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News from the Utah Genealogical Association

UGA

The following is from the Utah Genealogical Association:

The DNA Interest Group will meet virtually on Thursday, May 7th and June 4th at 7:00 pm. Angie Bush will present AncestryDNA: Matches Circles and NADs in May, and First Steps for Adoptees in June. Complete information is posted on the UGA DNA Interest Group page, but you may also go directly to the DNA Genetic Genealogy Community to log into the webinar. Recordings of past presentations and handouts, when provided, will be placed behind the members wall for those unable to attend. Angie Bush, the Genetic Genealogist, is also the coordinator for the SLIG 2016 Advanced DNA Course.

SLIG Scholarship: The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy is accepting applications for the SLIG Scholarship named in honor of Jimmy B. Parker. The winner will be able to attend the SLIG 2016 course of their choice. The deadline is May 15th. Details about submission requirements and judging criteria may be found on the UGA website under SLIG Scholarships.

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Apple Said to Be Working on a DNA Study

The following teaser is from a May 5, 2015 posting at 9to5mac.com:

Apple is working on a plan that could give the company and its research partners access to consumer DNA, a new report suggests. The data would be collected by research partners and stored in an online cloud to be used in medical studies, such as one run by the University of California that examines the DNA of expectant mothers to help pinpoint the causes of premature birth.

Other studies are already being planned, and the report suggests that Apple could be prepared to roll out the DNA component of ResearchKit as early as this year’s WWDC in June…

Read the full article.

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Posen I – Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Now Shipping

German-Map-Guide-51-300pw

The Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Posen I, RB Bromberg, by Kevan Hansen was just delivered in soft cover and is now shipping from Family Roots Publishing. Note that the hard cover edition is still at the bindery and will ship on May 21. This is Volume 51 of the 55-volume German Map Guide series. This volume includes a total of 2,332 places – mostly towns, found in the Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Posen, Regierungsbezirk Bromberg. The book also includes a master index to Volumes 51 through 52, which covers all of Posen. Written in English by Kevan Hansen, the volume was principally written to help family historians resolve where their family may have gone to church – and left vital records behind that may be seen today. This is the fifty-first of a series covering all of Germany. The series is still in production. In many cases, even the smallest places are listed in this series – some with as little population as one person! These places are as of about 1870. If the place existed prior to that date, it will most likely be listed. If the place was named after that date, the chances drop.

Click on the link or illustration to order.

Each volumes of the series does the following:

  • Identifies the parish where an ancestor worshipped based on where they lived.
  • Gives the FHL microfilm number for the family’s parish records.
  • Identifies nearly every city, town, and place that included residents.
  • Visually identifies church parishes for Lutherans & Catholics in each district.
  • Identifies adjoining parishes in case an ancestor attended an alternate parish.
  • Aids in area searches, particularly across district or regional borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for a family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Aids in determining reasonable distances of travel from one area to another.
  • Identifies population centers in each parish.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources.
  • Aids in identification of the location of minority religions.
  • The following places are found in this volume.

  • Abbau Brenkenhof
  • Abdeckerei
  • Ablage Dratzig Schmelze
  • Ablage I
  • Ablage II
  • Ablagenwäterhaus
  • Adlig Brühlsdorf
  • Adlig Gonsawka
  • Adlig Grochowiska
  • Adlig Kobelnica
  • Adlig Kruschin
  • Adlig Neubrück
  • Adlig Szczytniki
  • Adlig Wymyslowo
  • Adolfsdorf
  • Adolphsheim
  • Albertsruh
  • Alden
  • Alexandrowo
  • Alt Flötenau
  • Alt Jägersburg
  • Alt Kokoszki
  • Alt Lachowo
  • Alt Latzig
  • Alt Panigrodz
  • Alt Patschin
  • Alt Theirgarten
  • Alte Mühle
  • Altenburg Gut
  • Altendorf
  • Altgrabia
  • Althof
  • Althütte
  • Altlinden
  • Altraden
  • Altsorge
  • Alyrode
  • Am Kanal
  • Amalienhof
  • Ambach
  • Amberg
  • Amfluss
  • Amsberg
  • Amsee
  • Amt Kruschwitz
  • Amt Schönlanke
  • Amwald
  • Anastazewo
  • Aniela
  • Anielamühle
  • Anielin
  • Annadorf
  • Annowo
  • Ansiedelung Rinkon
  • Antonienhof
  • Antoniewo
  • Arcugowo
  • Argenau
  • Arkusdorf
  • Arndshof
  • Arndtshain
  • Arnoldowo
  • Arnswalde
  • Aschenforth
  • Ascherbude
  • Athanasienhof
  • Auerbachshütte
  • Augustenau
  • Augustowo
  • Augustwalde
  • Bacharcie
  • Bachwitz
  • Bagnabruch
  • Bahnhof
  • Bahnhof Filehne
  • Bahnhof Grossendorf
  • Bahnhof Jesnitersee
  • Bahnhof Kreuz
  • Bahnhof Lopienno
  • Bahnhof Maximilianowo
  • Bahnhof Strehlau
  • Bahnmeisterei Rinkau
  • Balino
  • Balschau
  • Balzweiler
  • Bankwitz
  • Baranowo
  • Bärenbruch
  • Bärenbusch
  • Bartelsee
  • Bartschin
  • Batkowo
  • Baumgart
  • Baumgarten
  • [Read the rest of this entry…]

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Cops Used DNA from Ancestry’s Sorensen Database in a Murder Investigation

The following teaser is from a thought-provoking article posted May 5, 2015 at alternet.org. The Sorensen database was the first place I ever had a DNA test saved, many years ago. So what does the future hold for those of use who are actively using DNA for our genealogy research? Interesting…

Idaho Falls, Idaho – Would you find it frightening— perhaps even downright Orwellian — to know that a DNA swab that you sent to a company for recreational purposes would surface years later in the hands of police? What if it caused your child to end up in a police interrogation room as the primary suspect in a murder investigation?

In an extremely troubling case out of Idaho Falls, that’s exactly what happened.

Police investigating the 1996 murder of Angie Dodge targeted the wrong man as the suspect, after looking to Ancestry.com owned Sorensen Database labs for help. The labs look for familial matches between the murderers DNA and DNA submitted for genealogical testing after failing to find a match using traditional methods.

Read the full article.

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Nederland, Texas, Museum Maintenance Done

Nederland_Texas_Museum_Maintenance

The following teaser is from the May 5, 2015 Port Arthur News.

NEDERLAND [Texas]— The city has been working to reclaim part of its roots since the fall.

Nederland City Manager Chris Duque said there is no better permanent homage to the city’s rich Dutch and French ancestry than the Heritage Museums on Boston Avenue.

“Since last fall, we’ve been making an effort to add new elements to the city that highlight our French and Dutch heritage,” Duque said, referring to the new “Welkom” to Nederland sign and decorative street posts with both the historical and current names of the roads. “But our Heritage Museums — the windmill, especially — (are) essential to the city’s identity.”

At the beginning of the year, Duque said, the city realized the iconic Windmolen museum — a 40-feet high Dutch windmill replica that houses three floors of artifacts — and the picturesque La Masion Acadienne museum — a Cajun French house built in honor of the influx of of French settlers that arrived in Nederland by way of Louisiana — were in need of small, but necessary maintenance repairs.

Read the full article.

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West Virginia Court Records Being Digitized

The following excerpt is from an article by Andrew Brown, written for the Charleston Gazette – and posted May 4, 2015 at govtech.com.

…Since 2013, West Virginia Supreme Court employee Matt Arrowood has been assigned to move the state’s antiquated county court system toward its digital future, where paper copies are a 20th-century notion and lawsuits can be filed with a click of a mouse.

Even as he has suffered through the long drives from courthouse to courthouse, the dark, dank basements of old jails and the company of the snake that took up residence in some of the court records he was saving, Arrowood has successfully moved the state’s 55 county courts one step closer to the computerized era.

In less than two years, Arrowood has brought every county in the state up to speed on scanning and digitally saving new court records, and within the past four months, he’s overseen the adoption of the state’s first e-filing systems in two counties, where lawyers can file motions directly from their computers to the state’s electronic system.

The transformational effort is the result of a recent push by the West Virginia Supreme Court, led by Justice Brent Benjamin, to digitally save and archive all of the state’s court records, starting with present cases but eventually going back over 150 years of legal history…

Read the full article.

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The Search is on for a Downtown Indianapolis Site for the Proposed Indiana State Archives

The Indiana state budget approved by the general assembly last week includes twenty-five million dollars for a state archives building. However, the proposed building of the archives in what is currently green space on the city’s downtown canal was rejected. They are now looking for another downtown location.

Read more about it in an AP article posted at the Indianapolis Star site May 5, 2015.

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Genealogy At A Glance: Ohio Genealogy Research

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Settlement Background

Record Sources

Birth and Death Records

Marriage and Divorce Records

Land Records

Probate Court Records

Supplementary Source

Common Pleas Court Records

Quandrennial Enumeration

Naturalization Records

Major Repositories

Online Resources

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Ohio Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing.

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A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists

Online U.S. Name Lists Insta-GuideWilliam (Bill) Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing continue to to produce new guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists in their series, titled, A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide. The latest titles have focused Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. One of the newest guides is A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists.

Unique to Online U.S. Name Lists

Internet websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of the U.S. were extracted from Dollarhide’s Name Lists books (Family Roots Publishing Co, Orting, WA, 2013-2015). Using the PDF version of this Insta-GuideTM, every website address is hot linked to the Internet – just one click away.

The 144 databases listed here include Censuses and Census Substitutes, i.e., Name Lists derived from Federal Census Records, Immigration Lists, Historical Books & Documents, Land Records, Federal Tax Lists, National Vital Records, and U.S. Military Lists (including Lists of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Veterans, and Pensioners). Together, all of the databases listed have 1.526 billion searchable records/images. Keep in mind that one record/image may have dozens of names on it. Use these databases to locate the name and residence of an ancestor or relative anywhere in the United States.

The databases are identified by their inclusive dates, the name of the database, and the number of records/images in each.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or, you can order just the electronic format.

 

Other titles in the series include:

 

and those in the name lists group include:

 

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A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists

Online Maine Name Lists - A GenealogistsWilliam (Bill) Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing continue to to produce new guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists in their series, titled, A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide. The latest titles have focused Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. One of the newest guides is A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists.

Unique to Online Maine Name Lists

Internet websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of Maine were extracted from Dollarhide’s Maine Name Lists, 1623-2012 (Family Roots Publishing Co, Orting, WA, 2015). Using the PDF version of this Insta-GuideTM, every website address is hot linked to the Internet – just one click away.

The 138 databases listed here include censuses and census substitutes, i.e., name lists from Maine’s early censuses, court records, directories, histories, land records, militia lists, tax lists, vital records or voter lists.

First, find a Maine name list – then find the name of your Maine ancestor.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or, you can order just the electronic format.

 

Other titles in the series include:

 

and those in the name lists group include:

 

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“Roots” Gets a Television Remake by A&E Networks – to Air in 2016

The following except is from the CNN website.

Roots

(CNN) One of the biggest TV events of all time is being reimagined for new audiences.

“Roots,” the epic miniseries about an African-American slave and his descendants, had a staggering audience of over 100 million viewers back in 1977. Now A&E networks are remaking the miniseries, to air in 2016.

A&E, Lifetime and History (formerly the History Channel) announced Thursday that the three networks would simulcast a remake of the saga of Kunta Kinte, an African who was captured, shipped to America and sold into slavery to work on a Virginia plantation.

LeVar Burton, who portrayed Kinte in the original, will co-executive produce the new miniseries.

Read the full article.

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Rhode Island Historic Records Kept on a Floodplain.

The following excerpt is from an extensive article – with video footage & photographs – posted April 30, 2015 at the wrpi.com website.

Rhode-Island-Archives-Wet-300pw

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) – Some of Rhode Island’s most important and historic records are just a power outage away from damage and destruction.

Rhode Island is the only state in the nation that does not have a permanent location for their state archives, according to the Secretary of State’s office. The leased office space that currently houses centuries of state law, historic blue prints, birth and death records, even the state’s copy of the Bill of Rights, are located in a building that lies in a floodplain.

A Target 12 review of payments reveals the state pays $248,000 a year in rent to Paolino Properties, a real estate company owned by former Providence Mayor Joespeh Paolino. The archives were moved to the Providence location from the State House in 1990.

In all the state has paid $5.4 million in rent since that time.

Read the full article.

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So James Bond Isn’t from Britain After All?

The following teaser is from an article posted April 30, 2015 at the Daily Mail website.

Daniel-Craig-200pw

It’s the kind of genealogical puzzle that James Bond himself would have been satisfied to solve.

Researchers have discovered that 007 star Daniel Craig has a rather more exotic heritage than the fictional Englishman he plays on screen.

Records reveal that the actor’s ancestors are French and that he comes from a long line of distinguished clergymen and adventurers.

Read the full article.

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2015 Excellence-in-Writing Competition – Open for Entries

The following press release is from Tina Sansone with ISFHWE:

ISFHWE-Logo-200pw

May 1, 2015 – The International Society of Family History Writers and Editors (ISFHWE) is reminding writers IN ALL MEDIA (magazines, newspapers, journals, websites, blogs) that the 2015 Excellence-in-Writing Competition is now open for entries through 15 June 2015.

The International Society of Family History Writers & Editor’s “Excellence in Writing” competition has a few more weeks before the June 15, 2015 deadline. Please submit your entries for your chance to win and showcase your work. Winning articles will appear in ISFHWE’s quarterly, “Columns”, win a cash prize and certificate. We need entries for Categories 4 & 5, but all categories are open. For more information, please visit http://isfhwe.org/writing2015.php. Competition is open to both members and non-members of ISFHWE. For more information, please contact Tina Sansone at famhistorywriter@gmail.com. We look forward to seeing your submission soon!

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Greencastle, Indiana Letters & Photos Donated to Library by the Anniston, Alabama Salvation Army

Photo-Greencastle-Indiana-Child

The following teaser is from an excellent article posted April 29, 2015 at the Bannergraphic.com website:

A woman from Alabama drove more than 500 miles last week to donate boxes of letters from people that have been laid to rest in Forest Hill Cemetery for several decades.

Trish Robart hand-delivered more than a half dozen boxes of old letters, diaries and scrapbooks dating back to the early 1800s to the Putnam County Library [Greencastle, Indiana] Saturday on behalf of the Anniston, Ala., Salvation Army.

Robart and PCPL Head of Local History and Genealogy Anthony Barger met Saturday morning to go through the items for donation. She credited Bert and Cristi Lind, who are in charge at the Salvation Army where she works, for allowing her to go through the documents and ultimately make the donation.

Read the full article.

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