New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of March 20, 2017


The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (March 25, 2017), Hundreds of thousands of free indexed records from all over Italy are featured in these newly published online collections. Additionally, find newly searchable records from Canada, Ecuador, Germany, The Netherlands, Peru, Sweden and the United States. Search these new free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 73,853 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1800-1870 – 39,041 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Prato, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1923 – 15,463 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Rieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1840-1945 – 1,525 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Enna, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1944 – 108,603 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Grosseto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1851-1907 – 155 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Viterbo, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1870-1943 – 168 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496-1906 – 0 – 111,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 2,532,170 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869 – 42,862 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 28,563 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 2,668 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Norrbotten Church Records, 1612-1923; index 1658-1860 – 6,531 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Kopparberg Church Records, 1604-1900; index 1628-1860 – 7,194 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index – 3,390,197 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Alaska, Vital Records, 1816-1959 – 18,844 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866 – 72,842 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York State Census, 1865 – 18,804 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Pennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-1931 – 61,584 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

R.I.P. Elizabeth Lapointe

Elizabeth Lapointe, a friend and fellow genealogy blogger, passed away on Monday, March 13, 2017. Elizabeth was a terrific genealogist, specializing in Canadian genealogy. She wrote a column for Heritage Quest Magazine years ago, and that’s how I got to know her. Elizabeth was currently the editor of the Ontario Genealogical Society’s Families, having just completed the Spring 2017 issue prior to her passing. Her blog, Genealogy Canada, was always helpful and informative.

We will miss her.

For more information, see John D. Reid’s blog of March 14.

FindMyPast Offers FREE Access to Their Entire Irish Collection Thru March 17

To coincide with St Patrick’s Day 2017, Findmypast is making their entire collection of more than 116 million Irish records free for a limited time!

Through 17 March 2017, you can access the largest collection of Irish records online for FREE!

Unique records from World War 1 and the Easter Rising, extensive travel and migration collections, as well as detailed Irish court and prison registers are all available to help you add colour to your users’ discoveries.

Access Findmypast’s Irish records for FREE through March 17 – Saint Patrick’s Day! Click on the appropriate link below for access.

You can get free access to the following:

  • Over 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers
  • Over 9.5 million Census records including the 1901 and 1911 censuses
  • Over 22 million Petty Sessions Court Registers
  • Over 33 million Irish newspaper articles spanning the years 1708 to 1956
  • Over 7.3 million Dog Licenses
  • Over 24 million Irish Passenger Lists
  • Over 2.4 million workhouse & poor law records
  • 4 million Irish Quaker records
  • Over 131,000 Easter Uprising & Ireland Under Martial Law
  • Prison Registers, featuring over 3.5 million names
  • Landed Estates Court records featuring details of over 500,000 tenants residing on estates all over Ireland
  • The complete Griffith’s Valuation
  • The most comprehensive set of national directories, dating back to 1814
  • Indexes to Irish wills dating from 1270 – 1858
  • Over 400,000 gravestones and church memorials

Click on the appropriate link above to access the FREE databases. REMEMBER – the offer ends at the end of the day March 17.

FREE Access to All Irish Resources on AmericanAncestors.org from March 15-22

The following news release is from NEHGS:

Unique Databases, Boston Catholic Records, “How-to” Irish Research Guides, a Webinar, and More Resources Available with Free Guest Registration

AmericanAncestors.org/Irish

March 14, 2017 — Boston, Massachusetts—Honor your Irish heritage this St. Patrick’s Day by researching your Irish ancestry on AmericanAncestors.org, the award-winning website of New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS). Learn the essential concepts and techniques for Irish research, and find out which manuscripts, collections, and sources are used by genealogists at American Ancestors to crack the toughest research cases.

Irish resources will be free and open from Wednesday, March 15, through midnight (EDST) on Wednesday, March 22. Access requires a free, brief sign-up on AmericanAncestors.org.

The Only Online Source for Boston’s Catholic Records
Browse record images of baptisms, marriages, and more from Boston’s oldest parishes, including the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Holy Trinity. NEHGS is digitizing parish records from 1789 to 1900, a period of significant growth for both Boston’s Catholic Church and the Irish immigrant population.

Find Your Irish Ancestors in FREE Databases on AmericanAncestors.org
Search unique collections such as Irish Immigrant Advertisements, 1831-1920, and the NEHGS-exclusive database The Annals of Beara, The Session Book of Aghadowey, 1702-1725, plus many more.

Break Through Your Irish Brick Wall
With expert resources from NEHGS, found exclusively on AmericanAncestors.org, learn tips for navigating the sometimes challenging course of finding Irish ancestors. This Irish-themed promotion from American Ancestors includes an hour-long webinar on NEHGS Irish Resources, an online subject guide to locate key resources and records in Irish genealogy, and popular articles from our American Ancestors magazine with fascinating insights about Irish and Irish American genealogy.

NEHGS offers FREE access to all of its Irish databases and resources via AmericanAncestors.org from March 15 through midnight (EDST) on March 22. Access requires registration as a FREE Guest User at AmericanAncestors.org/Irish.

3 Irish Research Aids – 2 brand new – Bundled & Discounted 15% thru March 21

Family Roots Publishing has put together a bundle of three Irish Research Guides, two of which are brand-new (2017) and one popular 66 page booklet produced in 2012.

The bundle is normally $29.85. It’s discounted 15% through March 21. Click on this link to order the bundle. Don’t need all three items? Order any one of two items for 10% off at their respective sites (see links below).

The items are:

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page to order the bundle.

Donna Moughty’s Irish Research Series of Quick Reference Guides

Lisa Louise Cooke just released a new series of two Irish Research Quick Guides. They were written by Donna M. Moughty, and edited by Lisa. While only four pages each, these guides are loaded with information everyone with Irish ancestry can use.

FRPC is offering these new guides at 10% off through March 21.

Following is a description of each:

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series
Without the right preparation, researching in Ireland can be frustrating! Before you jump the pond, start your research at home to determine a place in Ireland, as well as details to help differentiate your person from someone of the same name. This research guide will walk you through the process of identifying records in the US to set you up for success in your Irish research.

Each Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish research preparation and template
  • Creating a research plan
  • Strategic steps to answer your research questions
  • Sample research plan outline
  • Irish immigration history
  • Irish jurisdictions
  • Next steps for Irish records research

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU25

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series
Civil Registration for all of Ireland began in 1864, with Protestant marriages dating back to 1845. Even if your ancestors left before that date, they likely had relatives that remained in Ireland. Prior to Civil Registration, the only records of births (baptisms), marriages or deaths (burials) are in church records. This Reference Guide will explain how to use the new online Civil Registration records as well as how to identify the surviving church records for your ancestors in Ireland.

Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish Civil Registrations history
  • Irish families, names, and variations
  • Strategies for locating Irish Civil Registrations
  • Northern Ireland research
  • Irish church records
  • Online and traditional resources for research

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU26

About the Author
Donna Moughty is a professional genealogist and a former Regional Manager for Apple Computers. She has been conducting family research for over 20 years. She teaches classes for beginners and lectures on a variety of subjects including Internet, Irish research, and computer topics. In addition, she provides consultations, research assistance, and training. She is a member of Association of Professional Genealogists and the Genealogical Speakers Guild.

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

“From trade directories, petty sessions, and DNA to Currency, Ships and even Irish-American Soldiers in the US Civil War, we’ll show you the resources you need to find your Irish ancestors!”

That is the splash on the front cover of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. Moorshead Magazines is the publisher of Your Genealogy Today, Internet Genealogy, and History Magazine. Every so often the company collects the best articles on a particular subject from each of the three magazines and combines them into a special edition. Like the recently reviewed Tracing You English & Scottish Ancestors, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors is one Moorshead’s special genealogical releases.

Produced in 2012, this 66-page special edition features 12 articles relevant to Irish research (a complete article list is provided below). As the cover text states, articles cover a wide variety of topics. Many article are printed with images and sample to get a better feel for the topic. Alan Stewart’s article on Internet-based Irish research covers over 50 websites, with full URLs and a brief summary of each. Page by page, the reader is taken through the various topics covered by each author’s area of expertise.

Family Roots Publishing is offering this publication at 10% off through March 21, 2017.

Even though each article appeared previously in one of Moorshead’s three magazines, before publication articles were updated to ensure source materials and online references were up to date. While some references may change with time, having the source names can help researches find any altered sites usually with some ease.

Whether the research lives in Ireland or is the descendant of an Irish immigrant, the information from these articles is highly relevant. With modern communications, the world seems to shrink more each year. The cost of communicating and accessing documents and records located around the world is faster and cheaper than ever before.

 

Contents

Can You Get a Certificate of Irish Heritage

Hilda McGauley looks at a fun, and informative, way to recognize your Irish heritage

Your Irish Ancestry Online: A Definitive Guide

Alan Stewart goes online in search of the top Internet-based Irish research resources

Online Irish Family History Resources

From Ireland’s local governments and libraries, David A. Norris looks at what is on the ‘Net

The Court of Petty Sessions

David A. Norris looks at Irish court records that might contain many ancestors names

City and Trade Directories

David A. Norris looks at an important resource for researching your Irish roots

Locating the Exact Origin of Your Irish Ancestor

Marie Daly looks at some important resources for researching your Irish ancestor

Six Steps to Research Success: Irish Style!

Brian Michell documents the six crucial steps necessary to reach your online research goal

Ancestors, Ships and the Sea

David A. Norris looks at the online resources available if your Irish ancestor was a sea rover

Ireland’s Money and Your Genealogy

David A. Norris looks at the local currency your Irish ancestor would’ve used

Finding Help With Your Scots-Irish Line

Cindy Thomas looks at the resources available to assist you with your Scots-Irish research

Surnames and Genetics in Ireland

Anthony Adolph explains how ancient surnames and modern genetics make perfect partners

Civil War Soldiers

David A. Norris looks at the resources available if your Irish ancestor fought in the Civil War

 

Order copies of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing.

Bockstruck’s New Settlements & Migrations book, bundled with his Names volume – 15% Off through March 14

Family Roots Publishing has put together a bundle of two recently published Lloyd Bockstruck books – one dealing with Settlements and Migration in America & the other the closely related subject of Names. We’ve discounted the bundle by 15%, making it just $30.52 (Reg. $35.90) The following books are included:

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book at their respective pages, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page to order the bundle.

Following are reviews of each of the books:
GPC has just released a new guide from Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck. This softbound book is titled American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians.

The book provides a synopsis of the original patterns of settlement and migration for the United States. Mr. Bockstruck discusses each of the 50 states, however, his emphasis is on the states and territories that were established between the colonial period and the middle of the nineteenth century. For each state the author examines pioneers’ places of origin, reasons for settlement, specific places of settlement in America, names of pioneering families, migrations within and between states, and more. Equally important, throughout the volume he names the key sources for further research.

The study of migration is inextricably intertwined with family history. By combining a knowledge of history and geography, therefore, the family historian can extend the family pedigree across the country. Every detail represents a potential clue to an elusive ancestor, from the name of a shipping line, port of embarkation, and clusters of fellow passengers, to the nature of soil available to the colonist, church membership, and status of roadways.

Some members of the family may not have ventured away from the ancestral home. Others went westward but did not continue as far as some of their kinfolk. They may have generated the records further inland that would enable the family historian to bridge an ancestral geographical gap. Finding earlier places of residence could enable one to determine the place of nativity of an ancestor. Following such paths could enable one to locate relatives who remained in the East or dropped off earlier along the migration route, thereby identifying the immigrant or colonist who founded the family in the New World and perhaps the ancestral home in the Old World as well.

The study of migration/immigration follows several principles. Firstly, one must understand the local history of one’s ancestral homes. For example, as late as 1950, the state possessing greatest percentage of residents of British descent was Utah. Why? Utah was settled by Mormons, and this relatively new religious group was mostly composed of New England Puritan stock. Moreover, that church’s first missionary efforts abroad were in conducted in the British Isles, and those converts joined them in Utah.

Secondly, migrations are also tied to similar climatic belts. Colonists and immigrants often sought out lands that were capable of growing the crops with which they were familiar, as in the case of Scandinavian settlement in Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Thirdly, migration rests upon forces that draw immigrants to a new home. It may also apply to those forces that drove them away from their home. In some instances both aspects may apply. For instance, more than 150,000 natives of Virginia were living in the states of the Old Northwest Territory in 1850—an area accessible to them and possessing terrain and soils with which they were familiar.

Still other factors impinging on migration and settlement include available modes of transportation, religious preference or ethnicity, economic factors such as famines and floods, and foreign wars, revolutions, and other aspects of statecraft. Bockstruck contrasts colonial migrations, for example, with those following American Independence. During the colonial period, individuals and groups moved from the southern colonies to the northern colonies, and vice versa. Until the 1750s, colonists utilized sailing ships as the primary mode of transportation between colonies. They did not move from the East to the West until after the French and Indian War, when the Braddock and Forbes roads were built to enable the military forces to go into the interior to challenge the French in the Ohio River Valley. Such roads were necessary to move heavy military equipment, such as canons, and materiel to the war front.

American Settlements and Migrations is arranged by region and thereunder by state. Each chapter outlines not only the events, persons, and forces that contributed to a state’s settlement but also offers untold clues to the reader’s own ancestors. Might an 18th-century South Carolina forebear have been part of the British expulsion of the French from Nova Scotia? Was your Welsh ancestor part of the Pennsylvania migration to work in the Knoxville, Tennessee mining industry? Your Irish Famine-era ancestor was living in Boston in 1860, but is the gap in his genealogy attributable to the fact that he might have entered North America through the Canadian Port of St. John, Newfoundland. These are just some of hundreds of possibilities Mr. Bockstruck gets you to consider. His new primer may be just the clue finder you have been looking for.

In my review of the volume, I found that virtually hundreds of resources are found within the text – all with full titles, and authors. This makes it easy for the genealogist to find the item with the publishers, or a nearby library genealogy collection. By the way, you can find books in libraries near you within seconds by typing the title into the search engine at http://www.worldcat.org/. Find the book, and click on it. Enter your location zip code (under Find a Copy in a Library). Bingo!

The only issue I have with the volume is that the font is a bit small for my old and tired eyes. But reading the volume in bright lighting made my reading pleasurable – and I learned many things that I didn’t know previously.

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

The following is from the Table of Contents – the abbreviations are mine:

  • Chapter One: American Settlements and Migrations in America
  • Chapter Two. New England – MA, CT, RI, Providence Plantations, VT, ME
  • Chapter Three. West Indies
  • Chapter Four. The Middle Colonies – NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD
  • Chapter Five. The Southern Colonies – VA, WV, NC, SC, GA
  • Chapter Six. The Impact of the Revolutionary War
  • Chapter Seven. Post Revolutionary War Settlements – FL, KY, TN
  • Chapter Eight. The Old Northwest – OH, IN, IL, MI, WI, MN
  • Chapter Nine. The Old Southwest – AL, MI, LA
  • Chapter Ten. The Trans-Mississippi West – IA, MO, AR
  • Chapter Eleven. The West – TX, KS, NE, OK, UT, NM. AZ, NV, CO, ND, SD, WY, ID
  • Chapter Twelve. The Pacific Coast – OR, WA, CA
  • Chapter Thirteen. Alaska, Hawaii and Canadian Settlements – AL, HI, QC, NS, ON

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.
_________________________

cf8006Two hundred years ago no parent would have named a child for a favorite movie star. There were no movies. However, naming a child for an historical figure, like George after George Washington, was not uncommon. Other naming practice common in the past would seldom be considered today. However, understanding such practices may help a genealogists better identify their ancestors. For example, using an uxornecronym. An uxornecronym is a name given to the first daughter born into a marriage were the name honors a previous wife. Such practices would be less common in a society were divorce is the primary reason for having previous marriages, but not so in a time when death, especially in child birth, would have left an empty place in a home to be filled by a second marriage. Genealogists looking to better understand and trace their ancestors by their names may benefit greatly from The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogists, a new book by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck.

What is Onomatology? Where etymology is the study of the origin and history of words, onomatology is the same for names. Bockstruck explains, “onomatology is the study of names. It involves both forenames, commonly called first, second, or middle names, and family names or surnames. It also includes nicknames and  place names which in the United States are often named for individuals.” He also makes the important distinction, “the study of onomatology is one based on records over centuries and requires an awareness of a multitude of changes in names.” This book provides, at least, the basics of onomatology for genealogists.

The Name IS the Game is broken into five chapters. The first acts as introduction. The second and third chapters examine given names and surnames, respectively. These chapters represent the bulk of the book and cover all types of naming practices over centuries of Europe and the United States. The last two chapters cover toponyms, place names, and provide a selected bibliography for further reference.

I have provided, below, and expanded table of contents. The list should demonstrate just how much this book covers, especially regarding surnames.

Table of Contents  (expanded)

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Forenames

  • Ethnic Clues in Forenames
  • Forename or a Title
  • The Maiden Name of a Mother as a Forename
  • Forename Clues
  • Diminutives
  • Diminutive Abbreviations
  • Forename Equivalents
  • Multiple Forenames
  • Uxornecronyms
  • Ambisexual Forenames
  • Postponing the Bestowing of Forenames
  • Repetition of Forenames
  • Forename Clues
  • Hagiographic Forenames
  • Naming Patterns
  • Optical Mis-recognition
  • Forenames from Historical Figures
  • Initials
  • Renaming of a Living Child

Chapter 3 Surnames

  • Maiden Names
  • Spelling Fixation
  • Surname Confusion
  • Misinterpretation of Letters of Surnames
  • The Un-aspirated Initial Letter of Surnames
  • Pronunciations
  • The Terminal “G”
  • Nee, Alias, and Genannt
  • Adoption of a Step-parent’s Surname
  • Military Influence on Surnames
  • From English to Another Language
  • From One European Language to Another
  • The Dit Name
  • Dialects and Minorities
  • Dutch Surnames
  • Abbreviations of Surnames
  • The Crossed Tail of the Letter P
  • The Long “S”
  • The Female Title of Mrs.
  • Idem  Sonans
  • Translation into English
  • Surname Shortening
  • The Letters “R” and “L”
  • “Ou” and “Wh”
  • Gender and Surnames
  • Ethnic Clues
  • Statutory Changes
  • District and County Court Changes of Names
  • Multiple Independent Appearances
  • Spanish
  • African-American
  • Jewish
  • American Indian Surnames

Chapter 4 Toponyms

Chapter 5 Selected Bibliography of Legal Changes of Names

 
Copies of The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogist are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.

Bundle of 3 Early American Research Guides – 40% Off thru Feb. 28

Family Roots Publishing has bundled 3 popular research guides, all dealing with early American history and genealogy.

This bundle of 3 items is made of the following:

Tracing Your Colonial American Ancestors

Tracing Your Revolutionary War Ancestors

Tracing Your War of 1812 Ancestors

Following is a partial description of each. Click on the links to see the table of contents for each item. Come back to this page and click here or on the illustration to purchase at 40% off. Just $17.91, plus $5.50 p&h – Normally $29.85 plus $5.50 p&h.

Don’t need all three? Purchase them individually for 30% off at their respective sites. This offer is good through Feb. 28, 2017.

Tracing Your Colonial American Ancestors; by David A. Norris, from the Publishers of “Family Chronicle” and “Internet Genealogy” & “History Magazine”; 2013; paper; 82 pp; 8.5×11; Item #: MM015
Discover Your Colonial Roots
LOCATE YOUR ANCESTORS IN:

  • Vital Records Sources
  • Revolutionary War Records
  • Militia Records
  • Tax Rolls
  • Colonial Court Records
  • Poll Books
  • Colonial Maps
  • Ship Passenger Lists
  • Land & Probate Records
  • And Much More!

Click here to go to the page for this item, and see the full Table of Contents. Return to this page to order as a bundle.

——-

Tracing Your Revolutionary War Ancestors; Compiled by author David A. Norris: from the Publishers of History Magazine; 68pp; Paper; saddle-stapled; Full Color; 8.5×11; Item # MM022
Start Your Revolutionary War Research!
Locate Your Ancestors In:

  • Military Service Files
  • Navy and Privateer Records
  • Stat Rosters
  • Pensions
  • Cemetery & Death Records
  • Political & Government Records
  • Bounty Land Warrants
  • Loyalist Records
  • And More!

——-
Tracing Your War of 1812 Ancestors; Compiled by David A. Norris; 68 pps; Paper; saddle-stapled; Full Color; 8.5×11; Item # MM012
Resources for USA, Canadian and British Research!
PLUS:

  • Army & Navy Records
  • Bounty Land Warrants
  • Newspapers & Maps
  • Government Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Pension Records
  • Militia Service
  • Impressment
  • US Marines
  • Prisoners of War
  • And More!

Click here to go to the page for this item, and see the full Table of Contents. Return to this page to order as a bundle.

Click here or on the illustration to purchase the Early American Research Bundle at 40% off. Only $17.91, plus $5.50 p&h – Normally $29.85 plus $5.50 p&h.

Don’t need all three? Purchase them individually for 30% off at their respective sites. This offer is good through Feb. 28, 2017.

Complete MyHeritage Subscription & DNA Test – $199 (Reg. $349) Now Thru Tuesday, Feb 21

As far as I can tell, the following is the best offer ever made for a MyHeritage Complete Subscription plus a MyHeritage DNA Test. 

I just returned from RootsTech, where I was again most impressed with the latest technological advances made by MyHeritage.com. While at the conference, they made two major announcements – one about their new “Photo Discoveries” feature, and another about the new Consistency Checker for online family trees at MyHeritage. Of course, Photo Discoveries was the most exciting new feature, as we can now count on getting far more photos in our trees than we’ve ever had before. NOTE: Since sending this out in the Genealogy Newsline last Monday, I’ve added the discount link to the above Photo Discoveries and Consistency Checker news releases – as I’ve had at least one reader attempt to get the discount directly from the MyHeritage Blog. WRONG PLACE! Thus the added paragraph and links in those blogs.

As I blogged last November, MyHeritage is now a major player in the DNA testing business. While at RootsTech, I worked out an exclusive offer for my readers. Subscribe to MyHeritage, and get their Complete Subscription, PLUS a MyHeritage DNA Test (with FREE shipping!) – all for just $199 (Reg. $349). This is the lowest price that I’ve ever seen offered! This offer was only good through February 20, but I got it extended for an additional day – through the 21st.  Click on this link to take advantage of the offer.

Since sending this offer out earlier, staff at MyHeritage have clarified that the offer is for new MyHeritage subscribers or those who have had subscription in the past and it is expired for at least 3 months. Anyone having a current subscription will not be able to see the offer when they click on the links… Sorry!

As my readers know, I’ve been a big fan of MyHeritage for a long time. Traditionally, I have considered the company and their website to be the European competitor to Ancestry.com, while FindMyPast filled the same niche for British research. Both MyHeritage and FindMyPast have expanded into the United States and Canada markets in recent years, with hundreds of millions of records of specific interest to Americans and their northern cousins.

Led by their founder and CEO, Gilad Japhet, MyHeritage has consistently pushed the technology envelope. The technology that Gilad and his team have produced has allowed millions of genealogists worldwide to find more ancestors. New search technologies have kept MyHeritage at the forefront of the online database business for several years. And that technology continues to make huge advances.

MyHeritage is far more than just a place to build online family trees. While their trees continue to grow dramatically, they continue to collect data in many forms worldwide. Many of their users are our European and British cousins whose data may often be accessed at the site. Using the MyHeritage technologies, users are prompted to check out new MyHeritage Discoveries, Smart Matches and Record Matches. 

Based on my personal experience with MyHeritage, I highly recommend the site, as well as their DNA test. As I mentioned early in this article, I’ve worked out a promotion for my readers offering a Complete Subscription, plus the DNA test for only $199. What’s a Complete Subscription? It’s a MyHeritage membership which includes all the MyHeritage Data, as well as the Trees. Click Here to take advantage of this amazing offer.

This offer will give you the following:
• Your Personal Private site with unlimited capacity
• Start a new tree or import by GEDCOM
• Unlimited photo storage
• Apps for the iOs/Android smart phones and tablets
• Family Tree Builder premium software for the PC and MAC
• Smart Matches with 35 Million trees
• Automatic Record Matches
• Full Privacy Control
• Global Name Translation
• Record Detective II
• Over 7 billion historical records
• More than 100 Million newspapers
• Vital records from 48 countries
• 1790-1940 USA census records
• 1841-1911 England and Wales census records
• Over 5 million Dutch records
 NEW Compilation of Published Sources collection with over 450,000 books and 91 million pages
• Book Matching
NEW PedigreeMap
• NEW Sun Charts
 Join 87 million users who have built trees with 2 billion people.

Don’t just take my word for it. The following comment was made by my friend, Dick Eastman:
“I was amazed at the results. Within minutes MyHeritage.com showed me more information about a number of my ancestors than I had found in 35 years of searching on my own”
Dick Eastman – Author of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

Here’s the deal: $199 for a full year of a Complete Subscription to  MyHeritage – that’s their PremiumPlus Family Site, their Data Plan, and a DNA Testing Kit. Everything!!! Again – This is the lowest price I’ve ever seen for these products, So Click here to order yours today. Did I mention that the DNA Test Kit ships FREE! Order now, as this price will only be offered through Tuesday, February 21, 2017.

Note that the offer is for Genealogy Newsline Readers. However, since I author and own Genealogy Newsline, I can also offer it to my GenealogyBlog.com readers and folks that read me through social media. The landing screen from the above link says “Genealogy NewslineReaders” but all my readers and friends are included. Note that I do get a portion of the subscription fee when folks use my links during the promotion period – and I thank you for that support.

Kind regards,
Leland K Meitzler
Genealogy Newsline & GenealogyBlog.com

Ancestry.com Settles Lawsuit with OraSure Technologies Over DNA testing

Ancestry.com has agreed to pay OraSure Technologies and its DNA Genotek subsidiary $12.5 million to settle a lawsuit that alleged that Ancestry took DNA Genotek’s saliva sampling technology and improved upon it, without giving credit to DNA Genotek. According to the agreement, “Ancestry can continue using its version of the sampling technology, but must pay royalties to DNA Genotek. DNA Genotek will also receive access to patents involved with Ancestry.com’s version of the test, but without any royalties.

The following teaser is from an article posted February 6, 2017 at The Morning Call website:

BETHLEHEM — Genealogy website Ancestry.com has agreed to pay Bethlehem-based OraSure Technologies Inc. and its Canadian subsidiary DNA Genotek $12.5 million to settle claims it stole patented DNA testing technology to produce its own saliva-based DNA test.

DNA Genotek sued Ancestry.com in May 2015, alleging the website stole its technology for collecting DNA via saliva samples and improved upon it for its own use in violation of the terms of an agreement between the two companies. The website offers to trace users’ ethnic background using their DNA.

Ancestry.com, according to the lawsuit, purchased DNA Genotek saliva test kits in 2012 and 2013 in order to collect saliva samples from its customers, then filed for its own patent for an improved version of the device in 2013 without DNA Genotek’s consent.

Read the full article.

The Japanese WWII Internment – 75 years ago today

Camp Harmony, under construction in 1942, at the Puyallup Washington State Fairgrounds. 7,390 people of Japanese decent were interned here. Photo courtesy of the Tacoma Public Library.

As I’ve written a number of times on this blog, our family had friends of Japanese ancestry who lived here in the Tacoma/Puyallup/Orting area of Western Washington. They were interned in “camps” during the Second World War. The presidential order for that round-up of American citizens took place exactly 75 years ago today. One of those camps – although a temporary collection point – was Camp Harmony, right here at the (Puyallup) Washington State Fairgrounds. See the photo. We attended many concerts in that grandstand behind the temporary housing – the Beach Boys, John Denver, and Ricky Nelson, just to name a few.

This was a shameful period in American history. Our small town of Orting was hit hard by it – the uncalled-for racism and the unrooting of our citizens is still felt today – all these years later. Our community has healed, but it took a very long time.

The following is from the February 19, 2017 Los Angeles Times. It includes comments made by the Press at that time. Oh, my…:
Seventy-five years ago today, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, declaring parts of the United States to be military zones from which particular groups of people could be “excluded” for security reasons. The order set the stage for the relocation and internment, beginning the following month, of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were American citizens living on the West Coast.

To our lasting shame, here’s what The Times editorial page had to say about the matter at the time:
“This is war. And in wartime, the preservation of the nation becomes the first duty. Everything must be subordinated to that. Every necessary precaution must be taken to insure reasonable safety from spies and saboteurs so that our armed forces can function adequately and our industrial machinery may continue to work free from peril.”

And this:
“The time has come to realize that the rigors of war demand proper detention of Japanese and their immediate removal from the most acute danger spots. It is not a pleasant task. But it must be done and done now. There is no safe alternative.”

And this, a year or so later, when some people were calling for the release of those who had been interned:

“As a race, the Japanese have made for themselves a record for conscienceless treachery unsurpassed in history. Whatever small theoretical advantages there might be in releasing those under restraint in this country would be enormously outweighed by the risks involved.”

Read the full article.

New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of Feb 13 2017

The following is from FamilySearch:

Another 15 million indexed historic records have been added to FamilySearch’s vast collections. Included are a wide variety of records from 13 countries (including Argentina, Australia, Denmark, England, and the Netherlands) containing passenger lists, obituaries, school records, marriage records and more. And check out the 7 million Oklahoma school, Illinois church, Louisiana World War I Service, Michigan obituary, and North Carolina county marriage records. Search these free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Argentina, La Pampa, Catholic Church Records, 1882-1976 – 61,602 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Argentina, Mendoza, Catholic Church Records, 1665-1975 – 273,551 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Australia, Victoria, Outward Passenger Lists, 1852-1924 – 1,598,094 – 116,274 – New indexed records and images collection
Australia, New South Wales, Deceased Estate Files, 1880-1923 – 211,390 – 0 – New indexed records collection
British Newspaper Archives, Obituaries – 1,795,894 – 237,537 – New indexed records and images collection
Chile Civil Registration, 1885-1903 – 182,479 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821-2015 – 54,266 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Croatia, Delnice Deanery Catholic Church Books, 1725-1926 – 47,665 – 3,485 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – 0 – 2,011,878 – Added images to an existing collection
Denmark, Copenhagen City, Civil Marriages, 1739-1964, Index 1877-1964 – 33,214 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Honduras, Civil Registration, 1841-1968 – 71,620 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hungary, Jewish Vital Records Index, 1800-1945 – 746 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hungary Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 41,377 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 728,435 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Philippines Civil Registration (Local), 1888-1986 – 68,551 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Sweden, Västernorrland Church Records, 1501-1940; index 1650-1860 – 0 – 1,313 – Added images to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994 – 3,422 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California, County Marriages, 1850-1952 – 27,451 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Court and Emancipation Records, 1820-1863 – 0 – 12,462 – New browsable image collection.
Illinois, Chicago, Catholic Church Records, 1833-1925 – 194,888 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Louisiana World War I Service Records, 1917-1920 – 74,174 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 449,089 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 557,105 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York State Census, 1865 – 0 – 392 – Added images to an existing collection
North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 – 770,164 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850 – 487,520 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Oklahoma, School Records, 1895-1936 – 7,397,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 19,345 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

TLC Reveals the New Celebrities for the Seventh Season of Who Do You Think You Are?

The following is from Danielle Matlin at discovery.com:

New season premieres Sunday, March 5 at 10/9c

TLC’s Emmy Award-winning series, WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? returns this spring with a new group of celebrities ready to delve into their lineage and get answers to the questions they’ve wondered about their entire lives. Eight new one-hour episodes bring more unexpected turns and surprising discoveries of great historical significance. Executive Produced by Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky, the new season premieres on Sunday, March 5th at 10/9c.

Check out the video about the upcoming seventh season by clicking or on the illustration.

This season’s celebrity contributors include:

  • Jessica Biel makes surprising discoveries that change what she thought knew about her heritage.
  • Julie Bowen uncovers the story of two relatives whose moral codes are from opposite ends of the spectrum.
  • Courteney Cox traces her maternal line back seven centuries to the Medieval times to discover royalty in her lineage and an unbelievable tale of family drama.
  • Jennifer Grey uncovers new information about the grandfather she thought she knew, learning how he survived adversity to become a beacon of his community.
  • Smokey Robinson searches for answers behind the mystery of why his grandfather disappeared from his children’s lives and finds a man tangled in a swirl of controversy.
  • John Stamos digs into the mystery of how his grandfather became an orphan, and learns of tensions between families that led to a horrible crime.
  • Liv Tyler learns that her family is tied into the complicated racial narrative of America.
  • Noah Wyle unravels the mystery of his maternal line, uncovering an ancestor who survived one of America’s bloodiest battles.

Ancestry, the leading family history company, is teaming up again with TLC as a sponsor of the upcoming season. As part of the show sponsorship, Ancestry provides exhaustive family history research on each of the featured celebrities to help make discoveries possible and build out the story of each episode.

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? is produced for TLC by Shed Media (part of the alternative department at Warner Bros. Television) and Is or Isn’t Entertainment. The series is based on an original format created by Wall to Wall Media and Alex Graham. More information can be found at TLC.com/WDYTYA. ‘Like’ Who Do You Think You Are? on Facebook.com/WDYTYA and follow @WDYTYA on Twitter.

ABOUT TLC
Offering remarkable real-life stories without judgment, TLC shares everyday heart, humor, hope, and human connection with programming genres that include fascinating families, heartwarming transformations, and life’s milestone moments. TLC ended 2016 strong ranked as the #6 Female ad-supported Cable network in prime with W25-54; a top 10 network for the 10th year in a row.

TLC is a global brand available in more than 91 million homes in the US and 325 million households in 220 countries and territories. Viewers can enjoy their favorite shows anytime, anywhere through TLCgo – the network’s TVE offering featuring live and on demand access to complete seasons. A destination online, TLC.com offers in-depth fan sites and exclusive original video content. Fans can also interact with TLC on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest. TLC is part of Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), reaching 3 billion cumulative viewers in 220 countries and territories to satisfy curiosity and engage superfans with a portfolio of premium nonfiction, sports and kids programming brands.

The New Consistency Checker for Online Family Trees at MyHeritage

NOTE: If you wish to order the bundle of the Full Subscription to MyHeritage & a DNA test for $199, Click on this link. The links below, as well as the link within the illustration just go to MyHeritage, and DO NOT include the special offer. I say this, because I’ve found that one of my readers was very confused, attempting to order the special offer directly from the MyHeritage blog, which these links go to. The offer is good through February 21, 2017.

I got a full demonstration of the new MyHeritage Family Tree Consistency Checker at RootsTech. This feature will make what could be a difficult project very simple. The following is from the MyHeritage Blog. To read more details, with examples, click on the illustration.

We’re excited to introduce the new Consistency Checker for online family trees at MyHeritage. This new tool scans your family tree and identifies mistakes and inconsistencies in your data so that you could make the necessary changes in your tree, improving its overall quality and accuracy.

The Consistency Checker employs 36 different checks on the family tree data, ranging from the obvious (e.g., a person was born before their parent, or when the parent was too young to be a parent) to the subtle and hard to find (e.g., a person was tagged in a photo and the photo is dated before the person’s birth; or two full siblings were born 5 months apart, which is impossible). Some of the issues it finds are factual mistakes (e.g. wrong birth date entered), some are bad practices (e.g. birth year entered as 22 instead of 1922, or prefix entered as part of the first name instead of in the prefix field), some are warnings about possible data entry errors (e.g. a woman’s married surname was apparently entered as her maiden surname, or a place was entered that looks suspiciously like a date) and some are inconsistencies you may want to fix, such as references to the same place name with two different spellings. Any issue you feel is fine and should intentionally not be addressed can easily be marked to be ignored and will not be reported again.

A similar Consistency Checker tool has long been available in our Family Tree Builder software and has been very much appreciated by the many users who have taken advantage of it. We are now providing it for the 37.1 million family trees managed by our users on the MyHeritage website. Genealogists who care about the accuracy of their information, as all genealogists should be, will be delighted with the opportunity to catch mistakes in their data and fix them. Take the challenge and run the Consistency Checker on your tree! Will your tree come out clean, with flying colors, or is it in need of serious cleanup? Most of the issues are easy to fix and we are sure that you will enjoy the process.

Read the full blog post.