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The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Launches New Online Resources

The following is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website:

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The digitized records cover British, Irish and Commonwealth casualties from the Second World War, together with records for most other nationals commemorated at CWGC sites: this includes the records for German soldiers. The release of the CWGC’s Second World War records follows the successful release of the First World War archive in August 2014.

The documents give a unique insight into the process of commemoration undertaken by the armed forces and the CWGC during and after the war, and include details of personal headstone inscriptions, date of death, rank, regiment and even some documents which show the journey of the deceased to their final resting place. The records are freely available to the public through the CWGC website at www.cwgc.org

Read the news release.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

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NGS Announces a New Course in the American Genealogical Studies Series: Beyond the Basics

The following is from NGS:

NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, August 17, 2015: The National Genealogical Society proudly announces the release of its newest American Genealogical Studies course, Beyond the Basics. This course joins The Basics and Guide to Documentation and Source Citation in the series of online courses developed by NGS to help those interested in discovering their roots.

Beyond the Basics offers advanced genealogical training. During the course, you will learn how to conduct a more systematic genealogical investigation as you build your family tree. Its modules are designed to challenge you as you learn how to read, write, decipher, and cite numerous genealogical documents. You will expand your proficiency by collecting, interpreting, analyzing, and evaluating genealogical information. You also will hone your skills as you write genealogical reports.

The course contains five modules that contain information, videos, examples, self-correcting quizzes, a glossary, a topic reference list, and a final written assignment, which is graded by a professional genealogist. The modules are:

  • Module 1 – Evidence Analysis
  • Module 2 – The Library: A Research Repository
  • Module 3 – The Federal Population Schedules
  • Module 4 – FamilySearch.org
  • Module 5 – Civil Registration Records

Beyond the Basics is the third course in the American Genealogical Study series. Registration requires students to successfully complete both The Basics and Guide to Documentation and Source Citation within the year before signing up for Beyond the Basics.

Beyond the Basics is available for $175.00 for members and $200.00 for non-members. The Basics andGuide to Documentation and Source Citation are available individually or as a bundle. For further information or to view the syllabus, visit the NGS website at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/ags_beyondthebasics .

The courses of the NGS American Genealogical Studies are presented through anonline cloud-based learning management system. To take advantage of this system, you need either a computer or tablet with an internet connection and an updated standard browser. Please refer to the NGS website for specific computer and software needs.

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The LDS Church Breaks Ground for First-of-Its-Kind St. George FamilySearch Library

The following Press Release is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Breaks Ground for First-of-Its-Kind St. George FamilySearch Library

ST. GEORGE, UT (AUGUST 15, 2015) — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and its nonprofit subsidiary FamilySearch International broke ground today on a first-of-its-kind facility in St. George, Utah. When complete, the state-of-the-art St. George FamilySearch Library will offer incredible free ancestry research services and fun, family-friendly experiences that invite personal and family discovery. Elder Allan F. Packer of the Church’s First Quorum of the Seventy presided over the groundbreaking ceremony along with local civic and faith leader guests. The new facility is projected to open in the fall of 2016.

“Today family history research and telling, sharing, and preserving family memories through stories, photos, and technology are engaging a growing number of individuals of all ages like never before,” said Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch International. “Youth want to discover themselves and their family’s history in fun, exciting ways, and adults want to strengthen family connections and leave enduring legacies. The discovery experiences provided by this facility will help do just that,” Brimhall added.

The 13,500-square-foot St. George facility will be state of the art—designed from the ground up with the entire family in mind. It will deliver personal discovery experiences through interactive technologies and activities that can be continued in the home. Think of it as a dynamic, ever-unfolding “museum of me.”

Patrons will have access to the most current research resources available online and personal guidance from 150 very knowledgeable staff members. In addition, 4,700 square feet of the facility will offer new, fun, interactive, family-friendly activities that enable patrons of all ages to discover themselves through their personal family stories (see more about the FamilySearch Discovery Center in Salt Lake City).

The official opening of the new St. George facility is scheduled for late fall of 2016, and admission will be free to the public.

The current St. George FamilySearch Library is located at 162 North 400 East, Bldg. B Suite 200, and will remain open until construction of the new facility is completed.

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years.

FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,800 family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

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The Return of a World War II Japanese Photo Album Found in Foxhole

The following teaser is from an article posted August 16, 2015 at Military.com:

Roy Hessman (Photo: The Hutchinson News)

Roy Hessman (Photo: The Hutchinson News)

For years after World War II, the photos of the Japanese families mesmerized Grace Hessman.

She would turn the pages of the photo album and study the exquisitely dressed ladies and the men in their military uniforms.

“It was like nothing I had ever seen, and you can’t imagine how fancy they were,” said Hessman, 96, a Hutchinson resident. “They were such nice-looking people.”

Her husband, Roy Hessman, found the photo album when his tank battalion came under heavy fire. He crawled into a foxhole to seek protection during a battle on the Philippines. The foxhole had previously been home for a Japanese soldier. Along with the album, there was a sword and a decorative letter opener. After the war, Hessman came home to Kansas with the album and the letter opener. However, the military confiscated the sword.

Roy Hessman, who grew up on a farm in Ford County, received a Purple Heart after being wounded in action, plus three Bronze Stars. Following the war, Roy wouldn’t talk to Grace about those experiences. But she felt herself drawn to the photo album, flipping through the pages and studying every detail.

Read the full article.

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Divers Raise Wreckage of Confederate Warship CSS Georgia

The following headlines are from a fascinating AP article posted at dailymail.co.uk about the raising of the CSS Georgia.

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  • Divers raise wreckage of Confederate warship CSS Georgia in 5-ton chunks after vessel was sunk by its own crew 150 years ago
  • Navy divers began working in late June to recover cannons, unexploded shells and other artifacts
  • They finally started midweek on their last major task — retrieving an estimated 250,000 pounds of the Civil War ironclad’s armored siding
  • The CSS Georgia was scuttled by its own crew to prevent Gen. William T. Sherman from capturing the massive gunship

Read the article.

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More than 82,000 FamilySearch Volunteers “Fuel the Find” for People Worldwide

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

SALT LAKE CITY UTAH - A total of 82,039 volunteers helped to “Fuel the Find” during FamilySearch’s Worldwide Indexing Event, held August 7-14, 2015. Though short of the goal of 100,000 participants, the effort produced a number of remarkable achievements, among them an 89% increase in non-English language indexing activity. Volunteers produced more than 12.2 million indexed (transcribed) and 2.3 million arbitrated (reviewed) records during the weekly event (See infographic). As with all records indexed by FamilySearch indexing volunteers, those indexed during the global event will be made freely searchable at FamilySearch.org.

For the Worldwide Indexing Event, FamilySearch sought volunteers who could decipher records recorded in a variety of languages, with a focus on French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. Volunteers from all over the world exceeded expectations by processing over 2,183,212 non-English records including 1,380,684 in Spanish, 147,568 in Portuguese, 226,734 in French, and 116,835 in Italian.

“We are thrilled with the number of people who are fluent in a non-English language who accepted the challenge to index records in that language,” said Courtney Connolly, FamilySearch digital marketing manager. “If volunteers will keep up this rate of non-English indexing and arbitration, we’ll soon see people everywhere experiencing the same success in finding their ancestors that English-language researchers enjoy.”

The #FueltheFind name is derived from the way indexing helps people find family information in collections of searchable historical records online. Indexed records are like the fuel that gives genealogical search engines like FamilySearch.org the power to connect people to their missing ancestors. Committed FamilySearch volunteers online know that every name they index adds another drop of precious fuel that can help someone else discover the missing members of their family tree and learn their stories.

This year’s week-long event had an international focus. Most online indexing volunteers are native English speakers and lean toward indexing English language record collections. Currently FamilySearch.org offers twenty times more searchable records in English than in all other languages combined. “There is a huge and growing need for English speakers who are fluent in a second language, and native speakers of non-English languages to learn how to index. Tens of thousands of new volunteers are needed to keep up with the opportunity to index the world’s records,” said Connolly.

FamilySearch heartily thanks all of the volunteers for their contributions and dedication and encourages anyone interested in participating to join the ongoing indexing initiative at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

ABOUT FAMILYSEARCH
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Guests may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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States Ration B,M,&D Certificates After Paper Company Suddenly Closes

The following teaser is from an article written by Barnini Chakraborty and published August 18, 201 at the FoxNews.com website.

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WASHINGTON – Someone call Dunder Mifflin: Several states are reporting a paper crisis, after an Ohio company that produces highly specialized paper for vital records closed without warning.

California has been hit the hardest by the shortage, and several counties are now being forced to ration birth, marriage and death certificates.

In California, the only other company that can meet its needs, under state law, is in Canada. Officials say it would likely take months for Canadian Bank Note Co. to get up to speed with the state’s paper needs – but that’s only after a contract is signed. In the interim, counties are left finding short-term solutions for the growing backlog.

The restrictions “will impact a lot of folks,” Rob Grossglauser, a lobbyist for the County Recorders’ Association of California, told the San Francisco Chronicle.

The closure of Sekuworks, the Ohio paper company, has a handful of states scrambling to find a fix, including Minnesota and South Carolina.

Read the full article.

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TLC’s Who Do You Think You Are? to Feature Bryan Cranston & Tom Bergeron – Aug. 23 & 30, 2015

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Bryan Cranston and Tom Bergeron discover absent fathers and a king’s daughter!

There are just two shows left this season — and these final episodes include some truly fascinating celebrity family stories. Bryan Cranston follows clues to a paternal line full of revelations. And Tom Bergeron travels from France to Canada to find a filles du roi. Tune in August 23 and 30 – 8/9c.

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NEHGS Appoints Christopher C. Child as Editor of the Mayflower Descendant

The following is from NEHGS:

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New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Announces Appointment of Christopher C. Child as Editor of the Mayflower Descendant

August 19, 2015 — Boston, Massachusetts — Christopher C. Child, Senior Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press at New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), has been named editor of the Mayflower Descendant, the Society announced today. Child is an award-winning genealogist and author of important published studies of American family history. He will begin his assignment as editor with the winter 2016 issue of the journal, the first to be published by NEHGS, while retaining his responsibilities with Newbury Street Press.

Last week NEHGS announced that, as the result of an agreement with the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants (MSMD), NEHGS will assume a ten-year stewardship of the Mayflower Descendant. First published in 1899 by George Ernest Bowman, under the auspices of the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, the journal is one of the most highly respected scholarly journals in the field of genealogy. NEHGS plans to continue twice-a-year publication, winter and summer, available by subscription.

In making the announcement of Child’s appointment, Penny Stratton, NEHGS Publishing Director, stated “Chris Child is an excellent choice for this new position, poised to bring his well-articulated vision of genealogical scholarship to this very important journal.”

Child is the recipient of two publishing awards this year: Ancestors and Descendants of George Rufus Brown and Alice Nelson Pratt (2013, co-written with Patricia Law Hatcher and Kelvin L. Meyers) won the Brainerd T. Peck Award from the Connecticut Genealogical Society, and The Nelson Family of Rowley, Massachusetts (2014) won the Award for Excellence in Genealogy and Family History from the National Genealogical Society. In 2012 his book with NEHGS colleague Scott Steward, Descendants of Judge John Lowell (2011) won both those awards as well as the prestigious Donald Lines Jacobus Award of the American Society of Genealogists.

Child has been associated with NEHGS since 1997, first as a librarian and researcher, and later joining the Publications team as Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press in 2006. He also serves as editor of the genetics column in American Ancestors magazine and contributes frequently to the Vita Brevis blog of NEHGS.

An experienced and in-demand lecturer and consultant, Child has contributed many articles to scholarly genealogical journals, including the Mayflower Descendant. His wide-ranging research interests include, as well as Mayflower ancestry, colonial New England genealogy (especially Connecticut), presidential genealogy, and DNA. Chris holds a B.A. in history from Drew University in Madison, New Jersey.

More information about the Mayflower Descendant and subscription opportunities may be found at the website of NEHGS at www.americanancestors.org/mayflower-descendant.)

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The Henryk Ross Collection of Over 4000 Lodz Ghetto Photographs Posted Online

The Art Gallery of Ontario has posted over 4000 images from the Henryk Ross Lodz Ghetto Photographs collection. The user can browse the site, and search as well. You can search for images by theme or build your own groupings by using the My Collections link.

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If you’re going to browse, keep in mind that some of the images are the most horrific you might ever see.

Check it out.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

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FamilySearch Opens a New Seattle Family Discovery Center

I had the opportunity to use some of the Discovery Center resources at RootsTech this last February, and came away quite amazed. Now FamilySearch has opened the Seattle Family Discovery Center at the LDS facility in Bellevue, Washington. I’m looking forward to making a stop there in the near future. Patty and I live just under 40 miles directly south of this near resource.

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch opens a new Seattle Family Discovery Center that provides fun, interactive experiences to celebrate family history.

High-tech “Museum of You” concept for center guides visitors to discover, share, and preserve their histories and memories.

At the Seattle Discovery Center in Bellevue, Washington, Trace Farmer of Seattle, Washington, discovers 4,586 people share his first name while using the “Discover My Story” experience.

At the Seattle Discovery Center in Bellevue, Washington, Trace Farmer of Seattle, Washington, discovers 4,586 people share his first name while using the “Discover My Story” experience.

Aug 21, 2015 – BELLEVUE, WA — FamilySearch International announces the grand opening of its Seattle Family Discovery Center, the first to open outside its headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. Based in Bellevue, the center offers interactive experiences for visitors of all ages to discover, share, and preserve family histories and memories. It is free to the public. Find out more online at FamilySearch.org/discoverycenter/seattle.

Visitors to the center are provided with a tablet computer as a personal guide to interface with large touch screens, where they learn more about themselves, view family origins, and discover how ancestors may have lived and even dressed. Data used for the interactive experiences is drawn from online data at FamilySearch.org and select partners.

The center creates a “Museum of You” feeling through a variety of experiences and activities for children, five interactive station experiences, and software applications that explore family ancestral lines in fun, creative ways to help patrons discover famous relatives.

When asked how visitors respond to the new attraction, 16-year-old Brynn Stapley of Bellevue, Washington, said, “I see amazement at the technology, the information, and how it’s presented on big screens. Visitors get excited when they discover a little piece of new information that leads to more information about their families. I think people are surprised how much they learn about themselves and their cultural heritage and then leave eager to continue the journey.” Stapley is one of 23 volunteers at the center.

The center features a high-definition video recording studio, where visitors can answer questions about their life stories and archive the recording for long-term preservation so future children, grandchildren, or great-grandchildren can access the recording later. Visitors can also bring a USB drive to take home a copy of the recorded session.

Becca Escoto, 26, resident of Bellevue and center volunteer, said she met a couple engaged to be married and encouraged them to record their engagement story for their posterity. “It was exciting to see them in the studio, sharing a story that will be important for their future family members,” Escoto said. “What a perfect start to begin their family.” Escoto said she was also surprised to discover that she personally is an eighth cousin to President Barack Obama through their maternal family lines.

Discovery-Center-PHOTO-B-250pw

The Seattle Family Discovery Center is a free community attraction funded entirely by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, of which FamilySearch International is a nonprofit subsidiary. “We believe our precious family relationships and experiences in this life do not end with death,” said Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch International and managing director of the Family History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

“Today family history research and telling, sharing, and preserving family memories through stories, photos, and technology are engaging a growing number of individuals of all ages from every faith and ethnicity like never before,” said Brimhall. “Youth want to discover themselves and their family’s history in fun, exciting ways, and adults want to strengthen family connections and leave enduring legacies. The discovery experiences provided by this facility will help do just that,” Brimhall added.

Planning for the Seattle Family Discovery Center has been years in development, and construction was completed in April 2015. In addition to the family discovery centers in Salt Lake and Seattle, FamilySearch has announced future centers in London, England, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Seattle Family Discovery Center is located inside The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints facility at 15205 SE 28th Street in Bellevue, Washington.

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,800 family history centers in 132 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

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Professional Genealogy – Back in Print and 17% Off Sale Extended Thru September 1

gpc3844Imaging going to a genealogy seminar and having nothing but great classes taught by some of the very best professional genealogists in the county. That is what you get in Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians.

Edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG; this book was primarily compiled to help those who are, or wish to become, a professional genealogist. However, insight to the developing skills of a professional genealogists will help any family historian and genealogist, as well as those in other professions who support genealogical studies. Every genealogist, from beginner to advance, is constantly learning. “…that is, education. It is our foundation in genealogy. As we gain experience, it deepens and strengthens our grasp of concepts and techniques. Indeed, rapidly changing technology and increasing competition make continuing education imperative. Whatever form it takes—formal instruction or independent study—ongoing education is basic to our effective conduct of professional genealogical research.”

This “Bible” of the professional genealogist has just come back into print, and FRPC made a deal with the publisher to offer the book for 17% off – now through Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Regularly $59.95, it’s just $49.76!

For those who simply want to learn what the professionals know and become better researchers then there is plenty to learn within these pages. Learn about:

  • developing and maintaining a personal library
  • problem analysis and improved research skills
  • evidence analysis
  • writing skills, proofreading, and family histories
  • even learn how to become a presenter

Professional genealogists and those hoping to develop a career in genealogy will also learn important skills in areas including:

  • career management
  • building and marketing a genealogy business
  • writing reports and lineage papers
  • preparing books for press
  • becoming a professional presenter or teacher
  • ethics
  • accreditation

There is so much to learn and this book doesn’t hold back. Over 600 pages await to help any genealogist become a better researcher. Much of what is taught is common sense, and some provides truly practical use, like avoiding legal and ethical problems.

 

Contents

Figures

Appendixes

Acknowledgments

Chapter Authors

Foreword

Preface

Professional Preparation
1. Defining Professionalism, by Donn Devine,J.D., CG, CGI
2. Educational Preparation, by Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
3. Certification and Accreditation, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG; Paul F. Smart, AG; Jimmy B. Parker, AG; and Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
4. The Essential Library, by Joy Reisinger, CG

Ethics and Legalities
5. Ethical Standards, by Neil D. Thompson, LL.B., Ph.D., CG, FASG
6. Executing Contracts, by Patricia Gilliam Hastings, J.D.
7. Copyright and Fair Use, by Val D. Greenwood, J.D., AG

Career Management
8. Alternative Careers, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
9. Structuring A Business, by Melinda Shackleford Kashuba, Ph.D.
10. Setting Realistic Fees, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
11. Marketing Strategies, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
12. Business Record Keeping, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
13. Time Management, by Patricia Law Hatcher, CG, FASG

Professional Research Skills
14. Problem Analyses and Research Plans, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
15. Research Procedures, by Linda Woodward Geiger, CGRS, CGL
16. Transcripts and Abstracts, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL
17. Evidence Analysis, by Donn Devine, J.D., CG, CGI

Writing and Compiling
18. Research Reports, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
19. Genealogy Columns, by Regina Hines Ellison, CGRS
20. Proof Arguments and Case Studies, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
21. Book and Media Reviews, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
22. Record Compilations, by Bettie Cummings Cook, CG
23. Family Histories, by Christine Rose, CG, CGL, FASG
24. Lineage Papers, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL and Elisabeth Whitman Schmidt, CLS

Editing and Publishing
25. Editing Periodicals, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
26. Proofreading and Indexing, by Birdie Monk Holsclaw
27. Preparing Books for Press, by Joan Ferris Curran, CG

Educational Services
28. Classroom Teaching, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
29. Lecturing, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG

This 654-page reference book includes an appendix for Abbreviations and Acronyms as well as a section covering “Codes, Guidelines, and Standards: United States and International.” The book also has an extensive index.

Professional Genealogy is a landmark–the field’s most significant publication since 1960, when the American Society of Genealogists introduced Genealogical Research: Methods and Sources. In a sense, though, its title belies its greatest value: it offers priceless guidance to the many amateur family historians who want to ensure that their work is of high quality and enduring value.” – Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, President, Board for Certification of Genealogists

Become the best genealogist you can, click on the link and purchase Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price: $49.76; Regular $59.95.

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Out-of-Style: A Modern Perspective on How, Why, and When Vintage Fashions Evolved – 15% Off Sale Extended Thru Sept. 1

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One of my favorite books is Betty Shubert’s Out-of-Style: A Modern Perspective on How, Why, and When Vintage Fashions Evolved. Out-Of-Style was named to Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2013: Our Top Choice by Family Tree Magazine UK; and Finalist 2014 USA Best Book Awards: Performing Arts Theatre – Film category. Beverly Hills Best Book Award, Performing Arts. I understand the book recently got another award, but don’t know the details on it.

Family Roots Publishing is once again offering the book at a great discount – selling it for only $20.40 (15% off of the current MSRP). The book initially sold in huge quantities for $32, but Betty and her son found a way of lowering the printing cost and making it available inexpensively. Click on the link to order.

Following is a review written by my colleague, Andy Pomeroy, a while back.

Many of the books that I have reviewed have much to offer not just to genealogist but also historians, scientists, professionals and people from all walks of life. However, most of the books don’t point out their potential value to these other groups. Out-of-Style: A Modern Perspective on How, Why, and When Vintage Fashions Evolved is the first book I have come across doing these reviews which states right up front its intent is to serve not just genealogists but also groups like costume designers, theatre companies, social historians, vintage collectors, and fashionistas. Yet, this book offers obvious value to the genealogist. Knowledge of fashion, for example, can help date old photographs. In another example, there is a history as to where and how the garments your ancestors wore were designed and made.

Author, and Illustrator, Betty Kreisel Shubert is undoubtedly an expert on fashion. She knows what she was talking about and has every faith in her own abilities. According to her Author’s Notes, she got started on this book when she found herself walking with a women carrying photographs on her way to a genealogy club meeting. With what sounds like every confidence in her own ability she told the women, “show them to me, I can tell by the clothes about when the pictures were taken.” The very next month she was asked to speak at the club, and from that moment her career went from “Costume Designer to Fashion Historian, Author-Illustrator and Columnist for Ancestry Magazine.”

Despite her seeming self assurance, Shubert spared nothing in her efforts to assure every detail in this book was covered. She talks of having as many as 18 books open at once trying to verify and resolve questions.

One of my favorite elements of the book is the illustrations. There is a unique 40′s/50′s feel to this book; yet, it was published just this year.

From the 1900s, the author reveals carefully studied fashions, looking for and sharing the everyday wardrobe. These are the clothes your ancestors wore. As the book moves into the 20th century, the content becomes more personal. Especially, the discussion from the 30s on. Here you have more than just the author’s historical perspective. These are years in which the author was hard at work in her career. Her memories are a part of the discussion.

 

Table of Contents

Decade by Decade, Illustrations and Descriptive Text

Author’s Notes: How This Book Was Born

Introduction

PART ONE – 19TH CENTURY 1830-1900

Chapter 1: Evolution In A Thimble 1830-1900

  • Illustrated Overview of the Primary Silhouettes of Each Decade 1830-1900
  • How Fashions Go Forward and Sometimes Back Again

Chapter 2: Why Hoop Skirts Were Born

  • Illustrated Chart to Identify the Shape of Hoop Skirts
  • How They Grew and Why They Died

Chapter 3: The Nine Sequential Phases Of The Rise And Fall And Rise (Again!) Of The Bustle

  • Illustrations – What Was Hiding Under Her Bustle?
  • Illustrated Chart of the Nine Phases
  • Style Clues of the Nine Phases Decade-by-Decade

Chapter 4: The Out-Of-Style Fashion Show

  • Invitation to an Out-of-Style Fashion Show
  • From Stylish to Obsolete in a Few Short Years

Chapter 5: When Proportions Change

  • Illustrations – Proportions Change at Their Most Extreme to a Completely Opposite Look
  • Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder
  • Illustrations – Ever-Changing Erogenous Zones
  • The Pressure to Conform (Even if it Kills You!)
  • Illustrations – Foot Fetishes and Fashion Victims
  • The Pressure to Conform (Even if it Gives You Bunions!)
  • Arrested Development: Women Who Wait Too Long

Chapter 6: How Undergarments Affected The Posture And Shape Of Women’s Bodies

  • CORSETS
    • Illustrations – How the Changing Shape of Corsets Changed the Shape of Women and Their Clothes
    • All About Corsets … (How Fitting!)
    • Tight Lacing
    • Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder
    • A Good Body Never Goes Out-of-Style
  • BRASSIERES
    • From Upholstered Bodies to “LOOK MA! … NO BRA!”
    • From Thick Stockings to Sheer Pantyhose in a Few Hundred Years
    • News Flash! … 600 Year Old Bra Found in Medieval Castle!

Chapter 7: Special Occasion Clothes

  • REFORM DRESS
    • Illustrations – The Milestones of Reform Dress
    • The Milestones of Reform Dress and the Birth of the Bloomer Girl
    • Illustration – “We Got the Vote.”…1920
  • WEDDINGS
    • Illustrations – Wedding Veils and Hairstyles 1840s-1920s
    • Is She Wearing Her Own New Wedding Gown or Her Mother’s?
  • MATERNITY CLOTHES
    • Illustrations – Maternity Clothes
    • The Comfort of Mother Hubbard Dresses While “Heavy with Child” (aka pregnant)
  • MOURNING DRESS
    • Illustrations – First Phase Mourning Dress
    • How to Recognize Mourning Clothes in a Vintage Photograph
    • The Four Stages of Mourning in 19th Century
    • Mourning in the 20th Century
    • Mourning Dress Is Dead!
    • The Colors of Mourning
    • Life (And Weddings) Must Go On
    • Mourning Jewelry
  • BATHING SUITS
    • Illustration – From Baggy Bloomers to Sexy Bikinis 1850s-1950s
    • The Evolution of Bathing Suits

Chapter 8: Modern Improvements

  • PHOTOGRAPHY
    • Illustration –Vintage Camera…”See the Birdie”?
    • How Early Photography Froze Moments In Time, So that We Can Look at the Past
  • SEWING MACHINES
    • The First Sewing Machines
    • Illustration – What an Old Sew and Sew!
  • WASHING MACHINES
    • Illustration – Before Washing Machines and Dryers
    • Wash Day Over a Wash Tub
  • HAIRSTYLES
    • Illustration – Permanent Wave Machine
    • Women’s Hairstyle Notes – 19th to 20th Century

Chapter 9: How To Trace Your Ancestors… Literally!

  • Illustrated Instructions – How to Trace Your Ancestors
  • Style Clues That Result From Tracings

Chapter 10: Overview – Women’s Clothes 1840-1900

  • Style Clues for the Fashion Detective
  • Illustrations and Descriptive Text Decade-by-Decade
  • 1840-1850s
  • 1850-1860s
  • 1860-1870s
  • 1870-1880s
  • 1880-1890s
  • 1890-1900

Chapter 11: Overview – Men’s Clothes 1840-1900

  • Illustrations and Descriptive Text
  • 1840-1850s
  • 1850-1860s
  • 1860-1870s
  • 1870-1880s
  • 1880-1890s
  • 1890-1900

Chapter 12: Children’s Clothes 19th Century

  • Illustrations – From Pantaloons to Pants
  • When Little Boys Wore Dresses and Little Girls Wore Pantaloons
  • Illustration – Little Lord Fauntleroy and His Sister
  • Overview – The Small World of 19th Century Children

Chapter 13: Boys’ Clothes 1840-1900

  • Illustrations and Descriptive Text Decade-by-Decade
  • 1840-1850s
  • 1850-1860s
  • 1860-1870s
  • 1870-1880s
  • 1880-1890s
  • 1890-1900

Chapter 14: Girls’ Clothes 1840-1900

  • Illustrations and Descriptive Text Decade-by-Decade
  • 1840-1850s
  • 1850-1860s
  • 1860-1870s
  • 1870-1880s
  • 1880-1890s
  • 1890-1900

PART TWO – 20TH CENTURY 1900-1960

Chapter 15: Overview

  • Illustrations – Evolution of Hemlines in 100 years
  • Overview: The Bottom Line About Hemlines and The March to Modernity 1900-2000

Chapter 16: The First Two Decades 1900-1920

  • Illustrations 1900-1910 – Women’s Dress Variations
  • Turn of Century Silhouettes
  • Illustrations 1910-1920 – Women’s Dress Variations
  • Designer Paul Poiret and the Demise of The Hourglass Figure
  • How Tailor-Made Suits and Sears, Roebuck Catalogs Helped Unify America
  • Shirtwaist Blouses and Show Biz Gossip
  • The Color Alice-Blue and The Birth of Teddy Bears
  • Illustration – Child with Teddy Bear
  • Illustrations – Hats 1900-1914
  • The Changing Shapes of Millinery 1900-1920s
  • Illustrations – 1906-1920

Chapter 17: America On The Road

  • Illustrations – Auto Touring Clothes
  • Automobile Touring Clothes
  • Photograph: 1916 Elgin automobile
  • How WWI Jodhpurs and Riding Britches Replaced Dusters and Hats

Chapter 18: Fashion Changes 1920-1960

  • THE ROARING TWENTIES
    • Illustrations – Dress Variations 1920-1930
    • Who Put the Roar in the Roaring Twenties?
    • Illustrations – Hats and Hairstyles 1920-1930
  • THE “GREAT DEPRESSION” AND THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO
    • Everything Changed in the 1930s
    • Illustrations – Dress Variations 1930s
    • Illustrations – Hats 1930s
  • FASHIONS OF THE FORTIES AND HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
    • Illustrations – Hats 1940s
    • Illustrations – Hairstyles 1940s
    • Illustrations – Dress Variations 1940s
    • Fashions of the Forties and Hollywood Boulevard
    • The “Frantic Forties” Party Invitation
    • Newspaper Article
  • THE “NEW LOOK” HAS A LONGER SKIRT (AGAIN!) 1947-1950s
    • Illustrations – Dress Variations 1950s
    • The “New Look” for Women (and the “New Look” for Movies and Las Vegas) in the 1950s
    • Illustrations – Hair Styles 1950s
    • Phenomenon of the Fifties Felt Skirt
    • Illustration of the “Poodle Skirt”
    • Fashion Photo 1934
    • The Changing Styles of Fashion Photography
    • The Origin of Fashion Shows
    • Chanel’s Influence on Clothes Designed for The Movies
    • Authenticity of Period Costumes Designed for The Movies

Chapter 19: The Psychology Of Clothes

  • The Blue Velveteen Suit
  • The Eccentric Dresser
  • What is “Good Taste”?
  • The Twenty-five-year-old Dress – When do “Old” clothes Become “Vintage” Clothes?

Chapter 20: Overview, Men’s Clothes – 20th Century

  • Style Clues for the Fashion Detective
  • Descriptive Text 1900-1960s
  • Zippers and the Prince of Wales
  • The “New Look” for Men … Early 1950s
  • Illustrations – Foreign Cars Invade America
  • Illustrations 1900-1910
  • Illustrations 1910-1920
  • Illustrations 1920-1930
  • Illustrations 1930-1940
  • Illustrations 1940-1950
  • Illustrations 1950-1960

Chapter 21: Overview, Boys’ And Girls’ Clothes

  • Long Denims and Short-Shorts
  • Sears, Roebuck Catalog Prices at Turn-of-the-Century Illustrations: Boys and Girls Together
  • Illustrations 1900-1910
  • Illustrations 1910-1920
  • Illustrations 1920-1930
  • Illustrations 1930-1940
  • Illustrations 1940-1950
  • Illustrations 1950-1960

Photo: Visit to the Costume Collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London
Betty’s Bio
Bibliography
Recommended Sources
Index

 

Out-of-Style: A Modern Perspective on How, Why, and When Vintage Fashions Evolved is available at Family Roots Publishing.

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Norfolk Parish Registers Go Online at TheGenealogist

The following press release of August 1, 2015 is from TheGenealogist:

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TheGenealogist and the Norfolk Record Office announce that they have signed an agreement to make Norfolk parish and other historical records available online for the first time. The registers of baptisms, marriages, burials and banns of marriage feature the majority of the parishes in Norfolk.

On release the searchable transcripts will be linked to original images of baptism, marriage and burial records from the parish registers of this East Anglian county
● Some of the surviving records are from the early 1500s
● These vital records will allow family history researchers from all over the world to search for their Norfolk ancestors online for the first time

Famous people that can be found in these records include:

  • Samuel Lincoln, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Abraham Lincoln, 18th President of the United States of America, can be discovered in the baptismal records of St Andrew, Hingham in Norfolk for the 24th of August 1622. At some point his entry has been highlighted with a star.

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Vice Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson, who lost his life at the Battle of Trafalgar. This impoverished clergyman’s son can be discovered in the register for Burnham Thorpe in 1758. There his father, as rector of the parish, would have officiated at all the baptisms that year in this church with his name appearing at the bottom of the page.

Viewing an image of the actual parish register reveals that the young Horatio Nelson was firstly baptised privately in October 1758, just a week after being born and then given a second “public baptism” in the middle of November. This practice was carried out for sickly babies who were not expected to survive and begs the question of how different British history would have been had he died as an infant. Fascinatingly, by looking at the actual image of the page there are some additions to his entry that have been penned in the margin years later. These notes, reputedly to be by his brother the Rev William Nelson, 1st Earl Nelson, celebrated the honours that his brother received in his adult life. He ends it with the latin quote “caetera enarret fama” which translates as “others recount the story”.

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In addition to those from the Diocese of Norwich the coverage also includes some Suffolk parishes in and near Lowestoft that fall into the deanery of Lothingland and also, various parishes from the deanery of Fincham and Feltwell, that part of the Diocese of Ely that covers south-west Norfolk.

Burnham Thorpe Church, Norfolk. Horatio Nelson’s baptismal place. Photograph: John Salmon

Burnham Thorpe Church, Norfolk. Horatio Nelson’s baptismal place. Photograph: John Salmon

Nigel Bayley, Managing Director of TheGenealogist said: “With this collection you will be able to easily search Norfolk records online for the first time. From the results a click will allow you to view high quality digital images of the original documents. Joining our already extensive Parish Record collection on TheGenealogist, this release will be eagerly anticipated by family and local historians with links to Norfolk

Gary Tuson, County Archivist at The Norfolk Record Office said: “The Norfolk Record Office is pleased to be working with TheGenealogist, a commercial company helping to make these important records available to a worldwide audience.

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Who Do You Think You Are? to Reprise Highlights from Past Seasons & Unveil Outtakes From the Vault!

TLC-Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are-200pw

The Learning Channel will air a special episode of the series Who Do You Think You Are? entitled ‘Into The Archives’ this Sunday. The special digs into its archives, featuring highlights throughout the past seasons, including triumphs and tragedies, delightful discoveries and sobering moments. This special episode also unveils outtakes and never-before-seen footage from the series’ vault.

Be sure and tune in to TLC this Sunday, August 16 at 9/8c for what’s sure to be a fascinating special!

I note that at this moment there are at least eight full episodes from the past available to watch at TLC. Click on this link, and then click on the Must-See Full Episodes tab down the page a ways. Fascinating shows!

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