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American Place Names Of Long Ago — 50% OFF

 

A Family Roots Publishing Holiday Special: 50% OFF American Place Names Of Long Ago

 

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gpc225George Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World contains an index of over 100,000 place names of “every county, city, town, village, and post-office in the United States and shows the population of the same according to the Census of 1890.American Place Names Of Long Ago is a republication of the Index to Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World, as Based on the Census of 1890. Assembled and with an Introduction by Gilbert S. Bahn, Ph.D.

So why an index, a list, of places names from over 120 years ago? Well, when you consider how many nineteenth-century place names have changed or disappeared in the intervening years, and that 45 percent of the places listed in this index were too small or obscure to have their population counts listed by the census taker, the importance of such a work is self-evident. Indeed, there may be no official record of many of these places, and Cram’s index may be the only tool to guide you from an obscure location to the correct county courthouse.

Bahn further explains the value and purpose of this index:

“There are a variety of reasons why a place name that served its purpose well enough long ago may not be found in a modern finding tool. When one is looking for persons—one’s own ancestors or someone else’s—the story behind the disappearance of a place name is immaterial. Just finding where on a map that place was, in order to search for records, is the objective. Moreover, as I believe always to be the case in American genealogy, the test is to place the locality within the correct county where the appropriate records may be expected to reside—if they were indeed created and if they survived over time.”

Cram had the benefit of working with the 1890 census before it was destroyed. According to Gilbert Bahn, census enumerators listed all place names on their tabulation sheets, even when the population counts were too small to warrant recording. Thus, Cram was able to compile an extremely detailed list of place names–and an accurate list, at that, because the names were recorded by local enumerators and automatically tied in to their respective counties! It is fair to say that the compilation of such a list would have been impossible without the 1890 census.

The original index as published in the 1898 edition of Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas occupied 106 pages, each with six columns. For purposes of this reprint edition, the six columns have been rearranged into three; otherwise there has been no change to the original text. Each entry, in alphabetical order within states, gives the place name, the county in which the place is located, and the population of the place at the time of the census. State capitals and large cities are in caps, county seats are in boldface, post offices are in roman type, and places that are not post offices are rendered in italics. Places that were too small for a population count are indicated by an X.

This index is an unexpectedly rich source of information, and thanks to Dr. Bahn we are now able to place it before an appreciative audience.

 

Order American Place Names Of Long Ago from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC225

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ScotlandsPeople Adds the 1925 Valuation Rolls

Scotlands People

The folks at ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk have announced that the Valuation Rolls for 1925 have just been added to the ScotlandsPeople website.

The following is from their announcement:

The new records, which are FREE to search, comprise 2,103,648 indexed names and 76,512 digital images. The Rolls cover every kind of property in Scotland that was assessed in 1925 as having a rateable value, and provide a fascinating snapshot of Scotland in the aftermath of the First World War.

Check it out at ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk.

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The Great War: A Guide To The Service Records Of All The World’s Fighting Men And Volunteers — 50% OFF

 

A Family Roots Publishing Holiday Special: 50% OFF The Great War: A Guide to the Service Records of All the World’s Fighting Men and Volunteers

 

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Those born at the outbreak of World War I are now nearly 100 years old. There are only a handful of people left in the world who would have been old enough to have a solid recollection of the time. Those who fought, served, and volunteered during this time have become our past. They are no longer the parents and grandparents we can interview. Now, they are like most of our ancestors, whose stories come from records, from family tales, and from all the details that can be extracted through research. For those who served in the war, as soldier, as nurse, or in any other armed or volunteer service position, records are available, their story awaits to be uncovered.

The principle book on World War One genealogy research is titled, The Great War – A Guide to the Service Records of All The World’s Fighting Men and Volunteers, by Christina K. Schaeffer. The book was published in 1998, and reprinted in 2006 – and is still available in an extremely attractive hard-cover edition. The Great War will help us, the descendents, find our participant ancestors, regardless of which side or country they fought for. These records, like the war, span the world. Some two dozen countries were involved in the fight, but nearly every country in the world felt the effects of war. The records covered in this guide are often missed or neglected by researchers.

“With help from dozens of individuals and institutions throughout the world, in particular from libraries such as the Army Pentagon Library, the Navy Department Library, the Library of Congress, the Family History Library, the Hoover Institute (Stanford University), the Public Record Office (England), and the national archives of at least a dozen countries, the author (Christina K. Schaefer) has managed to compile a guide to WWI service records that is not only unique but totally comprehensive. She has taken a mountain of material and cut it down to size, transforming an unwieldy body of sources into a streamlined archive. Her pioneering efforts will save researchers untold hours of toil, adding limbs to family trees and providing opportunities for further research.”

is designed to provide background on the organization of the military in 1914, the order of battle, how to use the records, and a general time-line of events, focusing on 1914 to 1918.

The second portion concentrates on the combatants, describing each country’s armed forces, conscription history, and its military and naval records, and, to the greatest extent possible, their location. Records that have been microfilmed and are available worldwide through the FamilySearch LDS branch libraries are identified by roll number.

The third portion of the book describes casualty lists and POW records, and provides a table showing changes in place names.

The last portion of the book, an appendix, contains a glossary of abbreviations, Internet addresses, and a select bibliography of books written in English.

The disposition of personnel files varies from country to country, depending on privacy laws and archival practices. In some cases documents are held by a military archive, in others by a national repository. In a few cases, such as Great Britain, service files have been transferred from one agency to another. Whatever their disposition – and it is an important aim of this book to identify their disposition – the records covered here fall under the following headings:

  • Draft records,
  • Personnel papers,
  • Unit records,
  • Embarkation lists,
  • Death records and casualty reports,
  • Military parish registers,
  • Regimental returns,
  • Medal lists,
  • Entitlement lists,
  • Hospital registers,
  • Pension records,
  • and diaries.

A particularly useful section of the book, “Research Tips,” describes the general organization of military records, the organization of those records in specific countries, and the condition and comprehensiveness of the records.

With help from dozens of individuals and institutions throughout the world, including the U.S. Army Pentagon Library, the Navy Department Library, the Library of Congress, the Family History Library, the Hoover Institute (Stanford University), the Public Record Office (England), and the national archives of at least a dozen countries, the author compiled a guide to WWI service records that is not only unique, but comprehensive in scope.

 

Contents

Table of maps and illustrations

Preface

The History

  • Research tips
  • Time line

The Countries

  • Australia and New Zealand
  • Austria-Hungary
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada and Newfoundland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Great Britain
  • Greece
  • India
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Luxembourg
  • The Ottoman Empire
  • Poland
  • Romania
  • The Russian Empire
  • Serbia and Montenegro
  • South Africa
  • The United States
  • The Neutral Countries
  • Aftermath
  • Casualties and prisoners of war
  • New countries

4. Appendix

  • Information on the Internet
  • Glossary and abbreviations
  • Selected bibliography

Index

 

The Great War: A Guide to the Service Records of All the World’s Fighting Men and Volunteers is available Family Roots Publishing; Holiday Special 50% OFF

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PBS Genealogy Roadshow Season 2 Premieres January 13

The following news release is from Nisa Kiang at goodmanmedia.com

Genealogy-Roadshow-250pw

ARLINGTON, VA; DECEMBER 9, 2014 – From descendants of the infamous pirate Blackbeard to heroes of the Holocaust, PBS’ GENEALOGY ROADSHOW uncovers family secrets in the series’ second season, which premieres Tuesday, January 13, 2015, at 8:00 p.m. ET and airs every Tuesday through February 24 (check local listings). Part detective story, part emotional journey, GENEALOGY ROADSHOW combines history and science to uncover fascinating stories of diverse Americans in and around St. Louis, Philadelphia and New Orleans. Each individual’s story links to a larger community (and in some cases, national) history, to become part of America’s rich cultural tapestry.

GENEALOGY ROADSHOW stars genealogists Kenyatta D. Berry, Joshua Taylor and Mary Tedesco and features participants with unique claims and storylines, including a woman seeking to find out if she is descended from the infamous pirate Blackbeard; a pair of sisters exploring connections to a survivor of the legendary Donner party; a man hoping to recover essential family history that washed away in Hurricane Katrina; and a man learns that the event that drove his family to the City of Brotherly Love changed the course of history.

Over the course of the series, Berry, Taylor and Tedesco work with participants’ anecdotal clues, documents and family heirlooms to unite them with histories and people they never knew existed, as well as to reveal surprising turns and incredible histories.

“In three great and complex American cities we find engaging stories, dark mysteries, emotional reveals and more” said Beth Hoppe, Chief Programming Executive and General Manager of General Audience Programming for PBS. “In each episode, GENEALOGY ROADSHOW reaches out to help Americans who are interested in their family heritage and their community history. It proves that no matter one’s culture and background, everyone is part of the American story.”

St. Louis, Philadelphia and New Orleans were chosen as representative of America’s fascinating crossroads of culture, diversity, industry and history, as well as for their deep pools of riveting stories. GENEALOGY ROADSHOW’s hosts and experts add color and context to the investigations, ensuring every artifact and every name becomes part of solving the mystery.

Below are episode descriptions for each of GENEALOGY ROADSHOW’s six episodes:

New Orleans – Cabildo
Premieres, January 13, 2015 at 8:00 p.m
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A team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family stories at the famous Cabildo, home of the Louisiana State Museum. A couple whose ancestors hail from the same small Italian town explore the chance they may be related; a woman is desperate to find out who committed a gruesome murder in her ancestor’s past; a home held by one family for more than a century renders a fascinating story; and a woman discovers the difficult journey her ancestor took on the path to freedom from slavery.

St. Louis – Central Library
Premieres, January 20, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

At Saint Louis’ historic central library, a team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family stories from Missouri’s famous gateway city. A mystery writer discovers her mother has hidden a life-changing secret; a woman finds out if she is descended from the infamous pirate Blackbeard; a mother and daughter seek connections to a famous author; and a young man seeks connection to the Mali tribe in Africa.

Philadelphia – Franklin Institute
Premieres, January 27, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

At Philadelphia’s Franklin Institute, a team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family histories. A man learns that the event that drove his family to the City of Brotherly Love changed the course of history; a man may be a Viking descendant; another’s family could have part of one of history’s biggest scams; a young man hopes to confirm his relation to a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and two sisters learn their ancestors were part of the great Irish migration.

New Orleans – Board of Trade
Premieres, February 3, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

A team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family stories at the New Orleans Board of Trade. A local man seeks to recover essential history washed away in Hurricane Katrina; a woman discovers she has links to both sides of the Civil War; another unravels the mystery behind her grandfather’s adoption; and one man explores a link to the famous New Orleans Voodoo Queen, Marie Laveau.

St. Louis – Union Station
Premieres, February 10, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

At St. Louis’ historic Union Station, a team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family stories from Missouri. A musician hopes to find connections to a famous St. Louis jazz composer; two sisters explore links to a survivor of the legendary Donner party; an Italian-American woman finds out if she is related to Italian royalty; and a schoolteacher who has all the answers for her students has very few about her own past.

Philadelphia – Historical Society of Pennsylvania
Premieres, February 17, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

A team of genealogists uncovers fascinating family histories at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. One woman’s ancestor may have sparked historic labor laws; a pastor may have an outlaw in her family tree; a woman learns about slave genealogy and, with the help of DNA testing, gets the answer she has waited for; and another woman learns her ancestor may have helped others escape the Holocaust.

PBS LearningMedia, PBS’ destination for educators and students, offers a range of curriculum-targeted resources that support lessons on genealogy, immigration, and identity and delve into the personal histories of well-known icons and everyday Americans. Through discussion questions, worksheets, and videos, PBS LearningMedia helps teachers to promote inquiry in their classrooms and strengthen their student’s personal connection to history. For more information on the latest digital resources for GENEALOGY ROADSHOW classroom instruction, please visit pbslearningmedia.org.

GENEALOGY ROADSHOW is produced by Krasnow Productions. President and owner Stuart Krasnow is a longtime television industry veteran, having worked for all of the country’s top broadcasters in news and entertainment, as well as at numerous cable networks as a creator and executive producer. The series is also executive produced by TV veteran Carlos Ortiz, who has produced mega-hits for almost every major network on television. He brings 20 years of development and producing experience to the table and returns to PBS for his second season on the series.

About Big Mountain Productions
Big Mountain originated the GENEALOGY ROADSHOW format, and recently aired its second hit season in Ireland on RTE Television. Run by husband-and-wife team Jane Kelly and Philip McGovern — who are former BBC/RTE executive producers — Big Mountain originates and produces television shows for national broadcasters, specializing in hybrid shows that combine great content and entertainment value, including The Tenements, Life in the Big House, Craftmaster, Living the Eviction and the music-mentoring show Jam. For more information: bigmountainproductions.com.

About Krasnow Productions
Krasnow Productions is named for its founder and president, Stuart Krasnow, a 30-year veteran television producer. Under his banner, Krasnow has developed and produced series in almost every genre of unscripted television for broadcast and cable networks, including The Weakest Link, Average Joe, Dog Eat Dog and The Janice Dickinson Modeling Agency. Krasnow Productions also sold and produced Searching For…, one of the first original series to be produced for Oprah Winfrey’s OWN network. Additionally, Krasnow Productions has sold and produced original projects for NBC, A&E, TBS, GSN, MTV, HGTV, E! and Fremantlemedia.

About PBS
PBS, with its more than 350 member stations, offers all Americans the opportunity to explore new ideas and new worlds through television and online content. Each month, PBS reaches nearly 109 million people through television and over 28 million people online, inviting them to experience the worlds of science, history, nature and public affairs; to hear diverse viewpoints; and to take front row seats to world-class drama and performances. PBS’ broad array of programs has been consistently honored by the industry’s most coveted award competitions. Teachers of children from pre-K through 12th grade turn to PBS for digital content and services that help bring classroom lessons to life. PBS’ premier children’s TV programming and its website, pbskids.org, are parents’ and teachers’ most trusted partners in inspiring and nurturing curiosity and love of learning in children. More information about PBS is available at www.pbs.org, one of the leading dot-org websites on the Internet, or by following PBS on Twitter, Facebook or through our apps for mobile devices.

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Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans — 50% OFF

 

A Family Roots Publishing Holiday Special: 50% OFF Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans

 

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In his History of New Hampshire, historian Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole attempts to answer the question, “What makes a man prominent?” In his words:

“Whoever has helped notably in the great march of human progress deserves credit therefor in the popular estimation. Abilities, character and achievement make men prominent. Learning and money may be helpful, but they are not enough; without character they may the sooner sink one into oblivion.”

This seems to me as good as any definition. By whatever scale of prominence men have chosen to use, historians has provided us with tales, biographies, and accounts of men deemed important in their own right. Histories are written of events from those that changed the world to the deeds of men known only in their own communities. Either way, research can help uncover these men and their deeds. Family historians should take note that many of these histories contain vital genealogical data about not only individuals of prominence, but also their families, their acquaintances, and those with whom they interact, fixing these individual in time and place.

Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans, by William S. Speer, is a prime example of a selective history of men considered prominent with in their state. By whatever right the Honorable William Speer thought these men important, he has immortalized their names through the written word. First published in 1888, Speer selected 259 men from 19th century Tennessee for his historical record.

“I had a native ambition to rise from obscurity and make myself useful in the world, to shine and be distinguished.” ~ The  Hon. Neil S. Brown, one of the 259 prominent 19th-century Tennesseans profiled in this extraordinary book.

It is this kind of unique first-hand biographical information that makes Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans unequaled in the canon of Tennessee genealogical literature. Not only did compiler William S. Speer have the unparalleled opportunity to interview a number of the featured Tennesseans himself, he also was able to garner–and include in this book–thousands and thousands of names of their family members, friends, and colleagues.

Republished in 2008, this type of book is a treasure to both those interested in Tennessean history as well as to genealogists. As would be hoped, these sketches include many details about the lives of these men and their families. Speer offers, often extraordinary, insight into the personal, professional, and sometimes even physical characteristics that made each of these men a success. A complete list of names, or even surnames, would be too lengthy to list here. However, below is a list of surnames of those men highlighted in this book.

 

Pick up a copy of Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $44.10.

 

Surnames featured in the book:

  • Anderson
  • Arrington
  • Atkins
  • Atlee

[Read the rest of this entry…]

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Genealogy and the Law: A Guide to Legal Sources for the Family Historian

Genealogy and the Law-Front_Cover

Life in the past, the life your ancestors lived, was different from our own. They still had to meet their basic requirements of work, food, shelter, family, and religion. People were born, they were christened, they married and had families, they worked and they died. They lived their lives. Some ran businesses or worked for others. Some lived in cities and other in the country. These things don’t change. However, the means in which people conducted their daily lives, and the records that document those lives vary from place to place and by cultural and religion. Some vital records are kept by churches, many by governments. No matter where a person lived, one thing is for sure, they lived under the laws that governed their homelands.

As a unique textbook, Genealogy and the Law guides readers through the variety of legal sources that genealogists need in order to explain many of the events that occurred in their ancestors’ lives. Land ownership, estate administration, and taxation are a few of the many aspects of life that cannot be fully understood without knowledge of the law in effect at the time.

The authors, Kay Haviland Freilich and William B. Freilich, an award-winning genealogist and an attorney, both with long service in their professions, bring the perspectives of genealogy and the law together in a book that covers the language of the law, how to find pertinent laws, the kinds of sources available, where they can be found, citation of legal works, and how to apply legal research to genealogical problems.

Contents

Preface

Chapter 1 — Understanding the Law

  • Creating a Law
  • Government Checks and Balances
  • The Changing Law
  • Law and the Courts
  • The Importance of time and Place
  • Quiz – Chapter 1: Understanding the Law

Chapter 2 — Understanding the Terminology

  • Origin of Terms
  • Dictionaries – Black and Bouvier; Legal Dictionaries, Print and Online; Genealogical Dictionaries
  • Quiz 2 – Chapter 2: Understanding the Terminology

Chapter 3 — Types of Law

  • Jurisprudence
  • Historical Background
  • Origin of Laws – Stautory Law – Case Law
  • Public and Private Laws
  • Laws of Time and Place
  • Subjects and Actions – Civil Actions – Criminal Actions
  • Equity
  • Bankruptcy

Chapter 4 — Finding the Pertinent Law

  • Legislative History
  • Genealogy of a Law – with Examples of a 1783 Division of Real Estate and an 1847 Naturalization Requirements law.
  • Quiz – Chapter 4: Finding the Pertinent Law

Chapter 5 — Sources to Use

  • Codes
  • Session Laws
  • Case Reporters and Digests
  • Law Review Articles
  • Treatises
  • Legal Databases
  • State “Blue Books”
  • Biographical Materials
  • Directories
  • Quiz – Chapter 5: Sources to Use

Chapter 6 — Where to Research

  • Law Libraries
  • Law Library of Congress
  • State Law Libraries
  • County Law Libraries
  • Law Schools Libraries
  • Other Libraries
  • Genealogical Libraries
  • Online Sources
  • Quiz – Chapter 6 – Where to Research

Chapter 7 — Citing Legal Sources

  • Codes
  • Reporters and Digests
  • Unpublished Cases
  • Statutes
  • Law Review Articles
  • Treatises
  • Citation Guides
  • Quiz – Chapter 7: Citing Legal Sources

Chapter 8 — Applying the Law to Ancestral Events

  • Laws and Everyday Life
  • Case Studies
  • Quiz – Chapter 8: Applying the Law to Ancestral Events

Appendix 1 — Vocabulary of the Law

Appendix 2 — Selected Bibliography

Appendix 3 — Answers to Quizzes

Purchase Genealogy and the Law at the FRPC website for less than $20. Click here to order.

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Welsh Family History: A Guide to Research, 2nd Edition

Welsh Family History, A Guide to Research coverMany first time Welsh researchers underestimate the differences, historically speaking, between Wales and England. Wales has its own unique social, cultural, religious, and linguistic characteristics making it unique in historical perspective. In addition, many first time Welsh family historian discover the hard reality that many Welsh records have suffered a poor survival rate.

Welsh Family History: A Guide to Research was written to address the specific problems researchers face when trying to uncover their Welsh ancestry.

Welsh Family History was originally published by the Association of Family History Societies of Wales. The book is a compendium of research guides written by different authors specializing in areas of specific research. These essays, or articles, were written by both individuals with direct experience in Welsh family history research, as well as by those with extensive knowledge of the history of Wales.

Together, these guides form a handbook designed to help researchers avoid pitfalls and get through the sometimes difficult challenges presented in Welsh family history research. This book was not compiled to help beginners with research basics; rather, the book guides those with a basic understanding of research who need a more thorough assistance in dealing with Welsh history and records.

For the second edition, each author was given the opportunity to update his or her text. Consideration was given to recent developments, particularly in the area of local government and archives. The result of these changes led to a modification in the number of chapters but improved insights into Welsh family history research, while preserving the objectives of the first edition.

+ see the expanded Table of Contents below

Order your copy of Welsh Family History, A Guide to Research 2nd Edition

Editors: John & Sheila Rowlands
Published: 1998(UK), 1999(USA)
Type: soft cover
Size: 6 x 8½
Pages: 325
ISBN: 9780806316208
FRP Item #: GPC5030

 

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Notes on Contributing Authors
Editorial Preface to the First Edition
Editorial Preface to the Second Edition
Chapter 1 Introduction by Hafina Clwyd
Chapter 2 Archive Repositories in Wales by R. Kevin Matthias

The National Library of Wales
The Organisation of Local Governments
County Record Offices

Chapter 3 Family History Societies of Wales by Stewart Blackwell
Chapter 4 Parish Resisters and Bishop’s Transcripts by John Watts-Williams

Introduction
Finding Parish Registers
Survival of Parish Registers
Nature of Content
Nonconformity and Parish Registers
Detailed Content
Bishop’s Transcripts
Other Transcripts of Parish Registers, Copies and Indexes of Entries
Search and Photocopying Services

Chapter 5 Civil Registration and the Census by Sheila Rowlands

Civil Registration
The Census

Chapter 6 Nonconformity by Muriel Bowen Evans

Introduction
Some Preliminary Explanations
The Origins and Early History of Nonconformity
Toleration for Nonconformists
A Change of Tempo
Increases of Churches and Membership
Capel
Locating Nonconformist Records
Using the Records
A Case Study

Chapter 7 The Surnames of Wales by Sheila Rowlands

The Origins of Welsh Patronymic Surnames
The Adoption of Permanent Surnames in Wales
The Time-Scale of Change
Surnames Derived from Personal Characteristics
Occupational Names
Surnames Derived from Welsh Place Names
Non-Welsh Surnames in Wales
The Distribution of Welsh Surnames
Modern Names

Chapter 8 Place Names by Bedwyr Lewis Jones
Chapter 9 Some Basic Welsh for Family Historians by M. Auronwy James

Genealogical Sources in Welsh
Aspects of Welsh Grammar
Pronunciation
Vowel Sounds
Consonants
Glossary

Chapter 10 The IGI for Wales by Chris Pitt Lewis

The IGI
What it Contains
How it is Arranged (microfiche edition)
Indexing Welsh Names
The Treatment of Wills
‘Relative’ Entries
The CD-ROM Version
How to Use the IGI for Wales

Chapter 11 Estate Records by David A. Pretty

Growth by Marriage and Inheritance
Growth by Purchase
The Decline of Large Estates
Estate Administration and Records
Leases
Estate Surveys
Other Sources

Chapter 12 Maritime Records by Lewis Lloyd

The Emergence of ‘Maritime Wales’
The Nineteenth Century Expansion of Maritime Wales
Sources of Information Regarding Welsh Seafarers
General Sources
Specific or Generalized Sources
Apprentices’ Indentures
The Register of Merchant Seamen
Registers of Masters, Mates and Engineers
Crew Lists and Agreements (Articles)

Chapter 13 Wills and Other Records of Inheritance by Gareth Haulfryn Williams Wills

Probate and Associated Documents
Using Probate Records
Other Sources for Wills and Estates of Deceased Persons
Deeds of Settlement
The Scope of Inheritance Records

Chapter 14 Education Records by David A. Pretty
Chapter 15 Parochial Records by John Rowlands

Introduction
The Origins of Parochial Records
The Nature and Location of Parochial Records
Vestry Minutes
Rate Assessment and Collection
Church Wardens’ and Overseers’ Accounts
Settlement and Removal
The County Militia
Apprenticeships
Bonds of Indemnity
The Control of Vermin and Strays

Chapter 16 The Welsh at Law by Chris Pitt Lewis

Welsh Courts
1282-1542
1542-1830
English Courts
Court of Chancery
Court of Requests/Court of Star Chamber
Court of Augmentations
Court of Exchequer
Court of the Duchy of Lancaster
Court of King’s Bench/Court of Common Pleas
Supreme Court
Local Courts
Quarter Sessions
Borough Courts
Manorial Courts, etc.

Chapter 17 The Records of the Courts of Great Sessions for Wales by Murray Ll. Chapman

Introduction
The Courts of Great Sessions
The Jurisdiction of the Court
The Records
Civil Proceedings
Docket Rolls
Plea Rolls
Fines (Feet of Fines)
Writs
Prothonotary Papers
Chancery Proceedings
Bill Books
Decree of Order Books
Pleadings
Criminal Proceedings
Calendar of Prisoners
Nomina Ministrorum
Quarter Sessions’ Records
Examinations
Recognizances
List of Jurors
Schedule of Prisoners, Their Offenses and Pleadings
Indictments
Presentments
Petitions
Information or Articles of Misdemeanor
Process Writs
Coroners’ Inquests
Miscellaneous Correspondence and Papers

Chapter 18 Printed and Manuscript Pedigrees by Michael P. Siddons
Chapter 19 Migrations: Concepts, Patterns and Processes by W.T.R. Pryce

The Nature of Migration in the Context of Wales
Data Sources on Migration
In-Migration and Our-Migration: The Regional Impact
The Significance of Migration in the Context of Wales
Region Trends
Population Movements in North Wales
Migration and Settlement in South Wales
Migration of the Welsh into England

Chapter 20 Emigration by David Peate

Case Study: to America 1683
Case Study: to America 1795
Case Study: Convict to Australia 1838
Case Study: to America 1839
Case Study: to New Zealand 1875

Chapter 21 The Freeholders by Evan L. James
Chapter 22 Miscellaneous Sources by D. Emrys Williams and others

Bidding Letters
Poetry
Monumental Inscriptions
Church Records
Ordination Papers
The ‘Notitiae’
Biographical Works
Newspapers and Periodicals
Society Transactions
Taxation Records
Soldier Ancestors
Apprenticeship Records
Welsh Gypsies

Chapter 23 Select Bibliography compiled by Sheila Rowlands
Index

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Bundle of 2 Popular New York Vital Records Books – 55% Off

West and Central New York VR Book Bundle

Andy earlier posted two reviews for 10,000 Vital Records of Central New York 1813-1850 and 10,000 Vital Records for Western New York 1809-1850 – two classic hard-back vital records volumes written by the late Fred Q. Bowman.

Central New York covers 15 counties, with records pulled from publications in nine towns; Baldwinsville, Binghamton, Chittenango, Corning, Elmira, Geneva, Norwich, Oxford, and Utica. Geneva lies on the border between central and western New York. Vital records from the Geneva Gazette, 1809–1829 appear in the Western New York volume. Records for Geneva from 1830 to 1850 appear in this volume.

Western New York covers 17 counties, with records pulled from publications in five towns; Batavia, Bath, Geneva, Jamestown, and Palmyra. Geneva lies on the border between central and western New York. Vital records from the Geneva Gazette, 1824–1850 appear in the Central New York volume.

Family Roots Publishing made a special purchase of the volumes to offer for Christmas 2014 sales. They bundled the two books, and are offering them at 55% off the publisher’s MRSP. Regularly $77.00 for the two volumes, they are on sale for just $34.65 through Christmas Eve, 2014. Click here or on the illustration to purchase.

This bundle is made up of the two volumes:

10,000 Vital Records of Western New York 1809-1850

Click here for a review of the book at GenealogyBlog.com.

and

10,000 Vital Records Records of Central New York 1813-1850

Click here for a review of the book at GenealogyBlog.com

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10,000 Vital Records of Central New York: 1813–1850 – on sale for 20-55% Off!

In my review of 10,000 Vital Records of Western New York: 1809-1850, I stated:

“When someone has a real passion for genealogy, it will sometimes drive them to perform marvelous, if somewhat crazy, feats. I must assume it was passion that drove the late Fred Q. Bowman to abstract individual vital information for over 10,000, 19th century New Yorkers from early 19th century newspapers. After doing just that, Bowman did so twice more. The good news is, you don’t have to repeat the research process to enjoy the results of Bowman’s work.”

Like his book, 10,000 Vital Records of Western New York: 1809–1850,  10,000 Vital Records of Central New York: 1813–1850 is collection of records taken from the marriage and death columns from New York newspapers before 1850.

10,000 Vital Records of Central New York: 1813–1850, includes 5,124 marriage and 4,897 death (for an actual total of 10,021) records in Central New York. While births were not covered in these early newspapers, often birth dates and birthplaces and parents names were listed in these notices. Central New York covers 15 counties, with records pulled from publications in nine towns; Baldwinsville, Binghamton, Chittenango, Corning, Elmira, Geneva, Norwich, Oxford, and Utica. Geneva lies on the border between central and western New York. Vital records from the Geneva Gazette, 1809–1829 appear in the Western New York volume. Records for Geneva from 1830 to 1850 appear in this volume.

Central New York, like Western and Eastern New York, lists all records alphabetically, either by bridegroom or the deceased. Marriage officials are listed in the appendix; otherwise, all mentioned names appear in the index. These officials are listed alphabetically, with their religious affiliation (when available), the town in which they live, a date span of ceremonies they performed; and the number of ceremonies performed.

Like any source of extracted information from published records, this book makes a great addition to all family history and genealogical society libraries, as well as for individuals researching the New York area during the first half of the 1800s.

Order a copy of 10,000 Vital Records of Central New York: 1813–1850 from Family Roots Publishing; Item #GPC641. On Sale for 20% Off through Christmas Eve, 2014 – or bundle with the Western New York volume at an even better price of 55% off!

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10,000 Vital Records of Western New York: 1809–1850 – on sale for 20-55% Off

10,000 Vital Records of Western New York: 1809–1850, includes 5,275 marriage and 4,781 death (for an actual total of 10,056) records. While births were not covered in these early newspapers, often birth dates and birthplaces and parents names were listed in these notices. Western New York covers 17 counties, with records pulled from publications in five towns; Batavia, Bath, Geneva, Jamestown, and Palmyra. Geneva lies on the border between central and western New York. Vital records from the Geneva Gazette, 1824–1850 appear in the Central New York volume.

Records are listed alphabetically, either by bridegroom or the name of the deceased. Despite being listed alphabetically, there is an index, which may be easier to skim when browsing for a name. An appendix lists an abstract of names of Marriage Officials. These officials are listed alphabetically, with their religious affiliation (when available), the town in which they live, a date span of ceremonies they performed; and the number of ceremonies performed.

Like any source of extracted information from published records, this book makes a great addition to all family history and genealogical society libraries, as well as for individuals researching the New York area during the first half of the 1800s.

Order a copy of 10,000 Vital Records of Western New York: 1809–1850 from Family Roots Publishing; Item #GPC643. On Sale for 20% Off through Christmas Eve, 2014 – or as a bundle with the Central New York volume at an even better price of 55% off!

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An Index to the New UDC CSA Ancestor Album #Civil War #Genealogy

DOC Book

A few days ago, I was offered what turned out to be the last 5 copies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy CSA Ancestor Album, 2nd Edition. I got them from the publisher, Pelican Press, and they tell me that the book was printed in short run specifically for pre-orders of the book taken by the United Daughters of the Confederacy prior to their annual 2014 convention, where they distributed the volume. I almost didn’t get them, since 5 copies of anything are usually more hassle than they are worth. However, if I’d turned them down I would have been wrong. This book is a absolute delight! Patty immediately started searching for our Southern ancestors in the volume, and when she realized that this big hard-cover book was actually one book following another, she decided it needed an index produced for it. You can check out her surname index below. Note that the index is only to the Confederate Ancestor about whom the biography is written. All kinds of other family members, family history and genealogy is included, but for this index, she didn’t attempt to cover them all. There are 1526 surnames listed within the two books in the hard-cover volume (all listed below). The first volume in this book made up the First Edition – with the Second Edition having the second volume added. Volume 1 makes up the first 176 pages, with the additional biographies running from page 178 to 432.

Born out of the Daughters of the Confederacy in Missouri and the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Confederate Soldiers Home in Tennessee, the United Daughters of the Confederacy® (UDC) aims to preserve the history of the South, to support veterans who served in the War between the States, and to strengthen the bonds of friendship between its members. Membership is open to women descendent from those who fought in the War between the States or those who served honorably for the cause.

Since 1890, chapters have formed throughout the country, from Texas to Alabama and Ohio to North Carolina. From aiding Red Cross Efforts in World War II to offering assistance to veterans and their families, the UDC understands the importance of community and patriotism. In addition to the physical preservation of memorial sites and graves, the UDC maintains its historical, patriotic, benevolent, memorial, and educational objectives by speaking in schools, writing papers, publishing historical documents, and providing scholarships to exceptional young people.

Adding new and updated information to the long-out-of-print volume, the national organization has compiled an exhaustive number of notable ancestral records. This collection of biographies and photos is an impressive memorial to Confederate veterans. Whether you are a Southern history enthusiast, a son or daughter of the Confederacy, or a genealogy buff, you will discover a wealth of information in this volume about the lineal heritage, personal lives, and military efforts of the men who served in the War between the States.

About the Editors
Jamesene E. “Jamie” Likins serves as president general of the United Daughters of the Confederacy®. She attended the University of Florida and lives in Palm Coast, Florida.

With a background in the publishing and marketing industries, Lynda Moreau serves as general chairman of ways and means for the UDC. A Southerner through and through, she is an active member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy® and several other lineage organizations. Moreau is the editor of The Confederate Cookbook: Family Favorites from the Sons of Confederate Veterans and Sweetly Southern: Delicious Desserts from the Sons of Confederate Veterans, both published by Pelican. She lives in Metairie, Louisiana, with her husband and two children.

Purchase one of the 5 copies of the volume that are available by clicking on the following link: UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY® CSA ANCESTOR ALBUM, 2nd Edition; Jamesene E. Likins, Editor in Chief, Lynda Moreau, Editor; 352 pp. 8 1/2 x 1, 371 photos plus 34 illustrations; ISBN #:9781455620173; Item #: PP01; $95 plus $8 p&h.

SURNAME — PAGE

  • AARON 178
  • ABBOTT 8,178
  • ABEL 8
  • ABELS 8,9
  • ABERCROMBIE 178
  • ABERNATHY 9
  • ABLES 9
  • ADAIR 178
  • ADAMS 9,178
  • ADAMSON 178,179
  • ADERHOLT 179
  • ADKINS 179
  • AGEE 179
  • AGERTON 179
  • AGNEW 10,180
  • AILLS 10
  • ALBEA 180
  • ALBRITTON 10
  • ALDRIDGE 10,180
  • ALEXANDER 180
  • ALLEN 10,181
  • ALLEY 181,182
  • ALLGOOD 182
  • ALMAND 182
  • [Read the rest of this entry…]

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Finding Family in the Newspapers – Book Bundle – 30% Off

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Locating family in newspapers is always fun and rewarding. This bundle is made up of two popular items dealing with locating family in the papers – one by Lisa Louise Cooke, and the other by William Dollarhide. Family Roots Publishing has discounted the bundle by 30% for 2014 Christmas sales, making it only $20.93 (Reg. 29.90) (plus $5.50 p&h)

This bundle is made up of the following books:

Limited to quantities on hand (less than 50), so order now! Sale ends Midnight PST December 24, 2014 or when FRPC runs out of stock, whichever comes first.

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The British Newspaper Archive Celebrates its 3rd Birthday

The following press release was issued in celebration of The British Newspaper Archive’s website’s 3rd birthday:

 

The British Newspaper Archive celebrates its 3rd birthday

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has come a long way since the website launched on 29 November 2011 with 4 million historic newspaper pages.

9 million newspaper pages now online

The collection is now more than twice the size, with over 9 million fully searchable pages available from 300 British and Irish titles. The newspapers cover 1710 – 1954, a much broader time period than at launch.

If you weren’t able to find a particular person, event or place when The British Newspaper Archive launched, it’s well worth looking again now. Visit www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk to try a search for free.

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Revealed: the 5 most popular searches

As a birthday celebration, The British Newspaper Archive has used website analytics to work out the five most popular newspaper titles and search terms.

Based on search volume, the most popular titles are:

1.       Hull Daily Mail
2.       Aberdeen Journal
3.       Dundee Courier
4.       Bath Chronicle & Weekly Gazette
5.       Nottingham Evening Post

While some of the more unusual examples include ‘mouth is worn slightly open’ and ‘eyes with red hot needles’, the five most common search terms are:

1.       Football
2.       Murder
3.       Death
4.       Jack the Ripper
5.       Railway

You’ll find more information about The British Newspaper Archive and how the website is being used at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2014/11/28/the-british-newspaper-archive-is-3-years-old/

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Civil War 1/2 Boot Has Its Own Story to Tell

The following excerpt is from a fascinating story by Tony Gonzalez, published in the November 19, 2014 edition of The Tennessean.

The little leather boot sat on a shelf for 90 years. A family heirloom, mostly just gathering dust.

But when it showed up in a room filled with historical archivists, well, the boot could still turn heads.

Myers Brown remembers the moment as the crowd gathered around it.

“This guy walks in and he’s got it in this little box,” said Brown, a researcher with the Tennessee State Library and Archives who specializes in the Civil War.

“It’s a Yankee shoe. I knew immediately that it was legitimate.”

Read the full story.

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Registration Open for the NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri May 13-16, 2015

We will be heading for the NGS conference in St. Charles, Missouri this next May. It’s now time to get registered. The following news release is from the National Genealogical Society:

Registration is now open for the National Genealogical Society’s thirty-seventh annual family history conference, Crossroads of America, which will be held 13–16 May 2015 at the St. Charles Convention Center in St. Charles, Missouri. Conference highlights include a choice of more than 150 lectures, given by nationally known speakers and subject matter experts on a broad array of topics. The conference will open with The Tales of Pioneer Paths: Rivers, Roads & Rails given by J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA, a full-time professional researcher and educator, and former APG president.

Continuing NGS’s goal of providing quality educational opportunities to its participants, the conference will feature a variety of lectures for all skill levels from beginner to advanced. Lecture topics covered at the conference will include: researching in many Midwestern states; national and regional migration paths; land, military, immigration, and naturalization records; ethnic and religious groups including African American, German, Irish, Jewish, Native American, Polish, and Scots-Irish; methodology, analysis, and problem solving; and the use of technology including genetics, mobile devices, and websites useful in genealogical research. The Board for Certification of Genealogists’ Skillbuilding track will again be an integral part of the conference and presented over the four days of the event.

Registration is currently open. To register online, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/event-registration/ and complete the registration form.

The online searchable program is available at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/agenda/ and the PDF brochure is available at http://goo.gl/x92kAg. The brochure includes an overview of the sessions, tours, pre-conference events, registration times, and rates, as well as general conference and hotel details. Attendees are urged to visit the conference blog, which will feature tips on local and regional research facilities as well as things to do in and around Richmond and updated information on hotel availability and local restaurants.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

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