TheGenealogist Releases 650,000 Additional Parish Records for Nottinghamshire

The following news release was received from Nick Thorne at TheGenealogist.co.uk:

TheGenealogist has extended its UK Parish Records collection with a new and exclusive release of 650,000 parish records for Nottinghamshire. These records can be used to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records that cover parishes from this important East Midland county of England. With records that reach back to 1633, this release includes the records of 56 parishes, including:
369,100 individuals in Baptisms, 168,000 individuals in Marriages and 112,800 individuals in Burials

You can use these transcripts to find the names of ancestors, parents’ forenames (in the case of baptisms), father’s occupation (where noted), abode or parish, parish that the event took place in, the date of the event, and in the case of marriage records the bride’s maiden name and the witnesses’ names.

Lord Byron

Amongst the notable Nottinghamshire people that can be found in these records are the infamous Lord Byron and his brilliant mathematician daughter Ada, Countess of Lovelace. Both are buried in the parish of Hucknal Torkard. As well as nobility, in this collection we also come across the baptism of Amos Hind. He was famous for playing First Class Cricket for the neighbouring county of Derbyshire between 1876 and 1877. Amos died aged 82 in 1931.

These additions bring our Nottinghamshire parish record collection to over 919,800 records.To search these records and many more see TheGenealogist.co.uk

Read our article: https://www.thegenealogist.com/featuredarticles/2017/a-poet-a-mathematician-and-a-first-class-cricketer-596/

Parishes covered in this release are:

● Awsworth
● Arnold
● Awsworth
● Balderton
● Barnby in the Willows
● Barton in Fabis
● Beeston
● Bilsthorpe
● Bingham
● Blidworth
● Bole
● Burton Joyce
● Calverton
● Car Colston
● Coddington
● Cottam
● Cromwell
● Dunham
● Eakring
● East Bridgford
● East Drayton
● East Retford
● Egmanton
● Elston
● Elton
● Epperstone
● Everton
● Farnsfield
● Flawborough
● Fledborough
● Flintham
● Gamston
● Gotham
● Greasley
● Grove
● Hucknall Torkard
● Kneesall
● Kneeton
● Laneham
● Laxton
● Lowdham
● North Collingham
● Orston
● Owthorpe
● Papplewick
● Perlethorpe
● Radford
● Ratcliffe on Soar
● Rolleston
● Scarrington
● Selston
● Shelford
● Skegby
● Stapleford
● West Bridgford
● Woodborough

Ancestry DNA Tests Are 30% Off – Just $69 Until Tuesday, August 15


Ancestry is running a Summer Promo on their Autosomal DNA Testing kits. Click on the above illustration to purchase a test at 30% off – making it just $69! I’ve bought many of the tests for myself, my family and friends in the last several years. I’ve always been pleased with the new cousins and genealogy leads that I get from Ancestry’s DNA test. The sale ends on Tuesday, August 15 – so order today!

Please note that I have an affiliate relationship with Ancestry.com and AncestryDNA.

The Indian Ministry of Tribal Affairs to Create an Online Database on Tribes of India

The following excerpt is from an article posted in August 8, 2017 edition of India Times:

The database would include rare photographs and videos ­running in thousands ­ collected from different Tribal Research Institutes

The ministry of tribal affairs to create an online database on Tribes of India How do the Santhals live in remote forest areas? Do tribals of Jharkhand have a special broth to cure anaemia?

What is the difference between Gond tribals of Jharkhand and Gonds of Uttar Pradesh? These and many more questions about lifestyle, living conditions and historic facts about tribals are being documented in the first attempt to create a unique repertoire of Tribes of India.

The ministry of tribal affairs to create an online database on Tribes of India, which would document their evolution, place in history, contribution in India’s freedom struggle, changes in lifestyle, eating habits, architecture of huts or semi-pucca houses, education level, mortality rate, traditional art, folk dances and other anthropological details.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

FreeCEN Makes 19th Century British Censuses Available Online Free of Charge

The following Press Release is from FreeCEN:

FreeCEN offers a free-to-search online database of the 19th century UK censuses. Transcribed entirely by volunteers, we have more than 32 million individuals available on our website that anyone can search without having to create an account. The new ‘FreeCEN2’ website (https://freecen2.freecen.org.uk) [launched] Monday, 31st July 2017 with all of the records that the [older] website [held], but with a fresh new look and feel in-line with Free UK Genealogy and FreeREG. We believe that family history records should be free to access for everyone; our new website will offer more features for researchers, and make it easier for them to find what they’re looking for. FreeCEN2 also brings with it a host of improvements for existing and future volunteers, such as a members sign-in area and brand new messaging system. FreeCEN, FreeREG and FreeBMD are projects by Free UK Genealogy, a registered charity that promotes free access to historical records. FreeREG underwent this process in 2015, and FreeBMD is due to begin its renewal later this year.

Pat Reynolds, Free UK Genealogy’s Executive Director said, “We are very proud of the progress that our volunteers have made in the 18 years the project has been running, and we look forward to a time when we have a complete database of all UK censuses. The launch of our new FreeCEN2 website marks the beginning of an exciting period of renewal for FreeCEN.”

Brenda Bowers, FreeCEN project leader went on, “The new website is a work-in-progress and we want genealogists and family history researchers to try it out and let us know what they think. If we know what works for them, what doesn’t, and what features they’d like to see, we can make FreeCEN2 the best resource for free census records. It could even encourage new volunteers to join us!”

To try out FreeCEN2, please visit https://freecen2.freecen.org.uk and share your feedback with us to help make it the best it can be.

We couldn’t do what we do without our volunteers, and we’re always looking for more. If you’d like to join the FreeCEN team, go to freecen2.freecen.org.uk/cms/opportunities-to-volunteer-with-freecen

—————————————————————————————–
Free UK Genealogy is a non-profit organisation (a Charitable Incorporated Organisation registered in England and Wales, number 1167484) that provides free, online access to family history records. We work with a team of dedicated volunteers to create high quality transcriptions of public records from governmental sources, parish churches, and other trusted institutions. We believe that Open Data and Open Source are key to making and keeping public records accessible to all.

Our volunteers have made available:

  • 33,000,000 births, marriages and deaths in FreeBMD
  • 38,000,000 records from parish registers in FreeREG
  • 32,000,000 individuals from census data, from 1841 to 1891 in FreeCEN

We make the databases we create freely available for people to search in order to support their family history research. Unlike many sites, which are ‘pay-to-view’ after an initial search is carried out, our databases are completely free to search and view.

Thanks to Claire V. Brisson-Banks and ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Databases Posted at FamilySearch June 2 through August 10, 2017

The following databases were published or updated at FamilySearch between June 2 and August 10, 2017:

Title – Number of Indexed Records – Last Updated
BillionGraves Index – 21,969,173 – 02 Aug 2017
Find A Grave Index – 161,552,555 – 21 Jun 2017

Argentina, Buenos Aires, Catholic Church Records, 1635-1981 – 970,770 – 21 Jul 2017
Argentina, Entre Ríos, Catholic Church Records, 1764-1983 – 701,743 – 13 Jul 2017
Argentina, Mendoza, Catholic Church Records, 1665-1975 – 547,967 – 20 Jun 2017
Austria, Upper Austria, Linz, Death Certificates, 1818-1899 – 4,987 – 13 Jun 2017
Belgium, Limburg, Civil Registration, 1798-1906 – 65,837 – 19 Jun 2017
Belgium, Namur, Civil Registration, 1800-1912 – 162,851 – 09 Aug 2017
Bolivia Catholic Church Records, 1566-1996 – 744,404 – 23 Jun 2017
Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2014 – 4,178,251 – 25 Jul 2017
Brazil, Piauí, Civil Registration, 1875-2013 – 1,604,454 – 10 Jul 2017
Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980 – 2,253,162 – 13 Jul 2017
Canada: British Columbia, Victoria Times Birth, Marriage and Death Notices, 1901-1939 – 57,993 – 10 Jul 2017
Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821-2015 – 520,958 – 08 Aug 2017
Chile Civil Registration, 1885-1903 – 3,076,508 – 06 Jul 2017
China, Imperial Examinations and Related Papers (Han Yu-shan Collection), 1646-1904 – 154 – 05 Jun 2017
Costa Rica, Civil Registration, 1823-1975 – 3,839,222 – 09 Jun 2017
Denmark Census, 1911 – 2,792,790 – 12 Jul 2017
Denmark Census, 1916 – 2,964,499 – 13 Jul 2017
Dominican Republic Civil Registration, 1801-2010 – 513,356 – 07 Aug 2017
Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 1,514,690 – 18 Jul 2017
England, Cambridgeshire Bishop’s Transcripts, 1599-1860 – 52,632 – 23 Jun 2017
England, Staffordshire, Church Records, 1538-1944 – 4,852,180 – 09 Aug 2017
England and Wales Census, 1911 – 36,354,828 – 03 Aug 2017
France, Coutances et d’Avranche Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1533-1894 – 567,325 – 28 Jun 2017
Germany, Schleswig-Holstein, Kreis Steinburg, Civil Registration, 1874-1983 – 173,149 – 27 Jul 2017
Ireland Civil Registration, 1845-1913 – 389,073 – 23 Jun 2017
Italy, Asti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1803-1814, 1911-1935 – 51,472 – 13 Jul 2017
Italy, Bergamo, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1901 – 654,931 – 13 Jul 2017
Italy, Chieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1930– Browse Images – 16 Jun 2017
Italy, Macerata, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1808-1814 – Browse Images – 23 Jun 2017
Italy, Modena, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1942 – 317,276 – 16 Jun 2017
Lesotho, Evangelical Church Records, 1874-1983 – 10,255 – 27 Jul 2017
Liberia, Marriage Records, 1941-1974 – 35,699 – 10 Aug 2017
Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 17,511,123 – 01 Aug 2017
Nicaragua Civil Registration, 1809-2013 – 1,367,149 – 07 Jul 2017
Panama, Catholic Church Records, 1707-1973 – 226,937 – 20 Jun 2017
Paraguay, Catholic Church Records, 1754-2015 – 531,108 – 25 Jul 2017
Paraguay Miscellaneous Records, 1509-1977 – Browse Images – 11 Jul 2017
Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 96,481 – 19 Jun 2017
Peru, Cajamarca, Civil Registration, 1938-1996 – 1,157 – 07 Jul 2017
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 559,162 – 18 Jul 2017
Peru, Lambayeque, Civil Registration, 1873-1998 – 524,274 – 09 Jun 2017
Philippines Civil Registration (Local), 1888-1986 – 90,022 – 23 Jun 2017
Portugal, Coimbra, Civil Registration, 1893-1980 – 13,654 – 05 Jun 2017
Russia, Samara Church Books, 1779-1923 – 803,815 – 26 Jun 2017
Russia, Simbirsk Poll Tax Census (Revision Lists), 1782-1858 – Browse Images – 07 Jun 2017
Scotland Church Records and Kirk Session Records, 1658-1919 – 302,522 – 23 Jun 2017
South Africa, Dutch Reformed Church Records (Stellenbosch Archive), 1690-2011 – 20,413 – 01 Aug 2017
South Africa, Transvaal, Probate Records from the Master of the Supreme Court, 1869-1958 – 171,440 – 12 Jun 2017
Spain, Province of Asturias, Municipal Records, 1470-1897 – 86,369 – 09 Jun 2017
Spain, Province of Barcelona, Municipal Records, 1387-1986 – 910,059 – 09 Jun 2017
Sweden, Örebro Church Records, 1613-1918; index 1635-1860 – 231,883 – 25 Jul 2017
Sweden, Östergötland Church Records, 1555-1911; index 1616-1860 – 19,357 – 20 Jul 2017
Sweden, Stockholm City Archives, Index to Church Records, 1546-1927 – 278,704 – 15 Jun 2017

UNITED STATES DATABASES
California, San Diego Passenger Lists, 1904-1952 – 70,546 – 28 Jul 2017
California, San Francisco, Immigration Office Special Inquiry Records, 1910-1941 – 66,304 – 28 Jul 2017
Florida, Old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Home records, 1888-1938 – 164 – 06 Jun 2017
Florida, Spanish Land Grants, 1763-1821 – 932 – 06 Jun 2017
Florida, World War I Service Cards, 1917-1919 – 42,412 – 09 Jun 2017
Hawaii Obituaries Index, ca. 1980-present – 93,702 – 23 Jun 2017
Idaho Divorce Index, 1947-1963 – 43,956 – 25 Jul 2017
Idaho, Southern Counties Obituaries, 1943-2013 – 96,609 – 01 Aug 2017
Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994 – 6,560,088 – 13 Jul 2017
Iowa Mortality Schedules, 1850-1880 – 39,148 – 26 Jul 2017
Kansas County Birth Records, 1885-1911 – 21,152 – 01 Aug 2017
Kansas State Census, 1865 – Browse Images – 19 Jun 2017
Kansas State Census, 1875 – Browse Images – 19 Jun 2017
Kansas State Census, 1885 – Browse Images – 19 Jun 2017
Kansas State Census, 1895 – Browse Images – 19 Jun 2017
Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954 – 1,317,764 – 07 Aug 2017
Louisiana Deaths, 1850-1875, 1894-1960 – 775,158 – 13 Jul 2017
Louisiana, Orleans Parish Vital Records, 1905-1913, 1955-1963 – 54,367 – 09 Jun 2017
Louisiana, Parish Marriages, 1837-1957 – 1,094,026 – 01 Aug 2017
Maine Vital Records, 1670-1921 – 2,048,825 – 19 Jul 2017
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 715,183 – 05 Jun 2017
New Hampshire, United States Naturalization Records, 1906-1993 – Browse Images – 05 Jun 2017
New Jersey State Census, 1895 – 500,743 – 21 Jul 2017
New York, New York City Marriage Licenses Index, 1950-1995 – 3,124,588 – 19 Jun 2017
New York State Census, 1905 – 7,513,232 – 13 Jun 2017
Ohio, Crawford County Obituaries, 1860-2004 – 108,181 – 26 Jun 2017
Rhode Island Naturalization Records 1907-1991 – Browse Images – 05 Jun 2017
South Dakota, Department of Health, Index to Births 1843-1914 and Marriages 1950-2016 – 705,521 – 21 Jul 2017
Texas, Church Marriages, 1845-1957 – Browse Images – 18 Jul 2017
Texas, Eagle Pass Arrival Manifests and Indexes, 1905-1954 – 146,566 – 05 Jun 2017
Texas, Gonzales County, Death records, 1863-1970 – 15,028 – 12 Jul 2017
Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database, 1847-1868 – 60,137 – 25 Jul 2017
Vermont Naturalization Records, 1908-1987 – Browse Images – 05 Jun 2017
Washington, County Marriages, 1855-2008 – 372,134 – 12 Jul 2017
Washington Death Index, 1965-2014 – 1,891,273 – 13 Jul 2017

United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of Freedmen’s Complaints, 1865-1872 – 142,613 – 26 Jul 2017
United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 1,445,863 – 13 Jun 2017
United States Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors, 1775-1783 – Browse Images – 19 Jun 2017

Fort Hays State’s Reveille Yearbook Archive Digitized and Online

The following teaser is from the August 8, 2017 Fort Hays University News:

The new digital version in Forsyth Library’s Scholars Repository is faster, friendlier, better looking & easier to search

08/08/17 – HAYS, Kansas: Complete issues of Fort Hays State University’s Reveille yearbooks – from the first in 1914 to the last in 2003 – are now online, freely available to the public in clean, crisp, fast-loading and searchable digital versions in Forsyth Library’s FHSU Scholars Repository.

The yearbooks are available through the Archives Online link from the Scholars Repository homepage, scholars.fhsu.edu. The Reveille collection is one of the first major collections to be transferred to the Scholars Repository by Elizabeth Chance, Forsyth’s new digital curation librarian. The Scholars Repository went live in January 2016.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Four New Research in the States Guides From the NGS

Four new guides in the National Genealogical Society Research in the States Series are now available. They are for the following states:

And they are 10% off through August 18. Click on the links to order.

Following are descriptions of the four new titles:

Research in Mississippi – NGS Research in the States Series; By Lori Thornton, MLS; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 44 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-25-9; Item # NGS30

The National Genealogical Society’s Research in the States series, of which this book is one, had it’s start in the NGS Quarterly with the publication of “Master Plan for North Carolina Research” in 1987. The Quarterly continued to publish state guides and NGS later issued many of them as special publications. This series includes both revised editions of earlier guides and many new states. Additional states are planned and Family Roots Publishing plans to distribute them as they are printed.

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the Mississippi volume:

RESEARCH IN FLORIDA

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

  • French Province (1699-1763)
  • British West Florida (1763-1779)
  • Spanish Dominion (1779-1798)
  • Mississippi Territory (1798-1817)
  • The State of Mississippi (1817-Present)
  • Jurisdictional Changes
  • Economy

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • Major Repositories
  • Other Repositories

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers and Maps
  • Bible Records
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business and Organization / Fraternal Records
  • Cemetery Records / Cemetery Surveys
  • Census Records – Colonial, Territorial, State, Federal Population, Other Federal Censuses
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records
  • Directories: City and Suburban
  • Ethnic Records – AfricanAmerican; American Indian, Chinese
  • Genealogical and Historical Periodicals
  • Institutional Records
  • Internal Improvements
  • Land Records
  • Military Records – Civil War, Spanish American / Philippine Insurrection, World War I, World War II, Soldiers’ Homes
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Railroads
  • Religious Records – Assemblies of God, Baptist, Catholic, Church of God, Churches of Christ, Christian Churches, Disciples of Christ, Jewish, Methodist, Presbyterian
  • School Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption, Birth and Death, Marriage, Divorce
  • Women
  • Conclusion

——————-

Research in North Carolina – NGS Research in the States Series – Second Edition; By Jeffrey L. Haines, C.G; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 44 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-27-3; Item # NGS29

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the North Carolina volume:

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • State Archives of North Carolina
  • State Library of North Carolina’s Government and Heritage Library
  • University of North Carolina
  • University of North Carolina Collections – North Carolina Collection
  • University of North Carolina Collections – Southern Historical Collection
  • Duke University
  • East Carolina University
  • Other Repositories
  • North Carolina Genealogical Society
  • Other Societies

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes – Federal Censuses
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes – State Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records – County Courts
  • Court Records – Higher Courts
  • Court Records – Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Research – African American
  • Ethnic Research – American Indian
  • Ethnic Research – Cherokee
  • Ethnic Research – Lumbee
  • Ethnic Research – Other Tribes
  • Land Records – Colonial Land Grants
  • Land Records – County-Level Records
  • Military Records – Colonial Wars
  • Military Records – American Revolution
  • Military Records Cherokee Wars, War of 1812, and Mexican War
  • Military Records – Civil War
  • Military Records – Post Civil War and Reconstruction Records
  • Military Records – Spanish-American War
  • Military Records – World Wars
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Religious Records
  • State-Level Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption Records
  • Vital Records – Birth and Death Records
  • Vital Records – Marriage Records
  • Vital Records – Divorce Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women of North Carolina
  • Conclusion

———————

Research in Tennessee – NGS Research in the States Series – Second Edition; By Charles A. Sherrill; Edited by Barbara Vines Little; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 40 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-26-6; Item # NGS28

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of Research in Tennessee – Second Edition volume:

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

  • Jurisdiction Changes

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • Tennessee State Library and Archives
  • Tennessee Genealogical Society
  • Tennessee Historical Society
  • Other Facilities

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Sources
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses & Census Their Substitutes
  • Church Records
  • County–Level Records
  • County–Level Records – Loose Papers
  • Court Records
  • Court Records
  • County Courts
  • Superior Courts
  • Court System, 1809-1934
  • Chancery Courts
  • Circuit Courts
  • Supreme Court
  • Federal Court
  • Directories: City & Suburban
  • Ethnic Records – Growth & Dispersal
  • Ethnic Records – Ethnic Origins
  • Ethnic Records – African Americans
  • Ethnic Records – Melungeons
  • Ethnic Records American Indians
  • Ethnic Records – Cherokee Resources
  • Ethnic Resources – Chickasaw Resources
  • Ethnic Records – General Information
  • Land Records
  • Land Records – North Carolina Grants
  • Land Records – Tennessee Grants
  • Land Records – Accessing the Grant Records
  • Land Records – County-Level Land Records
  • Military and Pension Records
  • Military Records – Colonial Era
  • Military Records – Revolutionary War
  • Military Records – Indian Campaigns, 1784-1811
  • Military Records – State Militia Activity, 1796-1903
  • Military Records – War of 1812
  • Military Records – Old Indian Wars
  • Military Records – Mexican War
  • Military Records – Civil War
  • Military Records – Spanish American War
  • Military Records – World Wars
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • State Records
  • State Records – Legislative Records
  • State Records – Governors’ Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption Records
  • Vital Records – Birth and Death Records
  • Vital Records – Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Women
  • Conclusion

——————–

Research in American Indians of Oklahoma – NGS Research in the States Series; By Kathy Huber; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 40 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-28-0; Item # NGS31

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the American Indians of Oklahoma volume:

AMERICAN INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA

EARLY HISTORY AND REMOVAL

ARCHIVES AND LIBRARIES

  • Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS)
  • National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
  • National Archives of Fort Worth
  • Western Histories Collection, University of Oklahoma Libraries
  • Helmrich Center for American Research
  • Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC)

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Allotment Records
  • Atlases, Gazetteers and Maps
  • Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)
  • Census Records
  • Citizenship Records
  • Newspapers
  • Oral Histories
  • Personal Papers and Manuscripts
  • Removal Papers
  • School Records
  • Conclusion

Order any of the above books at 10% off through August 18, 2017 by clicking on their respective links.

NGS Research in the States Guides for the following areas are currently available from FRPC:

The 1st International Germanic Genealogy Conference


The 1st International Germanic Genealogy Conference took place July 28 through 30 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. I attended the conference, in support of FRPC’s authors who were speaking there, as well as the five venders who were marketing FRPC’s Germanic publications.

The conference sponsor was the International German Genealogy Partnership (IGGP). Kent Cutkomp, Dirk Weissleder and Kim Ashford are the founders – and much of the conference success can be laid directly at their feet. The Mission and Purpose of IGGP may be found at their website.

It was an amazing conference. Nearly 700 people were in attendance. I can honestly state that it was the best-organized conference I’ve ever attended. I attended the lunches and the banquet, and enjoyed the speakers, and good company at the table. Most of the rest of the time, I roamed the exhibit hall, the lobby and the hallways – visiting with the vendors. I was able to set at a table (reserved for the deaf) right near the podium each time, allowing me to hear – not great, but I was able to get most of the info.

I purchased the conference lectures on a flash drive. Most of the lectures given, except those given at the lunches and banquet, are on the drive. Cost was $149, but well worth it for me. Being deaf keeps me from understanding much of what is being said. It’s not that I can’t hear – so much as I can’t differentiate the sounds. Many consonants sound alike to me. So I now plan to listen to the entire conference with the use of my headphones. That will be fun!

While at the conference (and standing in a lunch line to be exact) I met a young man from Brazil by the name of André Hammann, who works for Team GenealogiaRS. He had heard about the conference just a week or so before it took place, and immediately registered – flying from Brazil to attend. It seems that Brazil has a huge German community that goes back to a first wave of immigration to the county in 1824. See the table below. Click on it to see an article on German Brazilians at Wikipedia.

André is a fifth-generation German-Brazilian – now doing professional genealogy research. He sent me a link to an 18-minute video that was made to celebrate 193 years of German Immigration in Brazil, last 25th July. It highlights some immigration characteristics, and the words are spoken in a German dialect with subtitles in Portuguese. It’s well done! André is looking into having English subtitles added to the film. Click on the above link to see it.

This conference will be the first of many annual gatherings. It’s planned that next year the conference will take place in Germany, and in 2019 Sacramento will be the host city. I will write more about these upcoming events as more data comes available.

Preserve the Pensions Announces Resumption of Document Conservation at the National Archives

This is great news! For reasons we won’t go into here, the conservation of documents, followed by digitization by Ancestry.com was halted over a year ago. It has been announced that work is now resuming. The following press release is from Tonia Kendrick, Marketing & Publicity Chair at the Federation of Genealogical Societies.

Preserve the Pensions Announces Resumption of Document Conservation at the National Archives – Digitization to follow.

Austin, Texas – The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) is pleased to announce National Archives staff have recently resumed document conservation of the War of 1812 Pension files covering surnames M(Moore)-Q. Document conservation is the essential first step in digitizing these files. Our digitization partner, Ancestry.com, has scheduled image capture of these newly conserved documents to begin the second week of September 2017. As capture resumes, new images will be added to Fold3.com on a rolling basis. The Federation and the dedicated volunteers of the Preserve the Pensions project have worked tirelessly for well over a year to negotiate a resolution to the work stoppage. This portion of the project plan is expected to be completed by third quarter 2018.

The War of 1812 pensions are among the most frequently requested set of materials within the holdings of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), yet had never been microfilmed or digitized. Through a fundraising effort unprecedented in the genealogical community, more than 4,000 individuals, 115 genealogical and lineage societies, and industry leaders such as FamilySearch helped FGS secure the funds, matched by Ancestry.com, to preserve and share this invaluable genealogical resource. The images already captured, as well as those soon to be, are hosted at Fold3.com for free, forever.

“We are grateful to our partners Ancestry.com and NARA for their support and willingness to continue working with us towards this successful outcome. We appreciate their recognition of the unique nature of this project and the community who worked so hard to fund it.” – Rorey Cathcart, FGS President

The Federation is committed to seeing the entire collection conserved, digitized and freely online at the earliest possible date. We will continue work with our partners to secure a timeline for the remaining portion of the War of 1812 Pension files.

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)
The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents genealogical, historical, and lineage organizations throughout the United States. The Federation empowers the genealogical community through its annual conference, publications (including FGS FORUM) and projects. The Federation was the driving force behind the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors project alongside the National Parks Service and since 2010 has been actively involved in Preserve the Pensions, an effort to raise more than $3 million to digitize and make freely available the pension files from the War of 1812. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

MyHeritage Acquires the Legacy Family Tree Software and Webinar Platform

MyHeritage has acquired Millenia Corporation. Based on my experience with both companies, I think this will be a good deal for the users of both companies.

The following news release is from my friend, Daniel Horowitz, at MyHeritage.com:

TEL AVIV, Israel & SURPRISE, Arizona, August 3, 2017 — MyHeritage, the leading global destination for family history and DNA testing, announced today its acquisition of Millennia Corporation, makers of the popular genealogy desktop software Legacy Family Tree and genealogy webinar platform, Legacy Family Tree Webinars. This is MyHeritage’s ninth acquisition to date.

With hundreds of thousands of devoted users since 1997, Legacy Family Tree consistently ranks among the top three most popular and highly rated genealogy software products in the industry. The Legacy Family Tree Webinar platform — which has amassed a large and dedicated fan base since 2010 — draws speakers who are leaders in their field and covers a wide variety of topics, including genealogical research methodology, DNA, and historical records, representing a full array of educational genealogy content.

MyHeritage, which has developed a world-class, global mobile and Web platform for family trees, historical records and DNA testing, used by more than 90 million users worldwide, will now offer its services to Legacy’s users.

Legacy Family Tree will retain its full staff and continue developing its software and webinar platform, backed by MyHeritage’s resources. Millennia Corporation and MyHeritage have started joint work on a new version of the Legacy Family Tree software — version 10 — which will include the optional capability to sync family trees to MyHeritage’s website and use the free MyHeritage mobile app to make remote updates to their family trees on the Legacy software. Legacy Family Tree version 9 has already integrated matching to MyHeritage’s 40 million family trees and to its historical records collection — which surpassed 8 billion records this week.

Legacy Family Tree Webinars will continue to feature diverse and informative content, and will be promoted to the millions of MyHeritage users, to increase the webinars’ audience. The webinar platform will also enjoy infrastructure upgrades to support increased concurrent viewership.

“We are very happy with the Legacy Family Tree acquisition as it gives us valuable assets that are highly complementary to our own, and a solid team.” said Gilad Japhet, Founder and CEO of MyHeritage. “We look forward to providing Legacy’s software and webinar platform with useful upgrades, and to welcoming Legacy’s huge user base of experienced genealogists to enhance their genealogical explorations through MyHeritage’s services.”

“The more I’ve learned about and experimented with MyHeritage, the more I have felt we need to partner together,” said Geoff Rasmussen, founder of Legacy Family Tree Webinars. “The technology behind their online trees and historical records is incredible — second to none. MyHeritage has positioned itself to become the leader of the future of the genealogy industry and we can be a part of it. It’s the perfect match: our software and webinars combined with their resources, technologies, and international reach will help both of us accomplish our mission — to help the world find their ancestors.”

“I’m excited for us to join forces with MyHeritage,” said Dave Berdan, President of Millennia Corporation. “MyHeritage clearly cares for genealogists and continues to invest in desktop genealogy software, in contrast to one of its major rivals that has done the opposite, shutting down its desktop genealogy software and then selling it off. As we’re passionate about genealogy, our team is happy to have found in MyHeritage kindred spirits and we’re excited about the value that we can create together to benefit millions of genealogists worldwide.”

For more information about this announcement and for answers to frequently asked questions, visit:
http://news.legacyfamilytree.com/legacy_news/2017/08/legacy-family-tree-has-a-new-home-with-myheritage.html

Illinois State Genealogical Society 2017 Annual Fall Conference

The following News Release is from Jaymie Middendorf, Marketing & Public Relations Chair for ISGS.

Springfield, IL – July 29, 2017. The Illinois State Genealogical Society (ISGS) is bringing the 2017 Annual Fall Conference to beautiful Moline, Illinois. The Society will hold its conference on Friday, October 27 and Saturday, October 28 at the iWireless Center. This year’s conference is co-hosted by local society Rock Island County Illinois Genealogical Society. Registration for the conference is open to the public.

Explore this year’s theme, “Build Your Family Tree: DNA, Research, & Writing” with two days of genealogical education for beginners through expert researchers, nationally-known speakers, door prizes, and opportunities to network with other genealogists and family historians. Attendees at the Friday evening banquet and the Saturday luncheon will be entered to win a free DNA test! Speakers include: Karen Stanbary, CG℠, J. H. Fonkert, CG℠, Tony Burroughs, Ginger Frere, Dr. Daniel Hubbard, Marsha Peterson-Maass, & Rachel M. Popma.

One or two-day conference registrations are available. Additional details may be found on the Illinois State Genealogical Society’s website at www.ilgensoc.org.

About the Illinois State Genealogical Society: ISGS was founded in 1968 to stimulate a public interest in the people and families that contributed to the establishment and development of the State of Illinois. ISGS is a not-for-profit, nonsectarian, educational organization.

Cedar Rapids Iowa “The Gazette” Newspaper – Digitized and Available Online from 1883

The following teaser is from an article by Alexandra Connor, and posted August 5, 2017 at The Gazette website. Click here to read the article.

Millions of pages from past issues of The Gazette [Cedar Rapids, Iowa], dating back to 1883, are being made available to the public in a digital, searchable format thanks to a partnership between the newspaper, Cedar Rapids Public Library Foundation, State Historical Society of Iowa and a local company that specializes in digitization.

…The project was announced in February and was unveiled by the State Historical Society with the hopes of preserving more than 12 million pages of Iowa newspapers.

So far, 2 million pages have been made available with 1 million more images expected to be added over the course of the next 18 months. Cedar Rapids papers separate from The Gazette, such as the Republican, or earlier namesakes like the Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette also have been archived.

The searchable database can be found at cedarrapids.advantage-preservation.com.

I did a bit of searching for ancestors in the database myself. It includes several historic newspapers, as well as City Directories and Phone Books! It’s easy to use. You can search the following items (note that the number of pages is as of today – the numbers will change as further digitizing takes place.

Gazette 1,425,632 pages
Cedar Rapids Gazette 100,337 pages
Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette 96,273 pages
Republican 94,132 pages
Cedar Rapids City Directories 80,160 pages
Cedar Rapids Phonebooks 29,762 pages

Just enter a keyword, or a first and last name in the search box, and search. You can narrow the search by date, and search for a Surname only. An Advanced Search is also available at: http://cedarrapids.advantage-preservation.com/advancesearch?bcn=1&lns=hinchey

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

For Canadians Only! – MyHeritage DNA Kits – Only $69 (USD) Through July 5

For Canadians Only!

MyHeritage is running a Canada Day promo on their Autosomal DNA test – cutting the price to just $69 until July 5. That’s again the best price that they’ve ever offered. Order 3 kits or more, and they add free shipping. Click on this link.

Note that Americans clicking on the links will be redirected to the current $79 sale price offered by MyHeritage.

MyHeritage DNA is the perfect gift for yourself and the people you love, now at the lowest price ever offered. By testing more relatives, you can learn more about yourself and determine whether your DNA matches are maternal or paternal.

All it takes is a few minutes and a gentle swab of the cheek to obtain the DNA sample that you mail back to the MyHeritage DNA lab. Within 4-5 weeks, DNA analysis will be complete, and you’ll be able to view the results online at MyHeritage.

DNA testing is the perfect way to celebrate Canada Day!

Mother and Adopted Daughter Meet For the First Time!

Robin never forgot the daughter she gave birth to at the age of 15. She’d counted the baby’s fingers and toes. The girl was perfect — and she never saw her again.

Becky wanted to find her birth mother from the time she discovered she’d been adopted. She wanted to know where she came from.

Becky was engaged when she took a MyHeritage DNA test, with her fiancé’s support, to learn of her heritage.

Robin had her DNA tested as a part of a family history project.

View the following video by clicking on the illustration to learn their story:

Following are links to blogs I’ve done in the past about their DNA test:

Canadians! Click here to order your MyHeritage DNA test for only $69 (USD) today!

By the way, I get matches to new cousins every few days from my MyHeritage DNA testing that I had done last February. On March 28, I had 1; on April 2, I had 1; April 10, I had 4; April 14, I had 2, April 30, I had 2; May 7, I had 3; May 9, I had 1; May 14, I had 1; May 21, I had 3; May 28, I had 5; June 4, I had 3; June 11, I had 1; and on June 18, I got 4. I can’t keep up!

UPLOAD YOUR DNA TEST RESULTS to MyHeritage – It’s FREE!
If you have tested your DNA with other autosomal DNA test providers than MyHeritage DNA, you can easily upload the DNA raw data file to MyHeritage.com to get a comprehensive Ethnicity Estimate and DNA Matches. It’s entirely free, and you will find more relatives! Click here to Upload your DNA data to MyHeritage and enjoy free DNA Matching and Ethnicity Estimates.

Please note – I have an affiliate relationship with MyHeritage and MyHeritage DNA. I receive a small portion of any sales made by my readers clicking on the above links, and purchasing.

Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 57 – Cities of Bremen, Lübeck & Kiel – now shipping

It’s been nearly a year since Family Roots Publishing produced a new German Map Guide. We’re now working on big-city volumes and honestly, they are harder to produce than the volumes for rural areas. The author is also spending a lot of time on the Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers series.

In the last few days, we shipped the all copies of the Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 57 – Cities of Bremen, Lübeck and Kiel, by Kevan Hansen. This volume is made up of three large German cities. They are: Free and Hanseatic City of Bremen, the Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck and the City of Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Prussia. Included are 128 historic stadtteile, or city sections, found in Bremen and Lübeck (see list below). Written in English by Kevan Hansen, this volume was principally written to help family historians resolve where their family may have gone to church – and left vital records behind that may be seen today. This is the fifty-seventh of a series covering all of Germany. These places are as of about 1870 to 1900. The Cities of Bremen, Lübeck and Kiel Map Guide is different than the others, in that totally different techniques are needed to locate in which church your ancestors may have worshipped when doing big city research.

To order your copy of Map Guide To German Parish Registers Vol. 57 – Cities of Bremen, Lübeck and Kiel, click on the link – or on the illustration.

This volume is also available in hard cover.Click here to order the volume in hard cover.

The final volumes of the Map Guide to German Parish Registers series (Vol. 56 on) all deal with the large and free cities of the German Empire. The cities books will be published as time permits in 2017 through 2018. We expect to produce another 5 books in the series

The following is from the Table of Contents of Volume 57:

  • Introduction
  • Historical Background of the Free City of Bremen
  • Overview Map of the Free City of Bremen Area
  • Free City of Hamburg Civil Registration
  • Bremen Parish Registers
  • Map and Key to Amtsgericht Bremen Lutheran Parishes
  • Map and Key to City of Bremen Lutheran Parishes
  • Bremen Lutheran Parishes
  • Additional Churches – Bremen
  • Bremen – Minority Religions
  • Using City Directories to Find the Street Reference
  • 1900 Bremen Parish Street Index – by Street
  • Bremen Reverse Parish Street Index – by Church
  • Other Bremen Genealogical Resources
  • The Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck
  • Historical Background of the Free City of Lübeck
  • Lübeck Parish Registers
  • Map and Key to Amtsgericht Lübeck Lutheran Parishes
  • Map and Key to the Free City of Lübeck Lutheran Parishes
  • Lübeck Lutheran Parish Listings
  • Lübeck Minority Religions
  • Using City Directories to Find the Street Reference
  • 1900 Lübeck Parish Street Index – by Street
  • Lübeck Reverse Parish Street Index – by church
  • Other Lübeck Genealogical Resources
  • The City of Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Prussia
  • Historical Background of the Free City of Kiel
  • Kiel Parish Registers
  • Map and Key to the City of Kiel Lutheran Parishes
  • Kiel Lutheran Parish Listings
  • Using City Directories to Find the Street Reference
  • 1900 Kiel Parish Street Index – by Street
  • Kiel Reverse Parish Street Index – by Church
  • Other Kiel Genealogical Resources
  • Bremen Town Index
  • Lübeck Town Index

The following historic stadtteil (city sections) are found in this volume.

  • Albsfelde Lübeck
  • Arsten Bremen
  • Auf dem Rüten Bremen
  • Auf der Heide Bremen
  • Baumsberg Lübeck
  • Behlendorf Lübeck
  • Beidendorf Lübeck
  • Blankensee Lübeck
  • Blockdiel Bremen
  • Borgfeld Bremen
  • Brandenbaum Lübeck
  • Bremen Bremen
  • Bremerhaven Bremen
  • Brodten Lübeck
  • Büren Bremen
  • Burg Bremen
  • Büssau Lübeck
  • Curau Lübeck
  • Dissau Lübeck
  • Düchelsdorf Lübeck
  • Dummersdorf Lübeck
  • Ellen Bremen
  • Evershof Lübeck
  • Fackenburg Lübeck
  • Falkenhusen Lübeck
  • Genin Lübeck
  • Giesensdorf Lübeck
  • Gneversdorf Lübeck
  • Gothmund Lübeck
  • Grambke Bremen
  • Gröpelingen Bremen
  • Gross Dunge Bremen
  • Gross Schretstaken Lübeck
  • Habenhausen Bremen
  • Harmsdorf Lübeck
  • Hasenbüren Bremen
  • Hastedt Bremen
  • Herrenwyk Lübeck
  • Herrnburg Lübeck
  • Hilgeskamp Bremen
  • Hodenberg Bremen
  • Hodenberg Bremen
  • Hohweg Bremen
  • Hollenbeck Lübeck
  • Hollerdeich Bremen
  • Horn Bremen
  • Huchting Bremen
  • Hünengraber Lübeck
  • Israeldorf Lübeck
  • Ivendorf Lübeck
  • Karlshof Lübeck
  • Kattenesch Bremen
  • Kattrepel Bremen
  • Kiel Kiel
  • Klein Dunge Bremen
  • Klein Schretstaken Lübeck
  • Krempeldorf Lübeck
  • Kronsforde Lübeck
  • Krumbeck Lübeck
  • Lankenau Bremen
  • Lehe Bremen
  • Lehesterdeich Bremen
  • Lewenbüren Bremen
  • Lsumbrok Bremen
  • Lübeck Lübeck
  • Malkendorf Lübeck
  • Marienthal Lübeck
  • Mittelsbüren Bremen
  • Moisling Lübeck
  • Monkhof Lübeck
  • Mühlenfeld Bremen
  • Neuenland Bremen
  • Neuhof Lübeck
  • Nieder Blockland Bremen
  • Niederbüren Bremen
  • Niemark Lübeck
  • Niendorf Lübeck
  • Nienhausen Lübeck
  • Nüsse Lübeck
  • Ober Blockland Bremen
  • Oberneuland Bremen
  • Oberneuland‑Rockwinkel Bremen
  • Oslebshausen Bremen
  • Osterholz Bremen
  • Ostfeuerberg Bremen
  • Padelügge Lübeck
  • Poggensee Lübeck
  • Pöppendorf Lübeck
  • Rablinghausen Bremen
  • Reecke Lübeck
  • Reeckerheide Lübeck
  • Ritzerau Lübeck
  • Rockwinkel Bremen
  • Roggenhorst Lübeck
  • Rönnau Lübeck
  • Rothebeck Lübeck
  • Schattin Lübeck
  • Schevemoor Bremen
  • Schlutup Lübeck
  • Schönböck Lübeck
  • Sebaldsbrück Bremen
  • Seehausen Bremen
  • Siems Lübeck
  • Sierksrade Lübeck
  • Steffensweg Bremen
  • Steinruder Hof Lübeck
  • Strecknitz Lübeck
  • Strom Bremen
  • Strömerdeich Bremen
  • Struckenberg Bremen
  • Teutendorf Lübeck
  • Timmersloh Bremen
  • Tramm Lübeck
  • Travemünde Lübeck
  • Utbremen Bremen
  • Utecht Lübeck
  • Vahr Bremen
  • Vegesack Bremen
  • Verenmoor Bremen
  • Volskuhle Bremen
  • Vorrade Lübeck
  • Walle Bremen
  • Warturm Bremen
  • Wasserhorst Bremen
  • Wesloe Lübeck
  • Westend Bremen
  • Wilhelmhöhe Lübeck
  • Woltmershausen Bremen
  • Wulfsdorf Lübeck

Bundle of 5 Popular German Genealogy Research Guides – 40% Off

Family Roots Publishing has for the first time bundled our five most popular Germanic research guides – and is offering them as a bundle to the public at 40% off (that’s full wholesale – what the dealer’s pay).

These books are perfect for the beginner in German research, as well as anyone wishing to have a variety of German resources at their fingertips.

The bundle is made up of the following items:

Value of the five books making up this bundle is $87.85. We are discounting the bundle by 40%, making it just $52.71 (plus $8 USA p&h). Click here or on the illustration to order. This sale ends July 20, 2017.

Don’t need all five of these books? We still have a deal for you. We are discounting each of the items by 25% purchased as less-than-the-bundle. Click on their links to go to their individual pages. Use your back arrow to return to this page and purchase the bundle.

Following are full descriptions of each of the five items:

Tracing Your Germanic Ancestors; by Leland K. Meitzler from the Publishers of Your Genealogy Today, Internet Genealogy & History Magazine; 2016; 8.5×11; saddle-stapled; 66 pp; Item #: FR0121

This book is also available in PDF format.

It’s a pleasure to announce this newest edition to the Tracing Your Ancestors series. German ancestral research represents one of the largest areas of interest in the USA

  • Find Your Germanic Place of Origin!
  • Passenger and Immigration Records
  • German Parish & Civil Registers
  • German Maps and Gazetteers
  • Census Records of Germany
  • Online German Research
  • Surname Distribution Maps

Contents

  • Finding The Place Of Origin; Locate your Germanic ancestors’ home villages
  • Genealogical “Hail Mary!” Search; Using German surname distribution maps
  • German Maps & Gazetteers; Don’t overlook these important resources
  • Passenger & Immigration Records; Trace your ancestors’ travels to their new homeland
  • Online German Research; We show you the key online resources for researching your Germanic ancestors
  • German Parish & Civil Records; Where to locate the vital records for the birth, marriage, and death of your ancestors
  • German Census Records; We look at where to locate German census records and the best way to access them

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource; by Roger P Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2016; 260 pp; 8.5×11; Softbound; Written in English; ISBN: 9781628590777; Item #: FR0650

After wondering for several years why American researchers know very little about German census records, my good friend, Dr. Roger Minert, found an opportunity to live in Europe for six months to investigate them. He was sure that many existed, but he could find very little information about them. While in Europe, he learned that even German researchers know very little about their census records! How could such a potentially important resource be lost to obscurity? In a new book, written in English, researchers can now learn where and when German census records were compiled, as well as why and how. The author also describes state by state the content of census records and explains how surviving census documents can be located. This is groundbreaking information, of enormous value to anyone researching their German roots.

Would you like additional information about your family in old country? The information found in the parish registers is key to your research, but there’s often even more family information to find in the German census records.

The following Table of Contents is found in the volume:

  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: A History of Census Records in the German States
  • Chapter 2: The Census of 1867: The Great Transition
  • Chapter 3: Census Records during the German Empire 1871-1918
  • Chapter 4: Census Records in the German States from 1816 to 1864
  • Chapter 5: Anhalt
  • Chapter 6: Baden
  • Chapter 7: Bayern [Bavaria]
  • Chapter 8: Brandenburg
  • Chapter 9: Braunschweig [Brunswick]
  • Chapter 10: Bremen (Hansestadt Bremen)
  • Chapter 11: Elsaß-Lothringen {Alsace-Lorraine]
  • Chapter 12: Hamburg (Hansestadt Hamburg)
  • Chapter 13: Hannover [Hanover]
  • Chapter 14: Hessen [Hesse]
  • Chapter 15: Hessen-Nassau [Hesse-Nassau]
  • Chapter 16: Hohenzollern
  • Chapter 17: Lippe
  • Chapter 18: Lübeck (Hansestadt Lübeck) [Luebeck]
  • Chapter 19: Mecklenburg-Schwerin
  • Chapter 20: Mecklenburg-Strelitz
  • Chapter 21: Oldenburg
  • Chapter 22: Ostpreußen [East Prussia]
  • Chapter 23: Pommern [Pomerania]
  • Chapter 24: Posen
  • Chapter 25: Reuß älterer Linie [Reuss Elder Line]
  • Chapter 26: Reuß jüngere Linie [Reuss Younger Line]
  • Chapter 27: Rheinprovinz [Rhineland Province]
  • Chapter 28: Sachsen-Altenburg [Saxe-Altenburg]
  • Chapter 29: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 30: Königreich Sachsen [Kingdom of Saxony]
  • Chapter 31: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 32: Provinz Sachsen [Province of Saxony]
  • Chapter 33: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach [Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach]
  • Chapter 34: Schaumburg-Lippe
  • Chapter 35: Schlesian [Silesia]
  • Chapter 36: Schleswig-Holstein
  • Chapter 37: Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
  • Chapter 38: Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
  • Chapter 39: Waldeck
  • Chapter 40: Westfalen [Westphalia]
  • Chapter 41: Westpreußen [West Prussia]
  • Chapter 42: Württemberg [Wuerttemberg]
  • Chapter 43: German Census Records from 1816-1916: What Do We Know Now?
  • Chapter 44: Conclusions
  • Appendix A: Writing to Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
  • Appendix B: Conducting Census Research in Archives in Germany, France and Poland
  • Appendix C: Interesting Documents Relating to German Census Campaigns
  • Appendix D: The States of Germany in 1871
  • Bibliography
  • Index

The German Research Companion, Third Edition, by Shirley J. Riemer, Roger P. Minert & Jennifer A. Anderson. 2010; 706 pp; softbound; ISBN 0-9656761-6-1; Item #M0025.

Roger Minert, Shirley J. Riemer, and Jennifer Anderson spent hundreds of hours in adding additional material to their earlier Second Edition, editing, and layout of this book, making a good volume even better.

The German Research Companion is often referred to as “the Bible of German family history.” It provides a wide range of helpful information on virtually hundreds of topics related to German research, most indexed for easy reference. It is published in a handy 5.5 x 8.5 inch format, making it an ideal book to accompany the German family historian on research trips to libraries, archives, seminars, and even the “old country.”

Although not intended as a “how to do German research” volume, genealogists will find it one of the most complete books on German research produced. Concentrating on German research sources, it is in fact the only book in print that deals with the wide range of material needed by those who are searching their German lines. Written in English, the genealogist needs no knowledge of the German language to use the volume. Any German words and phrases found in The German Research Companion are either translated or clarified in English.

The German Research Companion contains useful details on hundreds of German genealogical topics. The following is directly from the Table of Contents:

Section 1: German land, past and present

  • Germany’s political and jurisdictional organization
  • The three empires
  • Populations, capitals, and geography
  • The courts and the constitution
  • The rulers, the flag and the colonies
  • The major turning points and markers of German history

Section 2: The Tools, Contacts, and Resources

  • Resources for utilizing the Family History Library and its branches
  • Uses of the Family History Library Catalog for German Research
  • Credentialed researchers, societies, home-area sources
  • The search for the German immigrant’s place of origin
  • Communicating with Germany
  • Sending euro abroad
  • Village photographs and conference audiotapes
  • Choosing between Du and Sie
  • German organizations and institutes
  • Frequently used resources

Section 3: Emigration and Immigration

  • Immigration laws in the United States
  • Emigration laws in Germany
  • Naturalization records
  • The immigration process and Ellis Island
  • The Statue of Liberty
  • Immigration laws
  • Passport applications
  • German immigrant aid societies
  • Pennsylvania societies, archives, and libraries
  • Basic resources for researching Germans from Russia
  • Basic resources for researching the Danube Swabians
  • Basic resources for researching the Wends (Sorbs)
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Pennsylvania
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Alsace-Lorraine
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in the Austro-Hungarian Empire
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Sudetenland
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Bukovina
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Canada
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Czechoslovakia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Galatia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Liechtenstein
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Lithuania
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Netherlands
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Poland
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Silesia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Switzerland

Section 4: United States Resources

  • U.S. Cemeteries and burial records
  • National Archives and Records Administration
  • Social Security history and research
  • U.S. Railroad and Retirement Board
  • U.S. vital records
  • The WPA
  • The U.S. Census
  • Land and property records
  • The Homestead Act
  • U.S. Libraries and publishers
  • American military records
  • Germans who fought in the American Civil War
  • Hessian soldier research
  • The Turnverein in America
  • Fraternal organizations

Section 5: Language and Vocabularies

  • History and characteristics of the German alphabet and language
  • German dialectics and high, middle, and low German
  • The old German script
  • Abbreviations in German and Latin
  • German genealogy vocabulary
  • Occupations, trades and titles in German and Latin
  • Medical terms, illnesses, and causes of death, in German
  • German family relationships vocabulary
  • Christenings, marriages, and deaths vocabularies
  • Latin genealogy vocabulary
  • Roman numerals
  • Latin vocabularies for calendar dates, tombstone expressions, and old cities of Europe
  • French genealogy vocabulary
  • Fraktur
  • Yiddish

Section 6: German Resources

  • German church and civil registration records
  • Church inventories
  • Citizen books
  • The German privacy law
  • City registers
  • German cemeteries
  • Abbreviations keys to Meyers Orts- und Verkehrslexikon & Müllers grosses deutsches Ortsbuvh
  • Reverse alphabetical place name indexes
  • Maps
  • German phonetics
  • Indexes of German surnames
  • Periodicals
  • Place names
  • Researchers
  • Queries in German publications
  • Village lineage books
  • Postal code directories
  • The Ahnenpass
  • Telephone directories
  • Dictionaries

Section 7: Archives

  • German archive terminologies
  • German federal and state archives
  • County archives
  • Ecclesiastical archives and organizations
  • Central office for genealogy in Leipzig
  • The Berlin Document Center
  • The “Gauck” files
  • Specialized archives
  • Recommendations for working in a German archive
  • Genealogy related organizations in Germany
  • Historical societies in Germany

Section 8: Life in Our Ancestor’s Times

  • Names and naming patterns
  • Patronymic names
  • Given names of Germanic and foreign origin
  • “Name days”
  • Old measurements
  • Monetary units
  • Records of guilds and tradesmen
  • Calendars through the ages
  • The perpetual calendar
  • Feast days
  • Holidays and observances
  • History and customs of Christmas
  • The church in modern Germany
  • Religions: Protestant, Catholic, Jewish and pietist, with resources
  • German Universities and academic degrees
  • Heraldry
  • German nobility
  • Military church-books, cemeteries, archives & records
  • German expellees following World War II
  • German prisoners of war in Americas

Section 9: Newspapers, Libraries, Museums and other Information

  • City directories and manuscript collections
  • German and German-American newspapers
  • Special interest publications
  • Emigration records in newspapers
  • Sister City arrangements
  • German museums, libraries, and publishers
  • American universities in Germany
  • U.S. Embassy offices in Germany
  • Academic and cultural organizations
  • Cooking measurements and ingredients
  • Folk dress (Trachten)
  • Greetings in German
  • Formalities of letter-writing
  • Telephone cards

The Appendix

  • The appendix includes maps, tables, charts, and pictures that help to illustrate Germanic research.

In Conclusion

Simply said, if you’re an English-speaking person doing German research, you will profit by a copy of this new Third Edition of The German Research Companion.

Deciphering Gothic Records – Useful hints for helping you read “Old German” Script!; Compiled by Fay S. Deardon; 1996; 4.25×9; Spiral Bound; 13 pp; Item #FR0122

This booklet was created to give the researcher the most common alphabet variations, German words, names, Latin terms, and abbreviations used in Gothic records. The volume is printed in its entirety on card stock, with easy-to flip spiral binding at the top. It’s ideal for use when deciphering German Gothic script when working in the library or at home.

The following items are found in the booklet:

  • Gothic Alphabet Variations
  • Symbols Commonly Used in Gothic Records
  • Words found in Birth Records
  • Words Found in Marriage Records
  • Words Found in Death Records
  • Abbreviations (Gothic & Latin) Commonly Found in Old German Records
  • Latin Terms Found in Old German Records
  • Illnesses Found in Old German Death Records
  • Titles & Occupations Found in Old German Records
  • Common German Names

Understanding Meyers Orts – Translating Guide for the Directory of the Towns and Places of the German Empire; Compiled by Fay S. Deardon; 2013; 8.5×5; Spiral Bound; 20 pp; ISBN: 9781933194899; Item # FR0198

The book is a guide to reading Meyers Orts- und Verkehrs-Lexicon, which was published in 1912, and is a gazetteer of the Old German Empire., covering about 200,000 places. The gazetteer is extremely useful, but it’s very difficult to read, as it’s written in old Gothic German. The Meyers Orts set of three volumes, available at Ancestry.com in its entirely. The volumes are also partially translated at http://www.meyersgaz.org/. For those portions of each entry not translated, this guide will come in very handy.

This small booklet is made up of the following

  • An introduction to the importance of Meyers Orts.
  • Examples of the Gothic typeface used in Meyers Orts and how it differs from other Gothic alphabets.
  • How to Read Meyers Orts Entries – with examples, and sample translations
  • Common Abbreviations Used in the Meyers Orts Gazetteer – these make up the bulk of the booklet

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