Classes at the 2017 Salt Lake Christmas Tour Include a DNA Track & One-on-One Analytics

The classes being offered at the 2017 Salt Lake Christmas Tour are now posted at the website. Based on the overwhelming success of Regina Negrycz’s DNA presentation in 2016, we’ve asked her back to present a week-long DNA-oriented series. In addition to the lectures, Regina has agreed to do one-on-ones with Christmas Tour attendees, helping them analyze their data!

See Regina’s Ancestral Beginnings website.

So – Anyone coming to the Christmas Tour in 2017 should plan on bringing their DNA data if they want to go over it with Regina.

Regina’s lectures at the 2017 Salt Lake Christmas Tour are as follows:

  • Navigating Your 23&Me Results
  • Answering your AncestryDNA Questions
  • Reviewing FTDNA Tests and Results
  • Exploring MyHeritage DNA
  • Mapping Your DNA to Create Your Genetic Fan Chart

Lectures will also be given by the following speakers (with number of lectures in parentheses):

  • Thomas MacEntee (10)
  • Lisa Alzo (5)
  • Arlene Eakle (3)
  • Leland K Meitzler (1)
  • Raymon Nesbitt – FamilySearch (1)
  • Ron Tanner – FamilySearch (1)
  • Maureen MacDonald (1)
  • Anna Swayne – Ancestry DNA (1)
  • Dwight Radford (1)
  • Kevan Hansen (1)
  • Bruce Buzbee – RootsMagic Developer (1)
  • Loni Gardner (1)

I will write more about the above presenters and their planned presentations in upcoming articles.

The FT Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy – by Blaine T. Bettinger – 38% off thru Feb 28

We’re again running a promo on Blaine Bettinger’s The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy. We made a special purchase and are making it available for 38% off thru Tuesday, Feb. 28 – or whenever we run out of the current stock if before then. See my review below.

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Finally! We now have a terrific new book to help us with genetic genealogy. The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy, by Blaine T. Bettinger is what we needed. There have been several books printed, but it seems to me most have have been either way too scientific, or far too limited in scope for the average genealogist. Blaine T. Bettinger has written a colorful 239 page volume for the genealogical community that I recommend to everyone! It’s brand new, with information that is sure to help anyone interested in using DNA to find ancestors.

The Following is from the Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Part One: Getting Started
  • Chapter 1: Genetic Genealogy Basics
  • Kick-start your genetic research. This chapter features a brief history of DNA testing and breaks down DNA and the four popular genetic tests, plus how to identify your genetic family tree.

  • Chapter 2: Common Misconceptions
  • Debunk your DNA myths. This chapter addresses eleven common misunderstandings about DNA to set you straight as you begin your genetic research.

  • Chapter 3: Ethics and Genetic Genealogy
  • Conduct conscientious and responsible studies. This chapter explores some of the ethical issues involved in DNA testing for family research and how to account for them.

  • Part Two: Selecting a Test
  • Chapter 4: Mitochondrial-DNA (mtDNA) Testing
  • Discover Your female maternal ancestors and answer research questions about them with this guide to the oldest DNA test.

  • Chapter 5: Y-Chromosomal (Y-DNA) Testing
  • Find your paternal male ancestors. This chapter discusses how to use Y-DNA to track your male-line descendants and solve genealogical problems.

  • Chapter 6: Autosomal-DNA (atDNA) Testing
  • Explore your whole genetic family tree with this chapter’s guide to the atDNA test, the most popular and (arguably) most useful DNA Analysis.

  • Chapter 7: X-Chromosomal (X-DNA) Testing
  • Pinpoint your genetic ancestors. This chapter discusses how to use X-DNA and its inheritance patterns to grow your family tree.

  • Part Three: Analyzing and Applying Test Results
  • Chapter 8: Third-Party Autosomal-DNA Tools
  • Broaden your DNA analysis with this chapter’s tips for using software, online tools, and other third-party programs to analyze atDNA results.

  • Chapter 9: Ethnicity Estimates
  • Unpack the estimate provided by DNA testing companies. This chapter shows what you can use – and can’t – learn about your ancestry from ethnicity estimates.

  • Chapter 10: Analyzing Complex Questions with DNA
  • Dig deeper into your DNA research with these tips and strategies for using your DNA results to break through brick walls and answer challenging research questions.

  • Chapter 11: Genetic Testing for Adoptees
  • Uncover your hidden past. This chapter provides strategies for adoptees and other individuals who may face an extra hurdle when researching ancestors.

  • Chapter 12: The Future of Genetic Genealogy
  • Gaze into DNA’s future with these predictions about the field’s trajectory and what you can hope to achieve as genetic technology advances.

  • Glossary – 5 pages of terminology for the rest of us!
  • Appendices
  • Appendix A: Comparison Guides
  • Appendix B: Research Forms
  • Appendix C: More Resources
  • Index

About The Author
blaine_bettinger_125pw_author-of-dna-guideBlaine T. Bettinger, Ph.D. (biochemistry), J.D. is an intellectual property attorney in Syracuse, New York, by day, and a genealogy educator and blogger by night. In 2007, he created The Genetic Genealogist, one of the first blogs devoted to genetic genealogy and personal genomics.

Blaine has written numerous DNA-related articles for the Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly, Family Tree Magazine, and other publications. He has been an instructor at the inaugural genetic genealogy courses at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR), Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG), Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research, Family Tree University, and Excelsior College (Albany, NY). He is a former editor of the Journal of Genetic Genealogy, and a co-coordinator of the ad hoc Genetic Genealogy Standards Committee. In 2015, he became an alumnus of ProGen Study Group 21 and was elected to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society’s Board of Trustees.

Blaine was born and raised in Ellisburg, NY, where his ancestors have lived for more than two hundred years, and is the father of two boys. You can find Blaine on his website and on Twitter (@blaine_5).

Order The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy, by Blaine T. Bettinger for 38% off – just $18.59 (plus $5.50 p&h) thru the sale period. Order Now by clicking here.

Three Terrific New DNA Guides by Diahan Southard Are Now Available!

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Three NEW DNA Quick Guides by Diahan Southard are now available. They are:
NEXT STEPS: WORKING WITH YOUR AUTOSOMAL DNA MATCHES
ORGANIZING YOUR DNA MATCHES: A COMPANION GUIDE
GEDMATCH: A NEXT STEP FOR YOUR AUTOSOMAL DNA TEST

If you’ve gotten any of Diahan Southard’s DNA guides in the past, you already know just how valuable they are. You may have even purchased the bundle of 6 of Diahan’s guides that FRPC offered on sale a while back. Well, Diahan now has three new ones with detailed new information. Each of the three guides may be purchased separately, or as a bundle of three. During the promotional sale period, the bundle is 15% off (Reg. 26.85 – on sale for $22.82, plus $4.50 p&h). The individual laminate guides may be purchased for 10% off ($8.06 each, plus $4.50 p&h for the first laminate, and 50 cents for each thereafter). We’ve again put all of Diahan’s guides, including the bundle of six, on sale for 15% off on bundles, and 10% off on individual guides. Click on the links to order.

Following are descriptions of each of the new DNA guides:

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NEXT STEPS: WORKING WITH YOUR AUTOSOMAL DNA MATCHES; by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular); 4 pp; 8.5×11; Full Color, laminated; Published: 2016; Item # LU21

Many genealogists have heard about the power of DNA testing in genealogy and have dabbled in their own DNA test results. This guide outlines what to do next to maximize the power of DNA testing in genealogy. This guide provides instruction on:

  • How to leverage the power of known relatives who have tested
  • Gain a basic understanding of chromosome browsers and their role in the search process
  • Access to a free bonus template for evaluating the genealogical relationship of a match in relationship to the predicted genetic relationship
  • A methodology for converting the unknown relatives on the match list into known relatives

With this guide in hand, genealogists will be prepared to take their DNA testing experience to the next level and make new discoveries about their ancestors and heritage.

lu22_organizing-your-dna-matches_front
ORGANIZING YOUR DNA MATCHES: A COMPANION GUIDE; by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular); 4 pp; 8.5×11; Full Color, laminated; Published: 2016; Item # LU22

With over 2.5 million people in the possession of a DNA test, and most with match lists in the thousands, many are wondering how to keep track of all this data and apply it to their family history. This guide provides the foundation for managing DNA matches and correspondence, and will help budding genetic genealogists:

  • Centralize their point of contact with their matches from multiple testing companies
  • Familiarize them with Google Forms for tracking information, including providing a link to a free bonus form template
  • Provide a brief overview of how to use the power of Google Earth in their genetic genealogy
  • Provide an introduction to spreadsheets
  • Review valuable third party tools and their contributions to the organizing effort

lu23_gedmatch_front
GEDMATCH: A NEXT STEP FOR YOUR AUTOSOMAL DNA TEST; by Diahan Southard (who worked for Sorenson Molecular); 4 pp; 8.5×11; Full Color, laminated; Published: 2016; Item # LU23

Gedmatch is a third‐party tool for use by genetic genealogists seeking to advance their knowledge of their autosomal DNA test. You can upload your DNA results from any major genetic genealogy testing company into Gedmatch for free. Turn to this quick guide for answers to these common questions:

  • What is Gedmatch?
  • Who can participate?
  • What do I have to do to join?
  • What kinds of tools do they offer?
  • Can it help with my ethnicity results?
  • Will I find new matches?
  • Is this a necessary tool?

This guide will navigate through the myriad of options and point out only the best tools for your genetic genealogy research.

The following previously published DNA Guides by Diahan Southard are also available – at 10% off each, or as a bundle at 15% off (see explanation above):

Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist”

lu19Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist, provided insight to Autosomal tests and what they are, with coverage on SNPs or SNiPs and the idea that “your genetic pedigree is not the same as your genealogical pedigree. In Diahan Southard’s latest guide, Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist,” provides greater coverage of Autosomal DNA and much more.

“23andMe has a wide variety of content on their website that can easily distract you from the genetic genealogy tools they are offering. This guide will help you focus your efforts on the top genetic genealogy tools at 23andMe and how you can use them to verify and extend your family history.”

This guide is about helping you get the most of your DNA test results by using tools at 23andMe. A big section of the guide covers the main match page where you will “spend the majority of your time,” and “which displays a list of your genetic cousins.” The final page of the guide is dedicated to the admixture tool, or the “ethnicity tool, at 23andMe is called the Ancestral Composition view.” In other words, there is a lot for you to do and learn at 23andMe, and this guide will help you make the most of the site.

Understanding 23andMe is part of a series of guides on DNA genealogy. Each guide in the series follows the popular standard as four laminated pages with a simple center fold for easy storage and portability.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • Autosomal DNA and More
  • Your Health Information
  • Smart Communications
  • Talking Tips
  • Post Your Genealogy at 23andMe
  • Main Match Page
    • Names at 23andMe
    • Relationships
    • Ancestral Information
    • Haplogroups
    • Communicating with Matches
    • Map View
    • Surname View
  • Family Inheritance: Advanced
  • Admixture at 23andMe

 

About Author Diahan Southard (In her words):

“After getting bitten by the DNA bug as a high school student, I went on to study at Brigham Young University where I earned a bachelors degree in microbiology. I worked before and after graduation for the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation, one of the first efforts to create a correlated genetic and genealogical database.

Growing up with the budding genetic genealogy industry lead me to my current position as Your DNA Guide, where I provides personalized, interactive experiences to assist individuals and families in interpreting their genetic results in the context of their genealogical information. That means I can take you step by step through any kind of DNA test in a way that you will understand, and even enjoy!”

Diahan Southard has produced a series of colorful, laminated guides that outline all the basics one needs to understand DNA for genealogists. Her guides include:

 

All of Southard’s guides are available, along with Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist”, from Family Roots Publishing.

Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist” is available in hard copy as well as electronic (PDF format, available by clicking here).

23andMe Now Includes Reports That Meet FDA Standards

I got the following from 23andMe:

23andMe

Today marks a great milestone in the history of personal genetics. I am thrilled to let you know that 23andMe is now the first and only genetic service available directly to you that includes reports that meet FDA standards.

After nearly two years of work with the FDA, extensive user comprehension testing and a complete redesign, 23andMe is launching an entirely new experience that includes carrier status, wellness, trait and ancestry reports. We have also developed new and improved tools to share and compare your genetics with friends and family – and for those of you participating in research, we will provide new insights to explore.

As one of our earlier customers, you will continue to have access to your current health reports. The new experience will include redesigned versions of many of the same health and ancestry reports that you currently have. We have also added some new features and tools.

Our team will be rolling out the new experience to you by early next year. We will send you an email when your account is updated.

If you have any questions on the new experience, you can visit our new FAQ page. Additionally, we have updated our Privacy Statement and Terms of Service to support the new features, which I encourage you to read.

We are committed to bringing you a world class service which provides you with ongoing updates. The genetics revolution is here and we are excited to enable customers like you to keep learning about your DNA. Today is only the beginning!

Anne Wojcicki
CEO, 23andMe

23andMe – DNA Tests That Are Being Using For Far More Than Just Ancestry


Discover 23andMe & find out what your DNA says about you & your family! Buy one, get 20% off each ad

I ordered a 23andMe DNA test yesterday. Yes – I’ve taken one from Sorenson’s, and later AncestryDNA, but I’d like to see how the test done by 23andMe matches up to the earlier tests. I’m also fascinated by all the non-family history research that 23andMe does with our DNA – lots of health-related stuff. One of their areas of research deals with Lupus. When I registered my test, I was given the opportunity to fill out questionnaires that were to help advance their health-related research projects. I found it fascinating, and was pleased that I could be involved in a project that would help others. Click on the illustration to learn more about 23andMe.

DNA testing can also have a sociological side to it. A fascinating article was written by Carl Zimmer and posted at the New York Times website December 24, 2014. It was titled White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier. In the article he explains how 23andMe data was used to study how the ancestral makeup of self-identified African Americans, Latinos and European Americans differs by region-and why. I don’t remember reading this article when it was posted, but was prompted to do so by an email from 23andMe after I registered my test. Following is a teaser:

In 1924, the State of Virginia attempted to define what it means to be white.

The state’s Racial Integrity Act, which barred marriages between whites and people of other races, defined whites as people “whose blood is entirely white, having no known, demonstrable or ascertainable admixture of the blood of another race.”

There was just one problem. As originally written, the law would have classified many of Virginia’s most prominent families as not white, because they claimed to be descended from Pocahontas.

So the Virginia legislature revised the act, establishing what came to be known as the “Pocahontas exception.” Virginians could be up to one-sixteenth Native American and still be white in the eyes of the law.

People who were one-sixteenth black, on the other hand, were still black.

In the United States, there is a long tradition of trying to draw sharp lines between ethnic groups, but our ancestry is a fluid and complex matter. In recent years geneticists have been uncovering new evidence about our shared heritage, and last week a team of scientists published the biggest genetic profile of the United States to date, based on a study of 160,000 people.

Read the full article.

Genetic Information From 23andMe to be Used to Produce New Drugs

The following teaser is from a March 12, 2015 article posted at the Wall Street Journal website.

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23andMe Inc., the personal genetics company, has sold enough DNA spit kits to accumulate genetic information on 850,000 customers. Now it plans to mine that database for drug targets, and it has picked a star drug developer to lead the effort.

The closely held Mountain View, Calif., company said Thursday that Richard Scheller, who retired in December as head of research and early development at Roche Holding AG, will become chief science officer next month and lead a new therapeutics group that will seek to discover new drugs.

Dr. Scheller’s appointment is the latest in a string of moves 23andMe has made to revamp operations since late 2013, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rebuked the company for aggressively marketing the saliva kits as a medical test…

Read the full article.

23andMe and MyHeritage Announce Strategic Collaboration & Product Integration

The following news release was received from Daniel Horowitz, Chief Genealogist and Translation Manager for MyHeritage:

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New collaboration combines family trees and DNA to empower individuals to discover and document their ancestry

MOUNTAIN VIEW, California & TEL AVIV, Israel – October 21, 2014: 23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, and MyHeritage, the leading destination for discovering, sharing and preserving family history, announced today a strategic collaboration that will provide an enhanced experience for individuals to discover their legacy based on genetic ancestry and documented family history.

23andMe pioneered autosomal DNA ancestry analysis for consumers, and has created the largest DNA ancestry service in the world. With a simple saliva sample 23andMe can reveal the geographic origins of distant ancestors and help people discover unknown relatives. MyHeritage helps millions of families worldwide find and treasure their unique history with easy-to-use family tree tools, a huge library of more than 5.5 billion historical records and innovative matching technologies for automating discoveries. Integrating the market leading solutions in ancestral DNA and family trees will provide an unparalleled experience for customers of both companies.

“We believe this collaboration with MyHeritage will offer our customers a vastly improved opportunity to build their family tree and discover new connections,” said Andy Page, President of 23andMe. “Given MyHeritage’s technology leadership in the ancestry space and vast global reach, we are excited about the value this relationship will bring to our customers around the world.”

“Combining genealogy with DNA-based ancestry is the next evolution in uncovering family history,” said Gilad Japhet, Founder and CEO of MyHeritage. “DNA testing can connect you to relatives you never knew existed, who descend from shared ancestors centuries ago, but family trees and historical records are critical to map and fully understand these connections. We have great respect for 23andMe’s technology and values, and its pioneering approach to genetics represents strong potential value for our users in the future.”

23andMe will offer its more than three quarters of a million customers around the globe access to MyHeritage’s family tree tools. This will allow 23andMe’s customers to enjoy automated family history discoveries. Smart Matching™ automatically finds connections between user-contributed family trees and Record Matching automatically locates historical records from the billions of records available on MyHeritage, pertaining to any person in the family tree. MyHeritage will utilize 23andMe’s API to provide the best experience for customers, by allowing any two people with matching DNA to explore their family tree connections. MyHeritage will also offer 23andMe’s Personal Genome Service® to its global community of more than 70 million registered users, in addition to the DNA tests it already offers.

The first phase of integration will be complete by early 2015.

About 23andMe
23andMe, Inc. is the leading personal genetics company dedicated to helping people access, understand and benefit from the human genome. The company’s Personal Genome Service® enables individuals to gain deeper insights into their genetics and ancestry. The vision for 23andMe is to personalize healthcare by making and supporting meaningful discoveries through genetic research. 23andMe, Inc., was founded in 2006, and the company is advised by a group of renowned experts in the fields of human genetics, bioinformatics and computer science. More information is available at www.23andme.com. 23andMe’s health reports are not cleared by the FDA. US customers may purchase 23andMe’s ancestry-only product.

About MyHeritage
MyHeritage is the leading destination for discovering, sharing and preserving family history. As technology thought leaders and innovators in the space, MyHeritage is transforming family history into an activity that’s accessible and instantly rewarding. Trusted by millions of families, its global user community enjoys access to a massive library of historical records, the most internationally diverse collection of family trees and ground-breaking search and matching technologies.
MyHeritage empowers families with an easy way to share their story, past and present, and treasure it for generations to come. MyHeritage is available in 40 languages. www.myheritage.com

You can watch MyHeritage Founder and CEO, Gilad Japhet, break the news live on Bloomberg TV earlier today (And watch Oscar Pistorius being given five years for Reeva Steenkamp death at the same time): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c1MefhlGTA8