Archive

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The following news release is from Newswire.ca:

OTTAWA, May 11, 2015 /CNW Telbec/ – Canadians now have at their disposal the most important online research tool ever created about the history of their country.

Canadiana.org, a digital initiative of extraordinary scale, is a joint effort of 25 leading research institutions, libraries and archives working together with the goal of creating Canada’s multi-million page, comprehensive online archive.

Do you want to stump your friends with trivia about early hockey history? Are you searching family roots in Canada? Perhaps you’re working on a project for Canada’s 150th birthday or searching for information about a relative that took part in the Great War. Canadiana.org‘s online resources can provide answers to these questions and much, much more.

Canadiana offers more than 35 million pages of primary-source documents in 21 languages, including languages of our First Nations.

“Last year was a tremendous year of accomplishment”, said Canadiana.org Executive Director, Ron Walker: “Our member libraries have absolutely transformed the way Canadians access and study information about their past. Canadians now have a superb resource to help them in all manner of historical research.”

Chronicling the people and institutions that shaped Canadian history from the 1600s to the mid-1900s, the digital collection is already of major value for researchers. The majority is available free of charge: from school children, their teachers, family historians, and genealogists, to scholars in a wide variety of fields. Other content is available at a nominal fee, to help defray the hefty preservation costs.

The Canadiana.org team is also rolling out a campaign designed to increase public awareness of the initiative. The campaign, “Be Curious”, is highlighting little-known historical facts about Canada through social media. The goal is to bring Canadian history to life by distributing it through modern communication channels.

About Canadiana.org
Canadiana.org is a non-profit, charitable organization founded to preserve Canada’s print heritage and make it accessible for future generations, with a special emphasis on material that is rare, scattered or at-risk. With support from its partners, Canadiana pioneered the first large-scale online collection of Canadian print heritage, containing a mix of digitized microfiche as well as thousands of full-colour scans from over 230 lending institutions.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

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Eight Previously Out-Of-Print German Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Place Name Indexes Now Available!

Family Roots Publishing recently obtained the print rights to a number of important German research guides that I have found extremely helpful over the years. Included are eight of Roger Minert’s German Place Name Indexes – some of which have been out-of-print for some time.

To celebrate the publication of these invaluable guides, we are discounting the new volumes by 15% (Just $12.71 each!) through Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Click on the links to purchase.

What really makes these Place Name Indexes stand out from a typical gazetteer is that they index the town both in alphabetical order and in reverse alphabetical order. Anyone who has done any research in the German parish registers has run across instances where they can read the last letters of a place (such as: place of birth, previous residence, place of marriage, etc.), but the first or letters are illegible, making the place-name impossible to decipher. Roger’s indexes take care of that problem. Following is a list of the eight newly-printed volumes and their descriptions.

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Alsace-Lorraine Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 6,350 Alsace-Lorraine place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

An Alsace-Lorraine reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 6,350 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

Alsace-Lorraine Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 99 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0601.

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Braunschweig, Oldenburg, and Thuringia Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 1,550 Braunschweig, 3,050 Oldenburg, and 1,400 Thuringia place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A Braunschweig, Oldenburg, and Thuringia reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 6,050 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

Braunschweig, Oldenburg, and Thuringia Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 115 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0609.

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East Prussia Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 8,450 East Prussia place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

An East Prussia reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 8,450 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

East Prussia Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 109 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0611.

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Palatinate Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 1,650 Palatinate place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A Palatinate reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 1,650 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

This volume is also available in PDF eBook format – ready for immediate download.

Palatinate Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 62 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0621.

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Rhineland Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 4,950 Rhineland place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A Rhineland reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 4,950 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

Rhineland Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Published 2015; 146 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0627.

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Province of Saxony Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 4,950 Province of Saxony place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A Province of Saxony reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 4,950 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

Province of Saxony Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical and Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 92 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0631.

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West Prussia Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 5,100 West Prussia place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A West Prussia reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 5,100 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

West Prussia Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 98 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0637.

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Württemberg Place Name Indexes

This volume indexes over 7,250 Württemberg place names, in alpha and reverse alpha order.

A Württemberg reverse alphabetical index is key to doing research in the parish registers of the German state. The Reverse Alphabetical Index allows the researcher to determine the name of a town when the first part of the name (whether one or more letters) is missing. This is a common problem caused by torn or moldy pages, ink-blots, tight bindings, poor microfilm quality, etc. By using this index, the researcher can also determine the official spelling for towns when variant spellings occur in old records. The book includes a regular alphabetical index of all the towns in the province as well as regular and reverse alphabetical listings of over 7,250 names of German kingdoms, duchies, principalities, counties, rivers, mountain ranges, and other geopolitical and topographical entities.

Württemberg Place Name Indexes: Identifying Place Names Using Alphabetical & Reverse Alphabetical Indexes; by Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; Republished 2015; 124 pp; Soft Cover; Item # FR0641.

These Reverse Alphabetical Indexes are often key to overcoming difficult research problems. They are great companion volumes for those using the Map Guide to German Parish Registers volumes.

Again, to celebrate the publication of these invaluable guides, we are discounting the new volumes by 15% (Just $12.71 each!) through Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Click on the links to purchase.

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FamilySearch Adds Over 9.8 Million Indexed Records & Images for Canada, Costa Rica, Croatia, Jamaica, Peru, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, & the USA

FamilySearch Logo 2014

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 9.8 million indexed records and images for Canada, Costa Rica, Croatia, Jamaica, Peru, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 2,983,594 indexed records from the Croatia, Church Books, 1516–1994 collection; 57,446 indexed records and 1,785,969 images from the Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999 collection; and 1,087,758 indexed records from the Costa Rica Civil Registration, 1860–1975 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Canada, Saskatchewan, Catholic Church Records, 1846–1957 – 40,494 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Canada, Saskatchewan Cemetery Transcripts, ca. 1850–1994 -164,737 – 139,318 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Costa Rica Civil Registration, 1860–1975 – 1,087,758 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Croatia, Church Books, 1516–1994 – 2,983,594 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Jamaica, Civil Registration, 1880–1999 -57,446 – 1,785,969 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Peru, Catholic Church Records, 1603–1992 – 447,186 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 – 0 – 46,666 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Lambayeque, Civil Registration, 1873–1998 -53,466 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Philippines, Civil Registration (National), 1945–1984 – 0 – 2,508 -Added images to an existing collection.

Philippines, Northern Samar, Roman Catholic Diocese of Catarman, Church Records, 1860–1983 – 0 – 63,212 – New browsable image collection.

Puerto Rico, Civil Registration, 1805–2001 – 97,379 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, BillionGraves Index – 363,233 – 363,233 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, Georgia, Deaths, 1928–1939 – 15,495 – 1,750 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, Missouri, County Marriage, Naturalization, and Court Records, 1800–1991 – 0 – 894,662 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, North Dakota Census, 1915 – 361,965 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, North Dakota Census, 1925 – 394,391 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Ohio, Bloomfield Township, Brownwood Cemetery Records, 1824–2012 – 0 – 636 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, Manifests of Aliens Granted Temporary Admission at El Paso, ca. July 1924–1954 – 117,170 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States Headstone Applications for U.S. Military Veterans, 1925–1949 – 346,070 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

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Maine Names Lists 1623-2012 – Now Shipping

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The brand new Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook! The Name List book is 103 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 – with FR0248 FREE as a PDF download eBook; by William Dollarhide; 103 pp., paper; 8.5×11; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781628590302; Item # FR0247

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Washington. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

Contents

  • Preface
  • Map: USGS Map Of Maine.
  • Map: English, French, Dutch, and Swedish Colonies, 1584-1626
  • Map: 1790 (as part of Massachusetts)
  • Map: Grants to the Plymouth and Virginia Companies
  • Maine Name Lists
  • Maine Historical Timeline, 1524-1863
  • Accounts of the First Europeans to Visit the Present Maine
  • Things to Know about Maine’s Censuses and Substitutes
  • Online Databases at the Maine State Archives
  • Genealogy Resources at the Maine State Archives & Maine State Library
  • Online Genealogy Research at the Maine Historical Society
  • Bibliography of Maine Name Lists, 1623-2012
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

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    Eastern European Historical Repositories – on sale for 10 to 15% off thru May 11, 2015

    EasternEuropeanHistoricalRepostories-250

    I just obtained copies of the new Eastern European Historical Repositories by Dr. Charles Dickson. I’m always looking for new resources, especially as deals with Europe – and this book fills a void.

    America has often been described as a melting pot nation. While such an adjective contains some truth it does not capture the total flavor of its multiethnic experience. While many national groups have blended into the American fabric, they have also, to varying degrees, maintained a sense of individual ethic identity.

    This work represents an attempt to organize a list of the many resources that are available to serious students of Eastern European history in their ongoing search for family histories. The listings in this book cover the following ethnic groups: Albanians, Armenians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Estonians, Greeks, Hungarians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, Slovenians, and Ukrainians.

    Under each ethnic group a common format has been followed which includes an introduction to immigration patterns, followed by separate page listings describing the holdings of primary genealogical societies, museums, and educational institutions associated with that group.

    Next there are listings of other ethnic related societies which have some family histories followed by a listing of the regional public libraries located in areas where each particular group has settled in significant numbers. As the reader uses this handbook as a research tool in discovering group and family histories, hopefully he or she will be reminded that the American multiethnic experience may be singularly unique in human history.

    The following is from the Table of Contents

    • Preface
    • The Author
    • Table of Illustrations
    • Introduction
    • Albanians
    • Armenians
    • Bulgarians
    • Croatians
    • Czechs (including Bohemians & Moravians)
    • Estonians
    • Greeks (including Cypriots)
    • Hungarians (Including Magyars)
    • Latvians
    • Lithuanians
    • Poles (Including Pomeranians & Silesians)
    • Romanians (Including Moldavians)
    • Russians (Including Byelorussians)
    • Serbians (Including Bosnians & Macedonians)
    • Slovaks (Including Carpatho-Rusyns)
    • Slovenians
    • Ukrainians (Including Ruthenians)
    • General Bibliography

    Click on the link to order Eastern European Historical Repositories; by Dr. Charles Dickson; 140 pp., paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2014; ISBN: 0788455826; Item # HBD5582. On sale for 10% off through May 11, 2015 – or 15% off in the Eastern European bundle of 2 books. Sale ends at midnight May 11, 2015.

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    Who Will Design President Obama’s Chicago Library?

    The following teaser is from the May 5, 2015 edition of chicagotribune.com:

    It’s destined to be Chicago’s architectural commission of the decade, a building that gives physical form to the soaring ideals of the nation’s first African-American president.

    Which begs the question: Who will design it?

    In the run-up to next Tuesday’s announcement that the Barack Obama library and museum will be built in Chicago, speculation already centers on London-based, Tanzanian-born architect David Adjaye, who was seated with Obama during a 2012 state dinner for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

    Read the full article.

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    Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors – On Sale for 10 to 15% Off Thru May 11, 2015

    mm016
    Moorshead Magazines recently brought us Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors. At 82 pages, this journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

    Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

    “For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

    Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

    Contents

    10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

    Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

    Using Maps & Gazetteers

    Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

    Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

    Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

    Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

    Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

    Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

    JRI-Poland Expands Access

    Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

    Online Hungarian Research

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

    Researching the Hungarian Census

    Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

    Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

    Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

    Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

    Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

    Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

    Researching Your Russian Ancestors

    Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

    Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

    Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

    Copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Reg. Price: $9.95 – on sale for 10% off at just $8.96 – or 15% off as part of the 2-book Eastern European research bundle.

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    The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records, 15% Off, Thru May 14, 2015

    Family Roots Publishing just brought in another stock of The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records, and discounted them by 15% at the FRPC website. Normally $20, they are selling for just $17 – now through midnight PDT Thursday, May 14, 2015 – web sales only. We ran out the last time we ran these on special, and figured we would run them again to allow others to get copies.

    We’ve all heard the Benjamin Franklin’s sardonic quote, “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” We feel the pain in our pocketbooks every time we pay taxes. However, as genealogists we are fortunate to have tax records as a tool to researching the past. Tax records contain mountains of data, are often highly accurate, and cover a large variety of taxes, or tax types. The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records is the family historian’s educator to the world of tax document.

    As the authors, Carol Cook Darrow and Susan Winchester, say, “the census taker came every ten years and often missed people, The tax collector came every year and seldom missed anyone.” North American tax records date back to the earliest colonial period, back to the 1620s. Records can help establish location, real estate, personal possessions, economic status, occupations and businesses, and sometimes even relationships between individuals, helping link you to your ancestor. This guide was written to help the researcher find the various tax records and understand the information they provide.

    The first two chapters provide the necessary background and skills needed to successfully search tax records. The remaining chapters cover the different types of tax records, including:

    • Poll taxes
    • Real Estate taxes
    • Personal Property taxes
    • Federal Taxes
    • Inheritance taxes
    • School taxes
    • Liquor taxes and more…

    No two taxes are collected in the same way. Government at all levels can imposes taxes. This book examines the history of tax records in the United States, including early colonial taxes, along with common tax forms and collection procedures. Learn how to evaluate tax records and compare records of different years to track your ancestors and possibly gain additional information about their families.

     

    Table of Contents

    List of Figures

    List of Tables

    Preface

    Chapter 1. Getting Started in Tax Records

    • Benefits of Tax Record Research
    • Research Can Be Tedious – Until You Succeed
    • Tax Process
    • Locating Tax Records
    • Research Tax Records at Courthouse or Archive
    • Tax Records as Substitutes for Census Records
    • Verify County Formation Date
    • Following the Records Year By Year
    • Isolated Records
    • Indexes: Never the Final Answer
    • A Word About Slaves
    • Finding the Right Record in the Wrong Place
    • Ready to Begin?

    Chapter 2. Research Techniques

    • Types of Taxes
    • Tax Records May be Combined
    • How to Approach a Tax Record
    • Identify Information Being Collected
    • Sources for Interpreting Tax Information
    • Consider Spelling Variations
    • Become Familiar with Notations and Abbreviations
    • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name in the Same County
    • Doing the Math
    • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of an Ancestor
    • Records That Report Only Assessed Value
    • Paying Taxes in the Coin of the Realm
    • Calculating with Pounds, Shillings, and Peace
    • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of an Ancestor
    • Forming a Hypothesis
    • Summary of Research Techniques

    Chapter 3. Poll Taxes

    • Taxes “By the Poll” Were Earliest American Taxes
    • Massachusetts Poll Tax, 1646
    • Virginia Tithables
    • The Tithables Process
    • Poll Books and Voting Rights
    • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name int eh Same County
    • Tracking Changes Through Tax Lists Over Time
    • Research Example: Identify Men as They Become Adults
    • Finding the Landless Ancestor
    • Research example: Research A Landless Ancestor
    • Poll Tax Records Can Replace the Census

    Chapter 4. Land Taxes

    • Colonial Land Distribution
    • Land Taxes After the Revolution
    • Land Exemptions Used to Encourage Settlement
    • Tax Records Can Identify the Land and Location
    • Research Example: Separate Men with the Same Name in the Same County
    • Research Example: Use Tax Information to Lead to Other Valuable Records
    • Delinquent Land Tax Sales
    • Tracking Delinquent Land Tax Sales Records
    • Land Tax Records Can Point to a Migration Trail
    • Land Holdings May Imply Arrival Date
    • Tax Ledgers Arranged by Legal Land Description
    • Additional Information Collected in Tax Records
    • Information Common to Land Tax Records

    Chapter 5. Personal Property Taxes

    • Paying for Government
    • Estates Are Taxable
    • Research Example: Establish a Year of Death as Estate Becomes Taxable
    • Land and Personal Property Tax Lists Combined
    • Research Example: Estimate Wealth of tan Ancestor
    • Property Tax Lists Expanded Over Time
    • State Income Tax Replaces Some Personal Property Taxes
    • Homestead Exemptions Enacted
    • Personal Property Tax – “Everyman” Tax

    Chapter 6. Federal Taxes

    • Direct Tax of 1798
    • Tariffs and Import Duties
    • Direct Taxes of 1813, 1815, and 1816
    • Direct Tax of 1861
    • Federal Income Taxes (1962-1872)
    • Confederate Taxes
    • Tariffs Decline in Significance
    • Income Tax Reconsidered
    • Tax Protests
    • Tax Assessors and Collectors

    Chapter 7. Inheritance and Estate Taxes

    • Federal Estate and Inheritance Taxes
    • State Estate and Inheritance Taxes
    • Research Example: Identify the Heirs of an Estate
    • Estate and Inheritance Taxes Can Prove Relationships

    Chapter 8. Miscellaneous Tax Records

    • Militia Service
    • Road Orders
    • Ecclesiastical Taxes
    • Faculty Taxes
    • Business Licenses
    • Liquor Taxes
    • School Taxes
    • Federal Head Tax on Aliens
    • Old Age Assistance Tax

    Chapter 9. Summary

    • Summary of Research Techniques

    Appendix A Textural Records of the Direct Tax Commission in the Southern States

    Appendix B Microfilmed Records of the Internal Revenue Assessment Lists, 1862-1874

    Appendix C State Inheritance Tax Laws Through 1913

    Appendix D State Old Age Assistance Laws, as of 1934

    Glossary

    Research Bibliography

    Bibliography of Selected Tax Records

    Index

     

    Order a copy of The Genealogist’s Guide to Researching Tax Records from Family History Publishing; Item #: HBD4298, On Sale for just $17.00 – now through midnight PDT, Thursday, May 14, 2015 – Reg. $20.00.

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    Texas State Genealogical Society 2015 Family History Conference

    The following announcement is from the Texas State Genealogical Society:

    Texas_State_Genealogical_Society_logo_300pw

    TSGS is excited to announce its 2015 Family History Conference will be Oct 30—Nov 1, 2015 in Austin, Texas, and everyone is invited! This three day event will include wonderful research opportunities, insightful family history sessions for all skill levels, and a full exhibit hall.

    Austin’s rich historical and genealogical resources promise all TSGS 2015 Conference attendees will have a memorable learning experience allowing them to explore their family history.

    Visit the TSGS website and keep an eye out in your email inbox in the coming weeks and months for more information about the speakers’ call for presentation proposals, sponsorship opportunities, hotel information, keynote speaker announcement, exhibitor opportunities, volunteer opportunities, and registration.

    We can’t wait to meet you in Austin in the fall!

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    News from the Utah Genealogical Association

    UGA

    The following is from the Utah Genealogical Association:

    The DNA Interest Group will meet virtually on Thursday, May 7th and June 4th at 7:00 pm. Angie Bush will present AncestryDNA: Matches Circles and NADs in May, and First Steps for Adoptees in June. Complete information is posted on the UGA DNA Interest Group page, but you may also go directly to the DNA Genetic Genealogy Community to log into the webinar. Recordings of past presentations and handouts, when provided, will be placed behind the members wall for those unable to attend. Angie Bush, the Genetic Genealogist, is also the coordinator for the SLIG 2016 Advanced DNA Course.

    SLIG Scholarship: The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy is accepting applications for the SLIG Scholarship named in honor of Jimmy B. Parker. The winner will be able to attend the SLIG 2016 course of their choice. The deadline is May 15th. Details about submission requirements and judging criteria may be found on the UGA website under SLIG Scholarships.

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