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Ontario People : 1796-1803 – on sale for 50% off through Tuesday, Oct 28

cf1855Ontario People: 1796-1803 is a book of lists. The easiest way to describe its contents is to simply quote from its Introduction:

“After the American Revolution, several thousand families came to settle in the western part of Quebec, later called Upper Canada, then Canada West and today Ontario. These settlers were former members of American Loyalist regiments, discharged British and German servicemen, and some civilians and refugees. They were offered grants of 200 acres of land on condition that they take an oath of allegiance and remain loyal to the British regime. The military and Loyalist arrivals who had come earlier received larger grants, generally in relation to their services to the Crown, their rank or status, and family size…

All settlers received certificates showing the location of the lots on which they were to clear land and build houses. First, however, it was necessary to establish who had the right to obtain title deeds, and in 1796 a proclamation was issued that required Loyalists and others to surrender their certificates in exchange for title deeds and to make a statement under oath in the district court as to their right to hold them…

Subsequently, thousands of settlers appeared before the magistrates in district courts throughout Upper Canada. The magistrates provided additional information in the records, which have been preserved in the National Archives of Canada and are usually called the District Loyalist Rolls of 1796. These rolls have been carefully transcribed for the first time by Dr. E. Keith Fitzgerald, who has supplemented the 4,000 entries with further data from his own research. Details supplied by the settlers, the magistrates, and by Dr. Fitzgerald now provide a rich source of information on the early inhabitants of Ontario. Some entries show, for example, relationships, deaths, military service, maiden names of married women, and remarriage of widows…”

There are approximately 3,000 names listed in these pages.

Copies of Ontario People: 1796-1803 are available from Family Roots Publishing for 50% off this weekend. The sale ends Tuseday Midnight PDT, October 28, 2014

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The Sam Houston Regional Library & Research Center Closed for Renovations Nov 3 thru January 1

The following teaser is from the thevindicator.com:

SamHoustonRegionalArchive

Liberty, TX- The Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center will be closed for renovations from November 3, 2014 through January 1, 2015 as part of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s (TSLAC) multi-year plan to address critical safety and security needs at the 127-acre museum complex in Liberty, Texas.

A portion of funds from a $1 million appropriation by the 83rd Texas Legislature will be used to update facilities including the removal of hazardous asbestos, installation of a state-of-the-art fire suppression and detection system, and the replacement of flooring in the reading room. Additional funds provided by TSLAC will be used update furniture and fixtures and add computer work stations for visiting researchers.

The Center serves as the official regional historical resource depository for historical records and artifacts of the ten Southeast Texas counties of the historic Atascosito District (Chambers, Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Newton, Orange, Polk, San Jacinto and Tyler Counties). In addition to the research library and museum, the complex includes the Jean and Price Daniel Home and Archives; and four relocated historic buildings.

Read the full article.

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Cook County Cemetery at Dunning, Chicago Illinois Database of Nearly 8000 Now Available

I posted a blog just a few days ago about the new second edition of “Graveyards of Chicago.” Now I see that the Chicago Tribune has posted an article about the work of Barry Fleig, and the access to a database of folks now buried at the Read-Dunning Memorial Park. The following excerpt is from an article posted in the October 21, 2014 edition of chicagotribune.com:

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Beneath the ground in a Northwest Side neighborhood lie the remains of a wide assortment of souls, many of whom went to the grave without a ceremony or a certificate to document their passing.

But history buff Barry Fleig said he has created a portal back from anonymity for 8,000 of those who were interred at the grounds of a former county hospital and insane asylum, poorhouse and potter’s field.

Fleig, who said he has spent 25 years compiling cemetery records, made a searchable database available to the public this month.

“These are the people who fell through the cracks,” said Fleig, 70, of Phoenix. “These poor people were forgotten, but they don’t have to be forgotten anymore.”

In all, the property is believed to contain the remains of as many as 38,000 people. The area once housed the Cook County Almshouse, the county insane asylum, tuberculosis hospital and a potter’s field that eventually became Cook County Cemetery. Located in the Dunning neighborhood, the property and hospitals housed therein became known simply as “Dunning,” Fleig said.

Read the full article.

Search the Database.

Thanks to my friend, Sandra Bulthuis, for the heads-up.

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Federation of Genealogical Societies Announces 2014 Election Results

The following news release is from FGS:

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D. Joshua Taylor Re-Elected President; New Board Members and Directors include Melissa Tennant, Linda McCauley, and David E. Rencher

October 23, 2014 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announces results of its recent election for FGS board members and directors. The election was conducted online September 1 – 30, 2014, with all FGS delegates eligible to vote. Office terms for those elected will begin on January 1, 2015.

With the recent election results, re-elected FGS President D. Joshua Taylor states, “I am honored to serve with such a dedicated board, and look forward to working with those elected to the Board of Directors and Executive Committee over the next two years.”

Re-Elected FGS Board Members

The following directors were re-elected to their positions:

· Polly Fitzgerald Kimmitt, CGSM (Massachusetts) — Director

· Randy W. Whited (Texas) — Director

New FGS Board Members

The following board members and directors were newly elected to their positions:

· Melissa Tennant (Indiana) — Vice President of Administration

· Linda McCauley* (Kentucky) — Secretary

· David E. Rencher, AG, CGSM, FIGRS, FUGA (Utah) — Director

· Cherie Bush (Utah) — Director

*McCauley was first appointed to the FGS board as a Director in early 2014 to fill a vacant position and elected Secretary in this recent election.

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)
The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies and family history enthusiasts strengthen and grow through online resources, FGS FORUM magazine, and through its annual national conference which provides four days of excellent learning opportunities for both societies and family history enthusiasts. To learn more about FGS visit fgs.org. To learn more about the next annual conference to be held in Salt Lake City, UT, visit fgsconference.org. Also, find FGS on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/FGSgenealogy, on Twitter @FGSgenealogy and on the FGS Voice blog at http://voice.fgs.org.

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Donny Osmond Joins RootsTech 2015 As A Keynote Speaker

The following news release is from FamilySearch:

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Iconic Entertainer to Speak at Largest Family History Event in the World

SALT LAKE CITY, 22 October 2014 — One of the biggest names in entertainment from one of the most well-known families in the world will be part of the largest family history conference in the world. RootsTech 2015 announced today that entertainer, actor, author, and television host Donny Osmond will be joining RootsTech as a keynote speaker on Saturday, February 14, 2015. He will inspire the thousands of conference attendees to discover and share family stories of the past, present, and future. For more information, go to RootsTech.org.

Donny has been singing and entertaining audiences for almost 50 years. He has starred in shows on Broadway and in Las Vegas and was the season-nine winner of Dancing with the Stars. He has sold millions of records and hosted a variety of TV shows. He’s now anxious to share stories in a completely different venue at RootsTech 2015. “I’m already looking forward to this exciting event,” Donny said. “Family and family stories are obviously very important to me. This is a chance to connect to something that is part of who I am.”

Celebrating five decades in show business, Donny will be releasing his 60th album, Soundtrack of My Life , just a month before the RootsTech 2015 conference. Each track on the album tells a story, tracing many points of both his professional and personal life. “My family and the stories we share are such an important part of my life, so RootsTech is just the perfect place to celebrate that.”

Most people associate Donny with his large musical family, but they might not realize that the Osmonds are also family historians. They have gathered and recorded their family connections and stories since 1954 through the Osmond Family Organization (OFO). Started by Donny’s parents, George and Olive Osmond, the OFO conducts genealogical research and gathers historical family information for the world to view freely.

Donny will kick off the final day of RootsTech 2015, taking the stage for what is expected to be the largest RootsTech audience ever. For more information or to register, visit RootsTech.org.

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Vertical Cemeteries Built for Land-Starved Populations

Yarkon-Vertical-Cemetery-250pw

As we all know, Israel does not have a lot of land. Existing cemeteries are crowded and traditional burial space is nearly unavailable. Yarkon Cemetery (Petah Tikva, near Tel Aviv) is near capacity with 110,000 graves on 150 acres. About 35,000 Israelis die each year, with that number expected to grow as worldwide immigration continues. The Yarkon Cemetery has sought to alleviate the burial-space problem by building 30 vertical cemetery structures.This will provide 250,000 additional graves, allowing about 25 more years of burial.

Israel may be at the forefront of the building of vertical cemeteries. However, from Brazil to Japan, elevated cemeteries are now where folks are to be buried.

You’ll find a very interesting AP article on the subject of vertical cemeteries posted at the October 17, 2014 Yahoo website. It includes a photo gallery of eleven fascinating pictures.

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APG Offers Limited-Time Discount on New Membership & PMC Registration

The following news release is from APG:

Unique, Professionally-Focused Educational and Networking Opportunity for Those Interested in Genealogy; Savings for New Registrations Runs One Week Only

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 22 October 2014 −The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) today announced a discounted, limited-time bundle that includes 1-year membership in APG and registration to APG’s Professional Management Conference (PMC) being held in January 2015. This week only—Wednesday 22 October to Wednesday, 29 October 2014—registrants can receive a new APG membership plus full-conference registration for PMC for $245, which is $20 off the cost if purchased separately.

Themed “Professional-Grade Genealogy,” the conference will be held 8–9 January 2015 at the Hilton Hotel in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. Register for this special bundle at www.apgen.org/conferences/special.html.

“Membership in the Association of Professional Genealogists is key to the educational and networking needs of professional genealogists,” said APG President Kimberly Powell. “APG’s Professional Management Conference pairs advanced lectures with unique networking opportunities, appealing to the needs of professionals of all skill levels. If you’re new to professional genealogy or know someone interested in APG membership, this week’s offer makes now an excellent time to join.”

PMC 2015 – A Must-Attend Event

The 2015 PMC is the only genealogical conference focused on providing professional genealogists with opportunities for networking, advanced education, and professional and business development:

Keynote by Tim Sullivan, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com, who brings a unique perspective on business, genealogy, and the professional genealogists’ vital role in the industry. Ancestry ProGenealogists is a Diamond-Level PMC sponsor.

15 breakout sessions offer training on key topics for professional genealogists: DNA, time management, genealogical standards, citation writing, having difficult conversations, setting fees, adoption research, and professional writing and speaking.

Lunch with FamilySearch’s Chief Genealogical Officer, David Rencher, AG, CG. PMC Diamond-Level sponsor FamilySearch is supplementing the cost of lunch on Thursday, 8 January — making this plated lunch just $10 per person! Seats are limited and open only to PMC registrants.

New in 2015, PMC Poster Sessions offer one-of-a-kind networking opportunities by providing PMC attendees with an informal, interactive opportunity to showcase research, share work, and exchange ideas.

Complimentary attendee-benefits from PMC Platinum-Level sponsors: One-year subscription to online data-backup service BackBlaze (value $50). Registration to online course “Business Skills: Business Administration” from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies ($89 value).

The annual APG member meeting and the complimentary APG reception.

And MUCH more!

Register today for PMC 2015 and a 1-year APG membership at www.apgen.org/conferences/special.html. The website also includes full conference details, class descriptions, speaker bios and more.

The new-member-and-PMC-registration offer will run from 22—29 October 2014 and applies only to applicants who are not currently members of APG (and/or have not been for the past two years). Applicants must sign up for APG membership and a full PMC registration to receive the discount.

Breakout Sessions Will Include:

  • Thomas Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS—You’ve Got Options: Many Ways to Cite Right (3-hour workshop)
  • Angie Bush, MS—DNA and Genealogical Proof
  • CeCe Moore—Genealogy Professionals Needed: How Adoptees Discover their Genealogical Roots (2-hour workshop)
  • Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL—Finding the Law
  • Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL—(1) Measuring Yourself against Standards: A Practical Guide for Improving Your Skills (2-hour workshop) and (2) Get Paid for Your Passion: Setting Fees
  • Angela Packer McGhie—Time Management: Successfully Balancing the Demands of Our Many “Clients”
  • Kimberly Powell—Organizing Your Research and Writing with Scrivener
  • James M. Beidler—(1) Finding Your Niche: Matching Passion, Professionalism, and Pecuniary Interest and (2) Taxes and the Professional Genealogist
  • Anastasia Harman—Professional Writing Foundations: 5 Ways to Improve Your Writing Today (2-hour workshop)
  • Ron Arons, MBA—Mind Maps for Genealogy
  • Thomas MacEntee—Self-Publishing for Genealogists
  • Billie Stone Fogarty, MEd—So You Want to be a Genealogical Speaker
  • Christina Grover—How to Have Difficult Conversations with Clients and Colleagues

About the Association of Professional Genealogists
The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter (www.twitter.com/apggenealogy) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/AssociationofProfessionalGenealogists).

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4 New DNA Guides for Easy Reference to a Complex Subject – Get all 4 Togther and SAVE 15% Through Monday, October 27th

lu13You first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? OK, probably not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists, all of which can be difficult for the rest of us to understand. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Finally, someone has come up with guides to help genealogists understand the basics of DNA, DNA testing, and how each type of test may benefit the genealogist. Genealogy Gems Publications has put together a series of laminated guides under the series title, Your DNA Guide. Each one will be outlined in its own blog post. The four guides are:

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. Each guide was written by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular).

Click on the title, above, for each guide to read a review with a listing of contents, or simply click here to order the bundle from Family Roots Publishing and save 15%.

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Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist

AT-DNA-Genetics-Laminate-200pwYou first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? OK, probably not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists, all of which can be difficult for the rest of us to understand. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Finally, someone has come up with a guide to help genealogist understand the basics of DNA, DNA testing, and how each type of test may benefit the genealogists. Genealogy Gems Publications has put together a series of laminated guides under the series title, Your DNA Guide. Each one will be outlined in its own blog post. The four guides are:

  • Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist
  • Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist
  • Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist
  • Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. In Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist, you will learn, obviously, about Autosomal tests and what they are. Learn about SNPs or SNiPs and the idea that “your genetic pedigree is not the same as your genealogical pedigree. Also discussed using your “best matches” in your genealogy.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • What is Autosomal DNA?
  • What can atDNA do for You?
  • Connect with Living Relatives
  • Getting Started with atDNA Testing
  • SNiPs of Inheritance
  • Matching: Finding Relatives
  • How to Use Your Best Matches in Genealogy
  • Get Organized
    • Organize Your Email
    • Get Organized with Spreadsheets
    • Get Organized with Your Word Processor
    • New Tools to Try
  • Ethnic Heritage
    • Your DNA
    • Matching Algorithms

There are also embedded FAQs as well as spotlighted information. Each guide was written by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular)

 

Order copies of Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist from Family Roots Publishing.

Or, bundle all four together for a deal. Get the DNA bundle for 15% off through October 27th. Click here to order the bundle at a discount.

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Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist

MT-DNA-Laminate-200pwYou first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? OK, probably not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists, all of which can be difficult for the rest of us to understand. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Finally, someone has come up with a guide to help genealogist understand the basics of DNA, DNA testing, and how each type of test may benefit the genealogists. Genealogy Gems Publications has put together a series of laminated guides under the series title, Your DNA Guide. Each one will be outlined in its own blog post. The four guides are:

  • Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist
  • Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist
  • Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist
  • Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. In Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist, you will learn what it is and how useful it can be to you as a genealogist. Understand your mtDNA testing options, including Full Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing, get more about DNAs relationship to your health and more about haplogroups.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • What can mtDNA do for You?
  • How does mtDna Work?
  • What do I Get?
  • Getting Tested
  • Your mtDNA Profile
  • Your mtDNA Markers
  • Matches Map
  • mtDNA Haplogroup
  • mtDNA and Your Health

There are also embedded FAQs as well as spotlighted information. Each guide was written by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular)

 

Order copies of Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist  from Family Roots Publishing.

Or, bundle all four together for a deal. Get the DNA bundle for 15% off through October 27th. Click here to order the bundle at a discount.

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Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist

Y-DNA-Genetics-Laminate-200pwYou first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? OK, probably not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists, all of which can be difficult for the rest of us to understand. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Finally, someone has come up with a guide to help genealogist understand the basics of DNA, DNA testing, and how each type of test may benefit the genealogists. Genealogy Gems Publications has put together a series of laminated guides under the series title, Your DNA Guide. Each one will be outlined in its own blog post. The four guides are:

  • Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist
  • Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist
  • Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist
  • Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. In Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist, you will learn about testing for male ancestry, hence the “Y.” You also get to learn about haplotypes and groups, and of course, markers.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • Is this Test for Me?
  • Why the Y?
  • What do I get?
  • Your Haplotype
  • How many Markers Should be Tested
  • Which Testing Company?
    • Marker Setting
    • Total Number of Matches
    • Genetic Distance
    • Name
    • Information Column
    • Most Distant Ancestor
    • Deep Ancestry Information
    • TiP
    • 12 Marker Matches
  • Your Haplogroup
  • Getting Tested

There are also embedded FAQs as well as spotlighted information. Each guide was written by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular)

 

Order copies of Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist from Family Roots Publishing.

Or, bundle all four together for a deal. Get the DNA bundle for 15% off through October 27th. Click here to order the bundle at a discount.

 

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Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist

Getting Started GeneticsYou first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? OK, probably not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists, all of which can be difficult for the rest of us to understand. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Finally, someone has come up with a guide to help genealogist understand the basics of DNA, DNA testing, and how each type of test may benefit the genealogists. Genealogy Gems Publications has put together a series of laminated guides under the series title, Your DNA Guide. Each one will be outlined in its own blog post. The four guides are:

  • Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist
  • Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist
  • Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist
  • Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches. In Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist, you will learn the basics of what DNA can do for your genealogical research. You will get a basic understanding of testing, who offers these test, a simple glossary, and a chart to help you decide which test to take.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • What can DNA do for Your Research?
  • What CAN’T DNA do?
  • Who Should be Tested?
  • Just Begin!
  • Sample Collection
  • Choosing a Testing Company
  • Quick Guide Glossary
  • Which Test?

There are also embedded FAQs as well as spotlighted information. Each guide was written by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular)

 

Order copies of Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist from Family Roots Publishing.

Or, bundle all four together for a deal. Get the DNA bundle for 15% off through October 27th. Click here to order the bundle at a discount.

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Changes at the Family History Library

Pager

A few days ago, FamilySearch posted a blog about changes they are making both in layout and in service at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

The blog covers the following 5 major points. Click to get more in-depth info from the post itself.

  • Reference desks on the B1, B2, and 2nd floors are being removed and new consultation areas are being placed on each floor.
  • Guests can visit with a scheduler who will give them a restaurant-style pager. They will then be paged, allowing consultation time with library specialists.
  • Photo scanning equipment that can be used to scan photos and documents is now accessible.
  • Family Story booths are available where it is possible to make a video and audio recording of family stories and save them to a flash drive.
  • A children’s area where parents can entertain their children while a family member works on their family history in the Library is now available.

James Tanner posted a blog entitled Changes at the Family History Library – More than Decorative. It’s worth a read…

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Finding Your Chicago Ancestors

When talking about the origins of ancestral roots in America, New York may come first to mind for many people. However, no major city can be ignored in research. Many people can trace their family trees through one or more ports and through one or more major metropolitan areas. Chicago was home to people from all over the world. Many immigrant families spent time or settled down in the windy city. Grace DuMelle literally wrote the book on searching one’s ancestral trail through Chicago. Her book is Finding Your Chicago Ancestors: A Beginner’s Guide to Family History in the City and Cook County.

Other books on Chicago and Cook County exist. But none take the approach DuMelle has taken. As a reference desk professional staffer and researcher, she has learned to see the questions researches want to have answered. This book tries to help the researcher answer the questions they have. Instead of pointing to some records group and saying go there, DuMelle tries to instruct and guide the research to finding their own answers. Part I of this book attempts to help researcher answer basic questions:

  • Where do I start?
  • When was my ancestor born?
  • When did my ancestor come to America?
  • What did my ancestor do for a living?
  • When did my ancestor live?
  • Where is my ancestor buried?

These questions jump straight at the heart of research. Who was your ancestor and what can you learn about him/her.

Part II of this book takes research to greater specifics. Here the reader learns to go into greater depth on a topic, to find answers and ancestors. What the book doesn’t provide is information that changes too often to keep updated without costly new editions on a regular basis. Why tell how much copies were or what a books catalog number is a library, when that information may change tomorrow. However, knowing there is a library and what is hold is enough. Finding a records is easy with that information.

The book contains plenty of examples, tables, and illustrations to help the reader find and understand records. Addresses are given for major resource locations. Websites, too, provide online help not available just a few years ago. From the questions researchers ask to the nuts and bolts of researchers, this book cover what is needed to successfully find one’s Chicago ancestors.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Family History: The Ultimate Reality Show

Part I: Getting Your Questions Answered

1 Where Do I Start?

  • Step 1: Gather Your Family’s Information
  • Step 2: Organize Your Information
  • Step 3: Begin Research using the Census, Vital Records, and City Directories
  • Three Beginner’s Mistakes to Avoid

2 When (and Where) Was My Ancestor Born?

  • Strategy No. 1: Birth and Baptismal Records
  • Strategy No. 2:Birth Announcements
  • Strategy No. 3: Census
  • Strategy No. 4: School Records
  • Strategy No. 5: Social Security Application
  • Strategy No. 6: Post-1906 Naturalization Records
  • Strategy No. 7: Death Records

3 Who Were the Parents of My Ancestor?

  • Strategy No. 1: Birth and Baptismal Records
  • Strategy No. 2: Delayed and Corrected Birth Certificates
  • Strategy No. 3: Death Records
  • Strategy No. 4: Census
  • Strategy No. 5: Marriage Records

4 Who Were the Siblings of My Ancestor?

  • Strategy No. 1: Census
  • Strategy No. 2: Death Notices and Obituaries
  • Strategy No. 3: Proof of Heirship
  • Strategy No. 4: Divorce Records

5 When (and Who) Did My Ancestor Marry?

  • Strategy No. 1: Civil Marriage Records
  • Strategy No. 2: Church Marriage Records
  • Strategy No. 3: Unindexed Marriage Records

6 Where Did My Ancestor Live?

  • Strategy No. 1: Sources for Addresses
  • Strategy No. 2: Sources for Photographs
  • Strategy No. 3: Fire Insurance Maps

7 What Occupation Did My Ancestor Have?

  • Strategy No. 1: City Directories
  • Strategy No. 2: U.S. Census
  • Strategy No. 3: State Census
  • Strategy No. 4: Sources for Teachers
  • Strategy No. 5: Sources for City Workers (Chicago)
  • Strategy No. 6:Sources for Railroad Workers
  • Strategy No. 7: Sources for Professionals

8 When Did My Ancestor Die and Where is My Ancestor Buried?

  • Strategy No. 1: Determine the Death Date
  • Strategy No. 2: Determine the Place of Burial

9 When Did My Ancestor Come to America?

  • Strategy No. 1: U.S. Census
  • Strategy No. 2: Death Certificates
  • Strategy No. 3: Late Nineteenth-Century Voter Registrations
  • Strategy No. 4: Church Records
  • Strategy No. 5: Naturalization Records
  • Strategy No. 6: Passenger Lists

Part II: Practical Advice

10 Nuts and Bolts of the U.S. Census

  • Tips for Finding Your Ancestor’s Entry
  • Census Indexes
  • Soundex and Miracode Indexes
  • Find Your Ancestor by Address
  • Where to Find the Census

11 Nuts and Bolts of Newspaper Searching

  • Before You Start
  • Selected Chicago Newspapers and Where to Find Them
  • Indexes to Chicago Newspapers
  • Selected Suburban Cook County Newspapers
  • Obituary and Other Search Services

12 Nuts and Bolts of Birth and Death Records

  • Birth Records
  • Death Records

13 How to Use Machines and Catalogs

  • Microfilm and Microfiche Machines
  • Library Catalog

14 What to Expect at Chicago-Area Research Facilities

  • Chicago History Museum (CHM)
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County Archives
  • Cook County Bureau of Vital Statistics
  • Family History Center (FHC)—Wilmette, Illinois
  • Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD)
  • National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)—Great Lakes Region
  • Newberry Library
  • University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Richard J. Daley Library

15 Top Web Sites for Chicago-Area Research

  • Local Institutional Web Sites
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
  • Free Internet Sources
  • Subscription Databases
  • 16 Ethnic Resources
  • General Resources
  • Resources by Ethnic Group
  • Cultural Organizations

Beginner’s Bookshelf

Index

About the Author

 

Order  Finding Your Chicago Ancestors: A Beginner’s Guide to Family History in the City and Cook County from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: LCP256, Price: $16.61.

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Delaware County, Pennsylvania Quarantine Station’s Dead to be Memoralized

The following excerpt is from the October 21, 2014 edition of philly.com

Megan-Harris-Arlington-Cemetery-PA

One of the nation’s first quarantine stations had been transformed into a playground for the wealthy, and the dead buried on the property were no longer welcome.

Nobody wanted to play baseball on top of the departed. So, in 1900, the bodies were dug up and moved out.

Until last year, the final resting place of the immigrants who sailed to the United States in the 1800s but died at the Lazaretto in Tinicum Township, Delaware County [Pennsylvania], was the subject of informed speculation. No one was certain until Megan Harris’ work.

“When I actually found something, I thought I was going to cry,” said Harris, archivist at Arlington Cemetery in Drexel Hill.

Read the full article.

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