Genealogy Newsline Vol. 1 # 6

Genealogy Newsline – Vol 1 # 6 – Mar. 29, 2011
Edited by Leland K. Meitzler for Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This is the sixth edition of the FREE Genealogy Newsline. If you should get more than one newsletter, chances are we have more than one active email account in our database for you. My advice is to just scroll to the bottom of the duplicate newsletter, and click on “Unsubscribe.” That will get rid of the duplicate newsletter.

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CONTENTS OF THIS GENEALOGY NEWSLINE

Why Did I Receive This Genealogy Newsline?

Partly Personal

Free USA Shipping on Purchases of $25 or more at FRPC through April 5, 2011

New Wisconsin Probate Records Posted at FamilySearch.org

Going to Salt Lake City?

United States Birth & Christening Records at Posted at FamilySearch.org – The List

Finding My Second Great-Grandfather, William Canfield, in the Newspaper

Book Reviews & Announcements

  • Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era
  • Family Maps from Arphax Publishing – U.S.A. Land Ownership Maps
  • Google Earth for Genealogy Vol 1 – DVD
  • Google Earth for Genealogy Vol 2 – DVD
  • The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women’s Genealogy
  • The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox
  • Dating Old Photographs 1840-1929 on CD-ROM
  • More Dating Old Photographs 1840 -1929, THIRD EDITION
  • Chasing Women – Finding Your Female Ancestors – Webinar on CD-ROM
  • Google for Genealogists – Webinar on CD-ROM

Essential Books From Family Roots Publishing Company

Popular Books From Previous Genealogy Newslines

Events where Family Roots Publishing Co. LLC Will Exhibit in 2011

Going to Salt Lake City?

Check out Area-Info.net

Download a Free Issue of Family Chronicle Magazine

Subscribe/Unsubscribe

About the Genealogy Newsline

The Genealogy Newsline Archive

Changing a Password

Leland K. Meitzler Biography

Copyrights & Permissions

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WHY DID YOU RECEIVE THE GENEALOGY NEWSLINE?

You have received this email newsletter for one of the following reasons:

  • You are a Family Roots Publishing Company customer.
  • You signed up for the newsletter at the FamilyRootsPublishing.com website.
  • You wrote and asked to be added to the Genealogy Newsline list
  • You signed up for the newsletter at the Family Roots Publishing Company booth at a genealogy event.
  • Because until December of 2008 you were an Everton Newsline subscriber, Genealogical Helper subscriber, or had some other affiliation with Everton Publishers or the Everton.com website. More information about Everton.com is found near the end of this Genealogy Newsline

If you do not wish to receive the newsletter, you may Unsubscribe at any time by clicking on the link at the bottom of this newsletter.

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PARTLY PERSONAL
Gardening Season is Upon Us
It snowed several times here in Bountiful, Utah during the last week, but I have confidence that spring is going to get a chance. While the snow was clear for a couple days, I noticed that tiny green shoots of grass are pushing through the brown lawn that had to endure several months of being layered by the snow. Patty and I always look forward to spring. My grandfather George Meitzler spent most of his life as a farmer, and my father & mother (Theodore & Virginia Meitzler) operated greenhouses for about 35 years, raising everything from seasonal bedding plants to tropical foliage. I spent much of the earliest years of my life in a playpen perched on a greenhouse potting bench, and worked in the business for better than a decade before moving on to genealogy (you might say “from roots to roots”). I need to get a fence up, as last year we lost a lot of produce to the deer. Our grape vines don’t stand a chance. The deer eat the fresh foliage as soon as it makes an appearance. And there are a lot of deer! But we’re looking forward to planting and growing fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplant, squash and all such wonderful things.

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FREE USA SHIPPING ON ALL $25 OR MORE PURCHASES OF BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ORDERED AT THE FAMILY ROOTS PUBLISHING WEBSITE EXTENDED THROUGH TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2011.

Since we can’t exhibit at Springfield, Massachusetts, we’ve extended our FREE SHIPPING sale through April 5. Buy $25 or more in books, charts, forms, or supplies at the Family Roots Publishing Co. online bookstore before Midnight MDT April 5, 2011, and the items ship free. FREE SHIPPING is available for purchases with items being delivered within the United States. Click here to search or browse over 1000 genealogy-related guidebooks, atlases and charts. Regional guidebooks for most countries, American states, and Canadian provinces are located here! Guides on writing, and recording genealogy, photography, DNA research, genealogy dictionaries, computer use, immigration, migration, and on & on are found at the site!

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NEW WISCONSIN PROBATE RECORDS POSTED AT FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

Just after I sent out the last Newsline, FamilySearch.org post a large group of images for the Probate Records of four Wisconsin counties. You’ll find the link below.

Wisconsin, Probate Estate Files, 1848-1933 Imaged Records – No indexes yet – Images of probate estate case files from various counties in Wisconsin. This collection includes Green County (1848-1885), Pepin County (1900-1935), Shawano County (1861-1933) and Trempealeau County (1900-1920) – 347, 508 images as of 25 Mar 2011

I’ve added this Record Group to the long Family Search.org U.S. Death & Probate Record Listing at GenealogyBlog.com.

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THINKING OF GOING TO SALT LAKE CITY?

If you’re considering a research trip at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City NOW IS A GREAT TIME! The Salt Lake Plaza Hotel which is located next door to the Family History Library is offering special genealogy discounts for April and May 2011. Your discount will depend on the dates you reserve. They offer microwaves and refrigerators in every room, a full service restaurant, complimentary wireless hi-speed internet and a complimentary airport shuttle. Call them at 800-366-3684 or e-mail at admin@plaza-hotel.com and mention the Genealogy Newsline to receive your discount rate.

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UNITED STATES BIRTH & CHRISTENING RECORDS FOUND AT FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

The following listing is for United States Birth and Christening Records found at FamilySearch.org. The list covers 47 databases for 34 states, plus one relatively small database (abt. 21,000) covering the entire USA

Note that many of the “number of records” are marked as AFTER a specific date. That means that additional records, in some some cases tens of thousands, have been added since that date, which is the last one found on the site (with lower numbers). So if you haven’t checked one of these AFTER dated websites lately, and it’s important to you, take a minute to go check it out. If the record is listed “AS OF” a specific date, the number of records are really “as of” that date.

Alabama Births and Christenings, 1881-1930 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Alabama – 203,254 records after 6 May 2010

Arizona Births and Christenings, 1909-1917 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Arizona – 27,483 records after 27 Apr 2010

Arkansas Births and Christenings, 1880-1893 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Arkansas – 11,724 records – after 27 Apr 2010

Connecticut Births and Christenings, 1649-1906 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Connecticut – 548,635 records after 6 May 2010

Delaware Births and Christenings, 1710-1896 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Delaware – 24,010 records as of 27 Dec 2010

Delaware State Birth Records, 1861-1922Imaged Records – Name index and images of state birth records, 1861-1922, including delayed birth records – 121,234 records as of 4 May 2010

District of Columbia Births and Christenings, 1830-1955 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the District of Columbia – 121,224 records after 27 Apr 2010

Florida Births and Christenings, 1880-1935 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Florida – 28,301 records after 27 Apr 2010

Hawaii Births and Christenings, 1852-1933 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Hawaii – 150,992 records after 27 Apr 2010

Idaho Births and Christenings, 1856-1965 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Idaho – 75,881 records after 27 Apr 2010

Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878-1922 Imaged Records – Name index and images of certificates of birth as recorded at Cook County, Illinois – including the City of Chicago – 1,431,946 Imaged records as of 6 Apr 2010

Illinois, Cook County Birth Registers, 1871-1915Imaged records – Name index and images of birth registers as recorded at Cook County, Illinois – including the City of Chicago – 962,115 records as of 6 May 2010

Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1729-1956Imaged Records currently Browsable by Parish – unindexed – Records are found for the following 26 counties: Alexander, Clay, Clinton, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Lawrence, Marion, Massac, Monroe, Perry, Pulaski, Randolph, Richland, Saline, St. Clair, Union, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, White, and Williamson. Images of parish registers recording the events of baptism, first communion, confirmation (to 1907), marriage (to 1930) or death (to 1956) in the Diocese of Belleville (Illinois), Roman Catholic Church – 34,135 images as of 13 Nov 2010

Iowa Births and Christenings, 1830-1950 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Iowa – 1,778,058 records as of 6 May 2010

Kansas Births and Christenings, 1818-1936 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Kansas – 59,392 records after 27 Apr 2010

Kentucky Births and Christenings, 1839-1960 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Kentucky – 547,117 records after 13 Dec 2010>

Louisiana Births and Christenings, 1811-1830; 1854-1934 – Name index to birth, baptism, and christening records from the state of Louisiana – 16,890 records after 27 Apr 2010

Maine Births and Christenings, 1739-1900 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Maine – 940,882 records as of 27 Apr 2010

Maryland Births and Christenings, 1650-1995 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Maryland – 206,288 records after 27 Apr 2010

Massachusetts Births and Christenings, 1639-1915 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Massachusetts – 4,643,200 records as of 16 Dec 2010

Massachusetts Births, 1841-1915Imaged Records – Name index and images of state birth records from 1841-1915. The registers of births are first arranged in volumes by year. Within the volumes the birth entries are arranged by town, then numerically by the number it was entered into the registers. May include a few births for 1840 – 3,818,555 records as of 2 Feb 2011>/p>

Michigan Births and Christenings, 1775-1995 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Michigan – 1,631,193 records after 4 May 2010

Michigan Births, 1867-1902Imaged Records – Name index and images of Michigan statewide birth registration entries – 1,409,988 records as of May 2010

Minnesota Births and Christenings, 1840-1980 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Minnesota – 1,204,577 records as of 13 Dec 2010

Montana, Rosebud County RecordsBrowsable Images – Land records, vital records, voter lists and probate case files located at Rosebud County courthouse, Forsyth, Montana – 54,808 images as of 23, Mar 2011

New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900Imaged Records – Name index and images of New Hampshire birth records. Records consist of index cards that give the town and date of the event and often much more information. With the town and date, the original records can usually be located. Normally there is only one index card per child, but occasionally there is a corrected card before or after the original card – 480,354 records as of 23 Apr 2010

New Hampshire Births and Christenings, 1714-1904 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of New Hampshire – 404,459 records after 6 May 2010

New Jersey Births and Christenings, 1660-1980 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of New Jersey – 2,334,526 records after 6 May 2010

New Mexico Births and Christenings, 1726-1918 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of New Mexico – 435,411 records after 27 Apr 2010

New York Births and Christenings, 1640-1962 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of New York – 1,351,166 records after 27 Apr 2010

North Carolina Births and Christenings, 1866-1964 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of North Carolina – 156,155 records as of 16 Dec 2010

Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Ohio – 4,767,895 records as of 27 Apr 2010

Ohio, Diocese of Toledo, Catholic Parish Records, 1796-2004Browsable Imaged Records, Currently unindexed – Baptism Records are included. Images of parish registers recording the events of baptism, first communion, confirmation, marriage, and death in the Diocese of Toledo (Ohio), Roman Catholic Church. In addition to traditional parish registers, this collection includes miscellaneous cemetery records, Books of the Elect, Professions of Faith, Sick Call registers, etc. The following counties are found in the database: Allen, Crawford. Defiance. Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, Huron, Lucas, Ottawa, Paulding, Putnam, Richland, Sandusky, Seneca, Van Wert, Williams, Wood, and Wyandot. 101,982 images as of 26 Mar 2010

Oregon Births and Christenings, 1868-1929 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Oregon – 70,253 records after 27 Apr 2010

Rhode Island Births and Christenings, 1878-1914 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Rhode Island – 951,517 records after 7 May 2010

Tennessee Births and Christenings, 1828-1939 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Tennessee – 211,072 records after 7 May 2010

Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1934Digitized Records – Digital images and index of birth certificates for the state of Texas. Original records at the Vital Statistics Unit of the Texas Department of Health, Austin, Texas – 635,749 records as of 18 Mar 2011

Texas Births and Christenings, 1840-1981 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Texas – 560,870 records after 7 May 2010

Texas, Comanche County Records, 1858-1905Browsable Images – Not indexed yet – Records from Comanche County, Texas including births, marriages, divorce minutes, court records, probate records, and scholastic census records – 317,420 images as of 3 Mar 2011

Texas, Mills County Clerk Records, 1841-1985Browsable Imaged Records, currently unindexed as a full collection – Including births, marriages, deaths, court records, deed records, divorce records, naturalization records, probate records, and indexes for each of these record sets. 153,682 Images as of 9 Mar 2011

Utah Births and Christenings, 1892-1941 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Utah – 48,049 records after 27 Apr 2010

Vermont Births and Christenings, 1765-1908 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Vermont – 218,041 as of 13 Dec 2010

Vermont, Vital Records, 1760-1954Imaged Records – Name index and images (index cards) of town clerk transcriptions of births, marriages and deaths, 1760-1954. This collection is complete for years 1871-1908. As more data is received, the remaining year ranges will be incrementally updated – 721,132 records as of 23 Feb 2011

West Virginia Births and Christenings, 1853-1928 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of West Virginia – 54,589 records after 27 Apr 2010

West Virginia Births, 1853-1930 – Name index of West Virginia county birth records. Data is searchable for all counties. However, records within each county may not be available for the full year range – 1,051,545 records as of 27 Apr 2010

Wisconsin Births and Christenings, 1826-1926 – Name index to birth, baptism and christening records from the state of Wisconsin – 1,441,536 records as of 27 Dec 2010

United States Births and Christenings, 1867-1931 – Name index to small sets of birth, baptism and christening records from a few states within the United States – 20,946 records after 27 Apr 2010

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FINDING MY SECOND GREAT-GRANDFATHER, WILLIAM CANFIELD, IN THE NEWSPAPER

A while back, I was looking for information on my 2nd-great-grandfather, William Canfield. Honestly, I didn’t know a lot about him. But in searching for him at the GenealogyBank website, I found the most interesting letter to the editor – and it was written by MY William Canfield. Until I read this letter to the editor, published in the Albany Argus, and later the Otsego Herald, I didn’t even know that he was literate! William was a farmer, and he had a bit of farming information that he wanted to pass on to readers of the paper. Following is a transcription of his letter that was published in the Otsego Herald Feb 22, 1819:

“From the Albany Argus

Mr. Editor – As every thing relating to agriculture is read with great interest, please insert the following:

I sowed one bushel of flaxseed in the spring of 1817, on little more than an acre of ground corn stock land, pretty much worn down, and soil a sandy loam. I soaked the seed 12 hours in a strong lye made of potash, and then dried it with plaster. The crop was eighteen bushels of seed, and five hundred and ninety six pounds of excellent flax.

WILLIAM CANFIELD

Schodack, Feb 10, 1819.

Locating the letter was actually pretty easy, as I narrowed my search to one for specifically William Canfield, in New York State. The site gives snippet views of the data, with free searches allowing the user to see the snippets. This makes searching easy, and takes all the risk out of checking out the site prior to subscribing.

Huge Historical Newspaper Archive at GenealogyBank.com

One of the key sources for online newspapers is GenealogyBank.com. Featuring more than 4,600 U.S. newspapers with over 1 billion names from all 50 states, GenealogyBank is one of the most extensive online historical newspaper archives available anywhere, designed specifically for family history research. Over 95% of our newspaper content is exclusive to GenealogyBank. By providing access to rare and hard-to-find newspapers from 1690 to the present day, GenealogyBank gives researchers the opportunity to discover unique, long-forgotten information about their American ancestors.

Special Offer for Genealogy Newsline Readers – Join Now and Save Over 75%!
For a limited time, annual memberships are at their most affordable if you join before March 31st, 2010. For only $4.66 per month, you’ll save over 75% off the monthly rate and over $180 a year.

There’s never been a better time to explore your family history. You are just a few clicks away from fascinating facts and stories from your family’s past.
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Read this article at Genealogyblog.com, complete with illustrations.

FTC Statement

Full disclosure: I happen to be a big supporter of GenealogyBank.com. The site has been extremely useful to my own genealogy research, and I’ve purchased memberships for several years, finding things about my ancestors that I would never have found otherwise. I also have an affiliate relationship with GenealogyBank.com, and am proud to recommend their services to my readers.

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THE SALT LAKE CHRISTMAS TOUR

The Salt Lake Christmas Tour is known for having the highest ratio of consulting professional genealogists per attendee of any research tour to the Family History Library. Over 20 classes are offered during the week, as well as 6 days of professionally assisted research. Thomas MacEntee will also be lecturing and leading hands-on workshops throughout the week – 10 altogether. Join us for the 27th annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour – December 4 through 10, 2011. See: http://www.SaltLakeChristmasTour.com

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BOOK REVIEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

In this edition of the Genealogy Newsline, I am reviewing one book, one series of books, two DVDs and reprinting several reviews from earlier last issues.

GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES OF THE CIVIL WAR ERA – ONLINE AND PUBLISHED MILITARY OR CIVILIAN NAME LISTS, 1861-1869 & POST-CIVIL WAR VETERAN LISTS; by William Dollarhide; 2009; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp; Item # FR0113

Most genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. This volume by William Dollarhide identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories are identified within this book, with numerous resources listed for each category:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories

The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

  • Online Resources
  • Libraries & Archives
  • The various records are laid out in chronological order, complete with the Family History Library book or film numbers in most cases. Hundreds of online resources are also listed. All statewide lists are arranged alphabetically by state, and are then in chronological order. If you have Civil War era ancestors, this volume is sure to be of help in your research. It’s guaranteed to identify sources of information that you most likely never knew existed!

    Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era is available at the FRPC website, and can be purchased with FREE SHIPPING within the United States through Tuesday, April 5, 2011. In fact, all new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, will be shipped FREE. Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees.

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    FAMILY MAPS FROM ARPHAX PUBLISHING – U.S.A. LAND OWNERSHIP MAPS:
    Family Roots Publishing Co. has now posted detailed descriptions of the Arphax U.S.A. Land Ownership Atlases on our website. There are currently almost 500 atlases, for 22 the states. CLICK HERE to see an example description from Barry County, Missouri. The description are detailed – including a listing of the Surnames found on the maps in each county atlas! Look for your county Family Map Atlas under the State Category at the FRPC site.

    These wonderful atlases can be included in our free shipping sale going on until Midnight MDT, April 5, 2011.

    Patty and I love these atlases. Over the last couple of years, we’ve purchased atlases for virtually every ancestral county for which Greg had an atlas finished. And I know that we’re not alone. I’ve met many genealogists who love these maps just as much as we do. I think that you will too.

    The atlases are compiled by my friend, Greg Boyd. Because of Greg’s work, you will find that locating original landowners in patent maps has never been easier. Each volume in the Family Maps series contains newly created maps of original landowners (patent maps), gleaned from the indexes of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. And the volumes offer much more than that. For each township in the county, there are two additional maps accompanying the patent map: a road map and a map showing waterways, railroads, and both modern and many historical city-centers and cemeteries. what a wealth of information!

    Included are indexes to help you locate what you are looking for, whether you know a person’s name, a last name, a place-name, or a cemetery. The combination of maps and indexes are designed to aid researchers of American history or genealogy to explore frontier neighborhoods, examine family migrations, locate hard-to-find cemeteries and towns, as well as locate land based on legal descriptions found in old documents or deeds.

    The patent-maps are essentially plat maps, but instead of depicting owners for a particular year, these maps show original landowners, no matter when the transfer from the federal government was completed. You’ll find that dates of patents usually begin about the time of statehood and run down into the early 1900s.

    You may now obtain Land Ownership Atlases for the following states (the number following the state is how many county atlases are currently available). For the purposes of this review, I’ve only listed the number of county atlases available for each state in most cases. However, I’ve broken Michigan down to the county level, and given direct links to each of the 37 Michigan Atlases currently available.

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    GOOGLE EARTH FOR GENEALOGY – A Tutorial DVD Instructional Video; by Lisa Louise Cooke; 72 Minutes; 2010; Item # Lu02

    This 72-minute DVD tutorial video is made up of 7 video lessons, all taught by Lisa Louise Cooke, the producer and host of the internationally popular Genealogy Gems Podcast, an online genealogy audio show.

    Google Earth has the power to geographically document our ancestor’s lives. It’s one of the most exciting online genealogical tools now available. Best of all, it’s FREE!

    In this step-by-step tutorial series, the user will learn how to:

    • Download & Use Google Earth – Solve research mysteries using Google Earth’s 360-degree 3-dimensional method of viewing your ancestors’ world.
    • Identify Old Photos – Lisa goes into great detail in explaining how we can take old photographs and using census records, city directories and such, match them up with locations in Google Earth. This process can take several steps, using Google Earth, Street View, and overlaid Rumsey Maps.
    • Explore Church Record Origins – Locate the location and photographs of our ancestors’ churches. Use the “Places of Worship” feature in Google Earth, as well as aspects of Google Maps, and Google Images.
    • Plot Ancestor Homesteads – Use Google Earth along with the Bureau of Land Management’s GLO (General Land Office) website. At the GLO site, we will find 1820-1908 land patents for our ancestors. Lisa shows us how to convert the Township-Range information found at the GLO site to Latitude & Longitude, then “fly” to the exact section of land, which will be outlined in purple. If Street View is available, you can use it to see the property itself, as well as nearby communities.
    • Create Historic Map Overlays – Lisa shows how we can take the information found in historic plat maps (see the review of Arphax atlases above) (and often found in old map atlases – usually produced by county), and create our own map overlays in Google Earth. She recommends that we first create a digital image of the map (or use one already digitized and online). Create a folder where we can store our maps. Fly to the intended area in Google Earth. Add our Image Overlay, by using the transparency tool, matching a point on the maps and resizing our overlay to exactly match the Google Earth image. Save the map on our hard drive, and share with friends via the Internet. Use census records, along with our plat maps to visually identify where people lived. We can even figure out where people who did not own land may have lived using a combination of the census, plat maps, and Google Earth.
    • Save & Share Images – Lisa shows us quick and easy ways to save and share the maps, overlays and images we’ve created using Google Earth, as jpg files, or as PowerPoint images, and then share with our friends by email.

    Using this DVD, I learned what would have otherwise taken me days of experimentation. Lisa opened up new vistas in genealogy for me. The experience was even better than hearing her in person at a conference, as I could pause the DVD, go back, or whatever I needed to personally get a full understanding of using Google Earth for genealogy. I recommend this product to everyone!

    This DVD operates under the Windows PC operating system. I viewed my DVD on my Mac Powerbook, using Parallels, and it ran just fine.

    The Google Earth for Genealogy DVD sells for just for $11.88, and is available at the Family Roots Publishing Company website. There is a shipping fee of $4.90, but new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, will be shipped FREE. So just add another item or two to your order and it ships at no charge… Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees

    Also see: Google Earth for Genealogy Vol. II

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    GOOGLE EARTH FOR GENEALOGY VOL. II – A Tutorial DVD Instructional Video; by Lisa Louise Cooke; 95 Minutes; 2010; Item # Lu03

    This 95-minute DVD tutorial video is made up of 7 video lessons, all thought by Lisa Louise Cooke, the producer and host of the internationally popular Genealogy Gems Podcast, an online genealogy audio show. In this second installment of Google Earth for Genealogy DVD series, Lisa shows us how to take the next exciting steps in using the Google Earth Program.

    Google Earth has the power to geographically document your ancestor’s lives, and much more. It’s one of the most exciting online genealogical tools now available. Best of all, it’s FREE!

    In Vol. II of this step-by-step tutorial series, the user will learn how to:

    • Pinpoint Property – Lisa teaches us how to pinpoint the exact piece of property that our ancestor owned, plotting it on the Google Earth map. This involves reading and understanding the legal description of the property. Then creating and saving a custom overlay for the family homestead.
    • Locate Original Land Surveys – The Bureau of Land Management website includes more than just the Land Patent Image. The original survey and field notes for the property may also be available. We can save a jpg of the survey, and maybe even the field notes. The survey can be added as a layer on our saved Google Earth images.
    • Customize Place Marks – Beside our ancestors’ homes, we may also want to locate and mark places such as the church they attended, the cemetery where family is buried, the photographer’s studio where their pictures were taken, businesses where they worked, the schools they attended or maybe even battlefields where they fought! All kinds of icons are available, not just the usual pushpins. You can even color-code the labels and icons. Custom icons can also be added to your maps. We can include photographs, and documents that we can upload to the Internet.
    • Create and Share Family History Tours – Google Earth allows the user to create, save and share visual tours, showing movement over the land from one place to another, just as your ancestor may have moved from one place to another. Tours can be over distances, as in a major move of the family or very localized – like the route taken to school. Documents, 3-D models, video, photographs, and such will make your Family History Tour of interest to your relatives. You can record tours of your family members to share with others. You might want to write a script first, and narrow the story to that of one person or immediate family. Lisa explains all about how to record a really great tour for your relatives.
    • Add Video to Maps – We can add video using place marks. We upload our video to YouTube, and add information about the video. Copy the html code to our clipboard, and go to Google Earth. We can then zoom in on the location, and put a place mark on the map, then paste the html code in the description box. Add more description if we like. Change the icon to reflect the fact that this is a video. We can also link your map to historic video already residing on the web.
    • Incorporate 3D Models – We can add 3-D models of ancestral buildings using Sketchup. Sketchup.google actually has a 3-D warehouse where we can find models of all kinds of houses. We can add these models to our Google Earth map. We can even have a custom 3-D model made by Estate3d.com, and add representations of our ancestor’s actual home to Google 3-D maps.
    • Add Focus with Polygons and Paths – Draw polygons, adjust the width of the polygon lines, place them, colorize the polygon, and add a text box that appears when the image is clicked. Paths can illustrate movements. It can guide the viewer and enhance their experience. Using Tours can add further focus for the user.

    Also found on the DVD are links to 10 websites that work hand-in-hand with Google Earth to allow us to get the most genealogical use out of Google Earth.

    As with Volume I of this DVD series, using this DVD, I learned what would have otherwise taken me days of experimentation. Lisa continued to open up new vistas in genealogy for me. The experience was even better than hearing her in person at a conference, as I could pause the DVD, go back, or whatever I needed to personally get a full understanding of using Google Earth for genealogy. Again, I recommend this product to everyone!

    This DVD operates under the Windows PC operating system. I viewed my DVD on my Mac Powerbook, using Parallels, and it ran just fine.

    The Google Earth for Genealogy, Vol. II DVD sells for just for $11.88, and is available at the Family Roots Publishing Company website. There is a shipping fee of $4.90, but new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, will be shipped FREE. So just add another item or two to your order and it ships at no charge… Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees

    Also see: Google Earth for Genealogy Vol. I

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    THE FOLLOWING REVIEWS HAVE BEEN PRINTED IN EARLIER NEWSLETTERS

    THE HIDDEN HALF OF THE FAMILY: A SOURCEBOOK FOR WOMEN’S GENEALOGY; by Christina K. Schaefer; Published 1999, Reprinted, 2008; 310 pp

    By law and by custom, women’s individual identities have been subsumed by those of their husbands. For centuries women were not allowed to own real estate in their own name, sign a deed, devise a will, or enter into contracts, and even their citizenship and their position as head of household have been in doubt. Finding women in traditional genealogical record sources, therefore, presents the researcher with a unique challenge, for census records, wills, land records, pension records–the conventional sources of genealogical identification–all have to be viewed in a different perspective if we are to establish the genealogical identity of our female ancestors.

    Whether listed under their maiden names, married names, patronymic/matronymic surnames or some other permutation, or hidden under such terms as “Mrs.,” “Mistress,” “goodwife,” “wife of,” or even “daughter of,” it is clear that women are hard to find. But while women may never be as easy to locate as their male counterparts, Christina Schaefer here pioneers an approach to the problem that just might set genealogy on its head! And her solution is simplicity itself: Look closely at those areas where the female ancestor interacts with the government and the legal system, she advises, where law, precedent, and even custom mandate the unequivocal identification of all parties, male and female. According to this thesis, the legal status of women at any point in time is the key to unraveling the identity of the female ancestor, and therefore this work highlights those laws, both federal and state, that indicate when a woman could own real estate in her own name, devise a will, enter into contracts, and so on.

    The first part of the book–a lengthy and informative introduction–deals with the special ways women are dealt with in federal records such as immigration records, passports, naturalization records, census enumerations, land records, military records, and records dealing with minorities. All such records are discussed with reference to their impact on women, as are a group of miscellaneous, non-governmental records, including newspapers, cemetery records, city directories, church records, and state laws covering common law marriages and marriage and divorce registration.

    The bulk of this absorbing new reference work, however, deals with the individual states, showing how their laws, records, and resources can be used in determining female identity. Each state section begins with a time line of events, i.e. important dates in the state’s history, following which is a detailed listing of eight key categories of information:
    (1) Marriage and Divorce (marriage and divorce laws and where to find marriage and divorce records);
    (2) Property and Inheritance (women’s legal status in a state as reflected in statute law, code, and legislative acts);
    (3) Suffrage (information as to when any voting rights were granted prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920);
    (4) Citizenship (dates when residents of an area became U.S. citizens);
    (5) Census Information (special notes on searching federal, state, and territorial enumerations);
    (6) Other (information on welfare, pensions, and other laws affecting women);
    (7) Bibliography (books and articles relating to women in the state, historical and biographical sources, and publications regarding legal history and jurisprudence); and
    (8) Selected Resources for Women’s History (addresses of state archives, historical societies, and libraries; women’s studies programs, women’s history programs);
    (9) and more.

    This engrossing new work is as amazing as it is informative: amazing because it shows how women have been written out of genealogical history; informative because it demonstrates how their identities can be recovered. This is a new and promising path in genealogy, suggesting fruitful avenues of research and many new possibilities.

    The Hidden Half of the Family is available at Family Roots Publishing, at 5% off with FREE Shipping through Midnight MST April 5, 2011.

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    THE GENEALOGISTS GOOGLE TOOLBOX, by Lisa Louise Cook; 2011, Soft Cover; 209 pp; 8.5×11

    This new book on using Google for genealogy is an excellent volume. Lisa is known for her Genealogy Gems podcast website, and had become a popular speaker on the lecture circuit during the last couple of years. She lectured on using Google Earth at RootsTech, which was very well received.

    According to Lisa, this volume is “right up to date,” giving the latest information about using the features of Google. This is a great guidebook, in that it’s heavily illustrated and geared toward showing the genealogist how to use many of the free online “tools” that Google has made available to us.

    The use of the “tools” is laid out in a step-by-step manner that anyone can follow. The first 5 chapters all deal with Google’s Search abilities, followed by chapters on Google Alerts, Gmail, iGoogle, Books, News Timeline, Translation, YouTube & Video, Google Earth (in all its glory!), Family History Tour Maps, and an amazing “How to” index at the back.

    Following is a list of the chapters found in the volume:

    • Introduction
    • Chapter 1: Caffeine & Search Options Column
    • Chapter 2: Basic & Advanced Search
    • Chapter 3: Search Strategies for High-Quality Results
    • Chapter 4: Site Search & Resurrecting Web Sites
    • Chapter 5: Image Search
    • Chapter 6: Google Alerts
    • Chapter 7: Gmail
    • Chapter 8: iGoogle – Your Personal Genealogy Home Page
    • Chapter 9: Google Books
    • Chapter 10: Google News Timeline
    • Chapter 11: Google Translate & Translation Toolkit
    • Chapter 12: YouTube & Google Video
    • Chapter 13: Google Earth Overview
    • Chapter 14: Google Earth – Ancestral Homes & Locations
    • Chapter 15: Google Earth – Organizing, Naming & Sharing
    • Chapter 16: Google Earth – Historic Maps & Images
    • Chapter 17: Google Earth – Plotting Your Ancestor’s Homestead
    • Chapter 18: Google Earth – Fun with Images & Video
    • Chapter 19: Family History Tour Maps
    • Chapter 20: Find it Quick: The “How To” Index

    I like the guidebook, and recommend it to anyone who wants to get more use of the online “tools” available to them.

    The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox is available at Family Roots Publishing for just $25.00. Purchase before Midnight MDT April 5, 2011 and get FREE SHIPPING!

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    DATING OLD PHOTOGRAPHS 1840-1929 on CD-ROM; pdf format; auto-run; originally published in 2000; republished as a CD-ROM 2011 by Family Roots Publishing Co. L.L.C.; 94pp.; item #: FR0115; $12.00 price includes postage within the United States.

    You’ve almost certainly faced the problem: you have an album or box of old photographs, but almost all of them lack any identification. Family Chronicle’s Dating Old Photographs 1840-1929 can’t help you identify the subject, but it probably can help you with dating when the picture was taken — often within a couple of years.

    A number of books have already been published that describe how to date old photographs. They rely almost entirely on descriptions. This book on CD-ROM is made up of reproductions of old photographs of known date. There are over 700 pictures covering the period from the 1840s to the 1920s. By comparing your unknown pictures to those in this book, you will be able to compare clothing and hair fashion, the poses adopted by the subject, and the background settings. The book provides convincing evidence that our ancestors were at least as fashion conscious as we are today and that those fashions changed just as frequently.

    The volume also includes an introduction by Andrew J. Morris, explaining the technicalities and fashion styles of old photos. He details information on the various types of photographs, starting with the daguerreotypes of 1839-1860, the ambrotypes of 1854-1860s, the tintypes of 1856-1900, the carte-de-visites of 1859-1890s, and the cabinet cards of 1866-1910.

    Dating Old Photographs was compiled from a number of sources, but the majority of the photographs were submitted by readers of Family Chronicle Magazine. The book then goes on to graphically show the photographs of the following eras:

    • The 1840s – pages 8 & 9
    • The 1850s – pages 10-13
    • 1860-1864 – pages 14-17
    • 1865-1869 – pages 18-20
    • 1870-1874 – pages 21-24
    • 1875-1879 – pages 25-26
    • 1880-1884 – pages 27-30
    • 1885-1889 – pages 31-36
    • 1890-1894 – pages 37-43
    • 1895-1899 – pages 44-51
    • 1900-1904 – pages 52-60
    • 1905-1909 – pages 61-69
    • 1910-1914 – pages 70-77
    • 1915-1919 – pages 78-84
    • 1920-1924 – pages 85-89
    • 1925-1929 – pages 90-93

    Most pages have 9 photographs on them, with some larger photos on pages with 5 to 8 pictures. To make the book even more valuable, the photos are identified, and include the name of the party owning the original.

    System requirements:

    PC or Mac with Windows installed for auto start. Since the pages are pdf files they are readable under either Windows or Mac OS. Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader version 5 or later.

    Purchase this CD-ROM at Family Roots Publishing for just $11.88 (including postage) – or get it FREE with your purchase of the new Third Edition of More Dating Old Photographs. See the review of the new More Dating Old Photographs below:

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    MORE DATING OLD PHOTOGRAPHS 1840 -1929, THIRD EDITION; originally published 2004; Revised & republished 2011; 120pp.; Soft Cover; item #: FR0116; ISBN: 0-9731303-4-2; $15.95

    You’ve almost certainly faced the problem: you’ve got an album or box of old photographs but almost all of them lack any identification. Family Chronicle‘s More Dating Old Photographs 1840-1929 can’t help you identify the subject but it probably can help you with dating when the picture was taken — often within a couple of years.

    This book on is made up of reproductions of old photographs of known date, and identity. There are over 650 pictures with photos of virtually thousands of people covering the period from the 1840s to the 1920s. By comparing your unknown pictures to those in our book, you will be able to compare clothing and hair fashion, the poses adopted by the subject and the background settings. The book provides convincing evidence that our ancestors were at least as fashion conscious as we are today and that those fashions changed just as frequently.

    More Dating Old Photographs has been compiled from a number of sources, but the majority of them are photographs submitted by readers of the magazine.

    The book begins with a 12-page article by the Photo Detective Maureen Taylor in which she explains the technicalities and fashion styles of old photos. She details information on the various types of photographs, starting with the daguerrotypes of 1839-1860, the tintypes of 1856-1930, the ambrotypes of 1854-1865, the calotypes/talbotypes of 1833-1860s, the salt-paper prints of 1850-c1860, the arte-de-visites of 1859-1900, the cabinet cards of 1863-c1920, the cyanotypes of 1840s to present, and stereotypes of 1851-c1925. She then includes sections on the following photographic subjects:

    • Photographic Jewelry
    • Other Formats
    • Manipulated Images
    • Retouching
    • Hand Coloring
    • Crayon Portraits
    • Photo Editing
    • Watch out for copies
    • Noticing the Details
    • Photographer’s Imprint
    • Clothing
    • Women
    • Bodices
    • Sleeves
    • Accessories
    • Hats and Bonnets
    • Women’s Hair
    • Men
    • Coats
    • Ties
    • Vests
    • Men’s Hair
    • Children
    • Occupational Clothing
    • Ethnic Dress
    • Special Occasions
    • Oddities in the Collection
    • A Case Study
    • Caring for Your Photographs
    • Safe Handling Techniques
    • Space Considerations

    The book goes on to graphically show photographs of the following eras:

    • The 1840s – page 18
    • The 1850s – pages 19-20
    • 1860-1864 – pages 21-24
    • 1865-1869 – pages 25-28
    • 1870-1874 – pages 29-32
    • 1875-1879 – pages 33-37
    • 1880-1884 – pages 38-43
    • 1885-1889 – pages 44-48
    • 1890-1894 – pages 49-54
    • 1895-1899 – pages 55-60
    • 1900-1904 – pages 61-67
    • 1905-1909 – pages 68-74
    • 1910-1914 – pages 75-83
    • 1915-1919 – pages 84-92
    • 1920-1924 – pages 93-100
    • 1925-1929 – pages 101-108
    • Unusual photos – pages 109-112
    • Hand Colored – pages 113-117

    Most pages have 9 photographs on them, with some larger photos on pages with 4 to 8 pictures. The photos are identified, and include the name of the party owning the original.

    This book is a winner. If you’re only going to have one book on dating old photos, this is the one to have!

    Purchase the new Third Edition of More Dating Old Photographs for just $15.95 by Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, and get Dating Old Photographs (see description above) absolutely FREE! To get the Free CD, do nothing but order the above More Dating Old Photographs. Do not order the CD separately. There is a shipping fee of $4.90, but orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, will be shipped FREE. So just add another item or two to your order and they ship at no charge… Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees

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    CHASING WOMEN – FINDING YOUR FEMALE ANCESTORS – Webinar on CD-ROM – A webinar on CD-ROM by this column’s author, Leland K. Meitzler

    Posting this mention of the CD-ROM produced for the webinar I gave on February 16 seems a bit self-serving, but I’m actually kind of proud of the way it turned out. It is now shipping!

    Recording this webinar was fun, a bit frustrating because of technology challenges, and very worthwhile! I was able to cover numerous resources, with a wonderful response from a worldwide audience.

    Locating the names of our female ancestors can be difficult – principally because their names changed upon marrying. Women historically have not produced as many records as their husbands, since women’s suffrage largely did not exist until the twentieth century. This adds to the difficulty of finding their names, let alone the details of their lives. There are two major search areas that we deal with in locating women’s names, the first being the search for their maiden names, and secondly, the search for their married names. One search can be as hard as the other, and you may find you are doing both types of searches on the same women. Join nationally-known speaker, author, and publisher, Leland K. Meitzler as he gives details on a wide variety of sources, starting with the obvious, and working its way through sources that you may not have thought of using previously.

    Features

    This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on February 16, 2011. 1 hour 21 minutes. Plus a link to download the 4 pages of printable and clickable links in the handouts.

    Viewers’ comments:

    • Leland’s info gave me a few more options in finding my historical ladies. This may just pull my ox out of the ditch.
    • There was a lot of good information. I can hardly wait to try it out.
    • Learned a few new tips and it was nice to get a refresher on old ones. I really liked hearing about the German Parrish Registries, that’s going to be very helpful!
    • Leland was terrific! Informative, entertaining, and enjoyable.
    • Great info; could hear the passion in Leland’s voice
    • Enjoyed the many hints and can’t wait to try out a few. Have enjoyed Leland’s work with Heritage Quest and Gen. Helper in the past.
    • I like having all of these sources in one place. When I finish checking one, I can just move to the next source. It will give some order to my research.
    • I got so much info from the class. Can’t wait to go searching with all the new ideas I just learned. Thanks so much for offering this webinar. I would be very interested in any other webinars that Leland gives.
    • The information shared was excellent. The pace was good and I like the opportunity for Q&A at the end. I also like the ability to download his handouts.
    • Great ideas, I think I can now break a brickwall that is twenty years old!
    • This webinar certainly opened my eyes to the importance of using records that I have not tried before.
    • Soooo much good information of places to look. I’m encouraged! Thank you.
    • Excellent review for those who have been researching a long time. Also, a great guide for newcomers.
    • Leland was fantastic…he has given me so many more options for finding my female ancestors…I can hardly wait to get started. I especially found the German Parish Records information very helpful as I had hit a brick wall on many of them, now I have something to go on…thank you for these webinars.
    • A LOT of great information! I have renewed energy now to find a few of my female in-laws!

    The Chasing Women CD-ROM is now shipping at FRPC. Regularly priced at $12.95, the seminar is available for just $9.95. There is a shipping fee of $4.90, but new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, will be shipped FREE. So just add another item or two to your order and it ships at no charge… Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees

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    GOOGLE FOR GENEALOGISTS – Webinar on CD-ROM – presented by Thomas MacEntee

    My friend, Thomas McEntee, presented this Webinar just over two months ago. I was lucky enough to be able to catch the Webinar live, and came away from the program very impressed. I learned a lot – and enjoyed the entire program. You will too.

    Most genealogists are only using 10% or less of the resources behind Google when it comes to genealogy research. Learn from professional genealogist, Thomas MacEntee, about the other 90% and how these Google components can be leveraged for better search results. Google is more than just a search engine – it is a wealth of information much of which goes unnoticed by the average genealogist. Besides search, Google allows you to access maps, books, journals, abstracts, patents and much more. These components may be what is needed to make advances in your genealogy research.

    This class was presented to a live webinar (online seminar) audience on January 5, 2011.1 hour 28 minutes. Plus a link to download the 4 pages of printable and clickable links in the handouts.

    About the author: Thomas MacEntee is a professional genealogist specializing in the use of technology and social media to improve genealogical research and as a means of interacting with others in the family history community. Utilizing over 25 years of experience in the information technology field, Thomas writes and lectures on the many ways in which blogs, Facebook and Twitter can be leveraged to add new dimensions to the genealogy experience. As the creator of GeneaBloggers.com he has organized and engaged a community of over 1,300 bloggers to document their own journeys in the search for ancestors.

    The Google for Genealogists CD-ROM is now shipping at FRPC. Regularly priced at $12.95, the seminar is available for just $9.95. There is a shipping fee of $4.90, but orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, will be shipped FREE. So just add another item or two to your order and it ships at no charge… Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees

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    ESSENTIAL BOOKS FROM FAMILY ROOTS PUBLISHING COMPANY

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    MORE IMPORTANT BOOKS REVIEWED IN EARLIER NEWSLINES


    THE GERMAN RESEARCH COMPANION, by Shirley Riemers, Roger P. Minert, and Jennifer A. Anderson

    Shirley Riemer’s classic book, The German Research Companion is now in it’s Third Edition. The book has always been the best place to look for sources of German research information, but this new edition is by far the most useful ever published. The page count is up to 706 pages, but the price hasn’t gone up even a penny! As the cover says, the book is Revised, Updated and Expanded.

    STO LAT: A MODERN GUIDE TO POLISH GENEALOGY, by Cecile Wendt Jensen

    Family Roots Publishing is now offering this wonderful new title written by Ceil Jensen. The volume is a lavishly illustrated workbook titled Sto Lat: A Modern Guide to Polish Genealogy which offers a plan for researching at least one hundred years of family records, and is a compilation of Ms. Jensen’s techniques developed over thirty years of research and teaching. Both traditional and digital research methods are presented. Common research questions are answered and suggestions are offered to help novice and advanced researchers find ancestors in both North America and Poland.

    GUIDE TO THE GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES OF ITALY – REGION OF SICILY by George E. Ott

    George Ott’s book on research in Sicilian genealogical resources gives all kinds of information never before compiled for the genealogist. Following is a short list what it can do for anyone researching Sicilian ancestry.

    • An index of all incorporated towns/comuni and hamlets/frazioni in the region.
    • A wealth of information for each incorporated town/comune including: Population, Postal Code, Phone Code, Hamlets/Frazione under its jurisdiction, Town hall with address and phone number, Library and cemetery information, and Catholic parish information..
    • A listing of the Family History Library collection for each town with microfilm numbers.
    • A listing of State Archives and Diocesan Archives with addresses and phone numbers.
    • Maps of each province showing town locations.
    • Web site information for towns, provinces and region.
    • A listing of Provincial records available at the Family History Library with microfilm numbers.

    RECORDING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY, by William Fletcher

    This 317 page volume is a guide to preserving oral history. Although Fletcher wrote the book with video and audio recording in mind, the same methods apply to all types of digital recording today. Fletcher has designed a program that will allow you or anyone in your family to be a capable life history interviewer. Tips on interview techniques plus hundreds of useful family tree topics and questions. . . all in a practical, easy-to-use handbook that will help any reader/historian develop a comprehensive record of one’s life, or the saga of several generations. In a recent review for another similar book., Judith P. Reid of the Library of Congress said, “the best available work is William Fletcher’s Recording Your Family History,” which confirms that there are those who know still think this is the best available book on recording your family history.

    GOOGLE YOUR FAMILY TREE – UNLOCK THE HIDDEN POWER OF GOOGLE, by Daniel M. Lynch

    Since the last Newsline, one of the major genealogical events was RootsTech, which took place here in Salt Lake City. Over 3,000 people showed up for the conference. Several lectures were about using Google for genealogy. One of the speakers was Dan Lynch, the author of Google Your Family Tree. As we all know, Google is by far the most popular Internet search engine available to us today. The Internet is also loaded with genealogical and historical databases, web pages, indexes, photographs, video and stuff we never even thought of before. Finding and accessing these resources is our challenge – and it looks to me like if you know how to harness the overwhelming power of Google, you may – just may – be able to break some of those genealogical brick walls you have before you. If nothing else, you’ll certainly be able to locate data that will fill in holes and add richness to your family story.
    Google Your Family Tree is available at the FRPC website, and can be purchased with FREE SHIPPING within the United States through Tuesday, April 5, 2011. In fact, all new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, will be shipped FREE. Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees.

    MAP GUIDE TO AMERICAN MIGRATION ROUTES, 1735-1815; by William Dollarhide

    Family researchers need to locate and understand the early American migration routes their ancestors may have traveled. In this book, acclaimed author, William Dollarhide, shows these early roadways with well-researched and consistently drawn maps. Dollarhide’s guide begins with the King’s Highway of 1735 from Boston to Charleston and ends with the roads that resulted from the War of 1812 in the Old Southwest. These maps provide critical information for researchers trying to locate the passages of early migration in America.

    Map Guide to American Migration Routes, 1735-1815 is available at the FRPC website, and can be purchased at 10% off, making the price $17.95 through Tuesday, April 5, 2011. All new orders for U.S.A. delivery over $25 placed at the FRPC online genealogy bookstore before Midnight MDT on Tuesday, April 5, will be shipped FREE. Sorry, orders shipping to Canada and other countries have the normal shipping fees.

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    FAMILY ROOTS PUBLISHING CO., LLC IS CURRENTLY SCHEDULED TO EXHIBIT AT THE FOLLOWING EVENTS in 2011:

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    THINKING OF GOING TO SALT LAKE CITY?

    If you’re considering a research trip at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City NOW IS A GREAT TIME! The Salt Lake Plaza Hotel which is located next door to the Family History Library is offering special genealogy discounts for April and May 2011. Your discount will depend on the dates you reserve. They offer microwaves and refrigerators in every room, a full service restaurant, complimentary wireless hi-speed internet and a complimentary airport shuttle. Call them at 800-366-3684 or e-mail at admin@plaza-hotel.com and mention the Genealogy Newsline to receive your discount rate.

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    CHECK OUT AREA-INFO.NET

    I’ve just begun writing a genealogy column for a new website entitled Area-Info.net. The column is owned by my friends, Lee Everton and John Hardy. It’s set up so that you write the local news – including obituaries, family info, and such. As Lee says, “It’s about the people.” I think the site is a great idea. Check it out.

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    FAMILY CHRONICLE MAGAZINE
    I write for Family Chronicle, a delightful genealogy magazine that I recommend to everyone. For more information about the publication and to download a free issue, click here.

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    CHECK OUT GENEALOGYBLOG.COM

    I blog at GenealogyBlog.com, which I’ve been doing since 2004. I invite you to check it out.

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    To SUBSCRIBE – If you received this Newsline directly from Family Roots Publishing Company, do nothing. You are already subscribed. If not, to subscribe to the Genealogy Newline, Enter your email address in the box titled “Signup – Free Genealogy Newsletter” found on the upper left hand corner of the Family Roots Publishing Company website, just under the Family Roots Publishing logo.

    You may UNSUBSCRIBE to the Genealogy Newsline by just clicking on the “Unsubscribe” link in the lower left hand corner of this Newsline If you are getting more than one Genealogy Newsline, just click the link to unsubscribe to the duplicates.

    If you are getting DUPLICATE COPIES OF THE Genealogy Newsline, click on “UNSUBSCRIBE” as is described in the above paragraph in the unwanted Genealogy Newsline copies. This will normally only happen if we have more than one active email address for a subscriber.

    I hope that you find the Genealogy Newsline useful, and informative. I will do all I can to make it just that. If you like it, please tell your friends.

    Leland K. Meitzler, Editor
    Leland@familyrootspublishing.com
    Twitter @Lmeitzler

    ABOUT GENEALOGY NEWSLINE
    The Genealogy Newsline is a weekly publication of Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC, PO Box 830, Bountiful, Utah 84011. Additional Supplements are possible, but will not be published regularly. Genealogy Newsline is edited by Leland K. Meitzler. Guest articles are welcome, with acceptance wholly dependent on space available, quality of the writing, my personal interest in the subject, and interest to the genealogical community as a whole. Genealogy and history related books, CD-ROMs, DVDs, and software for review should be sent to the above address.

    GENEALOGY NEWSLINE ARCHIVE
    Click Here to find back issues of the Genealogy Newsline archived at GenealogyBlog.com.

    CHANGING A PASSWORD
    To change your password, go to the Family Roots Publishing website: http://www.familyrootspublishing.com/ On the left hand side is a column where you will find the word CONTENTS. A ways further down you will the words CHANGE PASSWORD and LOGIN. Log in first using your current password, then click on CHANGE PASSWORD. Type your old password, then your new password twice. Click on UPDATE. That will do it.

    LELAND K. MEITZLER BIOGRAPHY
    Mr. Meitzler founded Heritage Quest in 1985. Mr. Meitzler worked as Managing Editor for Heritage Quest Magazine from 1985 through 2005, and held the same position with Everton Publishers, editing The Genealogical Helper, from 2006 until February of 2009. He is the now co-owner of Family Roots Publishing Company, LLC, and writes daily at GenealogyBlog.com. Meitzler conducts the annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour, now in its 27th year. With over 2000 lectures to his credit, his programs are always motivational and informative. He may be contacted at Leland@familyrootspublishing.com

    COPYRIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
    Copyright 2011 Family Roots Publishing, LLC

    Although copyrighted by FRPC, readers may share the Genealogy Newsline with their friends by forwarding this email. Readers may also reproduce portions (not the entirety!) of the Genealogy Newsline in their own publications, newsletters, blogs, etc., with my permission, as long as full attribution is given as to where the information came from, in the following format please: From Genealogy Newsline Vol 1 #2, Tuesday, January 18, 2011; a publication of Family Roots Publishing Co. LLC – www.FamilyRootsPublishing.com

    Permissions can be obtained by simply emailing me at: Leland@FamilyRootsPublishing.com. Any reasonable request will most likely be granted immediately.

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