Flash Sale – 20% off select Family Tree Books

The following books are all on sale at 20% off, through July 5 or while supplies last.

FNW12-150p
The Family Tree Polish, Czech And Slovak Genealogy Guide, How to Trace Your Family Tree in Eastern Europe; by Lisa A Alzo

FNW13-150p
Trace Your German Roots Online, A Complete Guide to German Genealogy Websites; by James M Beidler

FNW14-150p
Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com, How to Find Your Family History on the No. 1 Genealogy Website; by Nancy Hendrickson

FNW15-150p
The Family Tree Historical Maps Book, A State-by-State Atlas of US History, 1790-1900; by Allison Dolan

FNW16-150p
The Family Tree Historical Maps Book – Europe, A Country-by-Country Atlas of European History, 1700s-1900s; by Allison Dolan

FNW17-150p
How to Archive Family Photos, A Step-by-Step Guide to Organize and Share Your Photos Digitally; by Denise May Levenick

FNW18-150p
Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org, How to Find Your Family History on the Largest Free Genealogy Website; by Dana Mccullough

FNW4-150p
The Family Tree Problem Solver: Tried and True Tactics for Tracing Elusive Ancestors; by Marsha Hoffman Rising

FNW1-150p
The Genealogist’s U.S. History Pocket Reference: Quick Facts and Timelines of American History to Help Understand Your Ancestors; by Nancy Hendrickson

FNW11-150p
The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Germanic Ancestry in Europe; by James Beidler

FNW6-150p
Family Tree Pocket Reference, 2nd Edition; by Diane Haddad

GPO01-150p
From the Family Kitchen, Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes; by Gena Philibert-Ortega

FNW07-150p
The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe; by Allison Dolan

Eastern European Historical Repositories – on sale for 10 to 15% off thru June 16, 2015

EasternEuropeanHistoricalRepostories-250

I recently obtained copies of the new Eastern European Historical Repositories by Dr. Charles Dickson. I’m always looking for new resources, especially as deals with Europe – and this book fills a void.

America has often been described as a melting pot nation. While such an adjective contains some truth it does not capture the total flavor of its multiethnic experience. While many national groups have blended into the American fabric, they have also, to varying degrees, maintained a sense of individual ethic identity.

This work represents an attempt to organize a list of the many resources that are available to serious students of Eastern European history in their ongoing search for family histories. The listings in this book cover the following ethnic groups: Albanians, Armenians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Estonians, Greeks, Hungarians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, Slovenians, and Ukrainians.

Under each ethnic group a common format has been followed which includes an introduction to immigration patterns, followed by separate page listings describing the holdings of primary genealogical societies, museums, and educational institutions associated with that group.

Next there are listings of other ethnic related societies which have some family histories followed by a listing of the regional public libraries located in areas where each particular group has settled in significant numbers. As the reader uses this handbook as a research tool in discovering group and family histories, hopefully he or she will be reminded that the American multiethnic experience may be singularly unique in human history.

The following is from the Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • The Author
  • Table of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  • Albanians
  • Armenians
  • Bulgarians
  • Croatians
  • Czechs (including Bohemians & Moravians)
  • Estonians
  • Greeks (including Cypriots)
  • Hungarians (Including Magyars)
  • Latvians
  • Lithuanians
  • Poles (Including Pomeranians & Silesians)
  • Romanians (Including Moldavians)
  • Russians (Including Byelorussians)
  • Serbians (Including Bosnians & Macedonians)
  • Slovaks (Including Carpatho-Rusyns)
  • Slovenians
  • Ukrainians (Including Ruthenians)
  • General Bibliography

Click on the link to order Eastern European Historical Repositories; by Dr. Charles Dickson; 140 pp., paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2014; ISBN: 0788455826; Item # HBD5582. On sale for 10% off through June 16, 2015 – or Now 15% off in the Eastern European bundle of 2 books. Sale ends at midnight June 8, 2015.

Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors – On Sale for 10 to 15% Off Thru May 11, 2015

mm016
Moorshead Magazines recently brought us Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors. At 82 pages, this journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

“For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

Contents

10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

Using Maps & Gazetteers

Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

JRI-Poland Expands Access

Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

Online Hungarian Research

Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

Researching the Hungarian Census

Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

Researching Your Russian Ancestors

Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

Copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Reg. Price: $9.95 – on sale for 10% off at just $8.96 – or 15% off as part of the 2-book Eastern European research bundle.

In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe — 50% OFF

What genealogical records are available?

Where are the records located?

How can each records repository be accessed and used?

gpc395Searching for specific records for your ancestors is work enough. There is no need to first spending significant time finding record repositories to begin with; especially, when there are guides available to point the researcher in the right direction. This includes guides like, In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe This book has been around a while, but it’s still loaded with valuable information on researching ancestors in Europe.

When it comes to European records, this book lists it all. What repositories are available. The types and nature of the records held in each. Where these repositories are held. You also get a little bit of history and key information in understanding and using the available records. This book is one of the few guides that provides the depth of details to prepare the researcher for searching each records set.

Inside this book you will find the archival resources of each country from the national to the local level; the location of church records and census returns; the systems of civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths; and how to find and use such records as certificates of domicile, orphan lists, emigration registers, guild records, internal passports, confirmation records, and even vaccination lists.

The third edition of this book added as many URLs (addresses) to as many associative websites as possible. However, the information in this book is by and large unchanged from its first edition, and invaluable compared to the contact information, like websites. The history and location of records is virtually unchanged and of the greatest worth. Besides, any websites or contact information changed since this book was last printed is easily obtained by searching online. By knowing, what is available, what each repository hold, with its history, any researcher can get online and search for online copies of documents or get current contact information for those repositories not yet indexed or copied online.

Never underestimate the value of a book like In Search of Your European Roots. The information is invaluable to researchers looking to find their European ancestors. Equally important, few books every try to cover the whole of a continent in the way this book has covered Europe. See below for a complete list of countries included in this book.

Get a copy of In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe from Family Roots Publishing currently on On Sale for 50% Off through January 15, 2015.

Countries included in this book:

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Austria
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia
  • Bularia
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • The Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Herzegovina
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macedonia
  • Malta
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • San Marino
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Ukraine
  • Yugoslavia

European Research Book Bundle on Sale for 29% off Thru Midnight Sunday, Feb. 16!

European Bundle
Last fall Family Roots Publishing ran a highly-successful promotion on the new The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe – Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe – 2nd Edition. Based upon that experience, I’ve concluded that a promo of this book, bundled with the also popular Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors would be an excellent value for my readers.

Both of these books are written and edited by knowledgeable folks, most of whom I know well enough to call friends. The principal editor of The FamilyTree Guidebook to Europe is Allison Dolan – Editor of Family Tree Magazine. She’s assisted by numerous writers – folks who are intimately acquainted with the subject countries that they are writing about in this volume. There was a Family Tree Guidebook to Europe published by F&W a decade ago, but this book bears little similarity to it. Although the 2003 book filled a need, this volume goes way beyond what the earlier book did. The author of the majority of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors is my friend, Lisa Alzo.

Since I love both of these books, Family Roots Publishing purchased a large quantity of them, and is making them available as a bundle as our current FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer for 29% off. Usually $36.94 (plus $9.50 p&h if purchased individually), we’re blowing them out as a bundle for just $26.23! (plus $5.50 p&h). This offer has been extended until midnight MDT Sunday, February 16, 2014. Better yet, add another book or two to your order, and we’re offering FREE USA shipping on all Website-placed orders of $50 or more, also through midnight MDT Sunday, February 16, 2014.

Note that we’re also offering the books individually at 15% off during the sale. Click on the links for the individual books to purchase just one or the other at 15% off. However, to get the bundle price, and save on shipping, be sure and purchase the bundle.

Following are reviews of both books

The FamilyTree Guidebook to Europe

Although I didn’t usually list them in the table I’ve created below, the various chapters detail the types of records used for doing genealogy in any particular country covered in that chapter. These include vital records, military records, census records, and such. Every country is different as deals with what records are available, and how useful those records might be.

The use of the word “tips” is found extensively throughout the book. Don’t let the small word give you the idea that these are small sources of information. They typically are not. I was amazed at how extensive and useful most of these tips turned out to be.

Excellent maps, as well as timelines for each region are included. The Resources sections of most chapters includes Organizations and Archives, Books, Periodicals and Websites. These are pretty extensive and include a lot of excellent information.

Following is a non-exhaustive table of contents for the book, along with the name of the contributing editor for each portion:

Introduction – by Lisa A. Alzo
A Guide to European Research – with 11 Tips
Step 1: Exhaust US Sources First
Step 2: Get the Immigrant’s Name Right
Step 3: Learn Naming Practices
Step 4: Brush Up on History
Step 5: Study Geography
Step 6: Bypass Foreign-Language Barriers
Step 7: Find Online Records
Step 8: Use FHL Microfilm
Step 9: Write to Archives
Step 10: Hire a Pro to Get What You Can’t
Step 11: Take a Research Trip Abroad

Ireland – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional History – with 7 Tips
Step 1: Learn a Wee Bit of History
Step 2: Know What You’re Up Against
Step 3: Understand Ireland’s Geographic Divisions
Step 4: Pinpoint the Place
Step 5: Search for Descendants
Step 6: Get Your Hands on Records
Step 7: Resources

England and Wales – by David A. Fryxell and Lise Hull
England
Locating Places
Censuses
Birth, Marriage and Death
Church Records
Wills and Probate
Military Records

Wales
Emigration to America
Naming Conventions
Parishes and Counties
Resources in Wales
England Resources
Wales Resources

Scotland – by Nancy Hendrickson and James M. Beidler
Regional Guide
In the Rough
Migration Patterns
Research Tee Off
People’s Choice
Alternative Access
Scots-Irish Origins
Scotland Resources

Scandinavia – by Diana Crisman Smith
Search at Home First
Understand Those Pesky Patronymics
Utilize Geographic and Language Aids
Recognize that Parish Records are Key
Parish Records
Always Work in Families
Scandinavian Censuses
Scandinavia Resources
Sweden Resources
Denmark Resources
Finland Resources
Norway Resources

France – by Nancy Hendrickson and Maureen A. Taylor
Regional Guide
Brush Up on Background
Take Care of Translations
Find the Place of Birth
Seek Microfilmed Records
Huguenot History
Open it Up to Other Records
French Naming Practices
France Resources

The Benelux Region – by Rhonda R. McClure and Sunny Jane Morton
The Netherlands
Lay of the Land
Tides of History
Cultural Waters
Immigrant Waves
Stream of Vital Stats
Flood of Records
Beyond the Data Deluge
Belgium & Resources
Luxembourg & Resources
The Netherlands Resources

Germanic Region – by James M. Beidler
Germany
Moving from Micro to Macro
Reviewing the Records
Surveying the States
Switzerland
Austria
Surmounting Language Barriers
German Outside Germany
Germany/Swiss/Austria Resources

Poland – by Cecile Wendt Jensen with Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Pieces of Palonia
Determining Your Destination
Polish Places
Homing in on Homeland Records
Poland Resources

Eastern Europe – by Lisa A. Alzo and James M. Beidler
Covering the following countries:
Albania
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Carpathian Rus
Croatia
Czech Republic
Hungary
Macedonia
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia

Czech Republic and Slovakia
Tracing Immigrants
Researching Names and Places
Finding and Using Records
Hungary
Getting Started
Seeking Sources
Using Church Records
Tapping Government Records
Croatia
Getting Started
Finding and Using Records
Romania and Bulgaria
Romanian Research Tips
Bulgarian Research Tips
Eastern Europe Resources
Bulgaria Resources
Croatia Resources
Czech Republic & Slovakia Resources
Hungary Resources
Romania Resources

Russia and the Baltic Region – by Lisa A. Alzo
Russia
Getting Started
Understanding Names
Studying Geography and History
Surveying Records
Researching Russian Immigrants
Accessing Archives
Learning the Language
Ukraine
Getting Started
Understanding Ukrainian Immigration
Finding Your Ancestral Village
Overcoming Language Barriers
Using Genealogical Records

The Baltic Region
Estonia
Latvia
Lithuania
Regional Resources
Getting Started
Understanding Baltic History
Learning Immigration Patterns
Studying Names
Grasping Geography
Finding Foreign Records
Tapping Online Resources

Regional Resources
Belarus Resources
Estonia Resources
Latvia Resources
Lithuania Resources
Moldova Resources
Russia Resources
Ukraine Resources

Italy – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional Guide
Step 1: Comuni Italiani
Step 2: Social Histories
Step 3: Italian Newspapers
Step 4: Order Sons of Italy in America
Step 5: Naming Traditions
Step 6: Translation Tools
Step 7: Research Guides
Step 8: Italian Genealogical Group
Step 9: POINT
Step 10: Mangia Mangia!
Four Steps to Finding Italian Ancestors
Italy Resources

Greece – by Thomas MacEntee
Regional Guide
History in the Making
It’s All Greek
Greek Census
For the Record
Surname Clues
Going Greek
Greek Resources

Spain and Portugal – by Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Step 1: Using US Records
Step 2: Translation Tools
Step 3: Geography and Governmental Archives
Step 4: Major Record Sets
What’s in a Nombre?
Spain Resources
Basque Resources
Portugal Resources

Your European Jewish Ancestors – by Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Learn Your History
Follow the Group
Break Down Language Barriers
Trace the Names
Review Available Records
Research in Repositories
Surname Suffixes
Go Genetic
Records at a Glance
Jewish Resources

Appendix A: Online Translators

Appendix B: Passenger Arrival Records – by Lisa Alzo
Step 1: Search at Home
Step 2: Examine US Records
Step 3: Locate Passenger Lists

Appendix C: Ancestry.com’s Immigration Collection – by David A Fryxell
Setting Sail
Anchoring Your Searches
Refining Your Search

Appendix D: Genealogy Glossary: Dutch, French, German, Spanish
Numbers
Dates
Relationships

Index

Purchase an individual copy of The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe, 2nd Ed. at the FRPC website for 15% off – just $22.94. To get the bundle price, and save on shipping, be sure and purchase the bundle.

Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors

At 82 pages, this new journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

“For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

Contents

10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

Using Maps & Gazetteers

Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

JRI-Poland Expands Access

Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

Online Hungarian Research

Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

Researching the Hungarian Census

Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

Researching Your Russian Ancestors

Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

Individual copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price: $8.46 To get the bundle price, and save on shipping, be sure and purchase the bundle.

Again, since I love both of these books, Family Roots Publishing purchased a large quantity of them, and is making them available as a bundle as our current FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer for 29% off. Usually $36.94 (plus $9.50 p&h if purchased individually), we’re blowing them out as a bundle for just $26.23! (plus $5.50 p&h) This offer has been extended until midnight MDT Sunday, February 16, 2014. Better yet, add another book or two to your order, and we’re offering FREE USA shipping on all Website-placed orders of $50 or more, also through midnight MDT Sunday, February 16, 2014.

The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe

fnw07Take some of the most experienced and well know authors and editors on family history matters, have them each provide a professional guidance and tips on tracing European ancestry, add to this a collection of online and print resources, contact information for more than 100 archives and libraries, historical events, maps and timelines, and the result is one of the best handbooks available today. The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe: Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe is filled with what you need to successfully navigate your European research.

Through fourteen chapters, Europe is broken down by country and region, covering 35 countries in all. This guide breaks down and organize your approach to researching your European ancestors. The knowledgeable contributors to this book left nothing out. Leland had this to say about all the great extras found in these pages:

“The use of the word “tips” is found extensively throughout the book. Don’t let the small word give you the idea that these are small sources of information. They typically are not. I was amazed at how extensive and useful most of these tips turned out to be. Excellent maps, as well as timelines for each region are included. The Resources sections of most chapters includes Organizations and Archives, Books, Periodicals and Websites. These are pretty extensive and include a lot of excellent information.”

Following is a non-exhaustive table of contents for the book, along with the name of the contributing editor for each portion:

Introduction – by Lisa A. Alzo
A Guide to European Research – with 11 Tips
Step 1: Exhaust US Sources First
Step 2: Get the Immigrant’s Name Right
Step 3: Learn Naming Practices
Step 4: Brush Up on History
Step 5: Study Geography
Step 6: Bypass Foreign-Language Barriers
Step 7: Find Online Records
Step 8: Use FHL Microfilm
Step 9: Write to Archives
Step 10: Hire a Pro to Get What You Can’t
Step 11: Take a Research Trip Abroad

Ireland – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional History – with 7 Tips
Step 1: Learn a Wee Bit of History
Step 2: Know What You’re Up Against
Step 3: Understand Ireland’s Geographic Divisions
Step 4: Pinpoint the Place
Step 5: Search for Descendants
Step 6: Get Your Hands on Records
Step 7: Resources

England and Wales – by David A. Fryxell and Lise Hull
England
Locating Places
Censuses
Birth, Marriage and Death
Church Records
Wills and Probate
Military Records

Wales
Emigration to America
Naming Conventions
Parishes and Counties
Resources in Wales
England Resources
Wales Resources

Scotland – by Nancy Hendrickson and James M. Beidler
Regional Guide
In the Rough
Migration Patterns
Research Tee Off
People’s Choice
Alternative Access
Scots-Irish Origins
Scotland Resources

Scandinavia – by Diana Crisman Smith
Search at Home First
Understand Those Pesky Patronymics
Utilize Geographic and Language Aids
Recognize that Parish Records are Key
Parish Records
Always Work in Families
Scandinavian Censuses
Scandinavia Resources
Sweden Resources
Denmark Resources
Finland Resources
Norway Resources

France – by Nancy Hendrickson and Maureen A. Taylor
Regional Guide
Brush Up on Background
Take Care of Translations
Find the Place of Birth
Seek Microfilmed Records
Huguenot History
Open it Up to Other Records
French Naming Practices
France Resources

The Benelux Region – by Rhonda R. McClure and Sunny Jane Morton
The Netherlands
Lay of the Land
Tides of History
Cultural Waters
Immigrant Waves
Stream of Vital Stats
Flood of Records
Beyond the Data Deluge
Belgium & Resources
Luxembourg & Resources
The Netherlands Resources

Germanic Region – by James M. Beidler
Germany
Moving from Micro to Macro
Reviewing the Records
Surveying the States
Switzerland
Austria
Surmounting Language Barriers
German Outside Germany
Germany/Swiss/Austria Resources

Poland – by Cecile Wendt Jensen with Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Pieces of Palonia
Determining Your Destination
Polish Places
Homing in on Homeland Records
Poland Resources

Eastern Europe – by Lisa A. Alzo and James M. Beidler
Covering the following countries:
Albania
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Carpathian Rus
Croatia
Czech Republic
Hungary
Macedonia
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia

Czech Republic and Slovakia
Tracing Immigrants
Researching Names and Places
Finding and Using Records
Hungary
Getting Started
Seeking Sources
Using Church Records
Tapping Government Records
Croatia
Getting Started
Finding and Using Records
Romania and Bulgaria
Romanian Research Tips
Bulgarian Research Tips
Eastern Europe Resources
Bulgaria Resources
Croatia Resources
Czech Republic & Slovakia Resources
Hungary Resources
Romania Resources

Russia and the Baltic Region – by Lisa A. Alzo
Russia
Getting Started
Understanding Names
Studying Geography and History
Surveying Records
Researching Russian Immigrants
Accessing Archives
Learning the Language
Ukraine
Getting Started
Understanding Ukrainian Immigration
Finding Your Ancestral Village
Overcoming Language Barriers
Using Genealogical Records

The Baltic Region
Estonia
Latvia
Lithuania
Regional Resources
Getting Started
Understanding Baltic History
Learning Immigration Patterns
Studying Names
Grasping Geography
Finding Foreign Records
Tapping Online Resources

Regional Resources
Belarus Resources
Estonia Resources
Latvia Resources
Lithuania Resources
Moldova Resources
Russia Resources
Ukraine Resources

Italy – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional Guide
Step 1: Comuni Italiani
Step 2: Social Histories
Step 3: Italian Newspapers
Step 4: Order Sons of Italy in America
Step 5: Naming Traditions
Step 6: Translation Tools
Step 7: Research Guides
Step 8: Italian Genealogical Group
Step 9: POINT
Step 10: Mangia Mangia!
Four Steps to Finding Italian Ancestors
Italy Resources

Greece – by Thomas MacEntee
Regional Guide
History in the Making
It’s All Greek
Greek Census
For the Record
Surname Clues
Going Greek
Greek Resources

Spain and Portugal – by Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Step 1: Using US Records
Step 2: Translation Tools
Step 3: Geography and Governmental Archives
Step 4: Major Record Sets
What’s in a Nombre?
Spain Resources
Basque Resources
Portugal Resources

Your European Jewish Ancestors – by Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Learn Your History
Follow the Group
Break Down Language Barriers
Trace the Names
Review Available Records
Research in Repositories
Surname Suffixes
Go Genetic
Records at a Glance
Jewish Resources

Appendix A: Online Translators

Appendix B: Passenger Arrival Records – by Lisa Alzo
Step 1: Search at Home
Step 2: Examine US Records
Step 3: Locate Passenger Lists

Appendix C: Ancestry.com’s Immigration Collection – by David A Fryxell
Setting Sail
Anchoring Your Searches
Refining Your Search

Appendix D: Genealogy Glossary: Dutch, French, German, Spanish
Numbers
Dates
Relationships

Index

The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe, Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe is available from Family Roots Publishing.

Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors

mm016Over the past few years, the folks who publish Family Chronicle, Internet Genealogy, and the History Magazine have created a series of journals offering a collection of previously published article, gathered together on a single topic. Here are some of the publications we have already seen:

The same group, Moorshead Magazines, has now brought us Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors. At 82 pages, this new journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

“For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

Contents

10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

Using Maps & Gazetteers

Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

JRI-Poland Expands Access

Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

Online Hungarian Research

Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

Researching the Hungarian Census

Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

Researching Your Russian Ancestors

Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

Copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $9.75.

Terrific Brand New Book! The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe – on Sale for 29% Off!

Family Tree Gudiebook to Europe
I just obtained a personal copy of the new book, The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe – Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe. It’s written and edited by a number of knowledgeable folks, most of whom I know well enough to call friends. The principal editor is Allison Dolan – Editor of Family Tree Magazine. She’s assisted by numerous writers – folks who are intimately acquainted with the subject countries that they are writing about in this volume. There was a Family Tree Guidebook to Europe published by F&W a decade ago, but this book bears little similarity to it. Although the 2003 book filled a need, this volume goes way beyond what the earlier book did.

Since I love this book, Family Roots Publishing purchased a large quantity of them, and is making it available for just 3 days as our current FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer for 29% off. Usually $26.99, we’re blowing them out for just $19.16 each! This offer is good for just 3 days, and ends at midnight MDT Thursday, September 26, 2013. Better yet, add another book or two to your order, and we’re offering FREE USA shipping on all Website-placed orders of $50 or more, also through midnight MDT Thursday, September 26, 2103.

Although I didn’t usually list them in the table I’ve created below, the various chapters detail the types of records used for doing genealogy in any particular country covered in that chapter. These include vital records, military records, census records, and such. Every country is different as deals with what records are available, and how useful those records might be.

The use of the word “tips” is found extensively throughout the book. Don’t let the small word give you the idea that these are small sources of information. They typically are not. I was amazed at how extensive and useful most of these tips turned out to be.

Excellent maps, as well as timelines for each region are included. The Resources sections of most chapters includes Organizations and Archives, Books, Periodicals and Websites. These are pretty extensive and include a lot of excellent information.

Following is a non-exhaustive table of contents for the book, along with the name of the contributing editor for each portion:

Introduction – by Lisa A. Alzo
A Guide to European Research – with 11 Tips
Step 1: Exhaust US Sources First
Step 2: Get the Immigrant’s Name Right
Step 3: Learn Naming Practices
Step 4: Brush Up on History
Step 5: Study Geography
Step 6: Bypass Foreign-Language Barriers
Step 7: Find Online Records
Step 8: Use FHL Microfilm
Step 9: Write to Archives
Step 10: Hire a Pro to Get What You Can’t
Step 11: Take a Research Trip Abroad

Ireland – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional History – with 7 Tips
Step 1: Learn a Wee Bit of History
Step 2: Know What You’re Up Against
Step 3: Understand Ireland’s Geographic Divisions
Step 4: Pinpoint the Place
Step 5: Search for Descendants
Step 6: Get Your Hands on Records
Step 7: Resources

England and Wales – by David A. Fryxell and Lise Hull
England
Locating Places
Censuses
Birth, Marriage and Death
Church Records
Wills and Probate
Military Records

Wales
Emigration to America
Naming Conventions
Parishes and Counties
Resources in Wales
England Resources
Wales Resources

Scotland – by Nancy Hendrickson and James M. Beidler
Regional Guide
In the Rough
Migration Patterns
Research Tee Off
People’s Choice
Alternative Access
Scots-Irish Origins
Scotland Resources

Scandinavia – by Diana Crisman Smith
Search at Home First
Understand Those Pesky Patronymics
Utilize Geographic and Language Aids
Recognize that Parish Records are Key
Parish Records
Always Work in Families
Scandinavian Censuses
Scandinavia Resources
Sweden Resources
Denmark Resources
Finland Resources
Norway Resources

France – by Nancy Hendrickson and Maureen A. Taylor
Regional Guide
Brush Up on Background
Take Care of Translations
Find the Place of Birth
Seek Microfilmed Records
Huguenot History
Open it Up to Other Records
French Naming Practices
France Resources

The Benelux Region – by Rhonda R. McClure and Sunny Jane Morton
The Netherlands
Lay of the Land
Tides of History
Cultural Waters
Immigrant Waves
Stream of Vital Stats
Flood of Records
Beyond the Data Deluge
Belgium & Resources
Luxembourg & Resources
The Netherlands Resources

Germanic Region – by James M. Beidler
Germany
Moving from Micro to Macro
Reviewing the Records
Surveying the States
Switzerland
Austria
Surmounting Language Barriers
German Outside Germany
Germany/Swiss/Austria Resources

Poland – by Cecile Wendt Jensen with Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Pieces of Palonia
Determining Your Destination
Polish Places
Homing in on Homeland Records
Poland Resources

Eastern Europe – by Lisa A. Alzo and James M. Beidler
Covering the following countries:
Albania
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Carpathian Rus
Croatia
Czech Republic
Hungary
Macedonia
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia

Czech Republic and Slovakia
Tracing Immigrants
Researching Names and Places
Finding and Using Records
Hungary
Getting Started
Seeking Sources
Using Church Records
Tapping Government Records
Croatia
Getting Started
Finding and Using Records
Romania and Bulgaria
Romanian Research Tips
Bulgarian Research Tips
Eastern Europe Resources
Bulgaria Resources
Croatia Resources
Czech Republic & Slovakia Resources
Hungary Resources
Romania Resources

Russia and the Baltic Region – by Lisa A. Alzo
Russia
Getting Started
Understanding Names
Studying Geography and History
Surveying Records
Researching Russian Immigrants
Accessing Archives
Learning the Language
Ukraine
Getting Started
Understanding Ukrainian Immigration
Finding Your Ancestral Village
Overcoming Language Barriers
Using Genealogical Records

The Baltic Region
Estonia
Latvia
Lithuania
Regional Resources
Getting Started
Understanding Baltic History
Learning Immigration Patterns
Studying Names
Grasping Geography
Finding Foreign Records
Tapping Online Resources

Regional Resources
Belarus Resources
Estonia Resources
Latvia Resources
Lithuania Resources
Moldova Resources
Russia Resources
Ukraine Resources

Italy – by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack
Regional Guide
Step 1: Comuni Italiani
Step 2: Social Histories
Step 3: Italian Newspapers
Step 4: Order Sons of Italy in America
Step 5: Naming Traditions
Step 6: Translation Tools
Step 7: Research Guides
Step 8: Italian Genealogical Group
Step 9: POINT
Step 10: Mangia Mangia!
Four Steps to Finding Italian Ancestors
Italy Resources

Greece – by Thomas MacEntee
Regional Guide
History in the Making
It’s All Greek
Greek Census
For the Record
Surname Clues
Going Greek
Greek Resources

Spain and Portugal – by Sunny Jane Morton
Regional Guide
Step 1: Using US Records
Step 2: Translation Tools
Step 3: Geography and Governmental Archives
Step 4: Major Record Sets
What’s in a Nombre?
Spain Resources
Basque Resources
Portugal Resources

Your European Jewish Ancestors – by Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Learn Your History
Follow the Group
Break Down Language Barriers
Trace the Names
Review Available Records
Research in Repositories
Surname Suffixes
Go Genetic
Records at a Glance
Jewish Resources

Appendix A: Online Translators

Appendix B: Passenger Arrival Records – by Lisa Alzo
Step 1: Search at Home
Step 2: Examine US Records
Step 3: Locate Passenger Lists

Appendix C: Ancestry.com’s Immigration Collection – by David A Fryxell
Setting Sail
Anchoring Your Searches
Refining Your Search

Appendix D: Genealogy Glossary: Dutch, French, German, Spanish
Numbers
Dates
Relationships

Index

The Family Tree Guidebook to Europe, Your Essential Guide to Trace Your Genealogy in Europe is available for just 3 days as our current FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer for 29% off. Usually $26.99, we’re blowing them out for just $19.16 each! This offer is good for just 3 days, and ends at midnight MDT Thursday, September 26, 2103. Better yet, add another book or two to your order, and we’re offering FREE USA shipping on all Website-placed orders of $50 or more, also through midnight MDT Thursday, September 26, 2103. Click on the link to order now.

Genetic Origins of European Jews

The following excerpt is from an interestig article dealing with the origins of European Jews.

Despite being one of the most genetically analysed groups, the origin of European Jews has remained obscure. However, a new study published online today (Thursday) in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution by Dr Eran Elhaik, a geneticist at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, argues that the European Jewish genome is a mosaic of Caucasus, European, and Semitic ancestries, setting to rest previous contradictory reports of Jewish ancestry. Elhaik’s findings strongly support the Khazarian Hypothesis, as opposed to the Rhineland Hypothesis, of European Jewish origins. This could have a major impact on the ways in which scientists study genetic disorders within the population.

Read the full article in the January 17, 2012 edition of ScienceCodex.com

Lisa Alzo’s “13 Ways to Find East European Ancestors in 2013”


My friend, Lisa Alzo, posted “13 Ways to Find Your East European Ancestors in 2013” in the Decmber 30, 2012 edition of The Examinar. The article is slanted toward those living in New York State, but the ideas and principles apply anywhere. Check it out.

By the way, Lisa will be in Salt Lake City with the Salt Lake Christmas Tour next December 8 to 14. Not only does she lecture at the tour, but she helps “hands on” with the attendees individual research problems.

Tracing Your European Roots

Hot off the presses, Tracing Your European Roots is W. Daniel Quillen’s fifth volume in his Essentials of Genealogy series. The Essentials series covers immigration and naturalization records, census and military records, family records, and more. European Roots serves as a basic research guide, breaking out individual countries and the available resources.

The first four chapters provide the reader with the basics needed to trace any European ancestor. The basics may prove redundant for the experienced researcher. However, the subsequent chapters examine individual nations and the means to research each. In general, the book covers the following topics:

  • “Where to find European records
  • How to access European records
  • How to use the Internet to help you in your search
  • Pitfalls and issues in obtaining European records
  • Countries covered include England, Ireland, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Poland, and the Czech & Slovak Republics”

Quillen is a professional writer. Yet, after 20 years he can still put heart and personality into his writing. Much of the praise given to this book talks to his writing skills and his ability to express the point with clarity. Anyone ready to research those countries listed above will find some helpful hints and great starting points in this book.

 

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. The Basics

  • Patronymics
  • Spelling Woes
  • US Records First
  • What’s in a Name?
  • Know Your History
  • Ethnic Gatherings
  • Religion
  • A Few Helpful Hints

3. Clues & Hints

  • Family Tradition / Legend / Knowledge
  • Immigration & Naturalization Records
  • Emigration Records
  • US Census Records
  • Passport Applications
  • Histories / Biographies

4. Research Tools

  • Websites
  • Books
  • Country and Record-Specific Websites
  • Genealogy Societies

5. Your British Roots

  • Key Records
  • Censuses
  • Civil Registrations
  • Parish Registration
  • Wills & Probate Records
  • Helpful Websites
  • National Archives
  • British Names

6. Your Czech & Slovak Roots

  • Key Records
  • Civil Registration
  • Church Records
  • Helpful Websites
  • Archives
  • Sample Letters
  • Genealogy Terms in Czech and Slovak
  • Months of the Year
  • Czech and Slovak Names

7. Your French Roots

  • Key Records
  • Civil Registration — Departments
  • Censuses
  • Parish Record
  • Wills & Probate Records
  • Helpful Websites
  • Sample Letters
  • Genealogy Terms in French
  • Months of the Year
  • French Names

8. Your German Roots

  • German States
  • Patronymics
  • Immigration Records
  • Emigration Records
  • Clan Books
  • Sample Letters
  • Genealogical Terms in German
  • Months of the Year
  • German Names

9. Your Irish Roots

  • Geographical Units
  • Key Records
  • Censuses
  • Civil Registration
  • Helpful Websites
  • National Archives
  • Going to Ireland
  • Irish Names

10. Your Italian Roots

  • Key Records
  • Censuses
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • Military Records
  • Province Archives
  • Helpful Websites
  • Sample Letter
  • Genealogy Terms in Italian
  • Months of the Year
  • Italian Names

11. Your Polish Roots

  • Censuses
  • Passports
  • Obituaries
  • Passenger Lists
  • WWI & WWII Draft Registration Cards
  • Partitioning of Poland
  • Helpful Websites
  • Polish State Archives
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • Sample Letter
  • Genealogy Terms in Polish
  • Polish Names

12. Your Portuguese Roots

  • Portuguese Naming Trends
  • Key Records
  • Censuses
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • National Archives
  • District Archives
  • Helpful Websites
  • Professional Genealogists
  • Sample Letter
  • Genealogical Terms in Portuguese
  • Months of the Year
  • Portuguese Names

13. Your Spanish Roots

  • Key Records
  • Censuses
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • State Archives
  • Helpful Websites
  • Sample Letter
  • Genealogical Terms in Spanish
  • Months of the Year
  • Spanish Names

Index

 

Tracing Your European Roots is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: CS02, Price: $11.71.

Effort to Preserve WWI Artefacts

A unique effort is taking place in Europe to preserve WWI artefacts as part of a WWI roadshow to cross 10 countries. Here is an excerpt from an article in The Visitor:

Appeal to help preserve World War One artefacts

LANCASTRIANS are being asked to help create an archive of World War One memorabilia.

They are being asked to take letters, photos, diaries and other items to a WW1 Family History Roadshow at the Museum of Lancashire, Preston.

Instead of festering in shoe boxes under the bed or deep inside the attic, we want to save your personal memories of the war in our virtual archive www.europeana1914-1918.eu/

The Preston roadshow is one of the first in a series that is being rolled-out across 10 countries in Europe this year to create a unique pan-European account of WW1 that is available to everyone.

Europeana 1914-1918 brings together a partnership of libraries, museums, academic and cultural institutions, which in the UK includes the British Library, Oxford University, JISC, and Lancashire County Council.

The organisers want ordinary families to tell us about their keepsakes, who they belonged to and why they are so important to them. Historians and experts will be on hand to talk about the significance of the finds – while professional digitisers and cataloguers will upload them to the website.

As the centenary approaches, the plan is to preserve these precious documents for future generations. Digitisation saves them from being lost or thrown away – and it keeps them safe for use by schools, genealogists and cultural organisations.

Click here to read the full article.

Europeana.eu Website Up and Coming With Digital Items

europeanalogoEuropeana.eu is about ideas and inspiration – in a digital format. It currently links to 2 million digital items, and the site isn’t even officially launched yet. This website is a prototype. Europeana Version 1.0 is being developed and will launch in 2010 with links to over 6 million digital objects. The following types of digital files will be found at Europeana.eu

  • Images – paintings, drawings, maps, photos and pictures of museum objects
  • Texts – books, newspapers, letters, diaries and archival papers
  • Sounds – music and spoken word from cylinders, tapes, discs and radio broadcasts
  • Videos – films, newsreels and TV broadcasts
  • The digital items found at the website come from Europe’s museums and galleries, archives, libraries, and audio-visual collections. Click here for a look as this astounding list of organizations that are involved. It’s pretty impressive. Included with the list are links to the archive websites. Try a few of the links. You’ll find all kinds of cool stuff!

    When launched, you will be able to use My Europeana to save searches, and set bookmarks.

    Europeana.eu is funded by the European Commission and the member states.

    It looks to me like this site may have some tremendous potential for genealogists. Because of the nature of the site – digital items from libraries, archives, and such, the items will be historical in nature – and may include items that have both direct and indirect links to our ancestors.

    You can already search on 2 million or so items. Try a search or two.

    Thanks to my friend, Jeff Bockman, for bringing the site to my attention.