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Kansas Name Lists Published and Online Censuses and Substitutes 1854–2012, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

According to Leland K. Meitzler:

“Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.”

fr0241The most recent release in the line of Dollarhide’s Name List guides is for state of Kansas. Kansas Name Lists Published and Online Censuses and Substitutes 1854–2012, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

In this book, names lists are detailed in the following database categories:

  • Territorial and State Census Records
  • State and County Court Records
  • Directories
  • County Histories
  • State Militia Lists
  • Tax Lists
  • Vital Records
  • Voter Lists

The contents of the Kansas Name Lists section of the guide include:

  • Kansas Name Lists
  • Historical Timeline for Kansas, 1540-1996
  • Introduction Kansas Territorial & Statewide Censuses
  • Online Resources of the Kansas Historical Society
  • Bibliography of Kansas Name Lists, 1854 2012

National Names Lists information included with every volume:

The National Names Lists have these categories (244 entries in all):

  • Federal Census Records
  • Immigration Lists
  • U.S. Military Lists
  • U.S. Veterans Records
  • U.S. Pension Records
  • National Vital Record

There are also a number of maps, including:

  • 1763 British North America
  • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
  • 1790 United States
  • 1800 United States
  • 1810 United States
  • 1820 United States
  • 1830 United States
  • 1840 United States
  • 1850 United States
  • 1860 United States
  • 1870-1880 United States
  • 1890-1940 United States
  • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

Order your copy of Kansas Name Lists Published and Online Censuses and Substitutes 1854–2012, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present from Family Roots Publishing.

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Old Ohio Newspapers Added to the Chronicling America Collection Posted by the Library of Congress

The following is from the July 14, 2014 edition of The Columbus Dispatch:

Democratic Northwest and Henry County News Headlines

A fascinating collection of Ohio’s historic small town newspapers has been digitized and added to the Library of Congress “Chronicling America” website

The Ohio History Connection said the [searchable] newspapers were digitized with a $248,600 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The latest editions will join 40 other papers, and 200,000 pages, published between 1845-1922…

Read the full article.

The following newspapers were added:
Carroll Free Press, 1836, 1841-1858;
Jackson Standard, 1853-1858, 1866-1888 and Jackson Daily Standard, 1873-1874, 1880-1881;
Lower Sandusky Freeman, 1849-1849, Freeman, 1849-1850
Fremont Weekly Freeman, 1850-1853;
(Napoleon) Democratic Northwest, 1881-1894 and Democratic Northwest and Henry County News, 1894-1897
Plymouth Advertiser, 1853-1855.

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Declining Funding of Libraries & Archives in the USA Directly Tied to the Recession

The following news release from IBISWorld was published on PRWeb.com:

The Libraries and Archives industry has suffered from declining government funding over the past five years. According to the Institute of Museum and Library Services, state and local governments account for more than 90.0% of public library revenue, and struggling state and local government budgets resulted in considerable cuts to public library funding. “Similarly, federal government grants to public libraries also contracted following the recession, due especially to growing concerns regarding the deficit,” according to IBISWorld Industry Analyst David Yang. Private libraries, which are funded through membership fees and endowment funds, also experienced tightening funding because falling disposable income made consumers less willing to purchase private library memberships. As a result, in the five years to 2014, IBISWorld expects industry revenue to fall at an average annual rate of 1.2% to $15.3 billion.

Declining government support over the past five years can be entirely attributed to the recession. Rising unemployment and falling disposable income resulted in declining tax revenue for state and local governments, which necessitated budget cuts. Since many public libraries serve as the only source of free computers and wireless internet in their community, according to the American Library Association, funding is anticipated to rise as the economy recovers and tax revenue increases. IBISWorld anticipates revenue to grow 1.2% in 2014.

“Although all public libraries and most private libraries operate on a nonprofit basis, cost control has been important over the past five years, especially as government funding decreased,” says Yang. Over the period, library privatization has grown. Local governments have been contracting out library operations to private for-profit companies, which can cut costs by centralizing operations and implementing flexible wages and benefits.

In the five years to 2019, IBISWorld forecasts that industry revenue will recover.

Government funding is anticipated to rise as economic growth picks up. Rising disposable income levels will also bolster consumer donations to libraries. Furthermore, according to the American Library Association, library visit frequency is correlated with education levels. As the number of students steadily increases over the next five years, demand for library services will grow.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Libraries and Archives in the US industry report page.

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Genealogy at a Glance: Scots-Irish Genealogy Research

gpc3876“The term Scots-Irish refers to people who originated in Scotland and settled in the 17th century in Ireland in the nine northern counties of Ulster. Claiming economic hardship, 250,000 Scots-Irish immigrated to North America between 1717 and 1776, principally to the port of Philadelphia, then west into the Appalachian region where they became the intrepid woodsmen and pioneers of American legend. The important thing to take away here is that this guide is intended as an aid to researchers who are attempting to trace Irish ancestors who arrived in North America prior to 1800.”

Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research, by Brian Mitchell was the first publication in the Genealogy at a Glance series. Brian Mitchell has now added another guide to the series, Genealogy at a Glance: Scots-Irish Genealogy Research. This issue describes who were the Scots-Irish, the settlement in Ireland during the 17th century and later emigration of many to America. Of course, the guide also covers the usually, what to look for in your research and resources to research.

Like many of the guides, this one begins with some quick facts relevant to the subject. Some Scotch-Irish quick facts include:

  • 100,000 Scottish migrants settled in Ireland during the 17th-century Plantation of Ulster
  • 34.6 million Americans, some 11% of the population, claim Irish Ancestry, with a further 3.2 million identifying more specifically with Scotch-Irish origins

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color limited brochure meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research. In this guide, Humphrey provides plenty of additional tips and further references to please the most avid researcher.

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

What is Scots-Irish

Historical Background

  • 17th-Century Planters
  • 18th-Century Emigrants

18th-Century Passenger Lists

Place of Origin

Family Names as Evidence

Census Returns

  • Church Registers
  • Census Substitutes
  • Estate Records

Record Repositories

Other Online Resources

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC349, Price: $8.77.

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The Alaska State Archives Has Accepted the Alaska Railroad and Territorial Court Records from NARA

Alaska Railroad

On Friday, the Alaska State Archives took official ownership of about 3000 cubic feet of records from the now-closed National Archives branch in Anchorage. This was done in a signing ceremony attended by court officials, judges, lawmakers, state historians, and museum volunteers. Since the records are being transferred from one archive to another, they all come ready to store in acid-free file folders and boxes. On August 4, 7 & 8, the records will begin to arrive in three 40-ft shipping containers. The containers will hauled on the Alcan Highway to Haines, after which a ferry will complete the transfer to the Juneau. The Alaska State Archives and Museum is currently under construction in Juneau with a portion of the storage space already completed, allowing a place to put all these records.

Twelve hundred of the records are from the Alaska Railroad. Included in the railroad records are items like lists of stoppages. According to State Archivist Dean Dawson in an interview with KTOO’s Matt Miller, “It might be we picked up five tons of coal from Healy, for example. Some of those are just garden variety records that make the trains run on time. Others, for example would go back to the early teens – a hundred years ago – and document why certain decisions were made regarding routes, regarding services, and so forth.”

The railroad records will be catalogued over the next year, and those that are considered to have no permanent archival value may be offered back to the Alaska Railroad itself.

Included in the transfer were about 1800 Alaska Territorial Court Records that date back to 1884. These records may be available to researchers in Juneau within a month or so.

Since the National Archives closed its Anchorage facility in June, most of the NARA records from Alaska are being sent to Seattle, to be consolidated with those records already housed there.

For more information, check out the following entries.

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/e441744fb42e474cbd7af7433a23ecb3/AK–Historical-Records

http://www.ktoo.org/2014/07/27/state-archives-accepts-alaska-railroad-territorial-court-records/

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/e441744fb42e474cbd7af7433a23ecb3/AK–Historical-Records

http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/07/28/3306906/territorial-court-records-will.html?sp=/99/296/359/

http://www.adn.com/article/20140530/national-archives-records-stored-anchorage-bound-juneau-seattle

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Bundle of the First 17 of William Dollarhide’s “Name List” Books AL-KS on Sale for Nearly 38% Off – Thru Thursday, July 31

Illinois-Name-Lists-200pw

The publication of an extremely popular “Kansas Name Lists” and the Dollarhide Name List book promotion this last weekend was so successful that FRPC is running another sale on the books – this time for all 17 volumes as one set. They temporarily discounted the volumes by nearly 38% (Reg. $322.15 – sale price $199.95), with one very low P&H charge totaling only only $8 for delivery within the United States! (Shipping by International Priority mail of the bundle to Canada is $40.15, and the other countries worldwide $58.65.) If you’d like all 17 volumes (including FREE PDF eBooks of all of them), purchase your set before midnight PDT Thursday, July 31, 2014.

This bundle is made up of the first 17 of William Dollarhide’s “Name List” Books – All the volumes from Alabama through Kansas – at a nearly 38% bundle discount for this July 2014 promotion. These are all the volumes in print as of July 27, 2014. A FREE PDF Download of all seventeen of the volumes as fully-linked PDF eBooks will also be sent to the email address of the purchaser within 24 hours of purchase. All books are by William Dollarhide; 8.5×11; Published: 2013 and 2014; Item # FR0900

All books currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. The purchaser will be sent several emails, with PDF attachments of the eBooks. The books themselves will be mailed within 24 hours by USPS media mail within the USA, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States. After downloading the FREE PDF eBooks, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census-year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

The following is TYPICAL of the contents of each of the volumes

Contents

  • Preface
  • Alabama Name Lists
    • 1820 Map of Alabama
    • Alabama Name Lists, 1702-2006
    • Historical Timeline for Alabama, 1519-1820
    • Map: Roads from Philadelphia to New Orleans by 1806
    • Map: 1810 West Florida Annexation
    • Introduction to Alabama’s Colonial, Territorial & Statewide Name Lists
    • Online Databases Available at the ADAH
    • Online Alabama Databases Available at Ancestry.com
    • Bibliography of Alabama Name Lists, 1702 – 2006
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

The set of Name List Guides is made up of the following 17 books, all written by William Dollarhide, all of which may be purchased individually or as electronic PDF eBooks from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

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Producing a Quality Family History — Now in Hardcover

Last year I reviewed Producing a Quality Family History, which I have copied below. This helpful guide is now available in hardcover from Family Roots Publishing. The hardcover looks just like the softcover, with the same four-color printed cover, only laminated and bound as a hardback. If you missed picking up a copy of this book before, now is the perfect time to get help creating your own permanent family record or book.

Original Review:

What does it take to put together a family history worth reading? The short answer is time, money, and effort. However, after all the work you have done in researching, collecting documents, gathering pictures, sorting, and recording genealogies and family stories, putting a family history together should seem like a piece of cake. To help researchers preserve their family histories and make the process as streamlined as possible, Patricia Law Hatcher has written the helpful guide, Producing a Quality Family History.

The obvious follow-up question is, what makes a “quality” family history? As a publisher and book designer, I have developed my own ideas over the years as to what makes a quality book. I have also learned that others have their own idea of what quality means. Hatcher acknowledges personal preferences in choosing how to produce a family history. She recommends researchers start by reviewing family histories at a library. She, also, goes on to suggest there are some basic guideline, or qualities,  which should be followed. The list reads as follows (referring to a quality work):

It presents quality research–research that is thorough, new, and based on a variety of primary sources

  • It is well organized, understandable, and attractively presented
  • It uses a recognized genealogical numbering system
  • It documents each fact and relationship fully
  • It expresses information accurately, indicating the likelihood of conclusions
  • It goes beyond records, placing people in context
  • It included illustrations such as maps, charts, and photographs
  • It has a thoughtful and thorough index

Producing a Quality Family History can help the reader create a manuscript, and final publishing, to meet and exceed these criteria. Not only is content reviewed, but layout and design, font selection, editing, and developing a print ready history are all covered. This book is meant to help you avoid mistakes before you even start writing. However, even if you are almost ready to print your book, this guide can help you feel confident you have produced a quality history, before you go to print.

Patricia Hatcher is a technical writer, instructor and certified genealogists. Having written and edited numerous books and articles, she is well versed in the subject. This guide is easy to follow, and equally easy to implement in your own writing. As Hatcher notes in the book, nonfiction writing is to inform, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be, or even shouldn’t be, interesting. Genealogies reproduce facts, family histories, when properly written, give life to your ancestors. Through this guide, your family history can find the life and quality you always dreamed about.

 

Contents

Publishing Family History in the 1990s

What to Write; When to Write It

You Must Have Style

Writing

Understanding Type and Fonts

Book Design

Page Layout and Formatting

Organizing and Presenting Family Information

How Do You Know?

Turning Paper into People

Illustrations, Charts, and Photographs

Opening the Door to Your Book

Developing an Editorial Eye

Preparing Camera-Ready Art

Turning Camera-Ready Art into Books

Options from Technology

Self-Publishing

Resources

Index

 

Producing a Quality Family History is available from Family Roots Publishing.

 

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Haasl Genealogy Donated to Kewaunee, Wisconsin Public Library

Sr. Cecilia Fandel presents books of her family history to Sue Grosshuesch, Kewaunee Public Library Director.

Sr. Cecilia Fandel presents books of her family history to Sue Grosshuesch, Kewaunee Public Library Director.

The following teaser is from an article published in the July 24, 2014 edition of the Kewaunee County Star-News, and posted online at greenbaypressgazette.com:

Sr. Cecilia Fandel, descendant of the Benish-Haasls from Wood and Rusk counties, has donated Haasl and Benish genealogy books to the Kewaunee Library history and genealogy section.

Books were distributed to descendants in Kewaunee County.

Read the full article.

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Genealogy Search Leads Australian Woman to Vallejo, California

The following excerpt is from an article written by Rachel Raskin-Zrihen and posted in the July 25, 2014 edition of timesheraldonline.com:

Genealogy work often requires much deep and time-consuming sleuthing, but often pays satisfying dividends for those interested in their family history and connections. Such was the case with Margery Morrison of Australia, whose climb through her husband’s family tree revealed a Vallejo connection the couple could not have imagined.

The Times-Herald caught up with her during a recent visit to the Mare Island Museum, where she was able to see an exhibit about her husband’s long-lost great granduncle, Willam Halford, one of three Congressional Medal of Honor recipients buried on Mare Island. It was a long and winding road that lead her from Queensland, Australia, to England and eventually, to Vallejo.

Read the full article.

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FamilySearch Adds Over 3.7 Million Indexed Records & Images to Brazil, Canada, Croatia, England, Germany, Isle of Man, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, and the USA

The following is compiled from the last two collection updates from FamilySearch (those for July 19 and July 25, 2014):

FamilySearch.org

During the week ending July 25, 2014, FamilySearch has added more than 1.7 million indexed records and images to collections from Canada, Croatia, Peru, Poland, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,160,179 indexed records from the United States, Hawaii, Honolulu Passenger Lists, 1900–1953, collection; the 50,858 indexed records from the Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997, collection; and the 99,950 indexed records from United States, Panama Canal Zone, Employment Records and Sailing lists, 1905–1937, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Canada, Quebec, Catholic Parish Registers, 1621–1979 – 27 – 290 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Croatia, Church Books, 1516–1994 – 0 – 201 – Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 – 50,858 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Poland, Radom Roman Catholic Church Books, 1587–1966 – 0 – 240 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Hawaii, Honolulu Passenger Lists, 1900–1953 – 1,160,179 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States, Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878–1938 – 77,476 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States Census, 1910 – 0 – 1,389 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States Census, 1940 – 99,173 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States, Panama Canal Zone, Employment Records and Sailing lists, 1905–1937 – 99,950 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States, Utah, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1847–1868 – 36 – 36 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

During the week ending July 19, 2014, FamilySearch has added more than 2 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, England, Germany, Isle of Man, Mexico, Netherlands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 148,960 images from the England, Durham, Diocese of Durham Original Wills, 1650–1857, collection; the 91,952 indexed records from the South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895–1972, collection; and the 804,247 indexed records and images from U.S., Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878–1922, 1959–1994, collection.

Again, see the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804–2013 – 0 – 147,861 – Added images to an existing collection.
England, Essex Parish Registers, 1503–1997 – 3,384 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
England, Durham Probate Bonds, 1556–1858 – 0 – 48,167 – New browsable image collection.
England, Durham Probate Commissions, Monitions and Citations, 1650–1858 – 0 – 32,085 – New browsable image collection.
England, Durham, Dean and Chapter of Durham’s Allerton and Allertonshire Original Wills, Inventories and Bonds, 1666–1845 – 0 – 1,842 – New browsable image collection.
England, Durham, Diocese of Durham Original Wills, 1650–1857 – 0 – 148,960 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Hesse, Frankfurt, Civil Registration, 1811–1978 – 0 – 24,327 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Isle of Man Parish Registers, 1598–2009 – 13,929 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
Mexico, Jalisco, Catholic Church Records, 1590–1979 – 0 – 7,217 – Added images to an existing collection.
Netherlands, Zuid-Holland Province, Civil Registration, 1679–1942 – 905 – 0 – Added images to an existing collection.
Netherlands, Census and Population Registers, 1574–1940 – 0 – 535 – Added images to an existing collection.
South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895–1972 – 91,952 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
United States Freedmen’s Branch Records, 1872–1878 – 0 – 61,984 – New browsable image collection.
South Korea, Civil Service Examinations and Records of Officials and Employees, 1392–1910 – 0 – 3,927 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Catholic Church Records, 1307–1985 – 0 – 1,449 – Added images to an existing collection
United States Census, 1850 – 0 – 3,199 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Obituaries, American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1899–2012 – 0 – 451,656 – New browsable image collection.
United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 – 169,857 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S., Alabama, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1865–1872 – 0 – 36,101 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878–1922, 1959–1994 – 751,805 – 52,442 – New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., Mississippi, State Archives, Various Records, 1820–1951 – 637 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.
U.S.,Ohio, Crawford County Obituaries, 1860–2004 – 0 – 25,819 – Added images to an existing collection.

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How Disney World Came to Be – in 38 Black & White Photos

Disneys comes to Florida

Disney World is a vacation spot that families have enjoyed since 1971. I first visited the park in 1975 while working for Green Thumb Products Corporation of Apopka, Florida. The company put up all the terminal managers from around the United States at the Contemporary Hotel (then the only hotel in the park) for a manager’s conference and pep-talk to those of us working for the struggling tropical plant company.

I just happened to run across a series of historic photos held by the State Archives in Florida that give some insights into the initial purchase and development of the 43 square miles that became Disney World. It’s too bad that Roy never got to see his dream developed. I think he would be mighty proud…

Check out the photos at wesh.com.

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Researchers From Ancestry.com Help Explore the Oregon Trail, Klondike Gold Rush, & More on New Season of TLC Series “Who Do You Think You Are?”

Cynthia Nixon's Connection to Prison Reform

The following is from globenewswire:

PROVO, Utah, July 23, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – In the new season of TLC’s Emmy-nominated series “Who Do You Think You Are?” Ancestry.com researchers mined thousands of historical documents to help producers make new family history discoveries for an all-star line up of celebrities. The new season premieres tonight and will feature Cynthia Nixon, Rachel McAdams and Kayleen McAdams, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Valerie Bertinelli, and Kelsey Grammer.

Amassing thousands of hours, Ancestry.com researchers explored 18th and 19th century America, Canada, and even Victorian England, to research topics that range from women’s rights, Italian heritage, and an American Loyalist who sided with the crown. There was even exploration of the Oregon Trail and adventure through the freezing temperatures of the Klondike Gold Rush.

“We are thrilled to again sponsor this new season of ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ and provide research support that helped celebrities experience a family history journey that connected them to new ancestors and new discoveries,” said Jennifer Utley, Lead Researcher for the project at Ancestry.com. “It’s always exciting to see where records will lead you when researching your family history. This season we explored stories that were at times tragic, and others uplifting, as life, no matter place or time, can be.”

Every day on Ancestry.com, members discover their family history through billions of historical records spanning different places and time. On this season of “Who Do You Think You Are?,” celebrities become acquainted with a variety of ancestral stories spanning historic moments.

  • While embarking on a journey to learn about her father’s side of her family Cynthia Nixon discovers that the harrowing experiences of an ancestor in mid 19th century Missouri, played a pivotal role that improved the future lives of women in prisons.
  • While looking to learn more about his father’s side of his family, Jesse Tyler Ferguson travels from Maryland and New York to the far reaches of Alaska where his great grandfather embarked on an ambitious gold expedition across the Klondike.
  • Rachel McAdams and her sister Kayleen explore the history of two ancestors: one a Loyalist/Tory during the American Revolution, and the other a butler in Devon with a “downstairs” romance.
  • California’s social history and letters from the Oregon Trail are examined while exploring the ancestors of Kelsey Grammer.
  • Valerie Bertinelli embarks on a journey that will connect her to Quaker ancestors and English heraldry, while exploring her Italian heritage.

The new season is the second time Ancestry.com has teamed up with TLC as a sponsor, and the fifth time it has worked with the program. As part of sponsoring the show, Ancestry.com provides exhaustive family history research on each of the featured celebrities, which is used to build out the story of each episode.

For more about Ancestry.com and weekly recaps for each episode, including research approach and topic explored visit http://www.ancestry.com/who-do-you-think-you-are.

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Nas Discovers His Ancestry Via Gates’s “Finding Your Roots:

Nas performing in Paris, France, July 2014

Nas performing in Paris, France, July 2014

Hip Hop star, Nasir Jones, found out about his ancestry recently as part of the 10-part season 2 of Finding Your Roots. The following excerpt is from an article posted July 24, 2014 at allhiphop.com:

Throughout his career Nas has used his music to explore and present historical information he felt was relevant to his listeners, so it’s not surprising the Queens emcee took advantage of the opportunity to learn more about his own family history.

Nas was able to accomplish that personal reflection thanks to the PBS series Finding Your Roots. The show’s host and executive producer, Henry Louis Gates Jr. of Harvard University, tapped Nas to become the first Hip Hop star to be featured on the program.

Read the full article.

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Ancestry.com LLC Reports Second Quarter 2014 Financial Results

The following is from globenewswire.com:

Q2 Non-GAAP Revenues $156.1 Million, Up 13% Year-Over-Year

July 23, 2014 16:05 ET | Source: Ancestry.com, Inc.
PROVO, Utah, July 23, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)
— Ancestry.com LLC, the world’s largest online family history resource, reported financial results today for the second quarter ended June 30, 2014.

“Despite softer performance in the second quarter, our core subscriber base retention remains solid and the business is healthy,” said Tim Sullivan, Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com. “We’re continuing to make strategic investments in content, product and technology as well as new product initiatives like our rapidly growing AncestryDNA business, all of which are designed to drive long-term growth, further strengthen our market leadership, and leverage the benefits of our attractive business model.”

Second Quarter 2014 Financial Highlights

  • Total revenues and non–GAAP revenues1 for the second quarter 2014 were each $156.1 million. Non-GAAP revenues increased 13.3% from $137.7 million in the second quarter of 2013 driven by growth in revenues from the Company’s core Ancestry.com branded websites and AncestryDNA.
  • Net loss for the second quarter of 2014 was $(7.6) million compared to net loss of $(21.3) million in the second quarter of 2013.
  • Adjusted EBITDA2 for the second quarter of 2014 was $55.4 million, compared to $54.2 million in the second quarter of 2013. Adjusted EBITDA for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 includes $2.6 million and $3.5 million, respectively, of professional service fees related to litigation and costs associated with the return of capital transaction declared in February 2014 by our parent. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2013, adjusted EBITDA includes $1.0 million and $2.2 million, respectively, of professional services related to litigation, costs associated with reorganizing our corporate structure and registering the Company’s senior unsecured notes with the SEC.
  • Free cash flow3 totaled $10.2 million for the second quarter of 2014, compared to $12.1 million for second quarter of 2013.
  • Cash and cash equivalents totaled $91.5 million as of June 30, 2014.
  • Obligations under long-term debt4 totaled $903.3 million as of June 30, 2014.

Ancestry.com Highlights

Subscribers – Subscribers of Ancestry.com websites totaled approximately 2,109,000 as of June 30, 2014, compared to 2,161,000 as of March 31, 2014 and 2,112,000 as of June 30, 2013.

New Content – The Company added more than 700 million new records during the quarter. New records include the final wave of already digitized collections made available through our collaboration with FamilySearch including:

  • Philippines, Civil Registration, 1888-1981 – 24.2 million records
  • Czech Republic, Land Records, 1450-1889 (in Czech) – 3.9 million records
  • Netherlands, Census and Population Registers, 1645-1940 – 2.7 million records
  • Zimbabwe, Death Notices, 1904-1976 – 329 thousand records
  • La Libertad, Peru, Civil Registrations 1903-1988 – 1.3 million records

Other new record collections added in Q2 include:

  • Quaker Birth, Marriage, Death, and Memorial Records, 1650-1910 – 8.5 million records
  • New York, State Census, 1905 – 7.2 million records
  • Surrey, England, Land Tax Records, 1780-1832 – 1.9 million records
  • Puerto Rico, Civil Registrations, 1885-2001 – 5.4 million records
  • Montana, County Marriages 1865-1950 – 1.9 million records
  • Michigan, Divorce Records, 1897-1952 – 1.1 million records

Expanded Search Controls – Ancestry.com expanded the functionality of the sliding controls in search results to allow more of the fields entered in the search form to be controlled by sliders – up to 10 fields. Additionally, improvements were added to the display of the fields entered that are not editable with sliders. With this update, users can expand the section of fields below the sliders to see all of the entered search criteria.

Ancestry Mobile App Award – The Ancestry mobile app was a finalist for the 2014 Appy Award for the second year in a row.

AncestryDNA Highlights

  • Database – DNA database samples at approximately 500,000 to date (cumulative since May 2012), an increase of 25% since April 30, 2014.

Archives Highlights

  • New Content – Launched ten new vital records collections, with more than 42 million records in total. Included in this release are U.S. Obituaries, South Dakota State Census Records, Idaho Marriage Records, Utah Birth Records, and Utah Federal Service Veterans Burial Records.

Other Business Highlights

  • Find A Grave – Has now reached a total of 118 million memorials and 96 million photos.
    New Mobile App User Profiles – During the quarter, Ancestry.com released several follow-ups to the initial Find A Grave mobile app, which introduced user profiles, including the ability to view, create and add a user’s own profile, as well as the ability to view the profiles of other users.
    New Mobile Photo Upload Feature – Additionally, as users take new photos at a cemetery, instead of waiting for each to upload before continuing to use the app, the photos are sent to a queue to be uploaded in the background. As a part of this capability, a user now also has the ability to pause a photo upload queue until connected via Wi-Fi.
  • Newspapers.com – Now with more than 70 million online newspaper pages, the site recently completed a full digital archive of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle by digitizing negative microfilm of the paper provided by the Library of Congress dating from 1841 to 1955.
  • Fold3 – Has more than 430 million total records, and in Q2 launched military collections, including rich Civil War records like photos from the New York State Military Museum.

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Read CEO Tim Sullivan’s comments about the report.

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FamilySearch Indexing Volunteers Set Single-Day Participant Record

The following is from FamilySearch on July 23, 2014:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch Indexing Volunteers Obliterate Single-Day Participant Record, Helping Millions Identify Their Ancestry

Monumental Crowdsourcing Effort Also Yields Second-Highest 24-Hour Record Count

Salt Lake City, Utah—FamilySearch indexing volunteers love a good challenge and once again have banded together to obliterate a record—this time the high mark for the most indexing and arbitration volunteers participating in a single day. The previous record of 49,025 volunteers set in July 2012 at the height of the 1940 US Census indexing effort is now a distant memory compared to the new high of 66,511 set yesterday during the first-annual Worldwide Indexing Event.

While the minimum requirement for participation was to submit a single batch of indexing or arbitration work, it is obvious that many volunteers continued working throughout the day as they also produced the second-highest combined (indexed or arbitrated) total of submitted records at just over 5.7 million.

“FamilySearch indexing volunteers continue to astound with their dedication to indexing day in and day out and their ability to not only meet but far exceed every challenge set before them,” said Mike Judson, FamilySearch indexing workforce development manager. “In my mind, the best part of this success is how many people are going to be helped to find their ancestors because so many volunteers were willing to give their time to this great cause.”

Volunteers who jumped into the challenge early (the event started at 6:00 p.m. MST on Sunday evening) discovered a surprise as the indexing system struggled to process the massive influx of volunteer requests. Many were dismayed at the slowness of the system and inability, in some cases, to download or submit batches. Despite the challenges, volunteers showed great patience and perseverance, and most were eventually able to complete and submit a batch.

“We took the indexing system into ‘unexplored territory,’” said Judson. “Never before have so many people tried to contribute all at once. We know some who wanted to give were not able to do so, but we want everyone who tried to know their efforts are appreciated, and we hope they will return soon now that the demands on the system have subsided.”

Learn more about FamilySearch Indexing.

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