With $500K Gift, FGS Announces Completion of Fundraising for Preserve the Pensions

Wahoo! The following is from FGS:

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September 1, 2016: Springfield, IL – Today at its annual conference, the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announced the receipt of a historic $500,000 anonymous contribution to the War of 1812 Preserve the Pensions fundraising project. The unprecedented donation, which came from outside of the genealogical community, will be matched by Ancestry.com, and in total provide $1 million to the project. Those funds, along with crowdsourced funds from the genealogical community have provided more than $3 million dollars to the project. With these donations, FGS officially has announced the completion of fundraising for “Preserve the Pensions,” the landmark community fundraising project.

The largest fundraising effort ever initiated for a single genealogical record set, Preserve the Pensions involved donations from more than 4,000 individuals and 115 genealogical and lineage societies. Each donation was generously matched by Ancestry.com.

“We are humbled and grateful for the generosity of the genealogical community and those outside of our community who are dedicated to the preservation of records, thank you!” noted D. Joshua Taylor, FGS President. “This historic gift, in-tandem with the thousands of contributions from individual genealogists and societies, illustrates the incredible power of the genealogical community – together we can make a difference.”

The War of 1812 pensions, among the most frequently requested set of materials within the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), had never been microfilmed or digitized. Now, with fundraising complete for the project, and with ongoing cooperation from the project’s partners and major supporters, NARA, Ancestry, Fold3, and FamilySearch, these important documents will be made available free, forever to the general public. The project, set out to raise more than $3 million in 2010, an unprecedented amount for the genealogical community.

“It’s gratifying to see the fundraising portion of this project completed after five years, and now we look forward to ensuring these important records are preserved,” said Ancestry President and CEO Tim Sullivan. “This is a fantastic moment for FGS, the genealogical community, and future generations who will benefit from the perseveration of these rich pension records. We want to thank the more than 4,000 individuals who have contributed and are thrilled to play a matching role in this campaign.”

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)
The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents genealogical, historical, and lineage organizations throughout the United States. The Federation empowers the genealogical community through its annual conference, publications (including FGS FORUM) and projects. The Federation was the driving force behind the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors project alongside the National Parks Service and since 2010 has been actively involved in Preserve the Pensions, an effort to raise more than $3 million to digitize and make freely available the pension files from the War of 1812. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

Vladimir Putin’s Nearly Unknown Ancestry

The following excerpt is from an article by Gennady Klimov and Maria Orlova, posted August 31, 2016 at the pravdareport.com website.

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Russian president Vladimir Putin was a mystery almost for everyone during the moment of his election. He seemed to be a man with no past, inspired with the symbol of the new epoch, but deprived of historic roots. The research, which was conducted by journalists from the Russian city of Tver, became a sensation. As it became known, the parents of the Russian president came from the Kalininsky area of the Tver region.

The president’s family tree is not traced after Putin’s grandfather Spiridon Putin, who left the Tver governor for St.Petersburg at the age of 15. Vladimir Putin’s grandfather was a serious, reserved man of immaculate honesty. Spiridon Putin became a good cook. He worked in fancy restaurants in St.Petersburg before the revolution of 1917. Later, he was invited to cook for Lenin himself.

Read the full article.

200 Million PictureLife Images Are Back, Thanks to SmugMug

The following excerpt was posted August 22, 2016 at petapixel.com.

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When photo storage site Picturelife shut down, users were left high and dry without a way to access and/or download the images they had stored there. This didn’t sit well with SmugMug, who reached out to Picturelife and, today, is helping reunite those photographers with their lost images.

In all, some 200 million files were lost into the ones and zeroes of Internet history when Picturelife went under—but out of this sad tale came 200 million opportunities for SmugMug to be both altruistic, and maybe snag a customer or two for themselves.

It’s important to note that it will cost you nothing to take advantage of this offer from SmugMug.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the Heads-Up.

How to Locate Abandoned and Hidden British Villages on Google Maps

Have you found that your ancestors came from a village that no seemingly longer exists in Britain? If so, then the following excerpt is a “must read.” It’s taken from an excellent article posted August 31, 2016 at bt.com. I highly recommend that you take a look.

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Whether they’ve fallen victim to Mother Nature or been commandeered for the war effort, Britain is host to countless lost settlements. Here’s how to visit them online.

Isn’t it strange to think there are places in Britain where folks once lived, but don’t anymore? Many centuries, even millennia-old settlements have been deserted due to illness, the elements or wartime requirements.

A great way to discover some of the fascinating ghost towns and villages around the UK is through Google Maps online or via the Google Earth desktop program. Click the links below to explore these abandoned or lost communities.

How to find hidden villages on Google Maps
While the overhead maps don’t always offer that much detail, you can click on the yellow stick man and drop him to a spot on the map to view street-level photos and 360-degree panoramas shot by visitors to these sites.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Materials from 200 Institutions Across North Carolina Now Online at DigitalNC

The following excerpt is from the Digital North Carolina Blog:

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Materials from 200 partner institutions across North Carolina are now officially online through DigitalNC, with the publication of The Brunswick Beacon. Thanks to our 200th partner institution, the Rourk Branch Library in Shallotte, N.C., we now have newspaper coverage of the southern North Carolina coast. You can read more about our 200 partner celebration on our blog or on our celebration page.

Rourk’s first addition to the collection helps us build the North Carolina Newspaper collection, with almost a decade of issues from The Brunswick Beacon. The Beacon is a unique community newspaper with issues dating from 1985 to 1994.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

APG Unveils Details for its 2017 Professional Management Conference

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Washington D.C. to Welcome Professional Genealogy’s Premiere Event

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 23 August 2016 – Mark your calendars for a trip to the U.S. capital in 2017. The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) is pleased to announce that the 2017 Professional Management Conference (PMC) will be held in Washington, D.C., at the DoubleTree by Hilton Washington D.C.–Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia. The conference dates are Friday, September 29, through Sunday, October 1, 2017.

The PMC is the one conference dedicated to the needs of professional genealogists and those who aspire to do professional work, whether for themselves or for others. The conference will offer three tracks over three days of classes, workshops, and panels presented by the top genealogists in the field. A welcome reception on Thursday evening, September 28, and optional purchased lunches throughout the conference will provide networking opportunities.

Come early and stay later to do research. The conference hotel is a walkable three blocks from the Pentagon City Metro stop. From there, the National Archives stop is an eight-minute ride. The hotel offers complimentary shuttle service to and from the Pentagon City Metro, as well as to and from Reagan National Airport.

“We are excited to offer attendees the opportunity to gather in Washington, D.C., in 2017 not only for a wonderful conference, but also to research at the National Archives and Library of Congress, as well as the DAR Library,” said Billie Stone Fogarty, president of the Association of Professional Genealogists. “In the meantime, we are looking forward to welcoming attendees to this year’s PMC at the Allen County Public Library in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.”

Registration is open for the 2016 PMC, September 22 through 24, at https://www.apgen.org/conferences/index.html.

About the Association of Professional Genealogists
The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada, and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

From Kathleen W. Hinckley, CG, Executive Director, Association of Professional Genealogists

FamilySearch Celebrates the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ 40-year Anniversary​

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Salt Lake City, UT and Springfield, IL, (31 August 2016) — As the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ (FGS) annual conference opens today in Springfield, Illinois, the nonprofit organization is also celebrating its 40th anniversary. FamilySearch International thanks and recognizes FGS for its significant contribution to the family history community and celebrates the success of its major joint projects over the decades and the ways those projects help people seeking their ancestors.

Federation Genealogical Societies president, D. Joshua Taylor, remarked, “In the past 40 years, the Federation has enjoyed a number of partnerships throughout the genealogical community. We look forward to continuing to serve the needs of genealogical societies and are committed to ensuring the preservation and access to records for generations to come.”

First, the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database (CWSS), a successful project that began in 1990 and was completed in 1997, was a joint project sponsored by the National Park Service (NPS) in cooperation with FGS, the National Archives and Records Administration, the Civil War Trust, and FamilySearch International. This searchable online database of participants in the Civil War has about 6.5 million entries.

Preserve the Pensions is an ongoing joint effort to create a digital index of pensions belonging to veterans of the War of 1812. The project aims to digitize 7.2 million historic records that are quickly deteriorating and will be available online for free when the project is complete. Preserve the Pensions relies on donations to fund it, with a generous contribution from Ancestry.com to match every dollar donated. FamilySearch International made the first substantial contribution to the project to help initiate the digitization of the pension records.

The most recent joint project is an ongoing effort to create an online index of participants in the Mexican-American War (1846–1848). This indexing project will involve about 130,000 entries. This project is in conjunction with the National Park Service, specifically, the Palo Alto Battlefield Historic Park located in Brownsville, Texas.

The success of each of these great initiatives is made possible because of FGS’s ability to organize the needed online volunteers and industry resources. When the broader genealogical community works together like that, marvelous things happen,” said David Rencher, FamilySearch International Chief Genealogy Officer.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

ISFHWE Excellence-in-Writing Competition Winners Announced

ISFHWE
For Immediate Release – August 31, 2016: The International Society of Family History Writers and Editors is proud to announce the winners of the Excellence-in-Writing Competition. All entries were exceptional this year. Submission details for 2017 will be announced soon. For any questions on the competition, email Tina Sansone at competition@isfhwe.org.

Cat 1 – Columns
1st Place: Elaine Thomas – Stories I’ve Been Told – Otto l. Fuchs, Jr.
2nd Place: Martha E. Jones, PhD – Ancestral Avenues – Write Your Own Obituary
3rd Place: Barbara Starmans – General Paresis of the Insane
HM: Carolyn Schott – Happy Birthday, Mom
HM: Susan R. Anderson – Searching for roots to find my way home
HM: James M. Beidler – Accomplishing Client’s Goal the Best Holiday Present

Cat 2 – Articles
1st Place: Barbara J. Starmans – ‘In every city, village & hamlet’
2nd Place: Barbara Ellman – Genealogy Myth-Busters
3rd Place: Beverly Thompson – A Most Amazing Find: Protecting the Purse
HM: Paul Gorry – the Changing Face of Irish Genealogy
HM: Mary Penner – Collaboration with Colleagues
HM: Carolyn Schott – The Letter to the Governor

Cat 3 – Newsletters
1st Place: Michelle D. Novak – The Archivist (Genealogical Society of Bergen County, NJ)
2nd Place: Tony Burroughs – The Center for Black Genealogy News & Notes (CBG)
3rd Place: Patricia Mansfield Phelan – Newsletter of the Irish Family History Forum – Irish Family
HM: Michael McKeag – (1) North Irish Roots & (2) Snippets
HM: Stephanie Jobes – Lifeliner (Genealogical Society of Riverside)
HM: James M. Beidler – Der Kurier

Cat 4 – Unpublished Authors
1st Place: Frieda Anna Stiehl – Aunt Frieda’s Story
2nd Place: Catherine Smith – Converging Lines

Cat 5 – Unpublished Material – Published Authors
1st Place: Ruth Randall – Joseph Workman: Pioneer
2nd Place: Wendy Wilson Spooner – English Colonists and their Quest for Structured Family Life in America
3rd Place: Emilee M. Marks – A Puzzling Puzzle
HM: Susan R. Anderson – They Were Soldiers in the War of Independence
HM: Elaine Thomas – Family Ties
HM: Roccie Hill – A Snapshot of my Iowa Family History

Cat 6 – Poetry
1st Place: Wendy Wilson Spooner – My Father, My North Star
2nd Place: John Newmark – The Genetic and Synthetic

Submitted by Tina Sansone, Competition Coordinator

Serendipity Day

** What Is A Source?

** Mine Is Name Most Unusual

**Library of Congress Digital Newspaper Program

** Images of America: Washington

**Offers from FamilyTree Magazine

 

What is a source? One dictionary definition is so vague as to be meaningless: “a place, person, or thing from which something comes or can be obtained.” See Google search for “define source.”

A source is the identity and location concerning where you got the information you are using. 

That isn’t very artfully said but genealogists are talking about sources being reliable or unreliable. A source is a source. If I got my information from a book in the local public library, the citation information about the book and the place where I found it constitute the “source” of my information. Any questions about the accuracy, reliability or whatever of the information have nothing whatsoever to do with the “source.” If I think your information is wrong or unreliable and you provide me with a source, I can go an check to see whether or not you are correct. Absent a source, I have to guess where you might have gotten the information and from my perspective, I have to assume, since you did not tell me where you got your information, that the information is unreliable and quite likely wrong. When people say a “source” is unreliable, what they really mean is that the information obtained from the source is unreliable. (From: James Tanner ‘s   Genealogy’s Star blog back on  5 Dec 2015.)

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My maternal grandfather’s surname was Gurney. Mother always wondered where her surname originated. And why was the hospital carry-cart called a gurney. Well, I sleuthed and learned that the name originated in France and was DeGournay, meaning of the village of Gournay. A fellow of that name came to England with William the Conqueror (1066) and eventually the name morphed into Gurney. As for the hospital cart? I asked Grandma Google (who knows most everything!) and she said a fellow surnamed Gurney had invented it. Duh.

I have a Gurney ancestor with the first name of Bezaleel. Where did that come from in the early 1700s in Connecticut? Especially when he had siblings Elizabeth, Mary and Thomas. WELL!  It’s a name from the Old Testament, Exodus 35:30:  “I have called by name, Bezaleel…… and have filled him with knowledge in all manner of workmanship.” And Bezaleel was called upon to build the ark for the covenant!

Now why blather you with all of this? Do you have unusual first- or surnames in your family tree? Have you done any sleuthing to learn where that name originated??

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In a previous Serendipity, I spotlighted Miriam Robbin’s Online Historical Newspaper Directory. Now to highlight one of her spotlighted sources:

The National Digital Newspaper Program is a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress. This is a long-term effort to develop an Intenet-based, searchable database of U.S. newspapers. This is said to be your best bet to find information about American newspapers published between 1690 and the present. Wow. For Washington state, there are 11,000,000 pages posted. Double wow. This website takes time to search, but if you take the time it may prove to be a goldmine for you. Click to www.loc.gov/ndnp

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Arcadia Publishing offers wonderful books most helpful to genealogists. Called Images of America, these books are of a standard format (strictly adhered to) and always pertain to a place. For instance, there are nearly 200 books published having to do with my state, Washington. For example I’ll just pick the center of the Evergreen State; there are books for Leavenworth, Lake Chelan Valley, Kittitas County, Wenatchee, Quincy Valley, Grant County, Soap Lake, Moses Lake, Grand Coulee Dam, Yakima, Walla Walla, Richland, Kennewick and Manhattan Project/Hanford. My friend, Susan Davis Faulkner, did an Images of America book on Early Pasco. Imagine of those nearly 200 titles how many are about Seattle, Tacoma, Spokane and all the little places in between. These books cost $22 (unless you find one on Amazon J)

Click to this website (www.arcadiapublishing.com/series/images-of-america-books) and search to see if a book has been compiled on your ancestor’s home place, whether in Washington or the other 49 states.

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FTree

Family Tree Magazine is a wonderful genealogical resource and just keeps getting better and better with each issue. For all of us genealogists who keep asking “What in it for me?” Family Tree Magazine has answers.

Disclaimer: This magazine is www.familytree.COM and is in no way connected with www.familysearch.ORG and the FamilySearch Family Trees. A piece of chocolate pie and a piece of cherry pie…two great desserts but a bit different.

Each bi-monthly issue carries a score of teaching articles and each issue always offers some FamilyTree freebies…………free for the downloading. Or cheaply for the downloading. Organization guides. DNA guides. Writing your own story guides. State, city, topic guides. Everything!

How about this tip from the September 2016 issue…. click to their website and watch a video demo on finding free old photos and maps on the Library of Congress website. Free is good, right?

So try two clicks to two affiliated websites here: www.familytreemagazine.com and www.shopfamilytree.com.  Might find some amazing stuff.

 

Searching for the Descendants of the Pitcairn Island Mutineers

The following teaser is from an article posted at phys.org August 22, 2016.

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Ten pigtails of hair thought to be from seven mutineers of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame and three of their female Polynesian companions will be analysed in a new collaboration between the Pitcairn Islands Study Centre at Pacific Union College (California, US) and the forensic DNA group at King’s College London (UK).

The forensic DNA group at King’s has been sent hair strands from the ten pigtails, which are currently on display in the California-based centre, to help establish as much information as possible on their origins.
As the pigtails purportedly date back to the pre-1800s, the King’s team will first attempt to extract DNA from the historical hair samples after cleaning the outside and then digesting the hair matrix using a chemical process. Nuclear DNA is not found in hair shafts, only the roots which are not available here; however, mitochondrial DNA may be present. If sufficient mitochondrial DNA can be collected, the first step will be to investigate the ancestral origins of the owners of the pigtails.

Read the full article.

Thanks to Olive Tree Genealogy Blog for the heads-up.

Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Free City of Hamburg – is now shipping

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After months of intense research and production, Volume 56 of the Map Guide to German Parish Registers series is now shipping. The volume is very different from most of the German Map Guides, in that totally different techniques must be used to find your family in the big cities of Germany.

Published by Family Roots Publishing Company, Volume 56 of the German Map Guide series was published in August of 2016. This volume is made up of the Free City of Hamburg, which includes 184 historic stadtteile, or city sections, found in Hamburg. Information on the nearby port city of Cuxhaven is also included. Written in English by Kevan Hansen, this volume was principally written to help family historians resolve where their family may have gone to church – and left vital records behind that may be seen today. This is the fifty-sixth of a series covering all of Germany. These places are as of about 1870 to 1900. If the city section existed prior to that date, it will most likely be listed. If the city section was named well after after those dates, the chances drop. The Free City of Hamburg Map Guide is different than the others, in that totally different techniques are needed to locate in which church your ancestors may have worshipped when doing “big city” research.

The final volumes of the Map Guide to German Parish Registers series (Vol. 56 on) will all deal with the large and free cities of the German Empire. The “cities” books will be published as time permits in 2016 and 2017.

The following is from the Table of Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Historical Background of the Free City of Hamburg
  • Historical Background of the city of Cuxhaven
  • Rulers of the Free City of Hamburg
  • Overview Map of the Free City of Hamburg
  • Free City of Hamburg Civil Registration
  • Map and Key to Modern Civil Districts
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another
  • Hamburg Early to Modern District Keys
  • Where to Write for Civil Registration Records
  • Map and Key to Modern Stadtteile (City Sections)
  • Finding the Modern District from the Stadtteil
  • 1900 Hamburg Civil District Street Guide
  • Hamburg Parish Registers
  • Lutheran Parishes
  • Minority Religions
  • Hamburg Lutheran Parish Key & Map – 1900
  • Cuxhaven Lutheran Parish Key and Map – 1900
  • Parish Street Index – By Street
  • Parish Street Index – By Church (Reverse Index)
  • Other Genealogical Resources

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 56 –Free City of Hamburg, by Kevan Hansen, 186 pp; Library of Congress Control Number: 2016946281; Soft Cover ISBN: 978-1-62859-085-2; Hard Cover ISBN: 978-1-62859-086-9
Click on the appropriate link below to order.
German Map Guide Volume 56 – Soft Cover (Item #FR0123)
German Map Guide Volume 56 – Hard Cover (Item #FR0124)

The following historic stadtteil (city sections) are found in this volume.

Achterschlag – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Allermöhe – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Alsterdorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Alstertal – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Altengamme – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Altenwerder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Altona – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Alt-Rahlstedt/Rahlstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Altstadt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Alvesen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Appelbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Arensch – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Bahrenfeld – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Barmbek-Nord – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Barmbek Süd-West – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Beckedorf, Kreis Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Berensch, Landkreis Hadeln – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Bergstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Berne – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Billbrook – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Billhuder Insel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Billstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Billwärder an der Bille – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Blankenese – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Boberg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Bojewiese – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Borgfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Braak – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Bramfeld – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Bullenhausen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Canzlershof – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Cranz – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Curslack (Hamburg) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Curslack (Prussia) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Cuxhaven – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Dockenhuden – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Domhorst, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Duvenstadt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ehestorf, Kreis Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Eidelstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Eilbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Eimsbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Eissendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Eppendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Farmsen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Farmser Zoll – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Finkenwerder (Prussia) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Finkenwärder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Fischbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Francop – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Friesenwerder Moor, Kreis Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Fünfhausen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Fuhlsbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Geesthacht – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Glinde, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Gross Borstel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Gross Flottbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Grosshansdorf, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Gross Moor, Kreis Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Gudendorf, Landkreis Hadeln – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Gut Moor – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hamm – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hammerbrook – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Harvestehude – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hasselwerder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Havighorst, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Heimfeld – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hinschenfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hoheluft – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hohenfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hoisbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Holte, Landkreis Hadeln – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Höltigbaum – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Horn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Hummelsbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Jenfeld – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Kattwyk – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Kirchwerder (Prussia) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Kirchwärder-Nord (Hamburg) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Kirchwärder-Sud (Hamburg) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Klein Borstel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Klein Flottbek (east half) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Klein Flottbek (west half) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Klein Moor – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Kleiner-Grasbrook – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Krankenhaus (Hospital) Barmbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Langenbeck – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Langenfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Langenhorn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lauenbruch – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lemsahl – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lohbrügge – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lohe – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lokstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lürade – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Lurup – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Marmstorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Meckelfeld, Kreis Harburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Meiendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Mellingstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Moorburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Moorfleth – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Moorwärder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Mühlenberg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Mühlenbeck – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Nettelnburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neu Boberg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuenfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuengamme – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neugraben – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuhof – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuland – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neumühlen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neu Rahlstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neustadt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuwerk – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Neuwiedenthal – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Niendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Nienstedten – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Nincop – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oberbillwärder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ochsenwerder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oejendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oevelgönne – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ohlenburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ohlsdorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ohlstedt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oldenfelde – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Osdorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ost Krauel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oststeinbek, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Othmarschen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Ottensen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Overhaken – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Oxstedt, Landkreis Hadeln – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Peute – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Poppenbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Reitbrook – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Rissen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Rönneburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Rotheburgsort – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Sahlenburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Sande – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
St. Georg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
St. Pauli – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
St. Pauli-Nord – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Sasel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Schleeme – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Schmalenbeck, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Schnelsen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Seefeld – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Sinstorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Spadenland – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Spangen, Landkreis Hadeln – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Stapelfeld, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Steenkamp – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Steilshoop – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Steinbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Steinfurt – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Steinwärder – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Stollau, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Stellingen – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Stemwarde, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Stickenbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Struckhold – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Sülldorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Tatenberg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Tonndorf/Tonndorf-Lohe – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Uhlenhorst – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Unterbillwärder (Billbrook) – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Vahrendorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Veddel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Volksdorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Waltershof – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Wandsbek – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Wellingsbüttel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
West Krauel – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Wilhelmsburg – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Willinghusen, Kreis Stormarn – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Winterhude – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Wilstorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Wohldorf – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg
Zollenspieker – Stadtteil of the Free City of Hamburg

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 56 – Free City of Hamburg, by Kevan Hansen, 186 pp; Library of Congress Control Number: 2016946281; Soft Cover ISBN: 978-1-62859-085-2; Hard Cover ISBN: 978-1-62859-086-9

Click on the appropriate link below to order.
German Map Guide Volume 56 – Soft Cover (Item #FR0123)
German Map Guide Volume 56 – Hard Cover (Item #FR0124)

New Records Available to Search at FindMyPast

The following was received August 26, 2016 from FindMyPast:

FindMyPast-Logo-250pw

Over 7.5 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

United States Marriages
Over 4 million new records have just been added to our collection of United States Marriage records including substantial new additions from New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Arkansas. Released in partnership with FamilySearch international, these latest additions mark the second phase of efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America. The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

Victoria Coastal Passenger Lists 1852-1924
Victoria Coastal Passenger lists contains over 3.2 million records taken from the Public Record Office Victoria series VPRS 944 Inward Passenger Lists (Australian Ports). The collection includes records of both those travelling from overseas and those travelling locally (from coast to coast) and can provide a missing link in your ancestor’s journey if you’ve been unable to find out how they arrived at their known Australian residence. Each result contains a transcript and an image of the original document. Transcripts will generally reveal your ancestors name, marital status, occupation, birth year and details of their voyage including their date of departure, date of arrival, port of departure and port of arrival.

Britain, Enemy Aliens and Internees, First and Second World Wars
Britain, Enemy Aliens and Internees, First and Second World Wars contains over 139,000 records of foreign born men and women who were investigated and interned in camps across the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth during the First and Second World Wars. Released in association with The National Archives, the records are comprised of enemy alien index cards from the Home Office, nominal rolls, correspondence, Prison Commission records and much more. They include people from Germany, Italy, Japan, Austria, Finland, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania, and range from individual index cards recording a person’s movements and background to nominal rolls of camp inmates.

Britain, Enemy Aliens and Internees, First and Second World Wars – Browse
Browse the collection by conflict, series, or piece. A list of all series included in the collection is available at the bottom of the search page.

Britain, Children’s Employment Commission Part 2, 1842
Britain, Children’s Employment Commission Part 2, 1842 is an illuminating social document about the state of child workers in the nineteenth century. It was created by the Royal Commission of Inquiry to investigate the condition and treatment of child workers. Sub-commissioners travelled across Great Britain and Ireland interviewing children and young adults, as well as parents, adult employees, educators, medical professionals, and clergymen. These documents are presented in a Portable Document Format (PDF). You can search the documents by name or keyword, or you can read the entire commission from beginning to end.

Ireland, Children’s Employment Commission Part 2, 1842
Did your ancestor work in a factory as a child? Read through this fascinating account, which offers insight into the daily working conditions for children in the early nineteenth century. If you discover your ancestor’s name within the document, your ancestor most likely owned a factory or was employed in a factory.

PERSI Monthly Update
9,2647 [sic… ???]images from 20 assorted publications have been added in our latest update. The articles, photos, and maps found within PERSI can help flush out the historical context of your family history research.

UGA’s Call for Papers for the April 22, 2017 South Davis Family History Fair

The following is from Ginny Ackerson at UGA:

UGA

Utah Genealogical Association’s 20th Annual South Davis Family History Fair. “Family Puzzles…Finding All the Pieces” Saturday April 22, 2017

Proposals are now being accepted for the Utah Genealogical Association South Davis Family History Fair Spring Conference, which will be held Saturday April 22, 2017 at Woods Cross High School (600 West 2200 South Woods Cross, Utah)

Each presentation will be 60 minutes in length which includes time for questions and answers. Presentations should reflect the latest status of research and publication on the topic. The deadline for proposals is Monday, October 17th, 2016.

We welcome proposals that allow participants to gain new skills and information in the following:
 Getting Started: Those new to family history or who have never done research, or other beginner topics
 Online Research: Using computers, technology and the Internet for family history research, Genealogical websites, etc.
 Research Methodology: Beginning, intermediate and advanced research methodology in an area specific region in the world. Including pedigree analysis, evidence evaluation, tracing immigrants, LDS research, records sources, etc.
 Technology: Family History databases and programs, getting teenagers involved, Facebook, Twitter, blogging, APPs for Smartphones, IPADs, YouTube, EBooks, digital photography, audio recording, etc.
 Family History: Family organizations, family collaboration, writing a personal or family history, editing and publishing family history, etc.

Proposals must include:
 Full name of the presenter, current e-mail, telephone number
 A brief biographical sketch of the presenter for the syllabus (50 words maximum)
 Title of the presentation
 Short class descriptions (50 words maximum)
 Lecture experience

Compensation:
Speakers participating in the Conference will receive:
 Complimentary registration
 Free lunch
 Computers, projectors, and Internet access will be provided for speakers to use for their presentations.

Please e-mail presentation proposals in Microsoft Word or PDF format to ugaconferences@gmail.com no later Monday, October 17th, 2016.

Complete syllabus materials must be submitted no later than Friday, March 31st, 2017.

The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox – 2nd Edition – Sale Extended Thru Wednesday, Sept 7, 2016

Google-Toolbox-2nd-edition-FrontCover-300pw

It was early in the spring that FRPC last ran a promotion on Lisa Cooke’s The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox. Since it’s nearly fall, we decided to do it again. This time it’s a full 20% off! This is an excellent book, and can be of help to anyone doing online research.

Following is the review (with modified sale information) that I wrote a while back.

I have used Lisa Louise Cooke’s 2011 first edition of The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox regularly in the last several years, and found it extremely helpful. This new edition is even more so. When it comes to tracing your family tree online, you need the right tools to get the job done. In The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, Lisa helps you stuff your genealogy toolbox with FREE state-of-the-art Internet tools that are built to search, translate, message, and span the globe. You’ll travel outside the genealogy community and straight to the folks who dominate the online world: Google. A lot has changed since the first edition was published in 2011 (see list at the bottom of this post), and it’s all documented step-by-step in this new edition.

FRPC has again made a special purchase of this volume and is making it available for 20% off at the website – now through Wednesday, September 7, 2016. Regularly $25, it’s just $20.00. Get yours today. Click on the links or on the illustration to order.

Following is a list of the chapters found in the volume:

  • Introduction, Getting Ready to build Your Family Tree Fast
  • Chapter 1: Search Tools
  • Chapter 2: Basic & Advanced Search
  • Chapter 3: Search Strategies for High-Quality Results
  • Chapter 4: Site Search & Resurrecting Websites
  • Chapter 5: Image Search
  • Chapter 6: Common Surname Searches
  • Chapter 7: Google Alerts
  • Chapter 8: Gmail
  • Chapter 9: Google Books
  • Chapter 10: Google News Archive
  • Chapter 11: Google scholar
  • Chapter 12: Google Patents
  • Chapter 13: Google Translate
  • Chapter 14: YouTube
  • Chapter 15: Google Earth: An Overview
  • Chapter 16: Google Earth: Ancestral Homes & Locations
  • Chapter 17: Google Earth: Organizing & Sharing
  • Chapter 18: Google Earth: Historic Images & Maps
  • Chapter 19: Google Earth: Plotting Your Ancestor’s Homestead
  • Chapter 20: Google Earth: Adding Family History Content
  • Chapter 21: Google Earth: Family History Tour Maps
  • Appendix: Find it Quick: The “How To” Index

I love this guidebook, and recommend it to anyone who wants to get more use of the online “tools” available to them. Check out the items that are new, expanded or updated in this edition.

  • Google Search: Put an end to fruitless searches forever – UPDATED!
  • Searching Common Surnames – NEW!
  • Google Alerts: Your personal genealogy research assistant – UPDATED!
  • Gmail: Never lose another email – EXPANDED!
  • Google Books: The world’s history at your fingertips – UPDATED!
  • Google News Archives: Free digitized historic newspapers – UPDATED!
  • Google Patents: Research the inventor in your family – NEW!
  • Google Scholar: Explore the world’s most scholarly sources – NEW!
  • Google Translate: Explore foreign language websites – UPDATED!
  • YouTube: Build your own genealogy channel – NEW!
  • Google Earth: Rock Your Ancestor’s World – EXPANDED!

The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox, 2nd Edition, Revised & Updated; by Lisa Louise Cooke; 2015, Soft Cover; 203 pp; 8.5×11; ISBN: 9780984522903; Item #LU18

Bundle of Two Popular Genealogy Atlases & a U.S. County Wall Map- on Sale for 35% off thru Wed, Aug 31

US-and-Europe-Map-Bundle-300pw

Family Roots Publishing has a pretty good stock of the Family Tree Atlases, as well U.S. County Wall Maps – so we decided to bundle them together and off the package at 35% off – just $60.40 for all three items, plus $8 USA postage.

Click here or on the illustration to order.

If you already have one or more of these items and would just like to order 1 or 2, we also discounted the U.S. Atlas and the County Wall Map by 28% purchased individually. The Europe atlas can be purchased individually for 33% off. Click on the links to purchase. Use your back arrow to return to this page and order as a bundle.

Note that detailed reviews of each of the 3 items are also available. Click on the “See Review” links below the items to read the review. Click on your back arrow to return to this page.

This Map Bundle is made up of 3 popular Genealogy-related map and atlas products. They are:

Click on each of the links to see the item at its own page. Use your back arrow to return to this page and purchase as a bundle.