2 Books on New England Captives Carried to Canada During the French & Indian War -10% Off thru March 8

This weekend we are featuring two books that deal with New England captives that were carried off into Canada during the French and Indian Wars. I happen to find this era of American history fascinating, and have found both of these books extremely helpful. Both are offered at 10% off through March 8, or while supplies last.

New-England-Captives-149pw

New England Captives Carried to Canada Between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars; by Emma Lewis Coleman; foreword by Donald R. Friary; 455 pp; paper; 6×9; Published: 2012; ISBN: 9780880822923; Item # NE25; 10% Off Through March 8, 2016 – $26.96 – Reg. $29.95 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase.

Originally published in two volumes in 1925, New England Captives Carried to Canada represents decades of research conducted by Coleman and C. Alice Baker (author of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada, 1897).

This work names all the captives the two women discovered, provides biographical data for each, and paints a detailed picture of the Indian attacks on New England communities over the eighty-year period. Includes sources, a comprehensive index, and an appendix with greater explanation of terms, key people, and places mentioned in the text. For nearly a century, this has been the go-to resource and the it’s said it’s the most definitive work ever published on the subject.

From the Table of Contents:
I. The Wars – Defense
II. Missions and Missionaries
III. Concerning Indians
IV. Redemptions, Ransoms, and Naturalization
V. Hatfield and Deerfield
VI. At the Eastward – Dover
VIII. Salmon Falls, Casco Bay, Sandy Beach (Rye) and River St. John
IX. The Attacks Upon York
X. Oyster River and Groton
XI. The Massachusetts Frontier – Squackig, Billerica, Lancaster, Worcester, Pascomuck, Marlborough, Dunstable, Brookfield, Northampton
XII. The Lower Merrimac and Exeter
XIII. Kittery, Eliot and Berwick
XIV. The Tragedy at Wells

True-Stories-of-New-England-Captives-149pw
True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars; by C. Alice Baker; 420 pp; Paper; 5.5×8.5, Published: 1896, Reprinted: 2004; ISBN: 1556134207; index; Item # HBB0420; 10% Off through March 8, 2016 – $30.60 – Reg. $34.00 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase..

In a day and age where selecting the perfect title for a book, a movie, or even a magazine article is often more a marketing question than a practical one, it is nice to find books whose titles declare exactly what the contents are. Of course, when I do find such a title it is often the reprint of a book originally published 100 plus years ago. So it is with True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars.

New England Captives was written by C. Alice Baker, and originally published in 1897. In her preface, Baker mentions reading the words “Carried captive to Canada whence they came not back.” These words peeked Baker’s curiosity. What happened to those captives? Curiosity turned to mission and this book is the result of C. Alice Baker’s efforts.

These pages provides detailed accounts of attacks on the following towns:

  • Well and York, Maine
  • Dover, New Hampshire
  • Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts

These stories focus on the points of view of just a few individuals, but offer extensive genealogical and biographical data. In particular, the following family names are treated:

  • Baker
  • Nims
  • Otis
  • Plaisted
  • Rishworth
  • Rising
  • Sayward
  • Sheldon
  • Silver
  • Stockwell
  • Stebbins
  • Wheelwright
  • Williams

From the Table of Contents
Christine Otis (A romance of real life on the frontier as told in the records.)
Esther Wheelwright
Story of a York Family
Difficulties and Dangers in the Settlement of a Frontier Town 1670
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Two Captives ( A romance of real life two hundred years ago)
A Day at Oka
Thankful Stebbins
A Scion of the Church in Deerfield,. Joseph-Octave Plessis (Written for the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of the church in Deerfield.)
Hertel De Rouville
Father Meriel – Mary Silver
Appendix
Christinr Otis
Esther Wheelwright
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Thankful Stennins
Index

FREE Access to Native American Records at Fold3 through November 15, 2015

Free-Access-Native-American-Fold3-300pw

Alerted by a note in the November 3rd edition of ResearchBuzz, I clicked over to the latest Upfront With NGS Announcement, and on to the Fold3 blog – where I found the following information. I’ve been a Fold3 member since May of 2007. It’s one of my favorite database websites.

Do you have Native American ancestry? Or are you interested in Native American history? Then explore Fold3’s Native American Collection for free November 1-15.

Titles in this collection include:

  • Ratified Indian Treaties (1722-1869): Ratified treaties that occurred between the United States government and American Indian tribes. Also included are presidential proclamations, correspondence, and treaty negotiation expenses.
  • Indian Census Rolls (1885-1940): Census rolls submitted annually by agents or superintendents of Indian reservations as required by an 1884 Act of Congress. Only persons who maintained a formal affiliation with a tribe under Federal supervision are listed on these census rolls.
  • Dawes Packets: Applications between 1896 and 1914 from members of the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole tribes to establish eligibility for an allotment of land in return for abolishing their tribal governments and recognizing Federal law.
  • Dawes Enrollment Cards (1898-1914): Enrollment cards, also referred to as “census cards,” prepared by the staff of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes, commonly known as the Dawes Commission. The cards record information provided by applications submitted by members of the same family group or household and include notations of the actions taken.
  • Eastern Cherokee Applications (1906-1909): Applications submitted for shares of the money that was appropriated for the Eastern Cherokee Indians by Congress on June 30, 1906.
  • Enrollment of Eastern Cherokee by Guion Miller (1908-1910): The Guion Miller Roll is perhaps the most important source for Cherokee genealogical research. There are an estimated 90,000 individual applicants from throughout North America included within this publication.
  • Cherokee Indian Agency, TN (1801-1835): The records of the agent of Indian Affairs in Tennessee, including correspondence, agency letter books, fiscal records, records of the Agent for the Department of War in Tennessee, records of the Agent for Cherokee Removal, and miscellaneous records.
  • Rinehart Photos – Native Americans (1898): Photographs of over 100 Native Americans taken by Frank A. Rinehart, a commercial photographer in Omaha, Nebraska. Rinehart was commissioned to photograph the 1898 Indian Congress, part of the Trans-Mississippi International Exposition.

Genetic Research Could Rewrite the History of the First Americans

The following excerpt is from an article by Mark Strauss, posted July 22, 2015 at the National Geographic website:

The Surui people of Brazil are related to indigenous Australians, a new genetic study shows. The research suggests that the prehistoric settlers of the New World could have arrived in two separate waves.  PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL NICHOLS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE.
The Surui people of Brazil are related to indigenous Australians, a new genetic study shows. The research suggests that the prehistoric settlers of the New World could have arrived in two separate waves. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL NICHOLS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE.

Since the 1930s, it’s been a generally accepted theory that indigenous Americans are descendants of Siberians who came to the New World by crossing a land bridge into Alaska around 15,000 years ago.

But, the details of that migration remain a source of contention. Did the Asians who trekked across the Bering Strait arrive in one or several waves? Were some of them isolated from the rest, settling on the land bridge until it submerged beneath the water of melting glaciers?

Two new studies—relying on genetic data from living individuals and ancient skeletons—offer possible answers, albeit with different interpretations.

Read the full article.

23andMe – DNA Tests That Are Being Using For Far More Than Just Ancestry


Discover 23andMe & find out what your DNA says about you & your family! Buy one, get 20% off each ad

I ordered a 23andMe DNA test yesterday. Yes – I’ve taken one from Sorenson’s, and later AncestryDNA, but I’d like to see how the test done by 23andMe matches up to the earlier tests. I’m also fascinated by all the non-family history research that 23andMe does with our DNA – lots of health-related stuff. One of their areas of research deals with Lupus. When I registered my test, I was given the opportunity to fill out questionnaires that were to help advance their health-related research projects. I found it fascinating, and was pleased that I could be involved in a project that would help others. Click on the illustration to learn more about 23andMe.

DNA testing can also have a sociological side to it. A fascinating article was written by Carl Zimmer and posted at the New York Times website December 24, 2014. It was titled White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier. In the article he explains how 23andMe data was used to study how the ancestral makeup of self-identified African Americans, Latinos and European Americans differs by region-and why. I don’t remember reading this article when it was posted, but was prompted to do so by an email from 23andMe after I registered my test. Following is a teaser:

In 1924, the State of Virginia attempted to define what it means to be white.

The state’s Racial Integrity Act, which barred marriages between whites and people of other races, defined whites as people “whose blood is entirely white, having no known, demonstrable or ascertainable admixture of the blood of another race.”

There was just one problem. As originally written, the law would have classified many of Virginia’s most prominent families as not white, because they claimed to be descended from Pocahontas.

So the Virginia legislature revised the act, establishing what came to be known as the “Pocahontas exception.” Virginians could be up to one-sixteenth Native American and still be white in the eyes of the law.

People who were one-sixteenth black, on the other hand, were still black.

In the United States, there is a long tradition of trying to draw sharp lines between ethnic groups, but our ancestry is a fluid and complex matter. In recent years geneticists have been uncovering new evidence about our shared heritage, and last week a team of scientists published the biggest genetic profile of the United States to date, based on a study of 160,000 people.

Read the full article.

Non-Hispanic Whites With American Indian Ancestry Make Up Half of Mixed-Race Americans

The-Multiracial-Experience-300pw

According to a study done by the Pew Research Center, Non-Hispanic caucasians with American Indian ancestry make up half of the current population of mixed-race Americans. However, they don’t usually claim to be multiracial.

Multiracial Americans make up 2.1 percent of the adult population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. During its survey from which the report was drawn, Pew asked respondents about their race, that race of their parents and that of their grandparents. The “Multiracial in America” report contends that 6.9 percent of the United States population is of mixed race.

Read more at the U.S. News website.

Read the Multiracial in America report at the Pew Research Center website.

Ancestry.com Now Has Over 10M American Indian Records

The following excerpt is from the November 7, 2014 edition of webpronews.com:

Genealogy site Ancestry.com has added millions of new American Indian records for the use of those who think they may have American Indian blood, according to AP.

The idea came about due to a slim 5.2 million people identifying themselves as having American Indian or Alaskan Native ancestry on 2010 U.S. Census forms.

Estimates as to those who have American Indian in their genealogy were much higher.

Ancestry.com figured that a lot of times, people just don’t know their genealogy very well or that they have American Indian blood.

So, to help solve that problem, the genealogy website has partnered with the Oklahoma Historical Society to add the American Indian historical records, as well as images, to its website.

Ancestry.com will now have more than 10 million American Indian historical records. That makes it the largest online collection of American Indian genealogy out there.

Read the full article – Warning – turn down your sound.

Check out Ancestry.com’s American Indian records.

See the AP article at the ABC website.

Read Crista Cowen’s very interesting blog about the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766

vb01

Fred Anderson’s Crucible of War is probably my favorite history book ever written. The book is about the Seven-Years War, otherwise known as the French and Indian War – a war that led directly to the American Revolution. If there hadn’t been a French and Indian War, there may very well not have ever been a revolution of the English colonies in America. It’s well written and a volume that I recommend to everyone.

Following is a review written in 2013 by Andy Pomeroy:

Do you think you know what the Seven Years’ War was about? Do you really understand it influence on shaping the colonies as a precursor to the American Revolution? After reading The Crucible of War you may just change your mind.

Winston S. Churchill called the Seven Years’ War the first world war. North Americans associate it primarily with the British conquest of Canada. But the conflict — in which Britain and Prussia opposed France, Austria and Spain — spread to Europe, the Caribbean, West Africa, India and the Philippines. Though it formally lasted from 1756 until 1763, the war’s first shots were fired in the spring of 1754 between French troops asserting their country’s claim to the Ohio Valley and Virginians commanded by the 22-year-old George Washington. Two of America’s most eminent historians devoted years of research and writing to the great contest for empire. In the 20th century Lawrence Henry Gipson published a three-volume history. In the 19th century Francis Parkman considered his ”Montcalm and Wolfe” to be his crowning achievement. Now Fred Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado, has written a panoramic narrative of the North American phase of the Seven Years’ War, an ambitious undertaking he discharges superbly. ~ CHARLES ROYSTER, New York Times Book Review (New York Times on the Web; Article Link)

Fred Andres is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His goal, like that of many historians, was to write a “book accessible to general readers that will also satisfy [his] fellow historian’s scholarly expectations.” In the Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766, Fred Anderson succeeded marvelously. This book is an historical narrative describing the events, people, and politics associated with what the colonists called the French and Indian War. In these pages you learn how and where many future leaders of the American Revolution developed their political view points and honed their military skills.

“Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven Year’s War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history. Demonstrating that independence was not inevitable or even at first desired by the colonists, he shows how removal of the threat from France was essential before Americans could develop their own concepts of democratic government and defy their imperial British protectors. Of great interest is the importance of Native Americans in the conflict. Both the French and English had Indian allies; France’s defeat ended a diplomatic system in which Indian nations, especially the 300-year-old Iroquois League, held the balance between the colonial powers. In a fast-paced narrative, Anderson moves with confidence and ease from the forests of Ohio and battlefields along the St. Lawrence to London’s House of Commons and the palaces of Europe. He makes complex economic, social, and diplomatic patterns accessible and easy to understand. Using a vast body of research, he takes the time to paint the players as living personalities, from George III and George Washington to a host of supporting characters. The book’s usefulness and clarity are enhanced by a hundred landscapes, portraits, maps, and charts taken from contemporary sources. Crucible of War is political and military history at its best; it never flags and is a pleasure to read. ~ JOHN STEVENSON, Professor/Dean at the University of Colorado

Few people have a true appreciation for the role of The Seven Years’ War in both America as well as the world at large. Few historians have the knack for narrative that Anderson excels at within these pages. The pages turn as easily as those in a favorite novel.

Here is more praise for this historical work:

“A wonderful book. Fred Anderson brings to life  a war that irrevocably shaped our nation. I wish all history were written this well.” ~ SEBASTIAN JUGER, author of The Perfect Storm.

“Reading Crucible of War is an enriching experience…Anyone who thinks that individuals have no significant effect on the fate of nations should ponder Mr. Anderson’s cast of characters.” ~ The Wall Street Journal

 

Contents

List of Illustrations

Introduction: The Seven Years’ War and the Disruption of the Old British Empire

Maps

Prologue: Jumonville’s Glen, May 28, 1754

Part I: The Origins of the Seven Years’ War, 1450-1754

  1. Iroquoia and Empire
  2. The Erosion of Iroquois Influence
  3. London Moves to Counter a Threat
  4. Washington Steps onto the Stage…
  5. …And Stumbles
  6. Escalation

Part II: Defeat, 1754-1755

  1. The Albany Congress and Colonial Disunion
  2. General Braddock Takes Command
  3. Disaster on the Monogahela
  4. After Braddock: William Shirley and the Norther Campaigns
  5. British Politics, and a Revolution in European Diplomacy

Part III: Nadir, 1756-1757

  1. Lord Loundoun Takes Command
  2. Oswego
  3. The State of the Central Colonies
  4. The Strains of Empire: Causes of Anglo-American Friction
  5. Britain Drifts into a European War
  6. The Fortunes of War in Europe
  7. Loudoun’s Offensive
  8. Fort William Henry
  9. Other Disasters, and a Ray of Hope
  10. Pitt Changes Course

Part IV: Turning Point, 1758

  1. Deadlock, and a New Beginning
  2. Old Strategies, New Men, and a Shift in the Balance
  3. Montcalm Raises a Cross: The Battle of Ticonderoga
  4. Amherst at Louisbourg
  5. Supply Holds the Key
  6. Bradstreet at Fort Frontenac
  7. Indian Diplomacy and the Fall of Fort Duquesne
  8. Educations in Arms

Part V: Annus Mirabilis, 1759

  1. Success, Anxiety, and Power: The Ascent of William Pitt
  2. Ministerial Uncertainties
  3. Surfeit of Enthusiasm, Shortage of Resources
  4. Emblem of Empire: Fort Pitt and the Indians
  5. The Six Nations Join the Fight: The Siege of Niagara
  6. General Amherst Hesitates: Ticonderoga and Crown Point
  7. Dubious Battle: Wolfe Meets Montcalm at Quebec
  8. Fall’s Frustrations
  9. Celebration of Empire, Expectations of the Millennium
  10. Day of Decision: Quiberon Bay

Part VI: Conquest Completed, 1760

  1. War in Full Career
  2. The Insufficiency of Valor: Levis and Vauquelin at Quebec
  3. Murray Ascends the St. Lawrence
  4. Conquest Completed: Vaudreuil Surrenders at Montreal
  5. The Causes of Victory and the Experience of Empire
  6. Pitt Confronts an Unexpected Challenge

Victory Recollected: Scenographia Americana

Part VIII: Vexed Victory, 1761-1763

  1. The Fruits of victory and the Seeds of Disintegration
  2. The Cherokeet War and Amherst’s Reforms in Indian Policy
  3. Amherst’s Dilemma
  4. Pitt’s Problems
  5. The End of an Alliance
  6. The Intersections of Empire, Trade, and War: Havana
  7. Peace
  8. The Rise of Wilkes, the Fall of Bute, and the Unheeded Lesson of Manila
  9. Anglo-America at War’s End: The Fragility of Empire
  10. Yankees Invade Wyoming—and Pay the Price
  11. Amherst’s Reforms and Pontiac’s War
  12. Amhert’s Recall

Part VIII: Crisis and Reform, 1764

  1. Death Reshuffles a Ministry
  2. An Urgent Search for Order: Grenville and Halifax Confront the Need for Revenue and Control
  3. The American Duties Act (The Sugar Act)
  4. The Currency Act
  5. Postwar Conditions and the Context of Colonial Response
  6. An Ambiguous Response to Imperial Initiatives
  7. Pontiac’s Progress
  8. The Lessons of Pontiac’s War

Part IX: Crisis Compounds, 1765-1766

  1. Stamp Act and Quartering Act
  2. Grenville’s End
  3. The Assemblies Vacillate
  4. Mobs Respond
  5. Nullification by Violence, and an Elite Effort to Reassert Control

Part X: Empire Preserved? 1766

  1. The Repeal of the Stamp Act
  2. The Hallowness of Empire
  3. Acrimonious Postlude: The Colonies after Repeal
  4. The Future of Empire

Epilogue: Mount Vernon, June 24, 1767

Notes

Acknowledgements

Index

 

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $22.54.

Native Americans’ Ancestry Traced to Siberia Through DNA

The following teaser is from an article by Rebecca Jacobson posted at the February 13, 2014 edition of pbs.org.

Projectile-points-250pw

The bones of a baby boy buried in Montana 12,600 years ago may help scientists confirm the origins of North and South America’s first peoples.

The remains were discovered when a construction dig on the Anzick family property overturned a grave in southwestern Montana in 1968. Archeologists determined the boy was between 12 and 18 months old when he died, although the cause of death is still a mystery.

Stone knives, spear points and elk bone artifacts buried with the boy identified him as one of the Clovis people—the earliest known indigenous North American culture, which existed approximately 13,000 years ago.

Read the full article.

Indian Schools, Seminaries, and Asylums

From the November 2, 2013, AccessGenealogy.com

indianschool7-300

Beginning in 1878 the goal was to assimilate Indian people into the general population of the United States. By placing the Indian children in first day schools and boarding schools it was thought this would be accomplished. Federal policy sanctioned the removal of children from their families and placed in government run boarding schools. It was thought they would become Americanized while being kept away from their traditional families.

In 1928, a report entitled “The Problem of the Indian Administration”, otherwise known as the Meriam Report, was produced at the direction of the Indian Commission. The Meriam report was highly critical of government Indian policy with regard to education. The poor quality of personnel, inadequate salaries, unqualified teachers and almost non-existent health care were some of the criticisms leveled by the report.

Read the full article.

American Indian Tribal Tract Reference Maps Now Available Online

Muckleshoot Reservation Map - 1 of 7
Many maps were created for the 2010 Census. One of these resources is the “Tribal Tract Reference Maps.”

The following is from the website:

These federal American Indian reservation-based maps show and label tribal census tracts and tribal block groups as delineated to support 2010 Census data dissemination. These maps also show the boundaries and names of American Indian reservations, off-reservation trust lands (ORTLs), Alaska Native areas, Hawaiian home lands, states, counties, county subdivisions, and places. Additionally, these maps display a base feature network including roads, railroads, and water bodies. These features are labeled as map scale permits. Each entity is covered by one or more parent map sheets at a single scale. An index map showing the sheet configuration is included for all entities requiring more than one parent map sheet. The map sheet size is 36 by 32 inches.

Using the maps online, you will want to blow them up to 150% or so. I found most that I had an interest in came onscreen as a PDF at 25%. Having lived in Western Washington for 40 years, I have an interest in the Puyallup and Muckleshoot Indian reservations. Each of these reservations has 7 pdf maps available.

Thanks to Accessible Archives for posting an item on Facebook about these maps.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England

hbh3291“A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time.” Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars

hbb0420In a day and age where selecting the perfect title for a book, a movie, or even a magazine article is often more a marketing question than a practical one, it is nice to find books whose titles declare exactly what the contents are. Of course, when I do find such a title it is often the reprint of a book originally published 100 plus years ago. So it is with True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars.

New England Captives was written by C. Alice Baker, and originally published in 1897. In her preface, Baker mentions reading the words “Carried captive to Canada whence they came not back.” These words peeked Baker’s curiosity. What happened to those captives? Curiosity turned to mission and this book is the result of C. Alice Baker’s efforts.

These pages provides detailed accounts of attacks on the following towns:

  • Well and York, Maine
  • Dover, New Hampshire
  • Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts

These stories focus on the points of view of just a few individuals, but offer extensive genealogical and biographical data. In particular, the following family names are treated:

  • Baker
  • Nims
  • Otis
  • Plaisted
  • Rishworth
  • Rising
  • Sayward
  • Sheldon
  • Silver
  • Stockwell
  • Stebbins
  • Wheelwright
  • Williams

 

Contents

Christine Otis (A romance of real life on the frontier as told in the records.)

Esther Wheelwright

Story of a York Family

Difficulties and Dangers in the Settlement of a Frontier Town 1670

Eunice Williams

Ensign John Sheldon

My Hunt for the Captives

Two Captives ( A romance of real life two hundred years ago)

A Day at Oka

Thankful Stebbins

A Scion of the Church in Deerfield,. Joseph-Octave Plessis (Written for the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of the church in Deerfield.)

Hertel De Rouville

Father Meriel – Mary Silver

Appendix

  1. Christinr Otis
  2. Esther Wheelwright
  3. Eunice Williams
  4. Ensign John Sheldon
  5. My Hunt for the Captives
  6. Thankful Stennins

Index

 

Copies of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $33.32

Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England

ne27Another in a line of great reprints from the New England Historic Genealogical Society comes a Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England, written by R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, in 1909, with an added foreword by David Allen Lambert, 2012.

For those who reside or come form New England, Native American names for towns, streets, rivers, parks, and other locations are a daily part life. I was born and raised in Southern California. Spanish names and words were what I knew and grew up with. I remember my first trip back east. I had a terrible time enunciating some of the location names based on Native American words. I am sure my twisted tongue was a source of amusement to some of my associates. Of course, I had my laughs when it was their turn to visit me. Either way, whether you currently live in New England or have your ancestral roots there, this dictionary of American-Indian names can go a long way in helping with your research.

In this dictionary you will find a(n):

  • “Introduction to New England tribes
  • State-by-state listing of place names, including some now extinct
  • List of prominent 17th-century New England Native Americans
  • Enumeration of New England tribes
  • List of words from the Abenaki and Massachusetts (or Natick) languages”

In other words, this book can help you identify specific locations within New England. It can also help to interpret records like early deeds. Consider the book mandatory to the amateur and professional historian interested in pre-colonial New England and native cultures.

As the author comments upon in his introduction, and is reiterated in the foreword, “these words represent almost all that remains of the aboriginal inhabitants of this country,—a brave, noble, and patriotic race who, opposed by the overwhelming and heedless forces of civilization, did everything the bravest and noblest could do to obey the first law of Nature[:] self-preservation.” Continuing, he marvels that so many names have survived considering the local Indian tribes had no written language. This dictionary is unique, and undoubtedly considered a blessing by many genealogists searching through places names of New England.

Dictionary of American-Indian Place and Proper Names in New England is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $24.45.

A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada

french warWhat do really know about any given historical event? Who were the major players? What smaller events led up to the bigger event? How did these events effect people living at that time? History books can do more than simply elaborate or expand on the short version of any event we learned about in high school. Books can offer insight into the lives of our ancestors, as well as providing insight into possible sources of information and records. Occasionally, books come to light that tell the story, the history, we otherwise may never hear or learn. A history does not need to be a new treatment on a subject to be of value. Time and again, we have reviewed great books on this site which are reprints of volumes originally published decades, if not centuries, ago. A History of The French War, is just such a book.

Originally published in 1882, the expanded title reads, Minor Wars of the United States, A History of The French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada with A Preliminary Account of the Early Attempts At Colonization and Struggles for Possession of the Continent. In this history, reprinted by Heritage Books, the reader will find an expanded timeline leading up to and including the French War.

This books starts by looking back at some of the earliest explorers and claims by different European countries over New World territory. These explorations, dating to the early 1500s, laid the ground work, and territorial claims, for later colonization from southern Florida on up the coast to lower Canada. The history go on, detailing event and individuals over roughly a  250 year period, on up to the major events of the war. While some of the author’s statements don’t meet today’s standards of political correctness, the fact the copy for this book is over 100 years old does not diminish its value.

 

A History of the French War can be obtained through Family Roots Publishing; Price: $30.87.

Contents

Chapter I – Early Voyages

  • Claims of European Nations to American Territory
  • Contests of the English and French
  • The Indians in War
  • The Cabots
  • Cortereal
  • Spanish Explorers
  • Decree of Alexander
  • Verrazzano
  • Cartier
  • Stadacone
  • Hochelaga
  • Donacona

Continue reading “A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada”

Virginia State Senate Tables Recognition of Groups Claiming Cherokee Ancestry

The following exceprt is from an article posted in the February 26, 2013 edition of cherokeephoenix.org.

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Citing the need for a new evaluation process, the Virginia Senate Rules Committee on Feb. 12 tabled resolutions calling for state tribal recognition of two groups identifying themselves as Cherokees.

Sens. Steve Newman, Jill Vogel and Kenny Alexander presented the resolutions for the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia, also known as the Buffalo Ridge Band of Cherokee, and the Appalachian Cherokee Nation Inc. However, the committee tabled them until an evaluation process is created.

Previously, the Virginia Council on Indians oversaw the process for state tribal recognition. However, it was discontinued in 2010. The former process required applicants to provide documentation proving their groups existed in Virginia at the time of Europeans contact, that they had existed in some form ever since and that they are distinct groups, among other requirements.

Read the full article.