Philyaw Family Bible Donated to the Onslow County Museum

Philyaw-Family-Bible-250pw

More than a century ago, near Comfort, John Robert Philyaw wrote his name in his Bible.

He added his second wife’s name, Susan Jones Philyaw, and as they were born, the names of their 15 children.

Today, the 98 grandchildren, at least 108 great-grandchildren and countless other relatives who claim John Robert Philyaw as their ancestor are using that Bible, among other genealogical tools, to fill in their family tree…

Recently, Fowler and other Philyaws donated the Bible to the Onslow County Museum, where it is being kept in an acid-free box before on display for about a year before it goes into climate controlled archives, according to Patricia Hughey, Onslow County Museum collections manager.

For more information on the what resources are available for genealogical research at the Onslow County Museum, visit onslowcountync.gov/museum or call 910-324-5008.

Read the full article.

Interesting Comments and Observations about the Hitler Surname

In the Yesteryear column of the guardian.co.uk is found an interesting column made up of comments about the surname Hitler. Following are just a couple as a teaser. Keep in mind that these are just comments, some lacking in veracity.

Was Hitler a common family name before 1945? What did Hitlers change their names to after the second world war?
John Burton, O’Connor, Australia

Hitler is not a particularly common German surname. In fact, Hitler himself was originally called Schicklegruber. Some have speculated that he changed his name to hide his Jewish descent.
Matt James, Sheffield, UK

Adolf Hitler was never called Schickelgruber. This was the name of his paternal grandmother. His father took the name of his supposed father, which was spelled Hiedler or Hitler according to preference, when he was 40, well before Adolf was born. Adolf Hitler had three surviving siblings. His half-brother Alois lived in Liverpool and had a son called William Patrick, who died in 1987. He changed his name and lived in the USA. He is believed to have left 4 sons, who have decided not to have children in order not to perpetuate the line. His sister Paula never married and had no children. She was known as Paula Wolf for a lot of her life. His half sister Angela married and had a daughter, Geli Raubal, who died in 1930. I believe there was also a son Leo Raubal who died in action in 1942. It is unlikely that the story of Adolf Hitler’s father being half Jewish is true. But since Anna Maria Schickelgruber died when her son was 5 years old no one will ever know the real details of what seems a very complicated story.
Susan Deal, Sheffield, UK

Read the full column.

Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition; On Sale at 50% off for a FEW Days ONLY!

gpc426A couple of months ago, Family Roots Publishing made a special purchase of several hundred copies of the 4th Edition of the Directory of Family Associations. The book was written by Elizabeth Petty Bentley and Deborah Ann Carl in 2001, and is the latest family association directory available. No further editions are planned at this time. Most genealogical research within the United States and much of Europe can easily be done for the last 200 years, if not much more. Figuring an average generation as 25 years, that’s eight generations of ancestors – or 510 different and unique surnames in the family tree! If you are working on that many surnames or even a small portion of that (as many of us are), information on family associations is invaluable to our research.

NOW, you may purchase the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition for 50% off, making it just $17.48 (plus $5.50 p&h), but ONLY for a few days!

There are many uses for a directory of family associations, but undoubtedly the best use for it is for genealogical research – for making contact with family members, sharing information about family history, developing common ground between people of the same surname, arranging reunions, discovering who’s out there and where you connect on the family tree, and finding out where you can go with your own research. And there are a host of other uses – kin searching and heir searching, for example, determining family migration patterns, even marketing your own genealogical research. The possibilities are endless.

Based largely on data received in response to questionnaires sent to family associations, reunion committees, and one-name societies, the 4th edition of the Directory of Family Associations gives you access to a range of possibilities, offering information on approximately 6,000 family associations across the United States.

The book starts with a section on Multi-family Resources, then launches into the bulk of the book listing the 6000 associations. It literally runs from Aaldericnk through Zyrkle.

This book is an immensely useful A-Z directory of family associations giving addresses, phone numbers, contact persons, and publications (if any). The book is 12 years old, so undoubtedly some of the contact info will be bad. However, having the data that tells of an association that did exist can also be useful. So whether you’re just starting your genealogical research or already waist deep in your investigations, planning a family reunion or hoping to attend one, or simply curious about your family or your surname, the course you choose from now on may be partially governed by this indispensable directory.

Note that the reviews on the various editions of this book have been outstanding. Library Journal listed the 1991 edition as a “Best Reference Book of 1991.”

Get your copy of the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition for 50% off from Family Roots Publishing

Surname Demographics in the United States

Have you ever wondered how popular your surname is? Here is a website that uses the 2000 U.S. Census to rank your families names.

Census-2000-350p

Discover the ethnic origin and meaning of last names. Find out how surnames are ranked in popularity, how many people in the United States of America bear a particular name according to the 2000 US Censuses.

10 most popular last names in the USA:

  • Surname Rank
  • SMITH 1
  • JOHNSON 2
  • WILLIAMS 3
  • BROWN 4
  • JONES 5
  • MILLER 6
  • DAVIS 7
  • GARCIA 8
  • RODRIGUEZ 9
  • WILSON 10

Two examples I tried were Meitzler & Daffern, two of my family names.

MEITZLER

Last Name MEITZLER
Rank 36531
Count 578
Race / ethnic distribution
The 2000 US Census says that

  • 97.06%, or 561 total occurrences, of those with this surname see themselves as being white
  • undisclosed % as black
  • undisclosed % as Asian and Pacific Islander
  • 0%, or 0 total occurrences, as American Indian and Native Alaskan
  • 1.56%, or 9 total occurrences, as two or more races, and
  • 1.21%, or 7 total occurrences, as Hispanic ethnic origin.

DAFFERN

Last Name DAFFERN
Rank 42363
Count 482
Race / ethnic distribution
The 2000 US Census says that

  • 95.64%, or 461 total occurrences, of those with this surname see themselves as being white
  • undisclosed % as black
  • undisclosed % as Asian and Pacific Islander
  • 1.24%, or 6 total occurrences, as American Indian and Native Alaskan
  • undisclosed % as two or more races, and
  • 1.66%, or 8 total occurrences, as Hispanic ethnic origin.

These numbers actually surprise me I thought that Daffern was a more popular name, with more than 482 people in the 2000 census.

To visit the website go to http://www.americanlastnames.us/

To view the site a bit better on mobile devices, see: http://www.americanlastnames.com.

Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition – on Sale at 50% off Through Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013.

Directory of Family Assoc
Family Roots Publishing just made a special purchase of several hundred copies of the 4th Edition of the Directory of Family Associations. The book was written by Elizabeth Petty Bentley and Deborah Ann Carl in 2001, and is the latest family association directory available. No further editions are planned at this time. Most genealogical research within the United States and much of Europe can easily be done for the last 200 years, if not much more. Figuring an average generation as 25 years, that’s eight generations of ancestors – or 510 different and unique surnames in the family tree! If you are working on that many surnames or even a small portion of that (as many of us are), information on family associations is invaluable to our research. Thus the FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer of The Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition this week.

You may purchase the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition for 50% off, making it just $17.48 (plus $5.50 p&h) through midnight EST (Not MST) Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013.

There are many uses for a directory of family associations, but undoubtedly the best use for it is for genealogical research – for making contact with family members, sharing information about family history, developing common ground between people of the same surname, arranging reunions, discovering who’s out there and where you connect on the family tree, and finding out where you can go with your own research. And there are a host of other uses – kin searching and heir searching, for example, determining family migration patterns, even marketing your own genealogical research. The possibilities are endless.

Based largely on data received in response to questionnaires sent to family associations, reunion committees, and one-name societies, the 4th edition of the Directory of Family Associations gives you access to a range of possibilities, offering information on approximately 6,000 family associations across the United States.

The book starts with a section on Multi-family Resources, then launches into the bulk of the book listing the 6000 associations. It literally runs from Aaldericnk through Zyrkle.

This book is an immensely useful A-Z directory of family associations giving addresses, phone numbers, contact persons, and publications (if any). The book is 12 years old, so undoubtedly some of the contact info will be bad. However, having the data that tells of an association that did exist can also be useful. So whether you’re just starting your genealogical research or already waist deep in your investigations, planning a family reunion or hoping to attend one, or simply curious about your family or your surname, the course you choose from now on may be partially governed by this indispensable directory.

Purchase the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition for 50% off, making it just $17.48 (plus $5.50 p&h) through midnight EST (Not MST) Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. Paper – perfect bound; 8.5×11; 328pp; ISBN: 9780806316796; Item #: GPC426

Note that the reviews on the various editions of this book have been outstanding. Library Journal listed the 1991 edition as a “Best Reference Book of 1991.”

Family Biographies Added for 10 More Counties to My Genealogy Hound

I have written about My Genealogy Hound in the past. They now have over 16,000 biographies posted. The following is info. I just received from them. Good stuff…

Family biography additions to the My Genealogy Hound website have been completed for ten more counties during the last month. The newest biographical additions are for Sebastian County, Arkansas; Greene County, Illinois; Warrick County, Indiana; Shawnee County, Kansas; Ballard County, Kentucky; Miller, Moniteau, and Morgan Counties, Missouri; and Fayette and and Hardeman County, Tennessee.

This brings the number of completed counties on My Genealogy Hound to 110 counties in ten states. Additional counties are continually being added with biographies currently being added for Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; Miami County, Ohio, Spencer County, Indiana; Page County, Iowa, Clark County, Missouri; and Crawford County, Arkansas.

In addition, My Genealogy Hound also features a growing collection of more than 400 vintage county maps. Currently, a county map is available for every county in Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee with additional maps available for counties in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma and the Indian Nations, and Texas. Additional county maps are also frequently added.

The My Genealogy Hound website currently features more than 16,000 family biographies and more than 23,000 pages in total. Biographies can be quickly and easily accessed by county and state or by family surname. All of the biography and map resources on My Genealogy Hound are available at no cost of any kind with no memberships or sign-ins needed to access.

The My Genealogy Hound website is located at:
http://www.mygenealogyhound.com/

Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy

cf8465Let me start with a simplified, and probably more than you will ever need, introduction to Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy. In short, surnames of 17th and 18th century colonists have changed over 400 years. This dictionary provides a brief, yet thorough, explanation of these linguistic changes along with a substantial list of surnames with their meaning and/or origin. Entries also provide some or all of the following information: the name of the first French-Canadian bearer of the name, the name of his parents, his place of origin in France, the name of his spouse and the names of her parents, and the place of his marriage.

That synopsis should just about cover it for most people, but for those who like big words, here is the advanced version, in the words of the author:

“Some 400 years later, it should come as no surprise to find that important differences, both linguistic and distributional, have developed between the surnames found in France and those of its erstwhile colony. Indeed, there are enough such differences to make francophone onomastic research in North America a field of study unto itself, one that, surprisingly, has received very little serious attention when one considers how much time and effort have been invested in the genealogical study of these names.”

The author goes on to explain the division, or categorization, of ‘Canadian French’ surnames, along with subdivisions and types. The subsequent 12 pages go into detail about how and why names change. Coverage include topis like orthographical changes and phonological changes. There is also coverage for foreign names; English, German, Basque and Breton names and others; which are found in the same area of Canada. The discussion also covers French-Canadian surname modifications in English Canada and the US, with coverage on types of anglicization, direct translations, partial translations, near translations, and mistranslations.

So why would you want this book? The names. Remember, most of this book serves as a dictionary of names. Here is a sample entry taken from the author’s own ancestry, showing the value of common entries in this book:

“Picard, from Picard, the nickname of a native of Picardie, a former province in France. — Amer. Peacor, Pecor, Pecore.

— Philippe Destroismaison dit Picard (Adrien and Antionete Lerous) from Montreuil in Pasde-Calais (Nord-Pas-de-Calais) m. Maritine Crosnier (Pierre and Jeanne Rotreau) in Chateau-Richer, QC in 1669.”

Let me go back to simple. Many surnames have changed with time and this dictionary will help trace your ancestor’s names through history.

Get your copy of Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy from Family Roots Publishing; Price: 21.51

Names Get Changed – sometimes for good reason…

Names get changed for a wide variety of reasons, the least of which is the oft-quoted “name was changed at Ellis Island.” I think you’ll find Matthew Hansen’s column on the subject interesting.

The following teaser is from a great column written by Mr. Hansen and posted in August 6, 2013 edition of Omaha.com:

I lean against the bleachers at the alumni banquet, looking down at my name tag and wondering why I’m here.

“HANSEN” my name tag says in black magic marker.

I need a drink, I think.

Red Cloud, like many small Nebraska towns, holds an annual gathering for anyone who ever graduated from its lone high school.

I happened to be in town on alumni weekend this year, and a bit of subtle guilt from my parents got me to attend the cocktail reception.

So here we are. I see no other 1998 graduates — that’s when I donned a purple cap-and-gown — and for that matter I see no other graduates from 1997, 1996 or 1995, either. You know you are from a small town when you end up talking to your Grandpa Richard at your class reunion, which is exactly what I am doing when a white-haired stranger walks up and blows my mind.

She is tiny, so tiny I have to lean down to read her name tag. Hers is typed.

“Ardyce Rose Hanson,” it says. “Class of 1951.”

Read the full article.

Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776

Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776, by Emily S. Wilson, is a list of adult male inhabitants living in New Hampshire in 1776. This records was originally published in Peter Force’s American Archives, in 1848.

In response to a Continental Congress resolution that all those not willing to sign the Association to defend the cause of the colonies should be disarmed, the New Hampshire Committee of Safety ordered all adult males to sign the Association and to turn in the names of any unwilling to sign. The results amount to a census of adult males living in the area.

This publication lists all the names entered in alphabetical order by surname. Previous publications listed names by town, this one, however, lists the entire “state” by name, with the town name following the individual. There are three abbreviations added to some names. Q for Quakers who would not sign for religious belief against bearing arms, n for non-associators, and s for selectman. Selectmen were those hired to collect the names in each town, and in some cases did not sign the Association, though this may have been thought a redundancy since they were signing the rolls.

 

Towns listed in this records:

  • Acworth
  • Allenstown
  • Alstead
  • Amherst
  • Atkinson
  • Barnstead
  • Barrington
  • Bedford
  • Boscawen
  • Bow
  • Brentwood
  • Cannan
  • Candia
  • Canterbury
  • Chester
  • Chesterfield
  • Claremont
  • Concord
  • Conway and Locations
  • Croydon
  • Deerfield
  • Deering
  • Derryfield [Manchester]
  • Dublin
  • Dunbarton
  • East Kingston
  • Enfield
  • Epping
  • Epsom
  • Exeter [fragment]
  • Gilmanton
  • Gilsum
  • Hampstead
  • Hampton
  • Hawke [Danville]
  • Henniker
  • Hillsborough
  • Hinsdale
  • Hpkinton
  • Keene
  • Kensington
  • Kinston
  • Leavitt’s Twon [Effingham]
  • Lebanon
  • Lee Lempster
  • Londonderry
  • Ludon
  • Meredith
  • Monadnock No. 5 [Marlborough]
  • New Boston
  • Newcastle
  • Newington
  • Newmarket
  • Newport
  • North Hampton
  • Northwood
  • Nottingham
  • Nottingham West [Hudson]
  • Packersfield [Nelson]
  • Pembroke
  • Peterborough
  • Piermont
  • Portsmouth
  • Raby [Brookline]
  • Richmond
  • Rindge
  • Rochester
  • Rye
  • Salem
  • Salisbury
  • Sanbornton
  • Sandown
  • Sandwich
  • Saville [Sunapee]
  • Seabrook
  • Society Land [Antrim]
  • South Hampton
  • Stratham
  • Surry
  • Temple
  • Unity
  • Wakefield
  • Weare
  • Estmoreland
  • Wilton
  • Winchester
  • Windham

Copies of Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776 are available through Family Roots Publishing; Item#: CF6422, Price: $17.64.

Scary Names From the Old Records

The following snippet is from a short article posted in the October 25, 2012 edition of Coventry Telegraph.

Mary Scary, Fran Pire and Frank N Stein are among the peculiar names unearthed by a family history website.

Ancestry.co.uk said a study of names on its site going back hundreds of years, ranging from school registers and marriage records to phone books, revealed some unusual entries.

Read the full article.

Famble – a Jewish Surname Game App for the iPhone/iPod/iPad

Andras Koltai of Budapest, Hungary recently developed Famble, an iPhone / iPod / iPad game app that plays with Jewish surnames, It is a classic word search type game, but the words you have to look for are Jewish surnames. The game can be
accessed at: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/famble/id543534434?l=hu&ls=1&mt=8

Check it out. It’s only 99 cents.

So – What does the L.L. of L. L. Bean Fame Stand For?

The following teaser is from an article posted in the July 4, 2012 edition of theeagle.com:

FREEPORT, Maine — He’s arguably Maine’s best-known native son, right up there with Civil War general Joshua Chamberlain, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and horror writer Stephen King. To his customers, he was simply known as “L.L.”

But as outdoors outfitter L.L. Bean celebrates its 100th anniversary, it’s still not 100 percent clear what the famous founder’s initials stood for. Was it Leon Leonwood Bean, as the company claimed for decades, or was it Leon Linwood Bean, as his grandson suggests?

The answer appears to be both.
Leon Gorman, L.L.’s grandson, said he was told that his grandfather was born Leon Linwood Bean and that it somehow morphed into Leon Leonwood Bean.

“There was some incident that happened years ago. I can’t remember what it was. They misspelled Leon’s name from Linwood to Leonwood,” Gorman, the company’s chairman, said. “L.L. was so taken by the new version of his middle name that he adopted it.”

His grave marker sheds no light on his middle-name preference; it says simply, “Leon L. Bean.” There’s no birth certificate, either.

In his autobiography, L.L. Bean talked about having a birth certificate, but no one knows where it is. Kim Sparks, town manager in Greenwood, where Bean was born, said a birth certificate can’t be located. And the state archives don’t have a copy, either.

Read the full article.

Salt Lake Christmas Tour………… Week’s Peek

You think today’s baby names are funny? And that our ancestors didn’t use “funny” names? Think again! Doing research in Pulaski County, Indiana, and in some Virginia counties, I was browsing through some of those county records when these names jumped out at me:

Jaariorigim SMITH m. 2 Jul 1810 to Mary DICKENSON in Virginia

Maindort DOODES, will 13 Dec 1677, had a son, Minor DOODES in Middlesex Co, Virginia

Haute WYATT, minister at Jamestown, Colonial Virginia

Mocin SMITH m. 24 Aug 1788 to Andrew FAGGOTT in Fauquier Co, Virginia

Alwilda PUGH, Thelka GROSS, Sofvonia WESLEY, Chestina COONFARE, Alzina NELSON, Mandane BENNETT, Princess Victoria NESS and Enata SPECKLE all lie resting in Winamac Cemetery in Pulaski County.

Usomen BULL m. 11 Feb 1781 to John SMITH in Berkeley Co, Virginia

German STOKES m. 1840 to Jabez SMITH in Henry Co, Virginia

That first name, Jaariorigim, really puzzled me. I Googled it with no results. It is not found in the Bible. Any ideas where that most unusual name (and it was a FIRST name, not a surname, remember) originated? If you have a thought about this……. or want to share your encounters with unusual names……. please share them with me to then share with you all.

Donna, aka Mother Hen, until next time

 

 

Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776

Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776, by Emily S. Wilson, is a list of adult male inhabitants living in New Hampshire in 1776. This records was originally published in Peter Force’s American Archives, in 1848.

In response to a Continental Congress resolution that all those not willing to sign the Association to defend the cause of the colonies should be disarmed, the New Hampshire Committee of Safety ordered all adult males to sign the Association and to turn in the names of any unwilling to sign. The ultimate result is effectively a census of adult males.

This publication lists all the names entered in alphabetical order by surname. Previous publications listed names by town, this one, however, lists the entire “state” by name, with the town name following the individual. There are three abbreviations added to some names. Q for Quakers who would not sign for religious belief against bearing arms, n for non-associators, and s for selectman. Selectmen were those hired to collect the names in each town, and in some cases did not sign the Association, though this may have been thought a redundancy since they were signing the rolls.

 

Towns listed in this records:

  • Acworth
  • Allenstown
  • Alstead
  • Amherst
  • Atkinson
  • Barnstead
  • Barrington
  • Bedford
  • Boscawen
  • Bow
  • Brentwood
  • Cannan
  • Candia
  • Canterbury
  • Chester
  • Chesterfield
  • Claremont
  • Concord
  • Conway and Locations
  • Croydon
  • Deerfield
  • Deering
  • Derryfield [Manchester]
  • Dublin
  • Dunbarton
  • East Kingston
  • Enfield
  • Epping
  • Epsom
  • Exeter [fragment]
  • Gilmanton
  • Gilsum
  • Hampstead
  • Hampton
  • Hawke [Danville]
  • Henniker
  • Hillsborough
  • Hinsdale
  • Hpkinton
  • Keene
  • Kensington
  • Kinston
  • Leavitt’s Twon [Effingham]
  • Lebanon
  • Lee Lempster
  • Londonderry
  • Ludon
  • Meredith
  • Monadnock No. 5 [Marlborough]
  • New Boston
  • Newcastle
  • Newington
  • Newmarket
  • Newport
  • North Hampton
  • Northwood
  • Nottingham
  • Nottingham West [Hudson]
  • Packersfield [Nelson]
  • Pembroke
  • Peterborough
  • Piermont
  • Portsmouth
  • Raby [Brookline]
  • Richmond
  • Rindge
  • Rochester
  • Rye
  • Salem
  • Salisbury
  • Sanbornton
  • Sandown
  • Sandwich
  • Saville [Sunapee]
  • Seabrook
  • Society Land [Antrim]
  • South Hampton
  • Stratham
  • Surry
  • Temple
  • Unity
  • Wakefield
  • Weare
  • Estmoreland
  • Wilton
  • Winchester
  • Windham

Copies of Inhabitants of New Hampshire 1776 are available through Family Roots Publishing; Item#: CF6422, Price: $17.64.