644,000 New Records & Newspaper Articles At FindMyPast

The following is from the June 26, 2015 FindMyPast Friday Announcement at FindMyPast:

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Australia Convict ships 1786-1849

Containing over 188,000 records, Australia Convict ships 1786-1849 date back the ships of First Fleet and include the details of some of the earliest convict settlers in New South Wales. These records are made up of five separate sets of musters and indents held by the the State Records Authority of New South Wales. They do not cover every convict who arrived in Australia on those early ships as many have been lost or scattered to other places. Indents records were used in the early settlements to keep track of the convict population while musters lists of who was on board a ship were taken at the port of embarkation.

Each record contains a transcript and a black and white image of original documents. Indents can include a variety of information about individual convicts such as their native place, details of their offence and sentence, a physical description and details of their family members. Musters usually only give a name, date and place of trial and sentence. Musters were also taken after disembarkation.

Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867

Containing almost 27,000 records, the Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867 list the details of convicts who built new lives in New South Wales. The records list the details of pardons by the Governor and date back to the earliest days of the colony. Pardons were generally handed out to convicts serving life sentences but in the earliest years of the colony the Governor had the power to grant both free and conditional pardons as rewards for good behavior, for special skills or for carrying out special duties or tasks. Conditional pardons meant that a convict was free as long as they stayed within the colony, known as “Government limits”. Most convicts received a conditional pardon. Absolute pardons meant that a convict’s sentence was completely remitted. They were free with no conditions and could move beyond the limits of the colony or even return to Britain.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of original documents. As well as listing the names of pardoned convicts, the records also include the name of the ship they arrived on, the term of the sentence they served , any additional notes, and details of their release.

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851 contains over 26,000 records. Convicts in Australian penal colonies were actually encouraged to marry as Governors believed that marriage and family life were good for both the morality and stability. Convicts who did marry could apply for tickets of leave or pardons as well as assistance in establishing a household. In the early years of the colonies, many convicts married even if they had wives or husbands back home. The Governor had to give permission before any marriage could take place and copies of the banns would be sent by the local clergy to the Colonial Secretary.

Each record contains a transcript as well as an image of the original document. The registers list the convict’s name, the name of their spouse, their profession and the length of their sentence as well as the sip they arrived on and when they were given their freedom. Some approved marriages did not go ahead so you might find more than one successful application for your ancestor.

Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1960

Over 7,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1948. The new additions are taken from the Central Register of Female Prisoners, held by the Public Record Office Victoria. The register kept a record of prisoners that passed through Pentridge prison in Coburg, Victoria. Pentridge was built in 1850 and was the central prison in the Melbourne region from about 1860. Each record includes a transcripts and scanned image of the original registers and many include mug shot photographs of individual’s prisoners.

They list fascinating details about not only the prisoners’ offences, sentences and incarceration, but also biographical information such as their name, date of birth, country of origin and occupation. Remarks on the register may also include the name of the ship on which the prisoner arrived if they were not born in Australia.

Sligo Workhouse Admission and Discharge Registers 1848-1859

Containing of over 9,000 records, the Sligo workhouse registers 1848-1859 consist of handwritten registers taken by the Sligo Union workhouse, one of three workhouses in the County Sligo. Levels of poverty in Ireland were far higher than in England and the workhouse was often an inescapable part of life that would have touched many, if not most Irish families. They were designed for the most destitute of the poor who could not support themselves. Conditions were harsh and inhuman. Inmates were stripped of their dignity, they were no longer a person but instead a pauper inmate.

The records pre-date civil registration and will be valuable resource to those with Sligo ancestors given the lack of 19th century census material available in Ireland. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document. The registers list the names of new arrivals and details including their age, occupation, religion, any illnesses or infirmities, family members, local parish, their condition on arrival (usually describing clothes or cleanliness) and when they were discharged or died.

Clare Poor Law Unions Board Of Guardians Minute Books

Containing over 63,000 records, the Clare Board of Guardian Books were taken from the Kilrush and Ennistymon unions, two of eight poor law unions located in County Clare. The minute books recorded weekly reports on the number of inmates, new arrivals, births, deaths and discharges. They also recorded expenditures including food supplies and salaries as well as the number of inmates receiving medical treatments.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of the original handwritten minutes. The amount of information contained in the image can be considerable. The minute books recorded what was said at each meeting of the Board of Guardians, including correspondence and contracts but also individual cases that came before the Board. These include the day-to-day running of the workhouses, disciplinary matters concerning both staff and inmates, individual case histories, foundling children’s fostering and upkeep and the hiring of foster mothers and wet nurses.

Irish newspaper update

Over 308,000 new articles have been added to our collection of historic Irish Newspapers. Substantial additions have been made to Saunder’s News-Letter, a title that dates all the way back to 18th century Ireland and now contains nearly 950,000 fully searchable articles.

The entire collection now covers over 175 years of Irish history (1748-1924) and contains over 9.1 million articles from 72 national, local and regional titles from every province and major city in Ireland.

North West Kent Baptisms

Nearly 2,000 new records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish baptisms. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the parish of Southfleet.

Each baptism includes a transcript of the original parish record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the child’s name, date of birth, date of baptism, place of baptism, mother’s name, father’s name, father’s occupation, residence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Marriages

Over 500 records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish marriages. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Southfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original marriage record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most transcripts will include the couple’s names, date of marriage, place of marriage, marital status, whether they were married by banns or licence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Burials

Over 1,500 burial records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish records. These new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Sothfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original burial record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the deceased’s name, burial date, place of burial, residence, age at death, description and any additional notes.

Prisoners of War 1715-1945

Over 71,000 fascinating Prisoner of War records containing the details of American soldiers captured during the War of 1812 have just been released in partnership with the National Archives. The new records form the second phase of the wider Prisoners of War 1715-1945 collection, the first phase of which was launched in April with the release of over 43,000 World War 1 records. The records are taken from British Foreign Office, Colonial Office, Admiralty and Air Force papers held by the National Archives.

The latest additions record the details of Danish, French, Prussian and American prisoners captured by British Forces during the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. They reveal when and where they were captured, where they were held and many include full physical descriptions such as hair, colour eye colour, build, complexion and any distinguishable marks. Records were also kept of their provisions and the supplies they received for example blankets, clothing, beds, etc. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original handwritten document. The amount of information in each record can vary depending on the type of document and the amount of detail recorded at the time of the event.

British Newspapers

Over 2.8 million new searchable articles have been added to our collection of historic British Newspapers. The latest additions include 3 brand new titles, the Cornish Times, Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, Tadcaster Post, and the General Advertiser for Grimstone, as well as substantial updates to 37 existing titles.

The total collection now stands at over 124 million articles and 341 unique titles, covering 245 years of British history (1710-1955).

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