TheGenealogist Has Released 5 Million British Emigration Records

The following news release is from Nick Thorne at TheGenealogist:

New Passenger lists go online with unique search facilities

RMS Campania, one of the ships included in the passenger lists.
RMS Campania, one of the ships included in the passenger lists.

TheGenealogist has just released five million Emigration BT27 records as part of their growing immigration and emigration record set. Uniquely TheGenealogist allows you to track transmigration of people across countries routing through British ports on their way to America. TheGenealogist is the only website with the facility to discover families travelling together on the same voyage using our SmartSearch technology.

The new records contain the historical records of passengers who departed by sea from Britain in the years between 1896 and 1909. These new records significantly boosts the already strong Immigration, Emigration, Naturalisation and passenger list resources on TheGenealogist.

TheGenealogist has further revealed that these records will be shortly followed by the release of many more unique migration records.

The searchable records released today will allow researchers to

● Find people using British shipping lines and travelling to places such as America, Canada, India, New Zealand and Australia in the Passenger lists of people leaving from, or passing through the United Kingdom, by sea which were kept by the Board of Trade’s Commercial and Statistical Department and its successors.

● The Homestead Act of 1862 in America gave free land to settlers who developed it for at least five years, and became a particular magnet for Norwegians, Danes, and Swedes, who arrived in their millions. To reach America, it was necessary to travel initially to England in order to then board one of the large transatlantic passenger ships and this preliminary journey has been recorded for many transmigrant passengers within the BT27 records. For the first time these can be easily found using the unique transmigration button.

● SmartSearch identifies potential family members travelling together. When our system recognises groups of people on the same voyage as a potential family it displays a family icon. This then allows you to easily view the family.

Illustration-2-570pw

● These fully indexed records enable family historians to search by name, port of embarkation, port of destination, country of departure, country arrival and nationality.

This release adds to TheGenealogist’s Immigration and Emigration records that already include the useful Naturalisation and Denization records.

Those with ancestors who travelled out of Britain will welcome this fascinating new release from TheGenealogist that reveal the details of the coming and going of passengers and is a precursor of a set of unique records joining the collection shortly.

Nigel Bayley, MD of TheGenealogist said: “We intend to make researching migrating ancestors easier with our new smarter interfaces and adding more records covering a growing range of countries.”

An example from the passenger list records:
Within the passenger lists, on TheGenealogist, we can find the passage of the Dunottar Castle from Southampton to Cape Town in South Africa on the 14th October 1899. One of the passengers was the young Winston Churchill who, at that time, was a member of the Press and was going out to report on the start of the Second Boer War.

Two days before his ship’s departure the war had broken out between Britain and the Boer Republic. At the news of this conflict Mr Churchill had obtained a commission to act as a war correspondent for The Morning Post newspaper. In return he was to be paid £250 a month for his services.

Illustration-3-570pw

After spending a number of weeks in the Colony he managed to get himself onto an armoured train, loaded with British soldiers, performing a reconnoitre between Frere and Chieveley in the British Natal Colony during November 1899. A Boer commando force, however, had placed a big boulder on the track and the train crashed into it. The Boers, having succeeded in stopping the train, then opened up with their field guns and rifle fire from a vantage position.

After a fight a number of the British were taken prisoner, but the locomotive, decoupled from the carriages and ladened with men, managed to escape. Churchill, unfortunately for him, was not one of those on-board the loco. Without his sidearm, which he had left on the train, he had no option but to surrender to the Boers. Churchill was then imprisoned in a POW camp in Pretoria. After being held captive for about four weeks Churchill escaped on the evening of 12th December 1899. He did this by vaulting over the wall to the neighbouring property and taking flight.

Illustration-4-570pw

If we look at Churchill’s travelling companions on the ship out to Cape Town, scheduled to take 65 days, we can see that he was sailing with a mixture of merchants, a jeweller, an actor, a Peer of the Realm (Lord Gerard), an optician and a couple of lawyers. The Hon A. Campbell was also listed, he was another member of the press corps who had made it on to that particular Castle Line sailing to the war zone with Churchill.

New FamilySearch Data Collections Posted the Week of August 5, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

This week millions of indexed birth, marriage, and death records from Italy and Mexico were published online. These free collections are the direct results of the online indexing volunteer community. Discover your ancestry reaching back as far as the 1500’s in new collections such as the Italy Bari Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1908, Mexico Distrito Federal Catholic Church Records 1514-1970, and Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984. Explore the full list of new collections online below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Italy Bari Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1908 – 604,492 – 8,571 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 291,719 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Genova Civil Registration (State Archive) 1796-1812 1838-1859 1866-1899 – 153,718 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Mantova Civil Registration (State Archive) 1496-1906 – 170,486 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Pesaro e Urbino Urbino Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1942 – 113,558 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Pescara Civil Registration (State Archive) 1865-1929 – 179,661 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Aguascalientes Catholic Church Records 1620-1962 – 135,095 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Baja California and Baja California Sur Catholic Church Records 1750-1984 – 43,067 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Campeche Catholic Church Records 1638-1944 – 19,651 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Chihuahua Catholic Church Records 1632-1958 – 27,361 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Coahuila Catholic Church Records 1627-1978 – 191,492 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Colima Catholic Church Records 1707-1969 – 61,464 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Distrito Federal Catholic Church Records 1514-1970 – 1,688,909 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Durango Catholic Church Records 1604-1985 – 109,707 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984 – 1,488,203 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Guerrero Catholic Church Records 1576-1979 – 16,290 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Hidalgo Catholic Church Records 1546-1971 – 1,619,767 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Jalisco Catholic Church Records 1590-1979 – 1,239,961 – 659 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Mexico México Catholic Church Records 1567-1970 – 1,035,414 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Michoacán Catholic Church Records 1555-1996 – 345,068 – 104 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Mexico Morelos Catholic Church Records 1598-1994 – 75,920 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Nayarit Catholic Church Records 1596-1967 – 9,863 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Nuevo León Catholic Church Records 1667-1981 – 33,747 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Oaxaca Catholic Church Records 1559-1988 – 1,279,525 – 916 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Mexico Puebla Catholic Church Records 1545-1977 – 1,799,313 – 322 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Mexico Querétaro Catholic Church Records 1590-1970 – 41,648 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico San Luis Potosí Catholic Church Records 1586-1977 – 396,924 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Sinaloa Catholic Church Records 1671-1968– 50,792 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Sonora Catholic Church Records 1657-1994 – 148,741 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Tabasco Catholic Church Records 1803-1970 – 32,572 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Tamaulipas Catholic Church Records 1703-1964 – 109,933 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Tlaxcala Catholic Church Records 1576-1994 – 63,259 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Veracruz Catholic Church Records 1590-1978 – 44,289 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Yucatán Catholic Church Records 1543-1977 – 13,476 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Mexico Zacatecas Catholic Church Records 1605-1980 – 53,168 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984 – 0 – 4,527,083 – Added images to an existing collection

UNITED STATES RECORDS
Massachusetts Marriages 1841-1915 – 0 – 5,711 – Added images to an existing collection

United States Census 1810 – 1,240 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Index to Alien Case Files 1940-2003 – 456,334 – 0 – New indexed records collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The First Wave: German Immigration to America – 15% Off Thru August 3, 2015

hbt0797Since Columbus introduced (or re-introduced if you prefer) the Americas to Europe, people have come, wave after wave, seeking a new life in the rich new world. America, since its colonial days, has experienced an almost never ending flow of immigrants. There are at least four identifiable time periods in which “waves” of people came from all over the world. There are also “waves” of people who came in mass from specific countries or areas. For example, most of the earliest colonists came from England. During the Great Depression people came in droves from all over Europe and the world. Masses of Irish came during and after the Great Famine. Some of the most overlooked, yet largest waves of immigrants, were the Germans. German Immigration to America: The First Wave examines those Germans who immigrated during the colonial period.

Germans were among the earliest colonist to the Americas. They are also one of the cultural groups who came in waves of mass migrations repeatedly over the years. 1708 saw the beginnings of the first major wave of German immigration. This book looks into the history of this important migration event. The book examines why such a large population of Germans immigrated suddenly, and in such numbers. The Germans brought with them many important trades and skills. Over the years, their contributions to the United States have often gone unrecognized and unrewarded, but their contributions were nonetheless of great value. The book’s introduction comments on  Germans contribution to this country. It also provides some background to the German areas of Europe, and introduces the bulk of the book.

Beyond the introduction, this books is actually the compilation of two separate works which examine the German population that made up this “first wave.” The first chapters is a copy of “The German Exodus to England in 1709,” by Frank Reid Diffenderffer. The pages appear as they did in the Pennsylvania German Society Proceedings and Addresses 7 (1897). There are 156 pages in this section, numbered as they appeared in the aforementioned work, pages 247 to 413. The official contents (from the contents page) for the section are listed below. However, the subsections and page titles give a better look into the actual content. Here are just some of the extra titles to look for in this section of the book:

  • German Exodus to England in 1709
  • Inquiry into their Coming
  • Forwarded at the Queen’s Expense
  • Royal Proclamation
  • The Edict of Nantes
  • Immigration Attributed to the Act
  • Catholics Sent Back
  • The Germans Issue an Address
  • Occupations of the Germans
  • Narcissus Luttrell’s Diary
  • Proposals Received from Ireland
  • The Linen Industry Established
  • Thrifty, Hones, and Prosperous

The second work cited is “The German Emigration to America,” by Henry Eyster Jacobs. Jacobs work appeared in the Pennsylvania German Society Proceedings and Addresses 8 (1898), pages 31 to 150. Like the other section of the book, this section’s subtitles add additional insight to the contents not clear from the official contents as listed below. Here are some of the subtitles:

  • Inducement to Settlers
  • Description of the Carolinas
  • Cost of the Voyage
  • Value of Boehme’s Service
  • Contract with Emigrants
  • Hebron Ev. Lutheran Church
  • Covenant of the Palatines
  • Trebecco’s Sermon
  • Piratical Depredations
  • Fatalities on Shipboard
  • Refuge in Prayer
  • Trouble with Governor Hunter
  • Germans at the Front
  • They Secure More Land
  • Mistaken Views
  • Continued Immigration

The books introduction put forth that many Germans indicated “the French ravages in 1707″ as a key reason for leaving Germany. Military aggression in the German states was high at the time Germans began leaving the area in mass. This, and so many other reasons, are explored throughout the pages of this book. Either way, it is clear that Germans were among the first and largest group of immigrants to the United States and with them came vital skills and a heavy cultural influence.

 

Contents for “The German Exodus to England in 1709″

Introductory

1. Immigration Begins

2. The German Exodus to England in 1709

3. Causes Leading to the Exodus

4. The Stay in England

5. The German Colony in Ireland

6. Conclusion

7. Cost of Maintaining These Germans

Appendix

 

Contents for ” The German Emigration to America”

1. The Effort to Turn German Emigration to South Carolina

2. The Immediate Results of Kocherthal’s Pamphlet

3. The Palatine Emigration to New York

4. On the Ocean

5. In New York

6. To Pennsylvania

 

Order German Immigration to America: The First Wave from Family Roots Publishing. Sale Price $26.35; Reg. $31.00

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German & Swiss Immigrants to America – 15% Off Thru August 3, 2015

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is an attempt to explain the genealogical mysteries associated with so many immigrant families. Why are there so many different spelling changes for family names? What drove people to move around? What factors contributed to the turbulent environment so many lived in? What was life like on the move? These questions are examined through the stories of two men and their descendants as they immigrated form place to place, and with a review of other historical factors considered to have been key elements in the politically, religiously, and economically difficult times endured by so many.

Across the Atlantic and Beyond opens and closes with a family story. The first is the tale of Gerrit Hendricks(ca. 1649-1691) and three generations of his migratory descendents. The final chapter concludes by counting the tale of Jacob Marzolf (1780-1870), an American immigrant. The intermediate chapters takes the reader through a step-by-step analysis of how these family histories were derived and the motivation behind these families migratory patterns. Genealogist encounter many frustrations and difficulties in their research. Name changes, plus map and border changes, are just a couple of the problems one may encounter in researching their immigrant ancestors. As to why people move from place to place, he obvious answer is war, famine, and disease. However, the author, Charles R. Haller, digs deeper looking for a root cause, or a collection of changes which moved the political and economic landscape.

The inner chapters of this book examines events such as the development of the moveable type printing press, the Reformation as begun by Martin Luther and advent of religious sects outside of the Catholic church, as well as the effects of industrialization. Many names are encountered withing this study. “As a necessary diversion, the changes in spelling of representative Germanic names is documented through various family histories from its origin in a European country to its modern occurrence, often Anglicized, in America.” In addition to all the above, the book gives an account of transportation in and around the Rhine River. Transportation along this major thoroughfare is examined from the earliest use to the time of steamboats.

 

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Preface

Acknowledgments

Prolgue

Part 1: Gerritt Hendricks of Krisheim, Germany

Part 2: Changes in German Surnames and Personal Names

  • Hendriks and Hendricks
  • Surnames and Personal Names
  • Mechanics of Name changes
  • Heinrich Buchholtz alias Henry Pookeholes

Part 3: Changes in City and Village Names

  • City and Village Names
  • Griesheim / Krisheim / Kriegsheim
  • Old European Maps
  • Early American Maps

Part 4: Mennonites, Quakers and the Settlement of Pennsylvania

  • The Wandering Menno Simons
  • The Beginnings of English Quakerism
  • William Penn’s Travels in Europe
  • Early german Quakers: A Small Minority
  • The Frankfort Companie
  • Germantown and the Susquehanna Subscribers

Part 5: Protestantism and books: Driving Forces Behind the German Migration

  • Mainz and Gutenberg
  • Frankfurt and the Book Fair
  • Martin Luther and the Book Wars
  • The Froschauer Presses of Zurich
  • Matthaus Merian and the House of Merian
  • The Rhine Travel Guides

Part 6: The Push and the Pull

  • The German Americans
  • The Land of Wars
  • Of Kings and Queens and Lesser Nobility
  • The Rhine as a Migration Route
  • Across the Atlantic and Beyond
  • Bridging the Prairies of Kansas

Part 7: Jacob Marzolf and Alsace

Glossary

Index

 

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH0697, Sale Price: $29.75; Reg. $35.00.

Maps of the USA Showing Our Ancestry & Other Cool Stuff

Irish-Ancestry-Map-250pw

The following teaser is from a fascinating article by Ana Swanson, published June 19, 2015 in the online edition of the Washington Post.

The way that different races and ethnicities are spread around the U.S. says a lot about our history. Some groups ended up in a particular region of the U.S. through the invitation of friends and family; others relocated to a particular place because the timing of their migration coincided with the “opening up” or economic boom of a certain part of the U.S. Of course, other patterns stem from more tragic histories, including the concentration of Native Americans onto reservations and the imprint of slavery in the South.

Nathan Yau, a statistician who runs the blog Flowing Data, has made a series of gorgeous maps breaking down the population of America. The maps are part of his recent project to recreate the 1874 Statistical Atlas of the United States with the original design but 2013 data. Below are 15 of them that illustrate how the U.S. population got here. All of these categories are self-reported; the data is based on what Americans told Census workers about race, ethnicity and background.

Read the full article.

FamilySearch Adds Over 3.7 Million Indexed Records & Images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 3.7 million indexed records and images for Belgium, England, Germany, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 2,807,806 indexed records from the England, London Electoral Registers, 1847–1913 collection; 190,879 indexed records from the US, Texas, Brownsville Passenger and Crew List of Airplanes, 1943–1964 collection; and 137,815 images from the Philippines, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1900–1952 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600–1913 – 79,444 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, Liège, Civil Registration, 1621–1914 – 67,410 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, West Flanders, Civil Registration, 1582–1910 – 8,560 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

England, London Electoral Registers, 1847–1913 – 2,807,806 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Germany, Hesse, Stadtkreis Darmstadt, Darmstadt District, Civil Registration, 1876–1925 – 0 – 70,510 – Added images to an existing collection.

Philippines, Index to Filipino Passengers Arriving at Honolulu, Hawaii, 1900–1952 – 0 – 137,815 – New browsable image collection.

US, Florida, Pensacola, Passenger Lists, 1900–1945 – 0 – 1,937 – New browsable image collection.

US, Louisiana World War I Service Records, 1917–1920 – 0 – 27,210 – New browsable image collection.

US, Maine, Bath, Seamen’s Proofs of Citizenship, 1833–1868 – 0 – 3,516 – New browsable image collection.

US, Massachusetts, Salem and Beverly Crew Lists and Shipping Articles, 1797–1934 – 0 – 33,017 – New browsable image collection.

US, Michigan, South Haven Crew Lists, 1957–1959 – 0 – 61 – New browsable image collection.

US, Minnesota, Duluth and Wisconsin, Superior Crew Lists, 1922–1958 – 0 – 26,368 – New browsable image collection.

US, Montana, Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals and Departures, 1923–1956 – 0 – 38,373 – New browsable image collection.

US, New York, New York, Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted, 1917–1957 – 0 – 119,753 – New browsable image collection.

US, Ohio, Southern District Naturalization Index, 1852–1991 – 83,982 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Oregon, Portland, Index and Register of Vessels, 1949–1955 – 0 – 88 – New browsable image collection.

US, Pennsylvania, Landing Reports of Aliens, 1798–1828 – 0 – 636 – New browsable image collection.

US, Rhode Island, Davisville, Melville, Newport, and Quonset Point, Airplane Passenger and Crew Lists, 1955–1957 – 0 – 387 – New browsable image collection.

US, South Carolina, Charleston U.S. Citizens Passenger Lists, 1919–1948 – 0 – 775 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, Brownsville Passenger and Crew List of Airplanes, 1943–1964 – 190,879 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Texas, Houston Arrival Manifests of Airplanes, 1946–1954 – 0 – 4,360 – New browsable image collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 4.6 Million Indexed Records & Images for Australia, Canada, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the USA

The following is from FamilySearch. This posting is of databases announced by FamilySearch on May 18 & 26.

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 4.6 million indexed records and images for Australia, Canada, China, India, Peru, the Philippines, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 327,195 images from the Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996 collection; 275,449 images from the Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 collection; 249,700 images from the Peru, San Martín, Civil Registration, 1850–1999 collection; 643,899 images from the Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888–2005 collection; 608,881 images from the Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881–2005 collection; and 531,346 images from the US, Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1994 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Australia, New South Wales, 1828 Census – 0 – 2,530 – New browsable image collection.

Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration of Births, 1899–1912 – 0 – 12,662 – New browsable image collection.

Australia, Tasmania, Correspondence of the Immigration Office Concerning the Nomination, Arrival, and Settlement of Migrants, 1920–1943 – 0 – 90 – Added images to an existing collection.

Australia, Tasmania, Miscellaneous Records, 1829–1961 – 0 – 50,885 – Added images to an existing collection.

Australia, Tasmania, Government Gazette, 1833–1925 – 0 – 101,074 – New browsable image collection.

Australia, Victoria, Assisted Immigrant Arrivals at Victorian Ports, 1839–1871 – 0 – 127,892 – New browsable image collection.

Canada Passenger Lists, 1881–1922 – 0 – 2,111 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, Newfoundland, Vital Statistics, 1753–1893 – 191,573 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

China Collection of Genealogies, 1239–2014 – 0 – 142,311 – Added images to an existing collection.

India, Hindu Pilgrimage Records, 1194–2015 – 0 – 143,871 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888–2005 – 0 – 643,899 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 – 0 – 287,219 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881–2005 – 0 – 608,881 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903–1998 – 0 – 110,758 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874–1996 – 0 – 327,195 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Moquegua, Civil Registration, 1850–1996 – 0 – 22,743 – New browsable image collection.

Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 – 116,677 – 275,449 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, San Martín, Civil Registration, 1850–1999 – 0 – 249,700 – New browsable image collection.

Philippines, Eastern Samar, Roman Catholic Diocese of Borongan, Parish Registers, 1842–1984 -0 – 32,304 – New browsable image collection.

US, California County Naturalizations, 1849–1949 – 0 – 99,436 – New browsable image collection.

US, Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1994 – 0 – 531,346 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Indiana, Marriages, 1811–2007 – Added images to an existing collection now totaling 1,242,528 images.

US, Michigan, Probate Records, 1797–1973 – 0 – 12,871 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Minnesota, County Birth Records, 1863–1983 – 0 – 9,777 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Minnesota, County Deaths, 1850–2001 – 0 – 367,790 – New browsable image collection.

US, Missouri, Deaths, 1835–1976 – 0 – 13,734 – New browsable image collection.

US, Utah Applications Indian War Service Medals, 1905–1912 – 0 – 7,861 – New browsable image collection.

US, Utah, Salt Lake City Cemetery Records, 1847–1976 – 0 – 70,504 – New browsable image collection.

US, Wisconsin, Milwaukee Petitions to Naturalization, 1848–1991 – 0 – 289 – Added images to an existing collection.

United States, Cancelled, Relinquished, or Rejected Land Entry Case Files, 1861–1932 – 0 – 161,468 – Added images to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 18.3 Million Indexed Records & Images for England, Italy, the UK, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 18.3 million indexed records and images for England, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 10,026,835 indexed records and 776,840 images from the England, Westminster Rate Books, 1634–1900 collection; 4,327,810 indexed records from the United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914–1920 collection; and 534,653 images from the Italy, Taranto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1926 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

England, Westminster Rate Books, 1634–1900 – 10,026,835 – 776,840 – New indexed records and images collection.

Italy, Taranto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1926 – 0 – 534,653 – New browsable image collection.

United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914–1920 – 4,327,810 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Kentucky Probate Records, 1727–1990 – 0 – 365,502 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925–1957 – 168,306 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Pennsylvania, Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records, 1866–1956 – 0 – 2,919 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837–1977 – 1,267,379 – 464,964 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, Texas, World War I Records, 1917–1920 – 0 – 400,918 – New browsable image collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 37.9 Million Indexed Records & Images to Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Guatemala, Indonesia, Italy, South Africa, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

FamilySearch adds more than 37.9 million indexed records and images to Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Guatemala, Indonesia, Italy, South Africa, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 24,405,544 indexed records and 1,244,622 images from the US, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014 collection; the 801,893 images from the Belgium, Limburg, Civil Registration, 1798–1906 collection; and the 38,322 indexed records and 687,456 images from the Italy, Napoli, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1865 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world ís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Austria, Upper Austria, Catholic Church Records, 1581–1919 – 0 – 16,882 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Antwerp, Civil Registration, 1588–1909 – 0 – 224,761 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Brabant, Civil Registration, 1582–1914 – 0 – 1,295 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541–1912 – 0 – 153 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Limburg, Civil Registration, 1798–1906 – 0 – 801,893 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Luxembourg, Civil Registration, 1580–1920 – 0 – 187 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600–1913 – 0 – 57,710 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, West Flanders, Civil Registration, 1582–1910 – 0 – 56,139 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, Newfoundland Census, 1935 – 0 – 9,509 – New browsable image collection.

Canada, Newfoundland Census, 1945 – 0 – 7,457 – New browsable image collection.

Canada, Newfoundland, 1921 Census – 0 – 8,415 – New browsable image collection.

Germany, Saxony-Anhalt, Halberstadt Kreisarchiv, City Directories, Citizen Rolls, Residence Lists, and School Directories, 1700–1933 – 0 – 58,139 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Alta Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 17,770 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Baja Verapaz, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 24,503 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Chimaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 3,075 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, El Progreso, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 -0 103,502 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Escuintla, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 2,355 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Guatemala, Civil Registration, 1877–2006 – 0 – 1,486 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Huehuetenango, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 17,993 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Izabal, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 9,848 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Jalapa, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 42,552 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Jutiapa, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 36,732 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Petén, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 713 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Quetzaltenango, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 41,022 New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Quiché, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 70,397 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Retalhuleu, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 550 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Sacatepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 63 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, San Marcos, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 16,730 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Santa Rosa, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 97,101 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Sololá, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 70,746 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Suchitepéquez, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 1,312 – New browsable image collection.

Guatemala, Zacapa, Civil Registration, 1877–1994 – 0 – 18,271 – New browsable image collection.

Indonesia, Jawa Tengah, Mungkid, District Court Records, 1985–2013 – 0 – 18,256 – Added images to an existing collection.

International, Current obituary.com index, 2001–2014 – 591,417 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496–1906 – 0 – 543,918 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Napoli, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809–1865 – 38,322 – 687,456 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Pescara, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1865–1929 – 0 – 61,597 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Reggio Calabria, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1896–1943 – 0 – 101,272 – New browsable image collection.

Luxembourg, Church Records, 1601–1948 – 0 – 272,699 – New browsable image collection.

South Africa, Transvaal, Estate Files, 1950–1993 – 0 – 191,580 – New browsable image collection.

US, BillionGraves Index – 386,819 – 386,819 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, California, Oakland, Alameda County, Newspaper Record Collection, 1985–2011 – 0 – 5,755 – Added images to an existing collection.

US, Delaware, Marriages and Marriage Licenses, 1713–1894 – 5,490 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

US, Hawaii, Honolulu Passenger Lists, 1900–1953 – 277,734 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Minnesota, Clay and Steele County Obituaries, 1865–2006 – 185,214 – 29,539 – New indexed records and images collection.

US, United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980–2014 – 24,405,544 – 1,244,622 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

US, United States Passport Applications, 1795–1925 – 932,030 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891 – 1,447,421 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, New York, Records of the State National Guard, 1906–1954 – 724,527 – 732,949 – New indexed records and images collection.

US, Texas and Arizona Arrivals, 1903–1910 – 0 – 4,528 – New browsable image collection.

US, Texas, El Paso Manifests of Arrivals at the Port of El Paso, 1905–1927 – 76,069 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

US, Wisconsin, Milwaukee Passenger and Crew Lists, 1922–1963 – 0 – 8,049 – New browsable image collection.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies — 50% OFF thru January 15

gpc1780Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies is a two volume set printed in one binding, and represents an authoritative work on Swiss emigration to the Carolinas and Pennsylvania in the 18th century. Volume I identifies approximately 2,000 emigrants from the Canton of Zurich during the period 1734-1744, most references comprising such useful data as age, date of birth or baptism, trade, name of wife, names of children, and place of origin and destination. Volume II extends the scope of investigation to Bern (1706-1795) and Basel (1734-1794) and surpasses Volume I in the quantity and variety of assembled data.

Volume I was actually discovered by the editor, and author of the introduction, Albert Bernhard Faust, while he researched at the State Archives in Zürich. Faust describes the listings as, “the most valuable single document relating to America contained in the Swiss archives, being quite as important for its historical as for its genealogical and statistical materials. The whole history of Swiss emigration in the eighteenth century is epitomized in this valuable document.” In addition, Faust wrote a 25 page introduction providing a significant insight into the history of Swiss emigration to America.

Volume II was the result of the success of volume I. Coming at the request of many researchers who found volume I so appetizing in their research, Faust returned with co-editor Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh to painstakingly extract a similar manuscript on emigrants from Bern and Basel. Under the direction of the state archivist, the team hired assistants and spent 12 months extracting, verifying, and organizing the contents of this second volume. This second volume also includes significant additional writings and history contributed by the state archivist G. Kruz. There is also an Introduction to the State Archives of Basel section by A. Gerber, PhD.

These books were first published in 1920 and 1925, then combined and published in 1976 with added “Notes on Lists of Swiss Emigrants,” as excerpted form the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (March 1972). Latest printing was in 2007.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies is currently available from Family Roots Publishing on On Sale: 50% OFF through January 15, 2015.

 

Table of Contents

Volume I

Preface, by Albert B. Faust

Introduction: Swiss Emigration to the American Colonies in the Eighteenth Century. Reprinted from the American Historical Review, by Albert B. Faust

The Manuscript: Zürich to Carolina and Pennsylvania, 1734-1744

Appendix: Movements of Swiss Emigrants in the American Colonies, by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

Index

Volume II

  1. Preface, by Albert B. Faust

State Archives of Bern

  1. Special Investigation, by G Kruz, state archivist
    1. The First Bernese Emigrants to America
    2. The Bernese Colonists of New Bern
    3. Bernese Soldiers in America
    4. From the Years of the Rabies Carolinae
    5. Newspaper Reports, 1735
  2. Lists of Emigrant Families, from Various Districts, 1733-1793
  3. Names of about 200 Emigrant Families, with numerous items of information concerning them, 1706-1795

State Archives of Basel

  1. Preface, by A. Gerber
  2. Introduction: The Canton of Basel and the Conditions of its Inhabitants in the Country Districts, by A. Gerber
  3. Lists of Swiss Emigrants from the Canton of Basel in Chronological Order, 1734-1794, and
  4. Emigrants of Uncertain Dates, by A. Gerber
  5. Index, prepared by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

Delaware County, Pennsylvania Quarantine Station’s Dead to be Memoralized

The following excerpt is from the October 21, 2014 edition of philly.com

Megan-Harris-Arlington-Cemetery-PA

One of the nation’s first quarantine stations had been transformed into a playground for the wealthy, and the dead buried on the property were no longer welcome.

Nobody wanted to play baseball on top of the departed. So, in 1900, the bodies were dug up and moved out.

Until last year, the final resting place of the immigrants who sailed to the United States in the 1800s but died at the Lazaretto in Tinicum Township, Delaware County [Pennsylvania], was the subject of informed speculation. No one was certain until Megan Harris’ work.

“When I actually found something, I thought I was going to cry,” said Harris, archivist at Arlington Cemetery in Drexel Hill.

Read the full article.

FamilySearch Adds Over 5.1 Million Indexed Records & Images to Brazil, New Zealand, & the USA

The following data is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch has added more than 5.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, New Zealand, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 375,900 indexed records from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980, collection; the 1,152,816 indexed records and images from the U.S., BillionGraves Index, collection; and the 3,560,424 indexed records from U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891, collection . See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 – 375,900 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

New Zealand, Auckland, Albertland Index, 1862–1962 – 20,415 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., BillionGraves Index – 576,408 – 576,408 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

U.S., Mississippi, State Archives, Various Records, 1820–1951 – 0 – 139 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820–1891 – 3,560,424 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Montana, Pondera County Records, 1910–2012 – 21,120 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores is a scholarly book, full of details and amassed facts in an effort to explain the mass migrations from the war torn Rhine Valley in the early 1700s.  The Palatines were driven from their homes, into the British Empire, by circumstance and desire for a war-free life. Promises were made and hope for something better drove thousands to flee only to be hampered at every turn as politicians, monarchs, and business ventures debated and held in fist the fates of these emigrants. Despite it all, many of these German emigrants and their descendants have played major roles in the American colonies and the overall welfare of what became the United Sates.

History buffs and family historians alike will appreciate the efforts the author has made to uncover the real driving factors, political and  personal, that led to so many Palatines fleeing their homes and seeking refuge throughout the British Empire, including Ireland and the New World. Through a careful and emotionally controlled review of facts, Knittle has made connections and uncovered facts which, in many cases, go against the presumptions and stories that have endured for hundreds of years. Take this example from the introduction written by Dixon Ryan Fox:

“For example, it has usually been state that the Palatine’s disgust for the treatment they had received in New York was an important factor in diverting subsequent German settlement from that province into Pennsylvania. By cool analysis the present author reveals how untenable is this thesis. He has been ready to throw out the dramatic and the picturesque when clouded with doubt or founded on error. He cites the ‘interesting legend’ set forth by his predecessors which had it that the five Mohawk Indians taken by Peter Schulyer to London were so grieved at the plight of the Palatines, then encamped on Blackhearth, that they gave the Schoharie Valley to the Queen on consideration that’s she would bestow it upon the emigrants; then he points out that the Palatines sailed from London before the Indians sailed from Boston, that four of the five Indians were not sachems and had no authority to grant Mohawk lands and that these lands were subsequently ceded at Albany to the province with no reference to the Palatines.”

The book contains a bonus for those whose ancestry leads back to these early German settlers. Contained within these pages are lists totaling around 12,000 Palatine names.

Uncover these truths for yourself, order your copy of Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBK1977, Price: $27.93.

 

Contents

Key to Footnote Citations

I. The Causes of the Early “Palatine” Emigrations

A. The emigrations studied

B. Area in Germany affected by the emigrations

C. Causes

1. Devastation of War

2. Severe winter of 1708

3. Oppressive taxation

4. Religion and land hunger

5. Liberal advertising of British colonies

6. Favorable attitude of British government

a. The aid given to foreign Protestants

b. The naturalization act of 1709

II. The Small Palatine Emigration of 1708

A. Members of the band

B. The trip down the Rhine River

C. Generous treatment in England

D. the settlement at Newburgh, New York

E. Financial difficulties of the colony

1. Kocherhal’s connection with the 1709 emigration

III. The 1709 Palatine Emigration

A. The emigration toward England

1. The preparations in Germany

2. The journey down the Rhine River

3. Subsistence and transportation to England supplied by the British government

4. The attempts to halt the unexpectedly large migration

B. The Palatines in England

1. The size of the immigration

2. The care of the Palatines in London

3. condition of the Palatines

4. Relations of Palatines with English populace

5. The difficulties of the government in relieving itself of the expense of the Palatines in London

a. Attempts to keep lists fail

b. Rio de la Plata proposal

c. Employment in Welsh mines

d. Newfoundland fisheries proposal

e. The proposal to settle in western England (Marquis of Kent)

f. West Indies proposal

g. Attempts to settle in England

h. Proposal to settle in Scilly Islands

i. Proposed settlement in Jamaica

j. Enlistments

k. The return of the Papists to Holland

C. Reasons for the absence of proposals from William Penn

IV. The Palatine Settlements in Ireland and North Carolina

A. Ireland

1. The invitation to send Palatines to Ireland

2. The Commissioners for Settling the poor distressed Palatines in Ireland

3. The government subsidies become objects of speculation

4. The desertion of the settlements

5. The attempts to make the settlement successful

a. Mr. Crockett’s mission

b. Subsidies for twenty-one years

6. The assimilation of the Palatines

B. North Carolina

1. Lords Proprietors’ proposal

2. Michel and his Swiss emigrants

3. Graffenried’s opportunity

4. Voyage and settlement under adverse conditions

5. Political difficulties in North Carolina

6. The Indian Massacre

7. The financial difficulties cause the failure of the settlement

8. The settlers without titles to their lands go to the frontier

V. The British Naval Stores Problem and ht Origin of the New York Settlement Scheme

A. Naval Stores—an English necessity

B. History of the Stockholm (Swedish) Tar Companies

1. Early companies

2. The 1689 Company pushes its advantage

3. The English desire for the carrying trade

4. The unfavorable balance of trade with Sweden

5. The Northern War makes conditions worse

C. The early interest in colonial production of naval stores

D. The attempts to secure colonial naval stores up to 1708

1. The request for importation birds

2. The Navy Board commissioners investigate New England possibilities

3. Governor Bellmont’s interest in the problem

4. The Bounty Act of 1704

5. The fear of woolen manufacturers in the northern colonies

6. Bridger appointed Surveyor of Woods

E. The Origin of the New York settlement scheme

1. Naval stores mentioned incidentally for Palatines of 1708

2. The Scotch settlement proposal of 1705

3. The Society scheme drawn up by Halifax

4. The proposal to settle Palatines in New York

F. The decision and plans form a government settlement in New York

G. The reasons for selecting New York

VI. A Government Redemptioner System

A. Preparation for settlement in New York

1. The optimistic expectations

2. Lands and conditions of grants suggested

3. The covenant requested by Hunter and agreed upon

4. War supplies and a minister

5. Transportation

B. The voyage

1. Time of sailing

2. Poor conditions on voyage

C. The reception in New York

D. The legend of the Indian gift of Schoharie

E. The search for suitable site for making naval stores

F. The settlement on Livingston Manor

VII. The Government Tar Industry in Operation

A. The conditions of life in the Hudson River settlements

B. The management

1. The organization

a. For supervision of the project

b. For maintenance of order

2. The supplies

a. Sources of supplies

b. System of distribution

c. Complaints about bad food

d. Charges of cupidity

3. The finances

a. The first year’s costs

b. The request for further grants DuPre’s return to London

c. The non-committal attitude of the Tory Treasury

C. The manufacturing of tar

1. Bridger’s defection

2. The 1711 expedition against Canada

3. Sackett, Bridger’s successor, in charge

4. The Palatine Commission to forward the work

5. Signs of progress int the tar-making

6. Tar manufacturing methods

7. Poor results from Palatine efforts

D. The reasons for the failure

1. Poor instruction and unwilling labor

2. Financial difficulties force the end of government subsistence

3. The effect of the “Ministerial Revolution” of  1710 upon the venture

4. The parliamentary investigation of the Palatine immigration in 1711

5. Hunter’s attempt to collect the debts incurred

VIII. The Palatine Settlements on the Frontier of the Old West

A. The dispersal

1. The Palatines receive permission to leave the government project

2. The suffering of the Germans in the winter of 1712

3. The Palatine preparations to go to Schoharie

4. The method of acquiring land titles

B. The Schoharie frontier settlements

1. Journey to Schoharie

2. The seven villages of the Palatines

3. Starting life all over in the Schoharie Valley

4. Social conditions

C. Relations with the provincial government

1. Reasons for Hunter’s opposition

2. the Bayard incident

3. The grant of the Palatine lands to the Seven Partners

4. Pressure on the Germans to accept the terms

5. The Vrooman incidents and the attempt to arrest Weiser

6. The Palatine mission to London

7. Hunter’s return to England and his opposition

D. The Palatines extend the frontier in the Mohawk Valley and the “Great Valley” of Pennsylvania

1. Governor Burnet’s orders and the first grants in the Mohawk Valley

2. The movement to the Tulpehocken section, around Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania

3. More Palatine grants and purchases in the Mohawk Valley

4. The continuation of Palatine immigrations to Pennsylvania

5. Reasons for the choice of Pennsylvania rather than New York

6. The New York naturalization act of 1715

7. The importance of pamphlet advertising in the Rhineland

E. The Palatines as frontiersmen

1. The hopes of the Board of Trade

2. The relations of the Palatines with the French and Indians

3. A suggested modification of Frederick Jackson Tuner’s thesis of the frontier influence

IX. Conclusion

X. Bibliography

A. Bibliographical guides

B. Primary Sources

1. Manuscript

2. Published

a. Official

b. Unofficial

C. Secondary Sources

1. General works

2. Special works

3. Periodical and learned society contributions

XI. Appendices-introduction to

A. The Kocherthal Party-the 1708 Emigration

B. The First Board of Trade List of Palatines in London (May 6, 1709)

C. The Embarkation Lists from Holland

D. The Roman Catholic Palatines Returned to Holland

E. The New York Subsistence List

F. The Simmendinger Register

G. The Pennsylvania Palatine Lists

H. The Petition List of Palatines in North Carloina

I. The Irish Palatine List

The Germans in Colonial Times

hbb0090Germans are the second largest ethnic group in the United States. Only those of English descent are more numerous. Even so, both groups represent generations of families living in America. These days, around a million people each year legally immigrate to the U.S. Countless more people immigrate illegally into the country hoping for a better life. The number of Germans or English coming to the U.S. today is hardly measurable amongst other immigrant groups. However, because of the waves of immigration from these two countries hundreds of years ago, they are still the foundation for the larger part of the U.S. population. Not even the large influx of Scots and Irish ever matched the overall migration of Germans. Germans were among the earliest people to move in mass to the New World. The Germans in Colonial Times examines the life of the earliest German settlers, their lives, their participation in the colonies, and even their part in the Revolutionary War.

This book is a facsimile reprint of the original work by Lucy Forney Bittinger. Her initial release was in 1901. Her turn of the [last] century writing style and word choice add some flavor to the book. She was concerned about the lack of knowledge and information people had about these early Germans and their deeds, even by their decedents. Quoting from the forward, “…even the descendants of these Teutonic pioneers are often ignorant or—more inexcusable—ashamed of their progenitors…”

In these pages you will find stories and essays on the history of Germans in American. How and why they came, the skills they brought with them, and their contributions in the colonies and in the Revolutionary War. Learning the history of these early German settlers can provide a sense of appreciation for their works and contributions to the country as a whole. Plus, learning specific history can sometimes help lead researchers to unexpected information and sources of information.

 

Contents

  1. Conditions in Germany Which Led to Emigration
  2. Penn’s Visit to Germany
  3. Germantown
  4. The Labadists in Maryland
  5. The Woman in the Wilderness
  6. German Valley, New Jersey
  7. Kocherthal’s Colony
  8. The Great Exodus of the Palatines
  9. Pequae and the Mennonites
  10. The Dunkers and Ephrata
  11. The Schwenkfelder and Christopher Dock
  12. The Progress of Settlement in the Valley of Virginia and in Maryland
  13. The Germans in South Carolina
  14. German Colonization in New England
  15. The Salzburgers in Georgia and the Pennsylvania Germans in North Carolina
  16. The German Press
  17. The Moravians
  18. Conrad Weiser and the Frontier Wars
  19. The “Royal American” Regiment
  20. The Redemptioners
  21. The Germans as Pioneers
  22. The Germans in the Revolution
  23. “The Rear-Guard of the Revolution”

 

Learn of these early German with your own copy of The Germans in Colonial Times, available from Family Roots Publishing.

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores

Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores is a scholarly book, full of details and amassed facts in an effort to explain the mass migrations from the war torn Rhine Valley in the early 1700s.  The Palatines were driven from their homes, into the British Empire, by circumstance and desire for a war-free life. Promises were made and hope for something better drove thousands to flee only to be hampered at every turn as politicians, monarchs, and business ventures debated and held in fist the fates of these emigrants. Despite it all, many of these German emigrants and their descendants have played major roles in the American colonies and the overall welfare of what became the United Sates.

History buffs and family historians alike will appreciate the efforts the author has made to uncover the real driving factors, political and  personal, that led to so many Palatines fleeing their homes and seeking refuge throughout the British Empire, including Ireland and the New World. Through a careful and emotionally controlled review of facts, Knittle has made connections and uncovered facts which, in many cases, go against the presumptions and stories that have endured for hundreds of years. Take this example from the introduction written by Dixon Ryan Fox:

“For example, it has usually been state that the Palatine’s disgust for the treatment they had received in New York was an important factor in diverting subsequent German settlement from that province into Pennsylvania. By cool analysis the present author reveals how untenable is this thesis. He has been ready to throw out the dramatic and the picturesque when clouded with doubt or founded on error. He cites the ‘interesting legend’ set forth by his predecessors which had it that the five Mohawk Indians taken by Peter Schulyer to London were so grieved at the plight of the Palatines, then encamped on Blackhearth, that they gave the Schoharie Valley to the Queen on consideration that’s she would bestow it upon the emigrants; then he points out that the Palatines sailed from London before the Indians sailed from Boston, that four of the five Indians were not sachems and had no authority to grant Mohawk lands and that these lands were subsequently ceded at Albany to the province with no reference to the Palatines.”

The book contains a bonus for those whose ancestry leads back to these early German settlers. Contained within these pages are lists totaling around 12,000 Palatine names.

Uncover these truths for yourself, order your copy of Early Eighteenth Century Palatine Emigration: A British Government Redemptioner Project to Manufacture Naval Stores from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBK1977, Price: $27.93.

 

Contents

Key to Footnote Citations

I. The Causes of the Early “Palatine” Emigrations

A. The emigrations studied

B. Area in Germany affected by the emigrations

C. Causes

1. Devastation of War

2. Severe winter of 1708

3. Oppressive taxation

4. Religion and land hunger

5. Liberal advertising of British colonies

6. Favorable attitude of British government

a. The aid given to foreign Protestants

b. The naturalization act of 1709

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