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Archive for the ‘U.S. Census’ Category

How Many Chicagoans Were Born in the City?

The following teaser is from the Feb. 10, 2014 edition of wbez.org: Tracy Miller noticed something about Chicago when she moved here nine years ago. “I meet many people who say they are native Chicagoans,” she says. “It seems like there are more natives still residing here than in other cities I have lived in.” […]

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FamilySearch Adds Over 4.5 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Brazil, China, Ghana, Italy, Netherlands, Philippines, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch: FamilySearch has added more than 4.5 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, China, Colombia, Ghana, Italy, Netherlands, Paraguay, Philippines, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,165,725 indexed records from the U.S., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, collection; the 469,903 images from the Ghana […]

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A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the U.S. to the Twelfth 1790-1900

By an Act of Congress in 1907 and “In order to permanently to preserve the valuable but vanishing census records which still remain, relating to the first year of constitutional government, and in response to urgent requests from many patriotic societies…Congress authorized…the publication, by the Director of the Census, of the names of heads of […]

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MyHeritage: All US Census Records Now Available!

The following release was post on the MyHeritage Blog: We’re proud to announce that the entire collection of U.S. Federal Censuses is now available on MyHeritage. These censuses span every decade from 1790-1930 and complement the existing 1940 U.S. Census, which you can search for free on MyHeritage. The collection is the nation’s largest and most […]

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Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920

The county has always been used as the basic Federal census unit. Genealogical research in the census, therefore, begins with identifying the correct county jurisdictions. Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses 1790–1920 shows county outline maps across the United States at ten-year intervals. Effectively, a map of each state’s county lines at the time […]

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Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maryland

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790 is a series of books which provide abstracts from the 1790 U.S. Census for the heads of house for each state. This volume covers Maine. Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the […]

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Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maine

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790 is a series of books which provide abstracts from the 1790 U.S. Census for the heads of house for each state. This volume covers Maine. Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the […]

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The 1840 Federal Census: A New Look

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… There are some special aspects to the 1840 federal census that make it one of the most interesting of all censuses taken in the United States since 1790. First of all, this was the last of the “heads of household” censuses, as the […]

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Common Census Questions

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… Following are some questions about the federal censuses, 1790-1940, perhaps common to all genealogists who use the censuses to locate their ancestors. ● Question: Who were the people who became the early census takers? Answer: From 1790-1870, the U.S. federal censuses were taken […]

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Are You Reading the Originals?

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 37: The Post Office shown on the census page where your ancestors are listed is for a town which appears on no known map ever published. Reading Federal Census Records It stands to reason that the spelling of names […]

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An Update to Birth Information from the Census Bureau

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… For years, the United States Census Bureau has provided a valuable information service concerning census age search transcripts, civilian births abroad, births at U.S. Army facilities, and births of adopted alien children. For the full information page, visit the Census Bureau’s webpage at […]

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A Checklist of 150 Genealogical Sources

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… That first pedigree chart usually shows up to four generations, sometimes more, but if a 4-generation chart starts with yourself, there are up to fourteen direct ancestors presented. How many documents have you collected for each of those fourteen persons? How many have […]

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Repositories Holding 1880 Federal Census Originals

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… Genealogists should know that many of the original sets of census records for 1880 are available to them by visiting various repositories outside of the National Archives. The 1880 census is the only federal census year which was distributed to other repositories by […]

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Early U.S. Census Losses

The following article was written by my good friend, William Dollarhide. Enjoy… Dollarhide’s Genealogy Rule No. 9: An 1850 census record showing all twelve children in a family proves only that your ancestors did not have access to birth control. The National Archives’ Guide to Genealogical Research in the National Archives (Washington: NARA, 1982), p.21, […]

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County Name Changes and Abolished Counties Reflected in the 1790-1920 Federal Censuses

The following article was written by my good friend, Bill Dollarhide: Dollarhide’s Rule No. 27: Research in one county that leads you to information in another county will only be revealed on the last day of your vacation. In an earlier article, U.S. Counties Created or Abolished, 1920 – 1983, we listed new counties or […]

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