Pribilof Islands, Alaska Territory 1875-1910 Digitized Census Posted Online with Free Access

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Every now an then we have census records turn up that were previously unavailable. The following teaser tells of just such a case. Looking for early Pribilof Islands, Alaska ancestors? If so, then you are going to like this.

Those who have experienced the frustration of trying to obtain historic information on individuals who lived in the Pribilof Islands around 1900 have reason to celebrate.

A set of very rare seven historic census records conducted between 1875 and 1910 on the Pribilof Islands have been released by The Alaska State Archives. Most pre-1900 federal censuses for communities in the state were lost.

These historic censuses document births, marriages, and deaths in some instances…

The Alaska State Archives has made it easy to access the digitized documents. Read the full article posted at www.youralaskalink.com to learn more and click on link for each of the digitized census books in PDF format.

New FamilySearch Database Collections Update for January 4, 2016

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

This week showcases sizable additions to collections for Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943, and Italy Udine Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1815 1871-1911, Colombia Catholic Church Records 1576-2014 and, South Africa Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive) 1838- 1991. Find these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Austria Upper Austria Catholic Church Records 1581-1919 – 39,213 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Colombia Catholic Church Records 1576-2014 – 1,355,484 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany Baden Church Book Duplicates 1800-1870 – 27,020 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943 – 63,630 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy Udine Civil Registration (State Archive) 1806-1815 1871-1911 – 252,037 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

South Africa Netherdutch Reformed Church Registers (Pretoria Archive) 1838- 1991 – 0 – 140,942 – New browsable image collection.

BillionGraves Index – 283,072 – 283,072 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

United States Databases
Alaska Vital Records 1816-1959 – 57,479 – 77,968 – New indexed records and images collection.

New Hampshire Death Records 1654-1947 – 0 – 1,460 – Added images to an existing collection.

New Maps of Juneau, Alaska’s Evergreen Cemetery to Go Online in October

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The following excerpt is from the June 22, 2015 edition of Alaska Public Media.

A grease-smudged stack of 25 fading sheets of paper in a storage shed is one of only two copies of who’s buried where in Evergreen Cemetery. All the burials since 1986 are handwritten, but that’s about to change. The City and Borough of Juneau was recently awarded a grant to map its graves digitally.

Inside the cemetery storage shed, along with gardening tools and a lawnmower, is an invaluable stack papers.

“Basically 25 pages of maps that show all the plots,” Patterson says.

… More than 8,000 people are buried at Evergreen. The cemetery dates back to the 1880s when it was moved from its original spot on Chicken Hill.

The City and Borough of Juneau was awarded a $17,000 grant in federal funds to put a cemetery map online.

The Evergreen Cemetery map goes online in October.

Read the full article.

The Alaska State Archives Research Room Closed Through March 27, 2015

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The following is from the Alaska State Archives website.

Between March 4—27, the Alaska State Archives Research Room will be closed and reference services curtailed so that staff can transfer and process approximately 10,000 boxes and court volumes from its 141 Willoughby Avenue facility into the new SLAM building.

50% Off! $hide Name List-Census Substitute #Genealogy Books AL-KS with Free eBook & Super-Saver USA Shipping

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To celebrate the Christmas Season, FRPC is discounting all seventeen Dollarhide Name List printed books by 50%, making them just $9.48 each (including a FREE immediate download of the eBook). The eBooks themselves are also discounted 40%, making them just $7.50 (with no shipping charges). We’ve also put together a Super-Saver USA shipping arrangement for these books. The first book in an order ships for just $4 – and each book thereafter is only 50 cents each! Order 2 Name List books, shipping is $4.50; three books, just $5; four books, just $5.50. Mix or match your Name List books. All 17 books currently in print are included in the sale with no limits on numbers to be ordered. Dealer purchases are welcome. Sales are subject to books in stock and on hand, as reprinting of the volumes will take too long for Christmas sales. This offer is good through Christmas Eve, December 24, 2014.

Sorry – this offer is for USA sales only.

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of a PDF eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

These books are also available in an electronic PDF format also. See below – 40% off for this sale!

See Bill Dollarhide’s article, “What Are Name Lists?

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co., and are being offered at 50% OFF FOR THIS CHRISTMAS 2014 PROMOTION:

  • Alabama

 

 

Juneau Archives Named for William L. Paul, Sr.

It’s been announced that the Juneau Alaska archives at the new Walter Soboleff building will be named for Tlingit Native rights champion, William L. Paul, Sr. The following excerpt is from an article posted in the October 19, 2014 edition of JuneauEmpire.com:

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The archives facility at the new Walter Soboleff building will be named for Tlingit Native rights hero William L. Paul, Sr., who was a major force in Alaska history and is recognized as the father of the Alaska Native land claims.

The William L. Paul, Sr., Archives houses 3,100 linear feet of archival and historical manuscripts and papers, photographs, and audio and visual recordings. The archives also include historical documents, manuscripts, and papers of individuals of importance to both the indigenous people of the region and Alaska history, and over 60,000 historic photographs.

Read the full article.

The Alaska State Archives Has Accepted the Alaska Railroad and Territorial Court Records from NARA

Alaska Railroad

On Friday, the Alaska State Archives took official ownership of about 3000 cubic feet of records from the now-closed National Archives branch in Anchorage. This was done in a signing ceremony attended by court officials, judges, lawmakers, state historians, and museum volunteers. Since the records are being transferred from one archive to another, they all come ready to store in acid-free file folders and boxes. On August 4, 7 & 8, the records will begin to arrive in three 40-ft shipping containers. The containers will hauled on the Alcan Highway to Haines, after which a ferry will complete the transfer to the Juneau. The Alaska State Archives and Museum is currently under construction in Juneau with a portion of the storage space already completed, allowing a place to put all these records.

Twelve hundred of the records are from the Alaska Railroad. Included in the railroad records are items like lists of stoppages. According to State Archivist Dean Dawson in an interview with KTOO’s Matt Miller, “It might be we picked up five tons of coal from Healy, for example. Some of those are just garden variety records that make the trains run on time. Others, for example would go back to the early teens – a hundred years ago – and document why certain decisions were made regarding routes, regarding services, and so forth.”

The railroad records will be catalogued over the next year, and those that are considered to have no permanent archival value may be offered back to the Alaska Railroad itself.

Included in the transfer were about 1800 Alaska Territorial Court Records that date back to 1884. These records may be available to researchers in Juneau within a month or so.

Since the National Archives closed its Anchorage facility in June, most of the NARA records from Alaska are being sent to Seattle, to be consolidated with those records already housed there.

For more information, check out the following entries.

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/e441744fb42e474cbd7af7433a23ecb3/AK–Historical-Records

http://www.ktoo.org/2014/07/27/state-archives-accepts-alaska-railroad-territorial-court-records/

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/e441744fb42e474cbd7af7433a23ecb3/AK–Historical-Records

http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/07/28/3306906/territorial-court-records-will.html?sp=/99/296/359/

http://www.adn.com/article/20140530/national-archives-records-stored-anchorage-bound-juneau-seattle

Alaska Will be Keeping Some of Its Federal Records After All

A few days ago, I blogged about the closing of several National Archives branches. One of those included the branch in Anchorage, Alaska. Now it looks like some of the records will be staying in Alaska.

The following teaser is from an article by James Brooks, posted in the April 4 edition of juneauempire.com:

Alaska’s archivists and historians are gaining ground in a fight to keep federal records in the state, but the Anchorage office of the National Archives and Records Administration is still set to close by the end of the year.

On Wednesday, Alaska State Library director Linda Thibodeau told the Alaska Historical Commission that negotiations are under way to keep roughly one quarter of the archive’s 12,000 boxes of records.

The remaining 9,000 boxes, which contain documents on topics as varied as village schools and the U.S. Coast Guard, are scheduled to move to the National Archives office in Seattle.

“We are going to be — that’s a sure thing — taking in 1,000 boxes of Alaska Railroad records,” Thibodeau told the commission.

Negotiations are under way for 2,000 boxes of territorial court records to also be transferred to the state archives in Juneau.

Read the full article.

All 14 Dollarhide Name List books – Print & PDF eBooks Are On Sale for 20% Off – Sale extended through January 6

Florida Name Lists

FRPC has extended the sale of all 14 of the new Dollarhide Name Lists books, which are on sale for 20% off thorugh January 6. The sale includes both the printed volumes, as well as the PDF eBooks. Normally $18.95, the printed volumes are just $15.16, and include a FREE immediately downloadable PDF eBook of the same. The PDF eBooks alone normally sell for $12.50 – and are on sale for $10.00 each! All printed books currently come with a FREE download of the PDF eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 14 days within the United States.

After downloading the eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

The sale ends at midnight EST (not MST) January 6, 2014.

Books are now available for the states of Alabama through Illinois.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are both censuses and census substitutes, and are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

 Not only do these volumes give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co., the printed volumes, as well as the PDF eBooks alone all at a 20% discount with an immediately available PDF eBook during this sale: 

A Genealogist’s Historical Timeline for Alaska, 1725-1959

Alaska Name Lists

The following article was excerpted from Dollarhide’s new book, Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

For any research in Alaska, the following timeline of events should help any genealogist understand the area with an historical and genealogical point of view.

1725. – Tsar Peter the Great of Russia commissioned a Danish sea captain, Vitus Bering, to explore the Northwest coast of North America. Bering is credited with the official discovery of Alaska, the first reliable information on the land, and the establishment of Russia’s claim to Northwestern North America. Although the Russians visited Alaska frequently with seal and fishing expeditions, the first attempts at colonization did not begin until 1784.

1774-1791. Charles III of Spain, fearing Russian expansion, sent several expeditions north from Mexico to Alaska, intent on claiming the entire area for Spain. But, their visits were fleeting, and no colonies or settlers were established at any of their stops. Few traces of the Spanish expeditions remain in Alaska except for a few placenames, such as Malaspina Glacier and Valdez.

1778. While searching for the elusive Northwest Passage, British explorer Captain James Cook explored the waterway (Cook Inlet) that downtown Anchorage now borders. Captain Cook’s maps of North America proved for the first time that Asia and North America were separate continents. His maps became the standard for world navigation in the North Pacific for the next hundred years.

1784. Grigory Ivanovich Shelekhov, a Siberian fur merchant, established the first permanent Russian settlement at Three Saints Bay, on Kodiak Island. His wife, Natalya, was the first European woman in Russian America.

1795. The first Russian Orthodox Church was established at Kodiak.

1799. – Alexander Baranov established the Russian post known today as Old Sitka; the trade charter from the Tsar granted exclusive trading rights to the new Russian America Company for a period of twenty years.

1821. The Russian trading charter was renewed, and extended the area of the Russian claim to the 51st parallel. Meanwhile, the British-owned Hudson’s Bay Company was trying to gain a foothold in the Alaska fur trade. In 1821 they made a deal with the Russian America Company, leasing land south of Cape Spenser. The British were a presence in Alaska for the next 30 years.

1823. President James Monroe issued the Monroe Doctrine, seeking to exclude European intervention in the New World. It was clearly aimed at Russia and Spain, countries still clamoring to gain more involvement in the Americas.

1824. Russia and the U.S. signed a treaty accepting 54 degrees 4 minutes as the southern boundary of Russian America. Also in 1824, the Russians began explorations of mainland Alaska that led to the discovery of the Nushagak, Kuskokwim, Yukon, and Koyokuk Rivers.

1857. The beginning of the end for the Russian America Company – the company was suffering from financial problems and the Tsar was threatening to revoke their charter. The company had been beaten by the Hudson’s Bay Company in the fur trade. The British company had better and cheaper items to trade with the natives for furs. The Russian America company tried new business ventures, such as coal mining, whaling, and ice trading, but failed at all of them. The company lost wealth and power before the first gold discoveries in Alaska. Gold mining was destined to replace fur trading as Alaska’s main economic activity.

1867 (April). Financial struggles forced Russia to sell Russian America to the United States. Negotiated by U.S. Secretary of State William Seward, the purchase price for what is now Alaska was $7.2 million, or about 2 cents an acre. Alaska’s value was not appreciated by most Americans, many calling it “Seward’s Folly.” The treaty was approved by Congress on 9 April 1867, and the United States flag was raised on 18 October 1867 (now called Alaska Day, a legal holiday). The rest of the U.S. may have forgotten William Seward, but in Alaska, Seward’s Day (another legal holiday) is celebrated every year on the last Monday of March.

1867 (October). While the United States and most of Europe recognized the Gregorian Calendar, Russia had still not made the change in 1867. The Gregorian Calendar had been in effect in British North America since the British officially changed from the Julian to Gregorian in 1752. On the day Alaska became part of the U.S., the change from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian Calendar caused Alaska residents to have Friday, October 6, 1867 followed by Friday, October 18, 1867. They also had their shortest year. In 1867, Alaska’s year began on March 25th and ended on December 31st.

1868. Congress designated the Russian America purchase as the Department of Alaska, under the command of U.S. Army Major General Jefferson C. Davis. Alaska was ruled by a military command until 1884, when it became the District of Alaska. As a district, Alaska had a civil government similar to that of the District of Columbia at the time. Alaska did not have a Governor or Legislature until 1912, when it became the Territory of Alaska. And, Alaska sent its first voting members to Congress after it became the State of Alaska in 1959.

1870. Although Alaska was a U.S. possession from 1867, a federal census for 1870 was not conducted there – except for a military tally of some of the inhabitants. Censuses exist for several local Alaskan jurisdictions from 1870 to 1880, many done as part of U.S. Government surveys of the seal and fishing industries. The extant name lists are included in the bibliography that follows.

1872. Gold was discovered near Sitka and in British Columbia.

1880. Richard Harris and Joseph Juneau discovered gold on the Gastineau Channel, with the aid of Kowee, a local clan leader. Soon after, the town of Juneau was founded.

1880-1900. Federal censuses came to Alaska in 1880, followed by 1890, but both were apparently statistical summaries only, since no name lists have been found. Without counties as the basic census units, the U.S. Census Bureau had to be creative in parceling out enumeration districts. The first full federal census was for 1900, which survives. In that year, the Census Bureau divided Alaska into Northern (Arctic), Southern (Kodiak Kuskokwim, Nushagak, Aleutian-Unalaska), and Southeastern (Sitka, Juneau) districts.

1896. Dawson City (Canada) was founded on the Yukon River at the mouth of the Klondike River. Gold was discovered on nearby Bonanza Creek, and Dawson City became the epicenter of the Klondike Gold Rush that followed.

1897-1900. Klondike Gold Rush. The main Gold Rush claims were on the Canadian length of the Yukon River. At the time, the easiest method of getting to Dawson City was a steamboat trip from the Bering Sea to the mouth of the Yukon River, across the length of Alaska, and into Yukon Territory. While the Yukon River was iced over, overland routes began at Skagway or Dyea over the Boundary Mountains by foot, and then a long sled-dog trek to the Yukon and into Dawson City.

1898. Skagway was the largest city in Alaska; work started on the White Pass and Yukon Railroad; Congress appropriated money for a telegraph from Seattle to Sitka; and the Nome gold rush started.

1910-1940. In the 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940 federal censuses, Alaska was enumerated using four judicial districts, indicated by the location of the district courthouse as Division 1 (Juneau), Division 2 (Nome), Division 3 (Anchorage), and Division 4 (Fairbanks).

1912. Alaska became a U.S. Territory. Alaska’s population was at 29,500 Eskimos, Indians and Aleuts; 4,300 “Caucasian Alaskans” and 26,000 Cheechakos (newcomers).

1913. The first Alaska Territorial Legislature convened. The first law enacted granted women voting rights.

1914. Congress authorized the construction of the Alaska Railroad, clearing the way for the only railroad in history which would be owned and operated by the U.S. government. The city of Anchorage was born as the main railroad construction campsite.

1924. Congress granted Native Americans the right to vote and U.S. citizenship. As a result of this act, the number of qualified voters in Alaska doubled over night.

1942. The Japanese invaded Alaska’s Aleutian Islands. As part of the defense of the West Coast, the Alaska Highway was built in the amazingly short time of eight months and 12 days, linking Anchorage and Fairbanks with the rest of the nation. Anchorage entered the war years with a population of 7,724 and emerged with 43,314 residents.

1955. A Constitutional Convention opened at the University of Alaska.

1959. The Alaska statehood measure passed Congress in late 1958. President Eisenhower signed the statehood bill, and on January 3, 1959, Alaska entered the Union as the 49th state.

Source: Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present, by William Dollarhide; published by Family Roots Publishing Co. For ordering information, click here.

To see more of Dollarhide’s Name List volumes, Click here.

Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

fr0211Just what are name lists and how can they be used? William Dollarhide and Leland Meitzler explain:

“Virtually all recorded events from a person’s life originated near the place the person lived, and the old records are usually still stored there today. Finding the place, therefore, is a matter of finding the local jurisdiction of the state, county, city, town, village, or local district.

An important step in finding the place of residence for a person is the use of published censuses and other name lists. A census or name list identifies the names of residents of an area from various local, state, and national sources. Thus, any name list is a place-finder.

Once a researcher has the exact place of residence, the next step is to visit the library and archives catalogs available to see what published information is available related to that place. The bibliography of name lists in this book was compiled from the most important library and archives catalogs in America – plus the vast resources of the Internet were scoured for identifying the most useful name lists online.”

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Family Roots Publishing has just released 9 new William Dollarhide Name Lists books. And, these books are all on sale for a short introductory period. Well, an introduction to a new series would not be complete without at lease one volume from the series standing in review. Herein, we look at Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present.

In this book, on Alaska, names lists are detailed in the following categories (with 270 links for the state of Alaska):

  • Local Census Records
  • District Court Records.
  • Directories
  • State Military Lists
  • Tax Lists
  • Voter Lists
  • Vital Records

Likewise, the National Names Lists have these categories (244 entries in all):

  • Federal Census Records
  • Immigration Lists
  • U.S. Military Lists
  • U.S. Veterans Records
  • U.S. Pension Records
  • National Vital Record

There are also a number of maps, including:

  • 1899 Alaska & Klondike Region
  • 1880-1940 Alaska Census Jurisdictions
  • 1763 British North America
  • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
  • 1790 United States
  • 1800 United States
  • 1810 United States
  • 1820 United States
  • 1830 United States
  • 1840 United States
  • 1850 United States
  • 1860 United States
  • 1870-1880 United States
  • 1890-1940 United States

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

This new series is bound to be a big hit with genealogists. The introductory offer is also difficult to pass up. If you order a print copy of the book you not only get 15% off, but you also will receive a FREE copy of the eBook version in  .PDF (Adobe Acrobat) format. The .PDF version is fully hyperlinked to take you quickly to each site, and can be viewed on any device or computer supporting Acrobat files, which is virtually every computer, laptop, tablet, and smart device on the market.

Order your copy of Alaska Name Lists 1732-1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present while the deals are good, from Family Roots Publishing; Temporary Price: $16.11 for both the paper and electronic versions together. Or, get the eBook version alone for just $12.50.

9 New Dollarhide Research Guides (AL – DC) Now Available at Introductory Prices with FREE PDF eBook & Nearly 50% Savings!

Connecticut Name Lists
With this new exciting series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

As of today, there are currently nine new volumes in print, each coverng a different state. Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, and the District of Columbia are in print. Others will follow as published.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

To celebrate the introduction of these new research guides, Family Roots Publishing is, for a LIMITED TIME, offering them to the public at 15% off (Reg. $18.95 ea.) with a FREE fully-hyperlinked pdf eBook of the guide or guides available by download immediately upon purchase. That’s a savings of nearly 50% for the book and PDF eBook combined! Start your Name List research in any of these 9 states now! No waiting for the book itself to arrive!

Internet hyperlinks alone for each of the volumes is as follows:

  • Alabama – 400 links
  • Alaska – 270 links
  • Arizona – 298 links
  • Arkansas – 424 links
  • California – 415 links
  • Colorado – 351 links
  • Connecticut – 336 links
  • Delaware – 307 links
  • District of Columbia – 380 links

The National Name List portion of each book includes 244 links.

The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased today from Family Roots Publishing Co. Note that the pdf eBook link alone follows the listing for the book itself & a FREE pdf (download link sent immediately).

Click on the links below to read more about each book, including a table of contents, and/or to make a purchase. – or click on this link to go directly to the Dollarhide Name Lists section of Family Roots Publishing.

Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Alabama Name Lists 1702-2006, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Alaska Name Lists, 1732 – 1991, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Arizona Name Lists 1684 – 2003, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Arizona Name Lists 1684 – 2003, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Arkansas Name Lists, 1686 – 2005, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Arkansas Name Lists, 1686 – 2005, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

California Name Lists, 1700 – 2011, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: California Name Lists, 1700 – 2011, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Colorado Name Lists, 1858 – 1998, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Colorado Name Lists, 1858 – 1998, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Connecticut Name Lists, 1600s – 2001, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Delaware Name Lists, 1609-1992, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: Delaware Name Lists, 1609-1992, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

District of Columbia Name Lists, 1600s – 1997, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

PDF eBook: District of Columbia Name Lists, 1600s – 1997, with a selection of National Name Lists, 1600s – Present

Note that PDF eBooks alone are available above at a total cost of $12.50 each – with immediate download available upon purchase.

Petersburg, Alaska, Public Library Posts Early Newspapers Online

The Progressive

The Petersburg, Alaska Public Library has posted several early newspapers online in their Digital Archives. The following papers are currently available for searching online:

The dates of items currently posted are from 1913 through 1931.

According to an article posted at the ksfk.org website, “By this fall, the archive should be complete up to a year within the current paper.” See the article for an interesting audio recording.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

RecordsBase.com Adds NY Death, Haywood Co, NC Marriage & AK Divorce Records

The following excerpt is from a press release posted at PRLeap.com:

OMAHA, Nebraska (November 1, 2012)RecordsBase.com has announced the addition of new records collections to make the work of genealogical researchers even faster. The new collections include documents for New York, North Carolina and Alaska, providing additional resources for members of the website that include death, marriage and divorce records for their perusal and use. Ashley Evans, PR manager for RecordsBase.com, explained the additional files are in response to RecordsBase review asking for more information to become available.

“Our goal is to make public records searches as fast and easy as possible,” Evans stated. “That is why we are constantly working toward making more records available to our members, through our website search functions that offer instant access to the records our members are looking for. Now, our customers can search even more public records free, with the addition of these collections.”

New files offered by RecordsBase include New York State death records dating between 1957 and 1962. This collection contains a total of 485,114 files. North Carolina, Haywood County marriage records, dating between 1857 and 1925, add 8,383 records, and Alaska divorce records dating from 1970 to present include 51,883 files. These records are now accessible for viewing through the RecordsBase.com website. Currently the website offers more than two billion public records, according to one RecordsBase.com review.

From PRLeap.com.

Ancestry Adds 1940 Indexes for 12 More States & is Now up to 37 States plus Washington D.C.!

The following is from Matthew Deighton at Ancestry.com:

With today’s addition of 12 states (18 million records) to the 1940 US Federal Census, Ancestry.com now has 37 states and Washington DC fully indexed and searchable on the site. All of the 1940 US Census will be free through 2013.

Number of records per state:

  • Alaska: 72,665
  • Arkansas: 1,955,176
  • Idaho: 526,673
  • Massachusetts: 4,325,657
  • Minnesota: 2,797,461
  • Missouri: 3,790,868
  • New Mexico: 534,334
  • North Dakota: 644,245
  • Oklahoma: 2,341,108
  • Rhode Island: 714,519
  • South Dakota: 643,766
  • Utah: 551,609