FamilySearch Databases Added or Updated From June 28 through August 8, 2016

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The following databases have been added or updated at FamilySearch.org from June 28, 2016 to August 8, 2016

Location – Number of Indexed Records – Date Posted or Updated

Australia, Tasmania, Migrant Files, 1945-1968 – Browse Images – 20 Jul 2016
Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541-1914 – 426,542 – 28 Jul 2016
Czech Republic Land Records, 1450-1889 – Browse Images – 05 Aug 2016
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – Browse Images – 02 Aug 2016
Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 481,724 – 15 Jul 2016
El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1990 – 723,047 – 30 Jun 2016
England and Wales Census, 1851 – 18,369,674 – 03 Aug 2016
France, Seine-Maritime, Rouen, Indexes to Church Records, 1680-1789 – 38,020 – 22 Jul 2016
Hungary Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 469,259 – 05 Jul 2016
Italy, Agrigento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1820-1865 – Browse Images – 26 Jul 2016
Italy, Benevento, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1810-1942 – Browse Images – 12 Jul 2016
Italy, Cremona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1744-1942 – 361,876 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Forlì-Cesena, Forlì, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1800-1815, 1866-1930 – 139,112 – 19 Jul 2016
Italy, Nuoro, Nuoro, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1915 – 18,865 – 18 Jul 2016
Italy, Savona, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1813, 1838-1936 – 154,198 – 18 Jul 2016
Norway, Probate Index Cards, 1640-1903 – 194,981 – 01 Aug 2016
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997 – 487,853 – 02 Aug 2016
Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 556,500 – 14 Jul 2016
Russia, Tver Church Books, 1722-1918 – 574,803 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1956 – 314,094 – 11 Jul 2016
Spain, Diocese of Cartagena, Catholic Church Records, 1503-1969 – 74,313 – 29 Jun 2016
Spain, Province of Córdoba, Municipal Records, 1509-1947 – 2,131,675 – 15 Jul 2016
Spain, Province of Málaga, Municipal Records, 1760-1956 – 308,744 – 28 Jul 2016
Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1734-1920 – 2,564,491 – 15 Jul 2016

UNITED STATES DATABASES

United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of Freedmen’s Complaints, 1865-1872 – 140,985 – 03 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Ration Records,1865-1872 – 154,587 – 02 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education, 1865-1872 – 145,374 – 01 Aug 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Claim Records, 1865-1872 – 273,418 – 29 Jul 2016
United States, Freedmen’s Bureau Records of Persons and Articles Hired, 1865-1872 – 34,998 – 28 Jul 2016

Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957 – 1,785,018 – 28 Jun 2016
District of Columbia, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1863-1872 – 90,597 – 03 Aug 2016
Georgia World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1940-1945 – 839,636 – 05 Jul 2016
Georgia, County Marriages, 1785-1950 – 779,774 – 20 Jul 2016
Georgia Marriages, 1808-1967 – 1,069,456 – 19 Jul 2016
Illinois, DeKalb County Land Records, 1838-1927 – 57,179 – 01 Aug 2016
Indiana, Civil Marriages, 1828-1957 – 10,571 – 29 Jun 2016
Indiana Marriages, 1780-1992 – 1,008,158 – 28 Jun 2016
Iowa, Armed Forces Grave Registrations, ca. 1835-1998 – 147,078 – 20 Jul 2016
Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979 – 1,532,533 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky Deaths and Burials, 1843-1970 – 627,320 – 30 Jun 2016
Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954 – 1,317,764 – 05 Jul 2016
Maine Vital Records, 1670-1907 – 1,421,557 – 19 Jul 2016
Maryland County Marriages, 1658-1940 – 106,686 – 11 Jul 2016
Maryland Marriages, 1666-1970 – 227,204 – 05 Jul 2016
Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1626-2001 – 2,405,620 – 19 Jul 2016
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 533,517 – 08 Aug 2016
Michigan Probate Records, 1797-1973 – Browse Images – 30 Jun 2016
Minnesota, County Marriages, 1860-1949 – 870,856 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota Marriages, 1849-1950 – 438,331 – 18 Jul 2016
Minnesota, Clay County, School Census Records, 1909-1962 – 586,237 – 08 Aug 2016
Missouri, Civil Marriages, 1820-1874 – 4,883 – 28 Jun 2016
Missouri, Reports of Separation Notices, 1941-1946 – 316,539 – 07 Jul 2016
Missouri State and Territorial Census Records, 1732-1933 – 109,803 – 21 Jul 2016
Montana, Chouteau County Records, 1876-2011 – 9,505 – 15 Jul 2016
New Jersey, State Census, 1855 – 73,030 – 08 Aug 2016
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 5,487,573 – 03 Aug 2016
New York, Church and Civil Marriages, 1704-1995 – 23,819 – 11 Jul 2016
New York Marriages, 1686-1980 – 767,083 – 11 Jul 2016
North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1979 – 1,207,804 – 19 Jul 2016
North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 – 3,457,243 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio, Summit County, Veteran Burial Cards, 1700-1941 – 5,535 – 28 Jun 2016
Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 – 4,709,143 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958 – 2,198,000 – 20 Jul 2016
Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003 – 4,107,607 – 19 Jul 2016
Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962 – 2,548,575 – 19 Jul 2016
Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950 – 2,255,061 – 28 Jun 2016
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages, 1677-1950 – 209,880 – 27 Jul 2016
Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950 – 4,802,418 – 28 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965 – 1,724,715 – 30 Jun 2016
Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1837-1910 – 4,575,333 – 21 Jul 2016
Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977 – 1,575,573 – 19 Jul 2016
Texas Marriages, 1837-1973 – 1,695,783 – 19 Jul 2016
Utah, Tremonton and Garland Obituaries, 1959-2013 – 18,360 – 03 Aug 2016

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798-1937 – 5,794,949 – 08 Aug 2016

CEMETERIES – WORLDWIDE

BillionGraves Index – 18,780,474 – 28 Jul 2016
Find A Grave Index – 146,748,413 – 11 Jul 2016

The 1939 Register of England and Wales Has Launched!

A few days ago, I posted a blog about the 1939 Register. The database launched today with much fanfare. Following is an excerpt from an interesting article posted November 1 at the DailyMail website.

It is a remarkable snapshot of a nation plunged into war.

Dubbed The Wartime Domesday Book, the record of Britain in 1939 will go online for the first time this week.

It lists the entire population of England and Wales, from King George VI to ‘general labourers’ and ‘coal hewers’, two common occupations of the day.

The typical 1939 woman was Mary Smith, a 35-year-old housewife – or ‘unpaid domestic worker’, as it was amusingly listed then.

The average man was called William or John and was 33. He was either a ‘general labourer or coal hewer’, although the most popular profession was ‘retired’.

Read the full article.

The Duchess of Cambridge’s maternal great-grandma Eliza Chandler was a widow and ‘food packer’ in Middlesex according to her entry.
The Duchess of Cambridge’ (Kate Middleton) maternal great-grandma Eliza Chandler was a widow and ‘food packer’ in Middlesex according to her entry.

The 1939 Register of England and Wales – Coming November 2 to FindMyPast.com

For those with family living in England and Wales at the start of WWII, the digitization and Internet access to the 1939 Register is an exciting development. Forty-one million people are included in the records, while records for 28 million will become available at launch. British privacy laws (their 100 year rule) restrict access to some records for some time.

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The following news release is from FindMyPast.com:

Explore your world on the eve of war – 41 million people recorded in one day on the eve of WWII

The 1939 Register will be launched online on November 2nd by Findmypast.com in association with The National Archives. Dubbed ‘The Wartime Domesday Book,’ it is the most comprehensive survey of the population of England and Wales ever taken.

On November 2nd 2015, the eagerly awaited 1939 Register will be launched online by Findmypast, a world leader in family history. Anyone can now discover their family, their home and their community on the eve of WWII. Until now, the most recent information available was the 1911 census. Owing to the 100 year rule, the 1921 census will not be released until 2022, while the 1931 census was destroyed in the war and the 1941 census was never taken. The 1939 Register therefore bridges an important 30-year gap in history.

In September 1939, WWII had just broken out. 65,000 enumerators were employed to visit every house in England and Wales to take stock of the civil population. The information that they recorded was used to issue Identity Cards, plan mass evacuations, establish rationing and co-ordinate other war-time provisions. In the longer term, the 1939 Register would go on to play a central role in the establishment of post-war services like the NHS.

Comprising 1.2 million pages in 7,000 volumes and documenting the lives of 41 million people, the 1939 Register opens a window to a world on the brink of cataclysmic change. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.

Findmypast has undertaken a monumental task in digitising the 1939 Register. Stacked end-to-end, the hard copy volumes would have reached twice the height of St Paul’s Cathedral. Work on conserving, scanning, transcribing and digitising the Register has been ongoing for more than a year. Despite the challenge of translating 65,000 unique sets of handwriting, including updates that have been made by hand up until 1991, Findmypast guarantees at least 98.5% accuracy of readable records. The result is a direct route to the past that will allow users to glimpse their family, their home and their communities in 1939, as they’ve never seen them before.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast says: “The 1939 Register is one of the most important documents of modern British history. It allows us to see where our relatives were living, with whom and what jobs they did at the start of World War II. To help people understand the period better and to create a picture of our world in 1939, we have added a range of contextual information to bring the records to life. Maps, photographs, newspapers, and infographics will immerse the user in the period and give a flavour of what life was like for our parents or grandparents.”

Audrey Collins, family history records specialist at The National Archives says: “The release of the 1939 Register is one of the most important events in family history in a long time. The significance of these documents cannot be underplayed; they provide a snapshot of life on the eve of war. The online publication of the 1939 Register offers us the chance to understand where our families came from, who lived in our neighbourhood, and how it has changed over the years.”

The 1939 Register is available online only at http://www.findmypast.com/. The Register is free to search but there is a charge to view the records with different pay per view packages starting at £6.95. Owing to data protection, there will be some closed records at the time of launch, either because the individual recorded is still living and less than 100 years old or proof of death has not been verified. At time of launch 28 million records will be searchable. The Register will be updated weekly. Findmypast, working with The National Archives, will have an ongoing process to identify records which can be opened on proof of death provided either by matching against robust data sets or supplied by users. Records will also be opened as people reach the age of 100 years+1 day.

For further information please contact Alex Cox; email: acox@findmypast.com Tel: 07464 946769

Prices in American Dollars will be as follows:

Records will be available to purchase for $10.95 per household or $37.95 for our 5 household bundle ($7.59 per household).

About Findmypast
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over four billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including the 1911 Census which they digitised in association with The National Archives.

About The National Archives
The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for the Week of September 21, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

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Check out the Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950, Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013, and Virginia Richmond City Birth Index 1870-1912 additions this week. Millions more records were also added for Italy (Potenza, Rieti, and Trapani) and Colombia. Search for these new records and more by selecting the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

BillionGraves Index – 2,764,124 – 2,764,124 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012 – 0 – 868,609 – Added images to an existing collection
England and Wales Census 1841 – 309 – 224,532 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
France Haute-Garonne Toulouse Censuses 1872 and 1886 – 952 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Potenza Civil Registration (State Archive) 1697-1923 – 0 – 3,139,547 – New browsable image collection.
Italy Rieti Civil Registration (State Archive) 1840-1945 – 0 – 394,525 – New browsable image collection.
Italy Trapani Civil Registration (State Archive) 1906-1928 – 0 – 229,704 – New browsable image collection.

UNITED STATES DATABASES
Ohio County Marriages 1789-2013 – 289,532 – 19,171 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Civil Marriages 1677-1950 – 0 – 1,117,101 – New browsable image collection.
Utah Applications Indian War Service Medals 1905-1912 – 11,658 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Utah Eureka and Payson Births and Deaths 1898-1903 – 4 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Virginia Richmond City Birth Index 1870-1912 – 53,488 – 53,470 – New indexed records and images collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

1861 Census Enumeration Book Pages for Milton and Glasgow Posted at ScotlandsPeople

Scotlands People

The following was received from ScotlandsPeople:

Release of further 1861 Census enumeration book, and updated index for all census years!
A further 1861 Census enumeration book has been indexed and is now available to search on ScotlandsPeople! 15 pages for the Milton, Glasgow area have been made available for the first time. If you are looking for ancestors around Glasgow, then be sure to search these new entries!

You can also browse the entire new 1861 book using the advanced search function with the advanced search query rdno:644 && rdsuffix:7 && enumdist:8.

For more information on using the advanced search function, please follow this link.

We’ve also updated over 44,000 indexes for all census years. So if you’ve had trouble locating an ancestor in the census and believe their name may have been miss-recorded, then you can try searching the new refreshed index.

New PDF feature for viewing multiple page documents
We’ve also added a new feature for viewing multi-page records (Wills & Testaments, Soldiers’ Wills, and Coats of Arms), to allow you to download all pages as a PDF document.

This great new tool means that larger documents, particularly the Wills & Testaments, which can be up to 40 pages, can be viewed, saved and printed as a single document. To download a multi-page document as a PDF, click the blue ‘Download as PDF’ button at the top right of the image viewer.

New Searchable Collections Added Online For Brazil, China, England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Spain, & the USA

The following was received from FamilySearch December 28, 2012:

FamilySearch added an additional 38.5 million new, free indexed records and images this week to its collection. Notable additions include the 6,095,759 indexed records in the new United States World War II Army Enlistment Records collection, the 4,068,907 indexed records for the new United States Germans to America Index from 1850-1897, the 2,922,943 added to the England and Wales Census of 1871, and the 2,608,645 added to the Denmark Estate Records collection from 1436-1964. Other new searchable collections online were added this week for Brazil, China, England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Spain, and the United States. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Miscellaneous Records, 1748-1980 – 0 – 133,932 – New browsable image collection.
China, Collection of Genealogies, 1239-2010 – 0 – 1,078,765 – New browsable image collection.
Denmark, Estate Records, 1436-1964 – 0 – 2,608,645 – Added images to an existing collection.
England and Wales Census, 1871 – 2,695,024 – 227,919 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
England, Manchester, Miscellaneous Records, 1700-1916 – 853,243 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
England, Westminster, Parish Registers, 1538-1912 – 1,276,875 – 43,393 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
Ireland, Landed Estate Court Files, 1850-1885 – 682,055 – 53,799 – New indexed records and images collection.
Italy, Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 193,658 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Messina, Patti, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1823-1941 – 0 – 143,597 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Pesaro e Urbino, Urbino, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 323,971 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Potenza, Potenza, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 298,330 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Siena, Montepulciano, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929 – 0 – 181,893 – Added images to an existing collection.
Russia, Simbirsk Church Books, 1768-1939 – 0 – 994,870 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Diocese of Santander, Catholic Church Records, 1538-1984 – 0 – 757,418 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Diocese of Segovia, Catholic Church Records, 1533-1987 – 0 – 8,311,103 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1931 – 0 – 316,188 – New browsable image collection.
Ukraine, Western Ukraine Catholic Church Book Duplicates, 1600-1937 – 0 – 264,777 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., California, San Francisco, World War I Enemy Alien Registration Affidavits, 1918 – 6,545 – 33,870 – New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., California, County Marriages, 1850-1952 – 1,439,474 – 1,962,567 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
U.S., Florida, Tampa, Passenger Lists, 1898-1945 – 50,103 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
U.S., New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846 – 526,400 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
United States, Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1820-1908 – 0 – 941,009 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Famine Irish Passenger Index, 1846-1851 – 604,596 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Germans to America Index, 1850-1897 – 4,068,907 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
United States, Italians to America Index, 1855-1900 – 845,287 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Russians to America Index, 1834-1897 – 527,394 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 – 6,095,759 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

All 1911 Census Transcriptions Are Now Free Until Nov 18 on Genes Reunited & FindMyPast.co.uk

Leading family history websites genesreunited.co.uk and findmypast.co.uk have teamed up to offer their members free access to all 1911 census transcriptions from today until 18th November 2012.

The 1911 census is a great place to start researching your family history as the records are the most detailed of any census. It includes places of birth, details of siblings, occupations, how many children have been born to the marriage, how many still alive at the time of the census and how many had died.

Debra Chatfield, Marketing Manager of findmypast.co.uk, said: “The 1911 census is an invaluable resource for tracing your ancestors and it’s fantastic to be able to offer this to our members for free.”

About Genes Reunited
Genes Reunited was launched in 2003 as a sister-site to the Internet phenomenon Friends Reunited. Since then it has grown to become the UK’s largest genealogy website.

It marked a revolution in genealogy and ancestry by combining them with Internet social-networking. Members are able to build their family tree by posting it on the site and investigating which ancestors they share with other members. They can also search historical records such as census, birth, marriage, death and military records.

Genes Reunited has 12 million members and over 780 million names listed. One new name is added to the site every single second.

About findmypast.co.uk
Leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk was the first company to make the complete birth, marriage and death indexes for England & Wales available online in April 2003, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation.

Findmypast.co.uk has subsequently digitised many more family history records and now offers access to over 750 million records dating as far back as 875 AD. This allows family historians to search for their ancestors among comprehensive collections of military, census, migration, parish, work and education records, as well as the original comprehensive birth, marriage and death records. The company runs the official 1911 census website for England & Wales in association with The National Archives and has digitised several other record sets from the national collection.

Thanks to Natasha White with Brightsolid, with FindMyPast.co.uk for the above news release.

1940 U.S. Census Community Project Nearly Halfway Complete

The following news release was received from FamilySearch.org:

22 May 2012 – The halfway point for indexing the 1940 U.S. census is fast approaching.

Congratulations and thank you to all of the volunteers participating in this unprecedented genealogical community effort. Currently more than 20 states are at or above 85 percent complete. Six states — Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia, and New Hampshire — are now indexed and searchable by name, location, and family relations. And thanks to the efforts of more than 100,000 volunteers, more states will be added in the coming weeks. Follow the day-to-day indexing status at the1940census.com dashboard and search completed states at familysearch.org/1940census.

Current and Completed Projects
To view a list of currently available indexing projects, along with their record language and completion percentage, visit the FamilySearch indexing updates page. To learn more about individual projects, view the FamilySearch projects page.

New Projects Added

  • Argentina, Santa Fe, Santa Rosa de Calchines y Rosario—Registros Parroquiales, 1888–1927
  • Deutschland, Mecklenburg, Schwerin—1867 Volkszählung [Teil B]
  • Italia, Nuoro—Stato Civile, 1866–1910
  • Nederland, Gelderland—Geboorten burgelijke stand, 1811–1902 [Part 2]
  • Norway—1875 Federal Census [Part F]
  • Panamá—Registros Parroquiales, 1748–1972 [Parte 1]
  • Slovensko, Prešov—štátny oblastný archív záznamov cirkvi, 1592–1935 [Časť A]
  • Sverige, Örebro—Kyrkoböcker till 1860 [Del 6]
  • Sverige, Uppsala—Kyrkoböcker till 1860 [Del 4]
  • Venezuela, Maracaibo—Registros Parroquiales, 1723–1976

View the FamilySearch projects page to see the full list of available projects and to learn more about how to participate in various projects.

Recently Completed Projects
Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process. They will be published at familysearch.org in the near future.

  • Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Part 2 J]
  • U.S., Indiana—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Nevada—1940 Federal Census
  • Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 2 H]
  • U.S., Texas—Deaths, 1890–1976 [Part B]
  • U.S., Wyoming—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Alaska—1940 Federal Census
  • Italia, Napoli, Castellammare di Stabia—Atti di Nascita, 1809–1885, Part 1
  • U.S., Arizona—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Florida—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Texas—County Marriages 1837–1977 [Part C]
  • U.S., Idaho—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Vermont—1940 Federal Census
  • UK, England and Wales—1871 Census for Lincolnshire, Cheshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Rutland
  • Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Parte 2 E]
  • U.S., Montana—1940 Federal Census
  • U.S., Veterans Pension Cards, 1907–1933 [Part A]
  • U.S., Mississippi—1940 Federal Census
  • Canada, Ontario—Marriages, 1869–1927 [Part B]

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The 1940 U.S. Census Now Being Indexed by the US Census Community Project – Delaware Finished

The following news release was received from FamilySearch:

4 April 2012: The 1940 U.S. Census is here and the 1940 US Census Community Project has kicked off to a great start! The excitement and enthusiasm for this project is far greater than anything previously seen in the six years that FamilySearch indexing has been available. Online volunteers completed the indexing for the state of Delaware in the first 24 hours. They are now indexing Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia!

It may take up to two weeks to make all of the states available for indexing, so check the current projects page or follow the feed on Facebook to stay up to date on the next states to be released.

Current and Completed Projects
To view a list of currently available indexing projects, along with their record language and completion percentage, visit the FamilySearch indexing updates page. To learn more about individual projects, view the FamilySearch projects page.

New Projects Added

  • Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Cartões de Imigração, 1900–1965 [Part 2 J]
  • U.S. 1940 Census—Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia
  • U.S., Arkansas—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918U.S., Georgia—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Indiana Steuben—County Marriages 1811-1959
  • U.S., Tennessee—County Marriages, 1790–1950 [Part G]
  • U.S., Texas—Deaths, 1890–1976 [Part C]

View the FamilySearch Projects page to see the full list of available projects and to learn more about how to participate.

Recently Completed Projects
(Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process. They will be published at familysearch.org in the near future.)

  • U.S., Alabama—County Marriages, 1809–1950 [Part C]
  • U.S., Alabama—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Missouri—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • U.S., Ohio—Tax Records, 1800–1850 [Part 5]
  • U.S., Texas—WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917–1918
  • UK, England and Wales—1871 Census for Lancashire and Yorkshire, and Durham [Part C]
  • U.S., Indiana, Morgan— County Marriages 1811-1959
  • U.S.—Index to Correspondence of the Record and Pension Office, 1889–1904

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Indexing Projects at beta.FamilySearch.org for the Holidays

The following was received from Paul Nauta, With FamilySearch:

FamilySearch beta

FamilySearch volunteers have some exciting new indexing projects to work on during this holiday season. Recently released projects include records from Canada, Mexico, Ireland, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and the United States. There are also projects from four different countries that were recently completed and will soon be available for searching at beta.familysearch.org.

New Projects in the Past Two Weeks

· Canada, Bas-Canada—Recensement de 1842

· Canada, Ontario—Marriages, 1869–1927 [Part B]

· Ireland—Tithe Applotment Books, 1824–1840

· Jamaica—Civil Births, 1900–1930 [Part C]

· Mexico, Oaxaca—1930 Federal Censo

· Nicaragua, Masaya—Registros Civiles, 1879–1984

· U.S.—Naval Enlistment Registers, 1855–1891

· U.S., Connecticut—WWII Draft Registration Cards, 1942

· U.S., Iowa—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Maine—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Texas—Birth Records, 1903–1934 [Part C]

· U.S., Wisconsin—1930 Federal Census

(See the chart below for a complete list and current status of all indexing projects.)

Recently Completed Projects

(Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process. They will be published at beta.familysearch.org in the near future.)

· België—Burgerlijke Stand, 1851–1900 [Deel D]

· Canada, Ontario—Marriages, 1869–1927 [Part A]

· U.K., Bristol—Parish Registers, 1837–1900 [Part H]

· U.S., Arkansas—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Connecticut—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Louisiana—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Maryland—WWII Draft Registration, 1942

· U.S., Puerto Rico—1920 Censo Federal

· U.S., Rhode Island—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., Vermont—1930 Federal Census

· U.S., West Virginia—WWII Draft Registration, 1942

Current FamilySearch Indexing Projects, Record Language, and Percent Completion

Argentina, Balvanera—Registros Parroquiales, 1833–1934 [Parte B] – Spanish – 58%

Argentina, Cordoba—Registros Parroquiales, 1722–1924 [Parte B] – Spanish – 89%

Argentina, Santa Fe—Registros Parroquiales, 1634–1926 [Parte A] – Spanish – 37%

Brasil—Registro Civil, 1852–1914 [Parte 2A] – Portuguese – 1%
Brasil, Florianópolis—Registros da Igreja, 1751–1954 [Parte A] – Portuguese – 13%
Brasil, Pernambuco, Recife—Registro Civil, 1900–1920 – Portuguese – 3%
Brasil, Rio de Janeiro—Matrimonios, 1900–1910 [Piloto] – Portuguese – 52%

Canada—Passenger Lists, 1881–1922 – English – 5%

Canada, Bas-Canada—Recensement de 1842 – French – (New)

Canada, New Brunswick—Deaths, 1815–1938 [Part B] – English – 18%

Canada, Ontario—Marriages, 1869–1927 [Part B] – English – (New)

Česká republika, Litoměřice—Matriky, 1552-1905 [část 1] – (Tschechien, Litomerice—Kirchenbücher [Teil 1]) – German – 92%

Chile—Registros Civiles, 1885–1900 – Spanish – 28%

Chile, Concepción—Registros Civiles, 1885–1903 [Parte 2B] – Spanish – 35%

Colombia, Bucaramanga—Registros Parroquiales, 1649–1959 – Spanish – 13%

Colombia, Marinilla—Registros Parroquiales, 1815–1959 – Spanish – 65%

Deutschland, Baden, Achern—Kirchenbücher, 1810–1869 [Part D] – German – 13%

El Salvador—Registros Civiles, 1835–1910 – Spanish – 24%

España, Andalucía—Registros Civiles, 1837–1870 – Spanish – 4%

España, Lugo—Registros Parroquiales, 1530–1930 [Parte 1] – Spanish – 42%

France, Cherbourg—Registres Paroissiaux, 1802–1907 – French – 44%

France, Coutances—Registres Paroissiaux 1802–1907 – French – 56%

France, Paris—Registres Protestants, 1612–1906 [Partie D] – French – 83%

France, Saint-Lo—Registres Paroissiaux, 1802–1907 – French – 60%

Guatemala, Guatemala—Registros Civiles, 1800–1900 – Spanish – 10%

Guatemala, Guatemala—Registros Civiles, 1877–1900 – Spanish – 26%

Ireland—Tithe Applotment Books, 1824–1840 – English – (New)

Italia, Napoli, Castellammare di Stabia—Atti di Morte, 1809–1936 [Parte B] – Italian – 73%

Italy, Trento—Baptisms, 1784–1924 [Part 2A] – Italian – 43%

Jamaica—Civil Births, 1900–1930 [Part C] – English – (New)

Mexico, D.F.—Bautismos, 1536–1900 [Parte A] – Spanish – 2%

Mexico, Oaxaca—1930 Federal Censo – Spanish – (New)

Mexico, Puebla—1930 Federal Censo – Spanish – 82%

New Zealand—Passenger Lists, 1871–1915 [Part 2A] – English – 8%

Nicaragua, Managua—Registros Civiles, 1879–1984 [Part 3B] – Spanish – 94%

Nicaragua, Masaya—Registros Civiles, 1879–1984 – Spanish – (New)

Norge —Tinglysningskort, 1640–1903 – Norwegian – 2%

Perú, Lima—Registros Civiles, 1887–1921 [Parte A] – Spanish – 77%

Portugal, Setúbal—Registros da Igreja, 1581–1910 – Portuguese – 24%

República Dominicana—Nacimientos Civiles, 1828–1906 – Spanish – 1%

Russland, Sankt Petersburg—Kirchenbuchduplikat, 1833–1885 – German – 38%

South Africa, Cape Province—Church Records, 1660–1970 – Afrikaans, Dutch, English – 64%

Sverige, Södermanland—Kyrkoböcker, till 1860 [Del 1] – Swedish – 69%

Sverige, Uppsala—Kyrkoböcker, till 1860 [Del 1] – Swedish – 73%

Sverige, Örebro—Kyrkoböcker, till 1860 [Del 1] – Swedish – 30%

U.K., Essex—Parish Registers, 1538–1900 [Part A] – English – 14%

U.K., Manchester—Parish Registers, 1813–1925 [Part B] – English – 11%

U.K., Warwickshire—Parish Registers, 1538–1900 [Part 2 Adv] – English/ Old English – 28%

Uruguay—Registros Civiles (Nacimientos), 1879–1930 – Spanish – 5%

U.S.—Naval Enlistment Registers, 1855–1891 – English – (New)

U.S., Alabama—County Marriages, 1809–1950 [Part A] – English – 60%

U.S., Arkansas—County Marriages, 1837–1957 [IX] – English – 58%

U.S., Arkansas—WWII Draft Registration, 1942 – English – 39%

U.S., California—County Marriages, 1850–1952 [Part B] – English – 70%

U.S., Connecticut—WWII Draft Registration Cards, 1942 – English – (New)

U.S., District of Columbia—County Marriages, 1811–1950 [Part A] – English – 39%

U.S., District of Columbia—Deaths, 1874–1959 – English – 86%

U.S., Illinois—County Marriages, 1810–1934 [Part A] – English – 65%

U.S., Indiana, Bartholomew—County Marriages, 1811–1959 – English – 47%

U.S., Iowa—1930 Federal Census – English – (New)

U.S., Iowa—County Births, 1880–1935 [Part A] – English – 11%

U.S., Iowa—County Marriages, 1838–1992 [Part A] – English – 45%

U.S., Maine—1930 Federal Census – English – (New)

U.S., Minnesota—County Marriages, 1860–1949 [Part A] – English – 35%

U.S., New Jersey—County Marriages, 1682–1956 [Part 1] – English – 25%

U.S., New York—Marriage Licenses, 1908–1938 [Part A] – English – 37%

U.S., New York—Marriages, 1908–1935 [Part A] – English – 34%

U.S., North Carolina—County Marriages, 1762–1959 [Part B] – English – 20%

U.S., North Carolina—Freedmen Letters, 1862–1870 – English – 10%

U.S., Oklahoma—Allotment Records, 1899–1907 – English – 74%

U.S., Oklahoma—County Marriages, 1891–1959 [Part B] – English – 32%

U.S., Puerto Rico—1910 Censo Federal – Spanish – 11%

U.S., Puerto Rico—Nacimientos Civiles, 1836–1930 [Parte B] – Spanish – 5%

U.S., Tennessee—County Marriages, 1790–1950 [Part B] – English – 29%

U.S., Tennessee—County Marriages, 1790–1950 [Part C] – English – 42%

U.S., Texas—Birth Records, 1903–1934 [Part C] – English – (New)

U.S., Texas—County Marriages, 1837–1977 [Part B] – English – 21%

U.S., Wisconsin—1930 Federal Census – English – (New)

Venezuela—Nacimientos Civiles, 1873–1909 – Spanish – 1%

Venezuela, Mérida—Registros Parroquiales, 1654–1992 [Parte 2] – Spanish – 25%

Österreich, Wiener Meldezettel, 1890–1925 – German – 33%

Россия, Самара—Метрические книги церкви, 1869–1917 (часть 1) – Russian – 66%

Украина, Киев—Метрические книги русской православной церкви, 1843–1845 [Часть B] – Russian – 9%

Current FamilySearch Partner Projects, Record Language, and Percent Completion

Belgique—Registres Civile, 1851–1900 [Partie A] – French – 61%

Brasil, Minas Gerais—Church Records, 1706-1952 – Portuguese – 1%

Canada, Ontario, Toronto—Trust Cemeteries, 1826–1935 – English – 18%

Deutschland, Westfalen, Minden—Volkszählung, 1880–1900 – German – 11%

España, Avila, Barroman—Registros Parroquiales, 1550–1930 – Spanish – 12%

España, Avila, Madrigal y Garganta—Registros Parroquiales, 1530–1935 – Spanish – 93%

España, Malaga—Registros Civiles, 1846–1870 – Spanish – 54%

France, Quimper et Leon, St. Louis—Registres Paroissiaux, 1722–1909 – French – 77%

Norway—1875 Census [Part B] – Norwegian – 63%

Philippines, Lingayen, Dagupan—Registros Parroquiales, 1615–1982 – Spanish – 72%

U.K., Norfolk—Parish Registers, 1538–1900 – English – 21%

U.S., Ohio—Tax Records, Post 1825 [Part 3] – English – 91%

U.S., Utah, Salt Lake County—Birth Registers, 1890–1908 – English – 67%

U.S., Utah, Salt Lake County—Death Registers, 1848–1940 – English – 33%

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

British Census Serves Up Some Wimbledon Quirks

The following news release was received from Debra Chatfieid, marketing manager at findmypast.co.uk:

As the 2010 Wimbledon Championships head towards the closing stages, findmypast.co.uk leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk has delved into its collection of census records from 1841 to 1911 to find some interesting tennis-themed entries..

The finds…
In the 1891 census, a Miss Mary Wimbledon, aged 3, can be found in the house of her 22 year old sister Ann Ball at 160 Latimer Road, London. Also present in the house were Ann Ball’s husband Richard and their son James, who was 7 weeks old.

Ann Ball can also be found 10 years earlier in the 1881 census when she still carried her maiden name, Wimbledon. She was recorded living with her parents, William and Elizabeth Wimbledon and her four siblings. The family were living at 14 Thresher Cottages, Kensington, where William worked as a brick maker and Elizabeth as a washer.

In the 1901 census, a male Venus Williams can be found working as a labourer in Hampshire. Venus’ parents were hawkers and lived in a tent / caravan along with Venus’ seven other siblings.

A Fred Perry can be found in the 1861 census living with his parents and sister who were tailors in Sawbridgeworth. Another person by the name of Fred Perry can be found in Lenton, Nottinghamshire as a lace winder, aged 14. Much like the Fred Perry of Wimbledon fame, the name seems to lend itself to those working with fabric!

In the 1841 census, findmypast.co.uk found a rather large Tennis family living in Smith Street in Warwick. The head of the household was William Tennis (40), recorded living with his wife Margaret Tennis (40) and the couple’s three daughters and six sons – creating a household of 11 Tennis’.

Debra Chatfield, Marketing Manager at findmypast.co.uk, said: “These finds outline just a few of the fascinating people who can be found in our census collection. The census records are an amazing resource for researching our own family histories, for providing a snapshot of British social history and for having fun at the same time.”

For more information log on to www.findmypast.co.uk

Entire 1911 Census Now Available Online for the First Time – at 1911census.co.uk

Thanks to Debra Chatfield for the following press release:

Records for Wales, Channel Islands and Isle of Man and military serving overseas now online 1911census-logo1

Following the initial release of the Southern English records in January 2009, 1911census.co.uk now hosts the complete 1911 census records for people living in England, Wales, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. What’s more, for the first time in a British census, full details are available of British Army personnel and their families stationed overseas. There were 135,866 people serving in the British Army and 36,804 people serving in the Royal Navy across the British Empire in 1911, including 69,785 serving in India.

The 1911census.co.uk website service has been developed by UK-based family history website findmypast.com, owned by brightsolid, in association with The National Archives. Completed by 36 million householders on Sunday, 2 April 1911, the census records show the name, age, place of birth, marital status and occupation of every resident in every home as well as their relationship to the head of the household and the online records include images of our ancestors’ own handwriting. For the first time the enumerators’ summary books for the whole of England and Wales have also gone online today, recording details of all properties in the country in 1911 – a great resource for anyone interested in local history or house histories. The 1911 census records have been released three years earlier than the scheduled 2012 date as a result of public demand for the 1911 census, which will be a key resource for family historians.*

Debra Chatfield, Marketing Manager at findmypast.com, says: ‘”We’re delighted that the final records from the 1911 census have been published online including the military records and the records for Wales, the Isle of Man and Channel Islands. We hope people of all ages will gain a huge amount of valuable information about their ancestors by consulting the records and that they’ll discover new chapters of their family history that they previously knew very little or nothing about.”

Oliver Morley, Director of Customer and Business Development at The National Archives, commented: “It’s wonderful to see that so many people are discovering a new passion for family history through the 1911 census. Bringing this project to completion has been one of the most exciting events for us this year, and to know that so many people have been able to access part of their personal history online shows how valuable it can be to make these records available via the web.”

1911 Wales Census Goes Online Today at 1911census.co.uk

The following news release was received from Debra Chatfield, findmypast.com

Online access to the records of 2.4 million people living in Wales in 1911

2.4 million people were recorded living in Wales in the census taken on the night of Sunday, 2 April, 1911. Today, after nearly 100 years, the Welsh census records are available to the public at www.1911census.co.uk.

Due to public demand for access to the 1911 census, the records have been released as soon as each region’s records have been digitised. Following the initial release of 1911 records in January 2009, the records of people living in Wales in 1911 are being made available today for the first time.

The 1911 census records contain details about the lives of the ancestors of many of Wales’ famous sons and daughters, such as Richard Burton, Dylan Thomas, Kylie Minogue and Tom Jones.

The census covered Wales, England, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, as well as recording those aboard Royal Naval and Merchant vessels at sea and in foreign ports and, for the first time in a British census, full details of British Army personnel and their families in military establishments overseas. It is the most detailed census since UK records began and the first for which the original census schedules have been preserved – complete with our ancestors’ own handwriting – providing a fascinating insight into British society nearly a century ago.

www.1911census.co.uk is easy to access and enables the public to view high quality colour images of their ancestors’ original handwritten census returns. Transcribed text versions of the records ensure they are fully searchable by name or address.

Public demand for the 1911 census, which will be a key resource for family historians, has resulted in the records being released earlier than the scheduled 2012 date. To make this early online release to the public possible, the 1911 census team worked around the clock for two years – scanning on average one census page per second. In line with data protection legislation, certain sensitive information relating to infirmity and to children of women prisoners will be held back until 2012.

Comprehensive and rigorously tested, www.1911census.co.uk has been developed by UK-based family history website findmypast.com, owned by brightsolid, in association with The National Archives.

Debra Chatfield, Marketing Manager at findmypast.com, said: “This latest release from the 1911 census offers a crucial new entry point to Welsh family history research for a wide range of people, from novice family historians to seasoned genealogists who have hit a ‘wall’ in their family tree research. As well as helping people trace their Welsh ancestors, these records shed more light on our predecessors’ day-to-day lifestyles, providing a snapshot of a day in their lives, with details of their occupations, housing arrangements and social status.”

The 1911 census is huge – occupying over two kilometres of shelving – an incredible eight million paper census returns have been transcribed to create over 16 million digital images. This makes the 1911 census one of the biggest digitisation projects ever undertaken by The National Archives in association with a commercial partner.

Oliver Morley, Director of Customer and Business Development at The National Archives, commented: “This is a major achievement. By teaming up with findmypast.com, we are bringing history to life for millions. This remarkable record is available online to researchers and family historians all over the world for future generations. The 1911 census is a poignant reflection of how different life was in early 20 century Wales, before the Great War.”

Handwritten records
Completed by all householders in Wales and England on Sunday, 2 April 1911, the census records show the name, age, place of birth, marital status and occupation of every resident in every home, as well as their relationship to the head of the household.

People will also have unique access to their ancestors’ handwriting as the original householders’ schedules were preserved and used as working documents rather than copying the details in to summary books as was the case in previous census years. The launch of the records also creates a starting point for people to trace their own family tree by looking up their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents who were alive in the year 1911.

‘Fertility Census’
The 1911 census was the first to ask questions relating to fertility in marriage. Married women were asked to state how long they had been married and how many children had been born from that marriage. The census also provides a fascinating snapshot of the population of the country just a few years before a whole generation of young men perished in the Great War of 1914-1918.

How to use the 1911 Census records

  • Log on to www.1911census.co.uk and register for free
  • Search for an ancestor in 1911 by entering their name
  • If the name is common you can enter their approximate year of birth, which will help to narrow down the results
  • Search for an address to look up the history of your house or an ancestor’s address in 1911
  • Pay as you go to view each record. You will be charged 10 credits per transcript and 30 credits for each original household page. Visitors to the website can buy 60 credits for £6.95.
  • Findmypast.com vouchers are also valid on 1911census.co.uk. Vouchers can be purchased from The National Archives bookshop and redeemed on findmypast.com. Credits can then be spent on both findmypast.com and 1911census.co.uk.
  • For more information about using the 1911 census for family history research, ‘Census: The Expert Guide’ by Peter Christian and David Annal is available from The National Archives online bookshop at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Michael Parkinson’s Roots are Found in the 1911 British Census of Yorkshire

You can now find families from not only West Yorkshire, but East and North Yorkshire as well as other areas of Britain (not all are posted yet), in the 1911 British Census at www.1911census.co.uk

And if you happen to be related to Sir Michael Parkinson, someone’s already found your family for you. The following excerpt is a teaser from a good article by Kate O’hara in the March 24, 2009 edition of the Yorkshire Post.

Sir Michael Parkinson

He is one of Britain’s best-known presenters, famous for interviewing legends such as Muhammad Ali and The Beatles, and a knight, but historical records released today reveal details of Michael Parkinson’s humble ancestry in Yorkshire.

The former Yorkshire Evening Post journalist’s grandmother and grandfather are among those whose poignantly hand-written details can be viewed by the public as parts of the 1911 go online today.

The 1911 records were not due to be released until 2012 but demand was so high that were released early.

The initial release was in January this year and included the records for West Yorkshire. Today the records of people living in East and North Yorkshire are available.

The census covered England, Wales, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, as well as recording those aboard Royal Naval and Merchant vessels at sea and in foreign ports. For the first time in a British census it also included full details of British Army personnel and their families in military establishments overseas.

It is the most detailed census since UK records began and the first for which the original census schedules have been preserved – complete with peoples’ own handwriting – providing a fascinating insight into British society nearly a century ago.

The census team worked around the clock for two years – scanning on average one census page per second. In line with data protection legislation, certain sensitive information relating to infirmity and to children of women prisoners will be held back until 2012.

Read the full article.

1911 British Census Goes Online

1911censusThe following press release was received today from Nicola Hussey, Lansons Communications.

36 million people were recorded in the British census taken on the night of Sunday, 2 April, 1911. Today, after nearly 100 years, these census records are available to the public at www.1911census.co.uk.

The census covered England, Wales, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, as well as recording those aboard Royal Naval and Merchant vessels at sea and in foreign ports and, for the first time in a British census, full details of British Army personnel and their families in military establishments overseas. It is the most detailed census since UK records began and the first for which the original census schedules have been preserved – complete with our ancestors’ own handwriting – providing a fascinating insight into British society nearly a century ago.

From today over 27 million people’s census entries – 80 per cent of the English records – will be available. A further nine million records of people from the remaining counties of England, Wales, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, as well as the naval and overseas military records, will be made available over the coming months.

www.1911census.co.uk is easy to access and enables the public to view high quality colour images of their ancestors’ original handwritten census returns. Transcribed text versions of the records ensure they are fully searchable by name or address.

Public demand for the 1911 census, which will be a key resource for family historians, has resulted in the records being released earlier than the scheduled 2012 date. To make this early online release to the public possible, the 1911 census team worked around the clock for two years – scanning on average one census page per second. In line with data protection legislation, certain sensitive information relating to infirmity and to children of women prisoners will be held back until 2012.

Comprehensive and rigorously tested, www.1911census.co.uk has been developed by UK-based family history website findmypast.com, owned by brightsolid, in association with The National Archives.

Elaine Collins, Commercial Director at findmypast.com, said: “The 1911 census offers a crucial new entry point to family history research for a wide range of people, from novice family historians to seasoned genealogists who have hit a ‘wall’ in their family tree research. As well as helping people trace their ancestors, these records shed more light on our ancestors’ day-to-day lifestyles, providing a snapshot of a day in their lives, with details of their occupations, housing arrangements and social status.”

The 1911 census is huge – occupying over two kilometres of shelving – an incredible eight million paper census returns have been transcribed to create over 16 million digital images. This makes the 1911 census one of the biggest digitisation projects ever undertaken by The National Archives in association with a commercial partner.

Oliver Morley, Director of Customer and Business Development at The National Archives, commented: “This is a major achievement. By teaming up with findmypast.com, we are bringing history to life for millions. This remarkable record is available online to researchers and family historians all over the world for future generations. The 1911 census is a poignant reflection of how different life was in early 20 century Britain, before the Great War.”

Due to the widespread popularity of family history, it is anticipated that www.1911census.co.uk will experience a high level of visitors logging on to search the records, especially in the first weeks of launch.

Elaine Collins, Commercial Director at findmypast.com, advises: ‘”We aim to deliver a quality service that has high but not infinite capacity. If visitors do experience a short delay in accessing the records via www.1911census.co.uk soon after launch, we would advise them to try again later when the website becomes less busy. www.1911census.co.uk is here to stay and access to the online census records will be unlimited permanently from today.”

Handwritten records
Completed by all householders in England and Wales on Sunday, 2 April 1911, the census records show the name, age, place of birth, marital status and occupation of every resident in every home, as well as their relationship to the head of the household.

People will also have unique access to their ancestors’ handwriting as the original householders’ schedules were preserved and used as working documents rather than copying the details in to summary books as was the case in previous census years.

The records contain details about the lives of many important British historical figures, such as David Lloyd George, the contemporary Prime Minister H.H. Asquith and ‘Bloomsbury Set’ author Virginia Woolf. The launch of the records also creates a starting point for people to trace their own family tree by looking up their parents, grandparents and great-grandparents who were alive in the year 1911.

‘Fertility Census’
The 1911 census was the first to ask questions relating to fertility in marriage. Married women were asked to state how long they had been married and how many children had been born from that marriage. The census also provides a fascinating snapshot of the population of the country just a few years before a whole generation of young men perished in the Great War of 1914-1918.

How to use the 1911 Census records

* Log on to www.1911census.co.uk and register for free
* Search for an ancestor in 1911 by entering their name
* If the name is common you can enter their approximate year of birth, which will help to narrow down the results
* Search for an address to look up the history of your house or an ancestor’s address in 1911 (this function will be available in summer 2009)
* Pay as you go to view each record. You will be charged 10 credits per transcript and 30 credits for each original household page. Visitors to the website can buy 60 credits for £6.95.
* Findmypast.com vouchers will also be valid on 1911census.co.uk. Vouchers can be purchased from The National Archives bookshop and redeemed on findmypast.com. Credits can then be spent on both findmypast.com and 1911census.co.uk.
* For more information about using the 1911 census for family history research, ‘Census: The Expert Guide’ by Peter Christian and David Annal is available from The National Archives online bookshop at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Note: The 1911 census is a special case at the request of the Information Commissioner all records of infirmity as listed on the records (e.g. ‘deaf’, ‘dumb’, ‘blind’, ‘lunatic’ etc.) have been obscured and will not be available to view until January 2012.

The 1911 Census is a special case in that parts of it are being made available early. Since 1920, government has given a commitment that information collected in a census will be kept confidential for 100 years.