New Databases at The Original Record in 2011

The following databases have been posted at The Original Record thus far in 2011:
The Original Record
1257 – Somerset Forest Pleas: Pleas of Somerton Warren
Forest pleas for the county of Somerset heard on the morrow of the feast of St Katherine in the 42nd year of the reign of king Henry III, 26 November 1257, recorded in Public Record Office Forest Proceedings, Treasury of Receipt, No. 152, were selected, transcribed (the Latin extended) and translated by G. J. Turner and published by the Selden Society in 1901. The text and translation are printed on facing pages.

1269 – Rutland Forest Pleas
Pleas of the Venison in the county of Rutland heard at Oakham on the morrow of Midsummer Day in the 53rd year of the reign of king Henry III, 25 June 1269, recorded in Public Record Office Forest Proceedings, Treasury of Receipt, No. 140, were selected, transcribed (the Latin extended) and translated by G. J. Turner and published by the Selden Society in 1901. The text and translation are printed on facing pages.

1270 – Somerset Forest Pleas: Pleas of Somerton Warren
Forest pleas for the county of Somerset heard at Ilchester on the morrow of Ascension Day in the 54th year of the reign of king Henry III, 23 May 1270, recorded in Public Record Office Forest Proceedings, Treasury of Receipt, No. 153, were selected, transcribed (the Latin extended) and translated by G. J. Turner and published by the Selden Society in 1901. The text and translation are printed on facing pages.

1288-1303 – King’s Ripton (Huntingdonshire) Court Rolls
Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of King’s Ripton or Ripton Regis. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a set of rolls (Portf. 23, No. 94) includes records of the manor courts of 5 March 1288, 19 March 1288, 12 April 1288, 3 May 1288, 24 May 1288, 28 July 1293, 21 June 1294, 12 July 1294, 2 August 1294, 23 August 1294, 13 September 1294, 4 October 1294, 25 October 1294, 15 November 1294, 6 December 1294, 3 January 1295, 24 January 1295, a court in early 1295 of which the date is now missing, 16 December 1295, 19 March 1296, 29 April 1297, 13 July 1301, 12 January 1302 and 1 August 1303. Extracts from these were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone.

1290 – Gidding Court Rolls
Among the Huntingdonshire possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor of Gidding. In the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of five rotulets (Portf. 34, No. 46) includes a record of the proceedings at Gidding view of frankpledge 28 November 1290. These were transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone.

1293-1295 – Broughton, Huntingdonshire, Court Rolls
Among the possessions of Ramsey abbey was the manor or honor of Broughton in Huntingdonshire. Among the Augmentation Office Court Rolls in the Public Record Office, a roll of six rotulets (Portf. 5, No. 29) records the business of the manor court from 19 May 1293 to 11 January 1295. This was transcribed by F. W. Maitland, extending the Latin but retaining the spelling of the proper names, and printed with a facing English translation in 1889. In many cases the surnames were also Englished, but we have reindexed the text on the original forms alone.

1381 – Hinckford hundred, Essex, Poll Tax
Charles Oman transcribed and edited the poll tax returns for Hinckford (Public Record Office Lay Subsidy Essex 107/68) for his study of the peasants’ rising of 1381. Full lists of adults are given, township by township, grouped by status or occupation. There are returns for Alhamston & Buris (Alphamstone and Bures), Bewchamp Oton (Belchamp Otten), Bumstede ad Turrim (Steeple Bumpstead), Felstede (Felstead), Fynchyngfelde (Finchingfield), Gelham Parva (Little Yeldham), Gosfeld (Gosfield), Hythingham Sibill (Sible Hedingham), Ovyton (Ovington), Pentelowe (Pentlow), Salyng Magna (Great Saling), Stebbyng (Stebbing), and Sturmer.

1453-1454 – Shaftesbury Abbey Court Roll
The roll (Shaftesbury Borough Archives B 6) of the courts of the fees of the barony of Shaftesbury (held by the Abbey of Shaftesbury) for the 32nd year of the reign of king Henry VI, of four membranes, contains the record of the 17 three-weekly courts from 17 October 1453 to 18 September 1454. The jurisdiction of the court included the bailiwicks of Bradford and Tisbury in Wiltshire, and Hanleigh and Kingston (Purbeck) in Dorset. The text from 17 October 1453 to 20 February 1454 was edited and published by Charles Herbert Mayo in 1890 to 1891.

1591-1621 – Worcestershire Quarter Sessions
J W Willis Bund compiled this abstract of surviving records from the Worcestershire quarter session rolls for the Records and Charities Committee of the Worcestershire County Council. This text, extending as far as 1621, was published in 1899: the entries are arranged by year under the headings Recognizances, Indictments, and Miscellaneous.

1609 – Towcester Rental
This rental of the manor of Towcester in Northamptonshire for 25 March 1609 was printed in 1890. The total rent roll, amounting to £92 17s 10d, includes some properties in Abthorpe, Burcote, Grimscote, Alderton, Wappenham and Caldecote.

1686 – Soldiers in Kilmainham Hospital
Kilmainham Hospital was established under a charter of 26 November 1684 for the ‘reception and entertainment’ of ancient, maimed and infirm soldiers.’ This list of men in the hospital as of 20 November 1686 survived among the Marquis of Ormonde’s manuscripts preserved at Kilkenny, and was printed in 1895.

1670 – State Papers Colonial: America and the West Indies
The State Papers Colonial Series, America and West Indies, 1669 to 1674, preserved in Her Majesty’s Public Record Office, were edited by W. Noel Sainsbury, Assistant Keeper of the Public Records, and published under the direction of the Master of the Rolls and with the sanction of Her Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Colonial Department in 1889. Some external material, particularly from the Shaftesbury Papers, was included in this compilation. There is material relating to Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Carolina (including Albemarle Point), Florida, Jamaica, Maine, New Providence, Newfoundland, New York, Rhode Island, Somers Islands (Bermudas), St Christopher’s and the other Leeward Islands, Surinam and Virginia.
The papers for 1670 also include a survey of Jamaica. Over 200,000 acres of land in Jamaica had been granted out to a total of 717 families: the Governor, sir Thomas Modyford, transmitted this survey ‘by the extraordinary diligence of his Majesty’s Receiver-General’, listing patentees by parish, giving full name and acreage, to Secretary of State sir Henry Bennet, the Earl of Arlington, 23 September 1670. The population of these rural areas was calculated at 11,898; there being, in addition, about 3,300 persons in the towns of Port Royal and St Jago.

1703 – Worcestershire Freeholders
In 1873 H. Sydney Grazebrook published this transcript of ‘an old MS. in the possession of R. F. Tomes, esq., of Weston, near Stratford-upon-Avon. The manuscript is “A True and perfect List of the Christian Names, Surnames, Addic’ons and places of abode of all persons within the County of Worcester who are betweene the Age of One and Twenty Yeares and the age of Seaventy Yeares who have, in their owne Names or in Trust for them, within this County of Worcester, Ten pounds pr Annu’ of freehold or Copyhold Lands, or of Lands of Ancient Demesne, or in rents in fee Simple, fee Tayle, or for their owne or some other person’s Life, as they are returned by the severall Cheife Conbles. and Petty Conbles. within this County att the Generall quarter Sessions of the Peace for the said County of Worcester, the fifth day of October, Annoq. D’ni 1703, and adjourned to the 25th day of October following, pursuant to an Act of Parliament intituled “An Act for the Ease of Jurors”.’ We have ind
exed the whole of the text, constablewick by constablewick. Usually the lists give full name, but only occasionally is occupation stated.

1714 – Persons Insured by the Sun Fire Office, London
This list of the 2,500 persons insured by the Sun Fire Office, London, gives full name (surname first), occupation (in italics), and the letter g (for goods) or h (for house) indicating the nature of their policy. Those with more than one g or h, have so many policies. An appendix lists those entered since, and omitted in printing the list, which was published in instalments from February to March 1714. The great majority of the policies were taken out by London tradesmen insuring against loss of their stock.

1720 – Prisoners for Debt
Notices by persons imprisoned for debt in Chester, Durham, Exeter, Halton, Lancaster, Oxford, Richmond, Ruthin, Southampton, Whitechapel and Worcester, (5876), 9-12 August 1720, of their intention to apply for discharge, pursuant to the Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors. The notices give full name, previous residence, and occupation.

1724 – City of London Poll
A list of the members of the several London livery companies that polled for Edward Bellamy esquire to be sheriff for the city of London and county of Middlesex for the remaining part of the year, published 16 March 1724. Full names are given, surname first, arranged roughly alphabetically by company: Apothecaries, Armourers & Braziers, Bakers, Barbers & Surgeons, Blacksmiths, Bowyers, Brewers, Broiderers, Butchers, Carpenters, Clothworkers, Coachmakers, Cooks, Coopers, Cordwaines, Curriers, Cutlers, Distillers, Drapers, Dyers, Farriers, Fishmongers, Funders, Framework Knitters, Fruiterers, Girdlers, Glaziers, Glass Sellers, Glovers, Goldsmiths, Grocers, Haberdashers, Innholders, Ironmongers, Joiners, Leather Sellers, Loriners, Masons, Mercers, Merchant Taylors, Musicians, Needle Makers, Painters & Stainers, Patten Makers, Pewterers, Plaisterers, Plumbers, Poulterers, Saddlers, Salters, Scriveners, Skinners, Stationers, Tallow Chandlers, Tilers & Bricklayers, Turners, Upholders, Vintners, Waxchandlers, and Weavers: we have indexed each separately.

1724-1728 – Macclesfield Hundred
Macclesfield Hundred court, held at Macclesfield every fourth Monday for the trial of civil causes, had jurisdiction over Bredbury, Brinnington, Bramhall, Fulshaw, Cheadle, Handforth, Dukinfield, Etchells, Hyde, Northenden, Romiley, Stockport, Werneth, Mottram (in Longdendale), Nether Alderley, Over Alderley, Birtles, Bollin Fee, Newton by Butley, Capesthorne, Chelford, Old Withington, Chorley, Eaton, Fallibroome, Henbury, Marton, Mottram St Andrew, Worth, Woodford, Pownall Fee, Snelson, Siddington, Somerford Booths, Lower Withington and Great Warford, all in east Cheshire. Whenever an action continued, through a series of writs or actual appearances, through subsequent sittings of the court, these were all entered on the same page, so that each is the full record of the particular action through to its conclusion. Some actions will have been settled ‘at the court door’, in which case nothing more is recorded than the names of plaintiff and defendant, the nature and value of
the action. Addresses and occupations are not usually given for plaintiff or defendant, but are stated for bail sureties. 27 January 10 George I 1724 to 30 September 2 George II 1728

1760-1765 – Convicted Criminals
When Joseph Redington, Assistant Keeper of the Public Records, calendared the Home Office papers from the accession of king George III, 25 October 1760, to the end of 1765, he gathered together references to criminals from the State Papers Domestic, Warrant Books, and Criminal Papers, and these were printed in tabular form. The information is set out in four sections: –
1. Letters to Judges: giving name of the judge; name of the convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; date; page.
2. Petitions in Favour: stating from whom; name of convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; object of petition (such as pardon or commutation); date.
3. Reports or Certificates of the Judges, chiefly addressed to the king, on the Cases of Criminals: with name of judge; name of criminal; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; condition of pardon.
4. Warrants and Letters relating to Criminals convicted, being Pardons, Respites &c.: with nature of document; name of convict; crime; sentence; where tried or confined; date; page.
In addition, there is a LIst of Capital Convicts in Newgate Respited in 1764.
The names of the criminals were not included in the printed index to the calendars, but we have now indexed them year by year.

1790 – Friends of the Establishment in Suffolk
On 23 February 1790 at Stowmarket ‘a very numerous and respectable Meeting of the Friends to the present Establishment in Church and State’ was held ‘to consider of the most effectual means for supporting our excellent Constitution’. Seven resolutions were passed, a key one being ‘That confining public employments and places of trust to persons professing the Established Religion, is expedient for the public good; as justice and reason naturally point out a preference to those subjects whose attachment to the constitution is perfect and unequivocal, rather than to those who comply in part only with the laws of this country’. Well over 200 subscribed, their names and the resolutions being subsequently published in several London and provincial newspapers. In some cases full names are given, in others just surnames with initials.

1791 – Unclaimed Dividends: Consolidated 3 Per Cent Annuities
In Spring 1791 this list was issued, of the ‘Names and Descriptions of the Proprietors of Unclaimed Dividends on the Public Funds Transferable at the Bank of England, Which became due before the 31st of December, 1780, and remained unpaid the 31st of December, 1790. With the Dates when the first Dividends respectively became payable, and the number of Dividends due thereon.’

1801 – Lincolnshire and Rutland Cottagers
In 1801 Robert Gourlay published the results of a detailed survey that he had made in person travelling from village to village in Lincolnshire and Rutland, examining the state of the cottagers in each parish. After a general description of the local agriculture, he listed the cottagers by name, and, where possible, recorded the acreage of their holdings, annual rent, the number of persons in each family, and their stock, giving numbers of cows, pigs, horses &c. There are returns from Appleby, Ashby cum Fenby, Aubourn, Barnetby le Wold, Belton, Bigby, Braunston, Burley, Cherry Willingham, Colsterworth, Croxton, Egleton, Empingham, Fillingham, Fiskerton, Glentworth, Grayingham, Great Limber, Greetham (Rutland), Hambleton, Harlaxton, Hemswell, Horbling, Humberstone, Ingham, Irby upon Humber, Keelby, Kirmington, Langham, Lyndon, Melton Ross, Normanby, Normanby in Burton, Osbournby, Owmby, Reepham, Riby, Roxby, Saxby, Scredington, Swallow, Winteringham and Wold Newton.

1807 – Bedfordshire Poll Book
A poll for two knights of the shire for the county of Bedford, was taken at Bedford from 11 to 22 May 1807, the candidates being Francis Pym esquire (1138 votes), the Rt Hon Richard Fitzpatrick (1084) and John Osborn esquire (1069). The poll book is arranged by hundred, and then by parish or township, giving the freeholders’ names, residence, ‘of what the freehold consists’ (e. g. H. & L. for house and land), the occupier, and the vote cast. Non-voters are not listed: but at the end of each hundred there is a list of rejected votes, giving full name of voter, situation of the property, ground of rejection, and candidates for whom the votes were tendered.

1807-1810 – Bankrupts: Dividends and Certificates
William Smith’s abstracts of bankruptcy certificates and dividends for England and Wales from December 1807 to 1810, referring to commissions taken out before December 1807. Each entry gives the year of the commission; the full name of the bankrupt, address, occupation, and the dates of dividends and certificate as appropriate.

1811 – Commanders of Calcutta Trading Vessels
The official list of trading vessels belonging to the port of Calcutta as of 31 December 1811 gives each vessel’s name, the name of the commander, tonnage, and (occasionally) where built.

1812 – Berkshire Poll Book
The poll of the freeholders of Berkshire on an election of two representatives in Parliament, taken at Abingdon on Monday 12 October 1812 and fourteen following days. The candidates were Charles Dundas esquire (D: 1717 votes), the Hon. Richard Neville (N: 1374), and William Hallett esquire (H: 525). This poll book sets out the names of the voters in alphabetical order parish by parish. After the name of the parish or township, the name of the hundred in which it lay is given in italics. The freeholders’ full names are stated, surname first, and the place of their abode (often elsewhere). The right hand column records their votes. The qualification for suffrage in the counties was the possession of a freehold estate worth more than 40s a year.

1820-1823 – Vagrants in Berkshire
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Berkshire includes lists of vagrants committed to the Gaol and House of Correction of the Borough of Newbury, and to the Gaol of the Borough of New Windsor. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c.

1820-1823 – Vagrants in Cornwall
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Cornwall includes lists of vagrants committed to the Prison in Falmouth, and to the Prison and House of Correction at Penzance. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c.

1820-1823 – Vagrants in Derbyshire
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Derbyshire includes lists of vagrants committed to the County House of Correction at Derby, the House of Correction at Tideswell, and the House of Correction for the borough of Derby. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c.

1820-1823 – Vagrants in Devon
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Devon includes lists of vagrants committed to Bideford Prison, the Prisons and Houses of Correction for the Town of Great Torrington, and the Gaol at Southmolton. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c.

1822-1823 – Vagrants in Cumberland
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Cumberland includes a list of vagrants committed to the House of Correction at Whitehaven. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c.

1826 – Teachers in Cavan Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 21 such teachers were identified in county Cavan in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Carlow Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 15 such teachers were identified in county Carlow in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in Donegal Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 38 such teachers were identified in county Donegal in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Dublin Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 33 such teachers were identified in county Dublin in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Fermanagh Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 32 such teachers were identified in county Fermanagh in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Londonderry Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 62 such teachers were identified in county Londonderry in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Monaghan Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 14 such teachers were identified in county Londonderry in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1826 – Teachers in County Tyrone Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 93 such teachers were identified in county Tyrone in 1826, and are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1831 – Buckinghamshire Poll Book
The poll of the freeholders of Buckinghamshire at the election of two knights of the shire to serve in Parliament, taken at Aylesbury 5, 6, 7 and 9 May 1831. The candidates were the Marquis of Chandos, John Smith esquire, and Pascoe Grenfell esquire. This poll book sets out the names of the voters in alphabetical order hundred by hundred and parish by parish. The freeholders’ full names are stated, surname first, and the place of their abode (often elsewhere). The right hand column records their votes. The qualification for suffrage in the counties was the possession of a freehold estate worth more than 40s a year.

1831-1832 – Patentees of New Inventions
Lists of patents granted from 20 September 1831 to 20 March 1832: giving full name of the patentee, address and occupation; a brief description of the innovation, period of protection, and date of grant.

1834 – Merchants, Bankers, Shipowners and Traders of London
The public prints of December 1834 carried this loyal address to king William IV of merchants, bankers, shipowners, traders and others connected with the city of London, requesting ‘permission at the present juncture to address your Majesty for the purpose of renewing the expression of our dutiful and loyal attachment to your Majesty’s person and crown. Deeply sensible of the practical blessings we have hitherto enjoyed under our wisely mixed constitution of King, Lords, and Commons, and feeling that the free and legitimate exercise of the Royal prerogative forms an integral part of that constitution (as essential to the maintenance of our own liberties as to the power and dignity of the Throne), we beg humbly to assure your Majesty of our determination steadfastly to uphold the same by every means in our power.
‘Feeling, in common with all classes of your Majesty’s subjects, the deep importance of applying to all real abuses, wherever they may be found, a wholesome and timely correction, and of effecting in our excellent institutions every improvement of which careful examination and experience may prove them to be susceptible, we desire further dutifully to express our entire confidence that these useful purposes will ever occupy your Majesty’s paternal care. Nor can we permit ourselves to believe that the importance of these objects will be less apparent to those to whom the powers of government have been recently intrusted.’
Full names are given (or surname with initials), and address. Over 5000 subscribed.

1836 – Westminster Bridge, Deptford and Greenwich Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Westminster Bridge, Greenwich and Deptford Railway, subscribers of Ł388,550 towards the Ł665,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, place of abode, quality or calling, witness’s name, number of shares, amount of subscription, and deposit paid.

1836-1837 – Patentees of New Inventions
Lists of English patents granted from 22 September 1836 to 27 March 1837: giving full name of the patentee, address and occupation; a brief description of the innovation, period of protection, and date of grant.

1837 – City Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in The City Railway, subscribers of £437,550 for 8,751 shares towards the £850,490 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, place of abode, profession or calling, number of shares, sum subscribed, and witness’s name.

1837 – Bath & Weymouth Great Western Union Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Bath and Weymouth Great Western Union Railway, subscribers to shares amounting to Ł517,800 towards the Ł771,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, address, designation (occupation), number of shares, and amount subscribed.

1837 – Birmingham, Bristol & Thames Junction Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Birmingham, Bristol & Thames Junction Railway, subscribers to 2,781 shares amounting to Ł55,620 towards the Ł105,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, address, designation (occupation), number of shares, amount of subscription, and witness’s name.

1837 – Chester Junction Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Chester Junction Railway, subscribers to shares amounting to Ł216,850 towards the Ł371,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, residence, addition (occupation), number of shares, sums subscribed, and witness’s name.

1837 – Chester & Crewe Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the 187 shareholders in the Chester and Crewe Railway, who between them had subscribed £191,500 for 3,830 shares, towards the £240,000 estimated expenses of the project. The list gives full name, residence, addition (i. e. occupation), number of shares and sum subscribed.

1837 – Devizes and Melksham Great Western Branch Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Devizes and Melksham Great Western Branch Railway, subscribers to 280 shares amounting to £28,000 towards the £55,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, address, designation (occupation), number of shares, and amount subscribed.

1837 – London, Shoreham and Brighton Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the 307 shareholders in the London, Shoreham and Brighton Railway, Without a Tunnel (Mills’s Line), who between them had subscribed £521,800 towards the £996,053 estimated expenses of the project. The list gives signature (i. e. full name), residence, addition (i. e. occupation), number of shares, sum subscribed, and the witnesses’ names.

1837 – Maryport and Carlisle Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the Maryport and Carlisle Railway, subscribers to shares towards the Ł180,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber (or surname with initials), number of shares, and value.

1837 – South Midlands County Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the South Midlands County Railway, subscribers to shares amounting to Ł605,200 towards the Ł1,100,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber, address, addition (occupation), number of shares, amount subscribed, and witness’s name.

1842-1849 – Prisoners in Reading Gaol for Contempt of Court
The return of prisoners imprisoned in Berkshire County Gaol at Reading for contempt of court gives full name; when committed; by what authority; cause of committal; and date of discharge.

1843 – The Phonographic Corresponding Society
The Phonotypic Journal, published weekly, contains lists of new members of the Phonographic Corresponding Society, alterations (such as changes of address), and lists of contributions to the Fund for purchasing a Phonotypic Fount. The lists of new members give full name (surname first) and address.

1845 – The Phonographic Corresponding Society
The Phonotypic Journal, published weekly, contains lists of new members of the Phonographic Corresponding Society, alterations (such as changes of address), and lists of contributions to the Phonographic Reformation Fund. The lists of new members give full name (surname first) and address. Members of the society agreed to correct the lessons of phonographic pupils through the post gratuitously: a duty not, however, incumbent on honorary members, marked in these lists with an asterisk.

1845 – Foreign Residents in China
The Chinese Repository for 1845 contains this alphabetical list of foreign residents in China, giving name (surname and christian name or initials) sometimes with the addition ‘& fam[ily]’, and italic abbreviations showing nationality (such as br for British, por for Portuguese, &c.), and where resident – a for Amoy, c for Canton, f for Fuchau, h for Hongkong, m for Macao, n for Ningpo, or s for Shanghai. ab means absent, and ‘in several instances the place of residence cannot be determined’.

1845-1847 – Merchant Seamen: Masters’ and Mates’ Certificates
The Board of Trade 19 April 1847 issued this list of all the masters and mates in the merchant service who had voluntarily passed an examination, and obtained certificates of qualification for the class against each assigned, under their regulations. The table gives the date of the certificate, name (usually in full), class of certificate, and usually gives age, present or last previous service (name and port of ship, sometimes stating in what capacity), number of register ticket (if any), and the name of the examining board.

1847 – Patentees of New Inventions
Lists of English patents granted from 15 January to 16 June 1847: giving full name of the patentee, address and occupation; a brief description of the innovation, period of protection, and date of grant. With lists of patents granted for Scotland 27 December 1846 to 22 May 1847; and Designs for Articles of Utility registered under 6 & 7 Vic. cap. 65, giving number in register, proprietor’s name and address, and subject of the design, 24 December 1846 to 17 June 1847.

1848 – Merchant Seamen: Masters’ and Mates’ Certificates
The Board of Trade 19 April 1848 issued this list of all the masters and mates in the merchant service who had voluntarily passed an examination, and obtained certificates of qualification for the class against each assigned, under their regulations. The table gives the full name, class of certificate, and usually gives age, present or last previous service (name and tonnage of ship, sometimes stating in what capacity), number of register ticket (if any), where examined and when.

1865 – Pharmacists
The annual list of Members, Associates and Apprentices of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain includes lists of London Members and Country Members (giving year of membership, number of certificate (if any), full name (surname first), and address: an asterisk indicates a Life Member); Associates admitted before 1 July 1842 (with full name, and where registered); Associates of the Society who had passed the Major Examination and were registered as Pharmaceutical Chemists, and Associates of the Society who had passed the Minor Examination and were registered as Assistants (year of admission, number of certificate, full name, and where registered); and Registered Apprentices (with date of registration, full name, residing with, and town).

1882 – Soldiers’ Balances Unclaimed
The War Office, under ‘The Regimental Debts Act, 1863’ compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1882 new lists CXLI to CL relating to recent deaths were issued, as well as republications of lists XCI to CL from previous years showing details of balances still remaining unclaimed.

1896 – Soldiers’ Balances Unclaimed
The War Office, under ‘The Regimental Debts Act, 1893’ compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1896 new lists CCLXXXI to CCXC relating to recent deaths, estates 1895-1896, were issued, as well as republications of lists CCLXXI to CCXL from previous years (estates 1890-1895) showing details of balances still remaining unclaimed.
A separate list of unclaimed estates of soldiers in India is arranged presidency by presidency, giving name, rank, regiment, and amount: an asterisk indicates that the sums were remitted by Administrators-General.

1905 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1905, refer to naturalizations from December 1904 to November 1905. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1906 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1906, refer to naturalizations from December 1905 to November 1906. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1907 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1907, refer to naturalizations from December 1906 to November 1907. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1908 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1908, refer to naturalizations from December 1907 to November 1908. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1909 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1909, refer to naturalizations from December 1908 to November 1909. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1910 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1910, refer to naturalizations from December 1909 to November 1910. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; and place of residence. An asterisk indicates that the person was currently serving in a British ship.

1910 – Soldiers’ Balances Unclaimed
The War Office, under ‘The Regimental Debts Act, 1893’ compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1910 new lists CCCCXXXI to CCCCXL relating to effects 1909-1910 were issued, as well as republications of lists CCCLXXX to CCCCXXX from previous years showing details of effects 1903-1909 still remaining unclaimed. In addition, List IV of Balances Due to Soldiers Discharged was issued (effects 1909-1910), as well as republication of Lists I to III for effects remaining unclaimed 1907-1909.

1914-1918 – London County Council Roll of Honour
The London County Council published a ‘Record of Service in the Great War 1914-1918 by Members of the Council’s Staff’ in 1922. This included a complete list, department by department, of the over 7000 staff who had served in the armed forces during the war, those dying while on active service being marked with an asterisk. The entries give full name, surname first, in bold, the years in uniform, any decorations, rank, and a brief description of theatre in which engaged.

1939 – Imperial Service Medal: On Retirement
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service on their retirement. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1939 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1940 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1941 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1942 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1943 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1944 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

The Original Records now has over 10 million hand-indexed entries directly available online, with a FREE unlimited search. User may purchase sets of scans, or buy open access to the surname(s) of their choice, including variants. See: www.theoriginalrecord.com

I have no affiliations with The Original Record. However, I try to let my readers know what’s new on the Internet for genealogists. Enjoy…

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