German Census Records 1816-1916

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After wondering for several years why American researchers know very little about German census records, my good friend, Dr. Roger Minert, found an opportunity a few months ago to live in Europe for six months to investigate them. He was sure that many existed, but he could find very little information about them. While in Europe, he learned that even German researchers know very little about their census records! In fact, while visiting dozens of archives, on several occasions, Roger found that when asked about census records, he was told there weren’t any. Checking the card catalogs, within minutes Roger found found numerous census records. How could such a potentially important resource be lost to obscurity? In his new book, researchers can now learn where and when German census records were compiled, as well as why and how. The author also describes state by state the content of the census records and explains how surviving census documents can be located. This is groundbreaking information, of enormous value to anyone researching their German roots.

Would you like additional information about your family in old country? The information found in the parish registers is key to your research, but there’s often even more family information to be found in the German census records. It requires some research, but it’s certainly worth the time, as you may locate documents that will tell you much about your family.

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource is available for immediate shipment.

This book is also available in a hardbound edition. Click on this link to be directed to that page at the FPRC website.

The following Table of Contents is found in the volume:

  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: A History of Census Records in the German States
  • Chapter 2: The Census of 1867: The Great Transition
  • Chapter 3: Census Records during the German Empire 1871-1918
  • Chapter 4: Census Records in the German States from 1816 to 1864
  • Chapter 5: Anhalt
  • Chapter 6: Baden
  • Chapter 7: Bayern [Bavaria]
  • Chapter 8: Brandenburg
  • Chapter 9: Braunschweig [Brunswick]
  • Chapter 10: Bremen (Hansestadt Bremen)
  • Chapter 11: Elsaß-Lothringen {Alsace-Lorraine]
  • Chapter 12: Hamburg (Hansestadt Hamburg)
  • Chapter 13: Hannover [Hanover]
  • Chapter 14: Hessen [Hesse]
  • Chapter 15: Hessen-Nassau [Hesse-Nassau]
  • Chapter 16: Hohenzollern
  • Chapter 17: Lippe
  • Chapter 18: Lübeck (Hansestadt Lübeck) [Luebeck]
  • Chapter 19: Mecklenburg-Schwerin
  • Chapter 20: Mecklenburg-Strelitz
  • Chapter 21: Oldenburg
  • Chapter 22: Ostpreußen [East Prussia]
  • Chapter 23: Pommern [Pomerania]
  • Chapter 24: Posen
  • Chapter 25: Reuß älterer Linie [Reuss Elder Line]
  • Chapter 26: Reuß jüngere Linie [Reuss Younger Line]
  • Chapter 27: Rheinprovinz [Rhineland Province]
  • Chapter 28: Sachsen-Altenburg [Saxe-Altenburg]
  • Chapter 29: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 30: Königreich Sachsen [Kingdom of Saxony]
  • Chapter 31: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 32: Provinz Sachsen [Province of Saxony]
  • Chapter 33: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach [Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach]
  • Chapter 34: Schaumburg-Lippe
  • Chapter 35: Schlesian [Silesia]
  • Chapter 36: Schleswig-Holstein
  • Chapter 37: Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
  • Chapter 38: Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
  • Chapter 39: Waldeck
  • Chapter 40: Westfalen [Westphalia]
  • Chapter 41: Westpreußen [West Prussia]
  • Chapter 42: Württemberg [Wuerttemberg]
  • Chapter 43: German Census Records from 1816-1916: What Do We Know Now?
  • Chapter 44: Conclusions
  • Appendix A: Writing to Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
  • Appendix B: Conducting Census Research in Archives in Germany, France and Poland
  • Appendix C: Interesting Documents Relating to German Census Campaigns
  • Appendix D: The States of Germany in 1871
  • Bibliography
  • Index

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource; by Roger P Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2016; 260 pp; 8.5×11; Softbound; ISBN: 9781628590777; Item #: FR0650.

The following reviews might be of interest:

What a happy ending! After all these years, family historians are no longer discouraged by futile searches into that formerly hidden and unorganized body of German censuses. Let’s sit back and listen to the cheers –from both sides of the water!
Shirley J. Riemer, author of “German Research Companion” and editor of “Der Blumenbaum”

Dr. Minert’s stupendous work has opened up a new world for German researchers.  No longer must one lament that census records are inaccessible or even “non-existent.”   He has made census records known and accessible.  All German genealogists should have this book and make it a standard reference in their research. Dr. Fritz Juengling, Research Specialist, Family History Library

This is truly a groundbreaking work! Roger Minert refutes the conventional knowledge that censuses were not taken in most German lands, with numerous examples proving that they do exist. He not only describes censuses taken in the German Empire, state by state, but gives pointers on where to obtain them. This opens a whole new realm to explore. Ernest L. Thode, author and lecturer in Germanic family history

Das Werk macht Historiker wie Genealogen auf vielfach völlig unbekannte Quellen aufmerksam, die zwischen 1816 und 1916 für das gesamte spätere Gebiet des ehemaligen Deutschen Reiches (1871 – 1916) und davor abdecken. Mit anderen Worten die Zeit nach dem Wiener Kongress bis zur Mitte des Ersten Weltkrieges. Ein unglaublich wertvoller Schatz für die Forschungen des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts. Roger Minert führt ein in die historische Entwicklung und Gestalt der Volkszählungsakten. Roger Minert hat damit Neuland betreten, das er sich angeschickt hat, zu vermessen. Ein großer Schritt für die Genealogie in Deutschland. Er gibt damit Anstoß und ermutigt, diese Quellen auszuwerten und Interessierten zugänglich zu machen.“ Dirk Weissleder, Vorsitzender der Deutschen Arbeitsgemeinschaft genealogischer Verbände e. V. (DAGV) [Translation below]

This book draws the attention of historians and genealogists to almost totally unknown resources. This is an amazing treasure for research in the German Empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Roger Minert introduces researchers to the development and nature of census records and he encourages us to seek out and utilize those records. This is a gigantic step for genealogy in Germany. Dirk Weissleder, President of the Federation of German Genealogy Societies

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource; by Roger P Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2016; 260 pp; 8.5×11; Softbound; ISBN: 9781628590777; Item #: FR0650.

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