The History of the Indian Wars in New England

hbh3291“A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time.” Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars

hbb0420In a day and age where selecting the perfect title for a book, a movie, or even a magazine article is often more a marketing question than a practical one, it is nice to find books whose titles declare exactly what the contents are. Of course, when I do find such a title it is often the reprint of a book originally published 100 plus years ago. So it is with True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars.

New England Captives was written by C. Alice Baker, and originally published in 1897. In her preface, Baker mentions reading the words “Carried captive to Canada whence they came not back.” These words peeked Baker’s curiosity. What happened to those captives? Curiosity turned to mission and this book is the result of C. Alice Baker’s efforts.

These pages provides detailed accounts of attacks on the following towns:

  • Well and York, Maine
  • Dover, New Hampshire
  • Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts

These stories focus on the points of view of just a few individuals, but offer extensive genealogical and biographical data. In particular, the following family names are treated:

  • Baker
  • Nims
  • Otis
  • Plaisted
  • Rishworth
  • Rising
  • Sayward
  • Sheldon
  • Silver
  • Stockwell
  • Stebbins
  • Wheelwright
  • Williams

 

Contents

Christine Otis (A romance of real life on the frontier as told in the records.)

Esther Wheelwright

Story of a York Family

Difficulties and Dangers in the Settlement of a Frontier Town 1670

Eunice Williams

Ensign John Sheldon

My Hunt for the Captives

Two Captives ( A romance of real life two hundred years ago)

A Day at Oka

Thankful Stebbins

A Scion of the Church in Deerfield,. Joseph-Octave Plessis (Written for the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of the church in Deerfield.)

Hertel De Rouville

Father Meriel – Mary Silver

Appendix

  1. Christinr Otis
  2. Esther Wheelwright
  3. Eunice Williams
  4. Ensign John Sheldon
  5. My Hunt for the Captives
  6. Thankful Stennins

Index

 

Copies of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $33.32

Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England

ne27Another in a line of great reprints from the New England Historic Genealogical Society comes a Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England, written by R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, in 1909, with an added foreword by David Allen Lambert, 2012.

For those who reside or come form New England, Native American names for towns, streets, rivers, parks, and other locations are a daily part life. I was born and raised in Southern California. Spanish names and words were what I knew and grew up with. I remember my first trip back east. I had a terrible time enunciating some of the location names based on Native American words. I am sure my twisted tongue was a source of amusement to some of my associates. Of course, I had my laughs when it was their turn to visit me. Either way, whether you currently live in New England or have your ancestral roots there, this dictionary of American-Indian names can go a long way in helping with your research.

In this dictionary you will find a(n):

  • “Introduction to New England tribes
  • State-by-state listing of place names, including some now extinct
  • List of prominent 17th-century New England Native Americans
  • Enumeration of New England tribes
  • List of words from the Abenaki and Massachusetts (or Natick) languages”

In other words, this book can help you identify specific locations within New England. It can also help to interpret records like early deeds. Consider the book mandatory to the amateur and professional historian interested in pre-colonial New England and native cultures.

As the author comments upon in his introduction, and is reiterated in the foreword, “these words represent almost all that remains of the aboriginal inhabitants of this country,—a brave, noble, and patriotic race who, opposed by the overwhelming and heedless forces of civilization, did everything the bravest and noblest could do to obey the first law of Nature[:] self-preservation.” Continuing, he marvels that so many names have survived considering the local Indian tribes had no written language. This dictionary is unique, and undoubtedly considered a blessing by many genealogists searching through places names of New England.

Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $24.45.

A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada

french warWhat do really know about any given historical event? Who were the major players? What smaller events led up to the bigger event? How did these events effect people living at that time? History books can do more than simply elaborate or expand on the short version of any event we learned about in high school. Books can offer insight into the lives of our ancestors, as well as providing insight into possible sources of information and records. Occasionally, books come to light that tell the story, the history, we otherwise may never hear or learn. A history does not need to be a new treatment on a subject to be of value. Time and again, we have reviewed great books on this site which are reprints of volumes originally published decades, if not centuries, ago. A History of The French War, is just such a book.

Originally published in 1882, the expanded title reads, Minor Wars of the United States, A History of The French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada with A Preliminary Account of the Early Attempts At Colonization and Struggles for Possession of the Continent. In this history, reprinted by Heritage Books, the reader will find an expanded timeline leading up to and including the French War.

This books starts by looking back at some of the earliest explorers and claims by different European countries over New World territory. These explorations, dating to the early 1500s, laid the ground work, and territorial claims, for later colonization from southern Florida on up the coast to lower Canada. The history go on, detailing event and individuals over roughly a  250 year period, on up to the major events of the war. While some of the author’s statements don’t meet today’s standards of political correctness, the fact the copy for this book is over 100 years old does not diminish its value.

 

A History of the French War can be obtained through Family Roots Publishing; Price: $30.87.

Contents

Chapter I – Early Voyages

  • Claims of European Nations to American Territory
  • Contests of the English and French
  • The Indians in War
  • The Cabots
  • Cortereal
  • Spanish Explorers
  • Decree of Alexander
  • Verrazzano
  • Cartier
  • Stadacone
  • Hochelaga
  • Donacona

Continue Reading “A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada”

Virginia State Senate Tables Recognition of Groups Claiming Cherokee Ancestry

The following exceprt is from an article posted in the February 26, 2013 edition of cherokeephoenix.org.

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Citing the need for a new evaluation process, the Virginia Senate Rules Committee on Feb. 12 tabled resolutions calling for state tribal recognition of two groups identifying themselves as Cherokees.

Sens. Steve Newman, Jill Vogel and Kenny Alexander presented the resolutions for the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia, also known as the Buffalo Ridge Band of Cherokee, and the Appalachian Cherokee Nation Inc. However, the committee tabled them until an evaluation process is created.

Previously, the Virginia Council on Indians oversaw the process for state tribal recognition. However, it was discontinued in 2010. The former process required applicants to provide documentation proving their groups existed in Virginia at the time of Europeans contact, that they had existed in some form ever since and that they are distinct groups, among other requirements.

Read the full article.

The Wampanoag: Genealogical History of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

Having become interested in local land records and ownership details, Dr. Jerome (Jay) Segel researched and wrote Owner Unknown: Your guide to Real Estate Treasure Hunting. His desire to produce this book came through his interest and research in uncovering land records related to his home on Martha’s Vineyard. Through this study, Jay developed and additional interest, of not a new passion, for Indian related records. He realized few details were provided in the existing histories as to the islands original owners, the Wampanoag tribe of Native Americans.

Segel’s interest grew beyond land records to a desire to know every detail about these native people who made it possible for the original European colonists to survive. Without the support of the native people, the earliest colonists would likely never have learned to cultivate the local land, fish the waters, catch whales, or learn which local plants were edible. Putting together a small team of supporters and researches, chief among them Richard Andrew Pierce, a professional genealogists, they spent years researching every possible record in order to put together The Wampanoag Genealogical History of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts: Referenced to Bank’s History of Marha’s Vineyard, Mass.; Volume 1: Island History, People and Places from Sustained Contact Through the Early Federal Period.

The records uncovered provide details on some of the oldest American lineages, several dating back to the 1500s. Research for this book took the authors from coast to coast, and over to Europe; including, research in Sweden, England, Scotland, and France. Records of every type were unearthed and fully examined; including, nearly indecipherable source materials like disputes, debt cases, letters, births, marriages, and death records. Account book, sea voyages, Indian and colonial records, land, judicial, military, maritime, and religious histories all contributed varying amounts of information. Literally, every scrap of paper with names and information related to the Native population were examined and cross referenced in order to provide as detailed a book as possible. The result is nearly 680 pages of native genealogical information, the likes of which exist for few Native American groups.

 

Contents

About the Authors and Contributors

Preface

Introduction

About Volume 1

How to Use This Book

Part 1: Background to the Research

Records, Repositories, and Resources

Historical Repositories and Services Used

Impact of Colonial Law on Genealogical/Historical Research

Abbreviations

Native New England Chronology: In Historical Context

European Westward Efforts, Natives, and the Vineyard

The Native Vineyard Language

The Six Sachemdoms of Martha’s Vineyard

Native Vineyard Population Statistics

Part 2: Database of Martha’s Vineyard Natives and Relations

Part 3: Appendixes

Appendix 1: Alphabetical Key to Wampanoag Database

Appendix 2: Numerical Key to Wampanoag Database

Appendix 3: Cross-reference to Settlers in Banks’ History

Appendix 4: Residents of Nantucket County in the Database

Appendix 5: Blacks & Mulattos in the Database

Appendix 6: Families Highlighted in Volumes 2 & 3

Appendix 7: Indian Converts…by: Experience Mayhew: Index

Appendix 8: Early Land Transactions: Natives to Immigrants

Appendix 9: Census Sources for Martha’s Vineyard

Appendix 10: Sachems in and Around New England

Appendix 11: Native Place Names on Martha’s Vineyard

Appendix 12: Native Village Names of New England

Part 4: Three Generation Descendancy Charts

Preview of Volume 2: Family Genealogical History: Able

Acknowledgments

Bibliography

Map — The Six Sachemdoms of Martha’s Vineyard alias Nope

 

The Wampanoag Genealogical History of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $83.30.

Pocahontas and Her Descendants

There are plenty of historical biographies of Pocahontas, a.k.a. Matoaka. However, there is only one that stands as the best guide to her descendants: Pocahontas and Her Descendents by Wyndham Robertson. This short volume contains the “Tree of Pocahontas and Rolfe, as it has grown from them as its root to its seventh season (inclusive) or fruitage.” Biographical sketches accompany some of more “notable products.”

Despite historical misrepresentations, made no more clear by certain movies and media that suggest otherwise, Pocahontas had no extensive relationship with Captain John Smith. She, in fact, married the well-known gentleman, John Rolfe. His historical popularity, though capable of standing on his own accounts, has mainly been thrust into the shadows of obscurity, becoming predominately known as little more that the husband of the famous Indian maid, Pocahontas. The only child of their union was Thomas Rolfe, who’s only child was Jane Rolfe; thus, there ending the Rolfe name in the line of this famous couple.

There are, however, many other names in the seven generations covered in this book. These are mentioned it the rather lengthy , if descriptive, full title for this volume:

Pocahontas, Alias Matoaka, and Her Descendants Through Her Marriage at Jamestown, Virginia, in April, 1614 with John Rolfe, Gentleman; Including the Names of Alfriend, Archer, Bentley, Bernard, Bland, Bolling, Branch, Cabell, Catlett, Cary, Dandridge, Dixon, Douglas, Duval, Eldgride, Ellett, Gerguson, Field, Fleming, Gay, Fordon, Griffin, Grayson, Harrison, Hubard, Lewis, Logan, Marham, Meade, McRae, Murray, Page, Poythress, Randolph, Robertson, Skipwith, Stanard, Tazewell, Walke, West, Whittle, and Others. With Biographical Sketches by Wyndham Robertson, and Illustrative Historical Notes by R. A. Brock

Seven generations carry births in this line into the beginning of the 1800’s. This book was originally published in 1887 and has been reprinted many time, most recently in 2008.

A great companion book to this descendants lists, with one of the best biographies on the life of Matoaka, is Pocahontas by Stuart E. Brown, Jr.

 

Contents of Pocahontas and Her Descendants

Genealogical deduction of descendants of Pocahontas to the seventh generation inclusive

Notice of Pocahontas

  • John Rolfe
  • Thomas Rolfe

Descendants of Pocahontas

  • In the second degree
  • In the third degree
  • In the fourth degree
  • In the fifth degree
  • In the sixth degree
  • In the seventh degree

Appendix

Notice of

  • John Bolling
  • Jane Bolling
  • Mary Bolling
  • Anne Bolling
  • Thomas Bolling and Elizabeth Gay
  • John Bolling, Jr.
  • Robert Bolling of “Chellow”
  • Archibald Bolling
  • Elizabeth Randolph, wife of R. K. Meade
  • Mary Murray, wife of Col. William Davies
  • Elizabeth Bolling, wife of William Robertson
  • William Bolling
  • Thomas Bolling
  • Lenaeus Bolling
  • Powhatan Bolling
  • Blair Bolling
  • Dr. William Tazewell
  • John Randolph, of Roanoke
  • The Whittle Family
  • Rt. Rev. F. M. Whittle, D. D., LL.D
  • Thomas Bolling Robertson
  • John Robertson
  • Wyndham Robertson
  • Charles Joseph Cabell
  • Jenny Eldridge

A copy of Pocahontas and Her Descendants is attainable from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $21.56.

 

Albert Afraid of Hawk Remains Returned to South Dakota After Over 100 years

The following excerpt is from an article posted at the September 9, 2012 TwinCities.com website:

MANDERSON, S.D. — Descendants of a Native American man who died more than a century ago while touring with a western-themed show gathered together Sunday, Sept. 9, to honor his life and celebrate his remains coming home to a South Dakota reservation.

About 75 people gathered at a gymnasium on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to take part in a traditional Lakota funeral for Albert Afraid of Hawk, who died at the age of 20 at a Connecticut hospital in 1900. A ceremony at a nearby cemetery followed Sunday’s service.

“He’s going to make his journey today after over 100 years,” said Lakota medicine man Rick Two Dogs.

Albert Afraid of Hawk was born in 1879, the third of seven children belonging to Emil Afraid of Hawk and his wife, White Mountain. His brother Richard was among the survivors of the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. Afraid of Hawk joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show in 1898 with childhood friend David Bull Bear from the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Afraid of Hawk died after a bout of food poisoning while traveling with the show and was buried in an unmarked grave in Connecticut.

Read the full article.

So – Why Not Kill the Messenger?

The Elizabeth Warren Cherokee ancestry controversy continues – and I’m betting it will right up to election day. The following excerpt is from a piece written by William A. Jacobson, Associate Clinical Professor at Cornell Law School. In his article, Jacobson documents how Cherokee genealogist, Twila Barnes, has been harrassed about her genealogical findings.

I find it interesting how politics has such an overpowering sway on how folks think – and too often act… Some of the most hateful stuff on the Internet has been written because of the powerful emotions that political thought brings about. Not that I’m anti-politics, I just think it’s sad that we’ve become such a divided country, often writing cruel comments on the Internet, not seeming to remember that there’s always two sides to every issue – and our mother taught us to be kind.

Twila Barnes is a Cherokee genealogist who, along with her Cherokee genealogy team, has done more than anyone to document that Elizabeth Warren does not have Cherokee ancestry and that her family lore stories likely are false.

Barnes has published her findings in great detail with documentary back-up at her blog Thoughts from Polly’s Granddaughter.

Read the full article.

Genealogy at a Glance: Cherokee Genealogy Research

I am not sure what percentage of the genealogical community (meaning anyone involved in family history research) has Cherokee blood, thus having a practical use for Genealogy at a Glance: Cherokee Genealogy Research but, I found the history alone an enlightening read. The first section of the guide gives a brief but insightful background into the Cherokee, their history, and their introduction to and trials with Europeans. Coverage includes their unique language, their first contact with the Spanish, peace treaties with the U.S. and more.

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color limited brochure meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research. The first page includes some interesting quick facts, like:

“The Cherokee are the largest Native American group in the United States; however, not all are members of a federally recognized group.”

A key part of this guide is the list of rolls, or censuses, dating from the 1817 Reservation Roll to the 1914 Dawes Roll. Per the tip for the 1909 Guion Miller Roll: this roll was an abstract from a twelve-volume work called Eastern Cherokee by Blood. This suggest that from the rolls and other research pointers, the individual researcher may be able to find a significant amount of information on their Cherokee ancestors. At the very least, there is probably far more information that the average research may have assumed to be available.

 

Contents for this guide:

Cherokee History and Migrations

  • The Trail of Tears

Unlocking Cherokee Family History

  • Surnames
  • Intermarriages and Mixed Bloods
  • Tribal Rolls and Requirements

Basic Genealogical Sources

Cherokee Freedmen and Black Indians

Rolls Pertaining to Cherokees

Other Online Resources

Further Reading

In addition to those with Cherokee blood and those with an interest in history, professional genealogists will likely find this guide useful in adding to their own skill set and knowledge base. One never knows what mysteries they may uncover as they dig deeper into a family’s history.

 

To order a copy of the new Genealogy at a Glance: Cherokee Genealogy Research, click through to Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC2273, Price: $8.77.

An Atlas of Northern Trails Westward From New England

No matter where in the World or in what era one lives, there are always people on the move. Some people are always looking outward, seeking change and challenge. Thus it was from the first American colonies, on through the expansion of the frontier, until the entire continent east to west was settled by Europeans and other from around the world. From the time of the colonies, trails were discovered and used by traders to move between Indian tribes and, by ranchers, farmers, hunters and trappers looking for new grounds to hunt, graze, and farm. Through historical atlases, researchers can learn about these early trails westward, and northward, and how they grew and developed into the major thoroughfares, some still used today. An Atlas of Northern Trails Westward From New England looks at these more northern trails from the colonies, west.

This atlas describes trails from New England through the northern frontier into Ohio, and beyond. All along the entire frontier, north or south, pioneers encountered similar problems. However, the solutions found by Northerners differed from those in the south. Such was the difference in culture. Norther Trails opens with a brief history, as does each chapter provide added historical reference, mixed with maps, to tell the migration story from east to west.

At 11″ x 17″ this Atlas offers maps at a size which are easy to read. Mixed with the maps are an extensive background to the early settlers, their migrations, and the importance of these towns and trails. With two columns per text page, each the size of a standard page, this book is the equivalent to a book twice as thick. Below are the Table of Contents followed by a listing of the Maps and Illustrations in the order in which they appear in the book.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

  1. Some European Settlers
  2. Barriers to Western Movement
  3. Indian Homelands
  4. Fur Traders & Indian Paths
  5. Portage Paths
  6. Northeast Settlement
  7. War and Migration
  8. English and French Fortifications
  9. American Independence
  10. Opening the Ohio Country
  11. Western Routes
  12. Western Lands and Eastern Money
  13. Destinations

Bibliography

 

Maps and Illustrations

Figure 1. Migration Routes 1775-1850

Figure 2. North American Land Claims

Figure 3. Physical Regions

Figure 4. Indian tribes 1650

Figure 5. Early Indian Trails of Eastern America

Figure 6.Watersheds and Portage Paths

Figure 7. North America – French vs English 1615-1750

Figure 8. Western Land Claims At the Close of the Revolution

Figure 9. Trails to the Ohio Valley by 1800

Figure 10. Creating Ohio

Figure 11. A Western Trek by the Ohio Land Company

Figure 12. Opening the West

Figure 13. Post (mail) Roads of 1804

Figure 14. New York Canals

Figure 15. The Erie Canal

Figure 16. Two Ohio Canals

Figure 17. Major Pioneer Trails 1775-1850

Figure 18. New Western Counties by 1840

Figure 19. Western Population

Figure 20.Vermont 1818

Figure 21. Ohio 1818

Figure 22. Indiana 1818

Figure 23. Illinois 1818

Figure 24. Michigan 1818

Figure 25. Missouri 1818

Figure 26. Original Plans for the Erie Canal


Order a copy of An Atlas of Northern Trails Westward From New England from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: CE03, Price: $19.60.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England

A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time. Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

Senate Candidate Elizabeth Warren Really is 1/32 Cherokee


Now we find out that Elizabeth Warren really has minority status after all – that is if being 1/32 Cherokee makes one an American Indian… This reminds me of an excellent novel I read in my college years titled Kingsblood Royal, by Sinclair Lewis.

The following teaser is from the USnews.com website, dated May 2, 2012:

Just in case anyone was concerned that the did-she-or-didn’t-she flap over whether or not Democratic Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren used a claim of minority status to advance her career was based on a lie, a Massachusetts genealogist has the answer: it wasn’t.

According to Christopher Child of the New England Historic and Genealogy Society, a document from 1894 confirms Warren’s great-great-great grandmother was a Cherokee. That would make Warren 1/32 American Indian, according to media reports.

Read the full article.

Applications for Enrollment of Creek Newborn Act of 1905

The Dawes Act of 1887 provided for the division of Indian lands to individual tribal members. This was an attempt to integrate the Indians into American society. The Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole) were excluded from the treaty. However, later efforts were made to garner their participation. The Curtis Act of 1898 required tribal population rolls, effectively a census, be compiled or recreated for each tribe. Tribal leadership resisted this effort until 1905. The Dawes Commission sent representatives to seven Creek Nation towns to collect names and affidavits for “newborns” making them citizens of the Creeks. Any children added to the rolls by May 2, 1905 would not be considered citizens of the Creek nation and thus eligible for a share of land. Applications for Enrollment of Creek Newborn Act of 1905 Volume I, by Jeff Bowen, contains transcriptions of these records.

The results of the Dawes Commission was the eventual break up of the Five Civilized Tribes as social units. Parcels of land were distributed to individuals based on their level Indian blood, age, and family status. Children, “Newborns,” would receive 40 acres of tribal lands.

2,410 child applications were submitted by the deadline. Bowen’s transcriptions include all correspondence associated with the 1,171 successful Creek claimants. Each volume contains approximately 100 “newborns,” their parents, doctors, lawyers, midwives, and other Creek relatives. In all, about 2,000 Creek connections appear in this first volume.

“Newborn” were any Creek child age four or younger living within a qualified Creek (or other tribal) household, and was not an orphan.

 

Applications for Enrollment of Creek Newborn Act of 1905 Volume I is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: CF9805, Price: $35.28.

Our Native Americans and their Records of Genealogical Value; Volume II

Our Native Americans and their Records of Genealogical Value; Volume II is a collection of resources available in research one’s Native American ancestry. The author has compiles indexes to listings, films, records, etc. available from multiple resources, including the following:

  • Over 78 pages of records available at the Genealogical Society of Utah and elsewhere
  • Index to 1900 federal census listing tribes and locality in 29 states.
  • Survey of records from over 200 museums, associations, libraries, etc.
  • Other records, such as religious records relating to native Americans

The book’s introduction provides suggestions for researching these records, including getting past errors made in records and censuses. One recommendation is to follow a family through multiple censuses to help identify and account for errors. Also, the introduction explains what CDIB is. In short, CDIB is a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood. These can be obtained through the Central Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Typically, at least one quarter degree of Indian Blood is necessary to receive a certificate.

The author, E. Kay Kirkham, provides a diverse listing of resources to help any researcher to begin identifying their Native American ancestors. By pulling and indexing a large variety of records, this book helps researchers begin to put together the puzzle of their native ancestral past. See below for a full list of contents.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgement

Introduction, use of records, etc.

Chapter I A selected list of museums, associations, etc. that have information about Native Americans

Chapter II General Information for the National Archives, its branches, the Genealogical Society of Utah and elsewhere

Chapter III A compiled index to the Federal Census of 1900

Chapter IV Religious denominations and the Native American

Chapter V Canadian bands, general information, etc.

Chapter VI A Brief Analysis of Some of the Major Indian Records

Appendices:

A – A listing of representative Native American records as found in agencies and archives

B – Vital records information for the Native American

C – Bureau of Indian Affairs area offices, agencies, etc.

D – Do you want your CDIB?

E – Chart for calculating degree of blood

F – Native American family record chart

G – Native American pedigree chart

H – Facsimile copies of some Native American records

I – Additional references to books about tribes, etc.

J – Records relating to the enrollment of Eastern Cherokee

Index

 

Order Our Native Americans and their Records of Genealogical Value; Volume II for you home or library from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: EV0011; Price: $19.60.