2 Books on New England Captives Carried to Canada During the French & Indian War -10% Off thru March 8

This weekend we are featuring two books that deal with New England captives that were carried off into Canada during the French and Indian Wars. I happen to find this era of American history fascinating, and have found both of these books extremely helpful. Both are offered at 10% off through March 8, or while supplies last.

New-England-Captives-149pw

New England Captives Carried to Canada Between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars; by Emma Lewis Coleman; foreword by Donald R. Friary; 455 pp; paper; 6×9; Published: 2012; ISBN: 9780880822923; Item # NE25; 10% Off Through March 8, 2016 – $26.96 – Reg. $29.95 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase.

Originally published in two volumes in 1925, New England Captives Carried to Canada represents decades of research conducted by Coleman and C. Alice Baker (author of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada, 1897).

This work names all the captives the two women discovered, provides biographical data for each, and paints a detailed picture of the Indian attacks on New England communities over the eighty-year period. Includes sources, a comprehensive index, and an appendix with greater explanation of terms, key people, and places mentioned in the text. For nearly a century, this has been the go-to resource and the it’s said it’s the most definitive work ever published on the subject.

From the Table of Contents:
I. The Wars – Defense
II. Missions and Missionaries
III. Concerning Indians
IV. Redemptions, Ransoms, and Naturalization
V. Hatfield and Deerfield
VI. At the Eastward – Dover
VIII. Salmon Falls, Casco Bay, Sandy Beach (Rye) and River St. John
IX. The Attacks Upon York
X. Oyster River and Groton
XI. The Massachusetts Frontier – Squackig, Billerica, Lancaster, Worcester, Pascomuck, Marlborough, Dunstable, Brookfield, Northampton
XII. The Lower Merrimac and Exeter
XIII. Kittery, Eliot and Berwick
XIV. The Tragedy at Wells

True-Stories-of-New-England-Captives-149pw
True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars; by C. Alice Baker; 420 pp; Paper; 5.5×8.5, Published: 1896, Reprinted: 2004; ISBN: 1556134207; index; Item # HBB0420; 10% Off through March 8, 2016 – $30.60 – Reg. $34.00 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase..

In a day and age where selecting the perfect title for a book, a movie, or even a magazine article is often more a marketing question than a practical one, it is nice to find books whose titles declare exactly what the contents are. Of course, when I do find such a title it is often the reprint of a book originally published 100 plus years ago. So it is with True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars.

New England Captives was written by C. Alice Baker, and originally published in 1897. In her preface, Baker mentions reading the words “Carried captive to Canada whence they came not back.” These words peeked Baker’s curiosity. What happened to those captives? Curiosity turned to mission and this book is the result of C. Alice Baker’s efforts.

These pages provides detailed accounts of attacks on the following towns:

  • Well and York, Maine
  • Dover, New Hampshire
  • Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts

These stories focus on the points of view of just a few individuals, but offer extensive genealogical and biographical data. In particular, the following family names are treated:

  • Baker
  • Nims
  • Otis
  • Plaisted
  • Rishworth
  • Rising
  • Sayward
  • Sheldon
  • Silver
  • Stockwell
  • Stebbins
  • Wheelwright
  • Williams

From the Table of Contents
Christine Otis (A romance of real life on the frontier as told in the records.)
Esther Wheelwright
Story of a York Family
Difficulties and Dangers in the Settlement of a Frontier Town 1670
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Two Captives ( A romance of real life two hundred years ago)
A Day at Oka
Thankful Stebbins
A Scion of the Church in Deerfield,. Joseph-Octave Plessis (Written for the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of the church in Deerfield.)
Hertel De Rouville
Father Meriel – Mary Silver
Appendix
Christinr Otis
Esther Wheelwright
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Thankful Stennins
Index

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766

vb01

Fred Anderson’s Crucible of War is probably my favorite history book ever written. The book is about the Seven-Years War, otherwise known as the French and Indian War – a war that led directly to the American Revolution. If there hadn’t been a French and Indian War, there may very well not have ever been a revolution of the English colonies in America. It’s well written and a volume that I recommend to everyone.

Following is a review written in 2013 by Andy Pomeroy:

Do you think you know what the Seven Years’ War was about? Do you really understand it influence on shaping the colonies as a precursor to the American Revolution? After reading The Crucible of War you may just change your mind.

Winston S. Churchill called the Seven Years’ War the first world war. North Americans associate it primarily with the British conquest of Canada. But the conflict — in which Britain and Prussia opposed France, Austria and Spain — spread to Europe, the Caribbean, West Africa, India and the Philippines. Though it formally lasted from 1756 until 1763, the war’s first shots were fired in the spring of 1754 between French troops asserting their country’s claim to the Ohio Valley and Virginians commanded by the 22-year-old George Washington. Two of America’s most eminent historians devoted years of research and writing to the great contest for empire. In the 20th century Lawrence Henry Gipson published a three-volume history. In the 19th century Francis Parkman considered his ”Montcalm and Wolfe” to be his crowning achievement. Now Fred Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado, has written a panoramic narrative of the North American phase of the Seven Years’ War, an ambitious undertaking he discharges superbly. ~ CHARLES ROYSTER, New York Times Book Review (New York Times on the Web; Article Link)

Fred Andres is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His goal, like that of many historians, was to write a “book accessible to general readers that will also satisfy [his] fellow historian’s scholarly expectations.” In the Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766, Fred Anderson succeeded marvelously. This book is an historical narrative describing the events, people, and politics associated with what the colonists called the French and Indian War. In these pages you learn how and where many future leaders of the American Revolution developed their political view points and honed their military skills.

“Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven Year’s War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history. Demonstrating that independence was not inevitable or even at first desired by the colonists, he shows how removal of the threat from France was essential before Americans could develop their own concepts of democratic government and defy their imperial British protectors. Of great interest is the importance of Native Americans in the conflict. Both the French and English had Indian allies; France’s defeat ended a diplomatic system in which Indian nations, especially the 300-year-old Iroquois League, held the balance between the colonial powers. In a fast-paced narrative, Anderson moves with confidence and ease from the forests of Ohio and battlefields along the St. Lawrence to London’s House of Commons and the palaces of Europe. He makes complex economic, social, and diplomatic patterns accessible and easy to understand. Using a vast body of research, he takes the time to paint the players as living personalities, from George III and George Washington to a host of supporting characters. The book’s usefulness and clarity are enhanced by a hundred landscapes, portraits, maps, and charts taken from contemporary sources. Crucible of War is political and military history at its best; it never flags and is a pleasure to read. ~ JOHN STEVENSON, Professor/Dean at the University of Colorado

Few people have a true appreciation for the role of The Seven Years’ War in both America as well as the world at large. Few historians have the knack for narrative that Anderson excels at within these pages. The pages turn as easily as those in a favorite novel.

Here is more praise for this historical work:

“A wonderful book. Fred Anderson brings to life  a war that irrevocably shaped our nation. I wish all history were written this well.” ~ SEBASTIAN JUGER, author of The Perfect Storm.

“Reading Crucible of War is an enriching experience…Anyone who thinks that individuals have no significant effect on the fate of nations should ponder Mr. Anderson’s cast of characters.” ~ The Wall Street Journal

 

Contents

List of Illustrations

Introduction: The Seven Years’ War and the Disruption of the Old British Empire

Maps

Prologue: Jumonville’s Glen, May 28, 1754

Part I: The Origins of the Seven Years’ War, 1450-1754

  1. Iroquoia and Empire
  2. The Erosion of Iroquois Influence
  3. London Moves to Counter a Threat
  4. Washington Steps onto the Stage…
  5. …And Stumbles
  6. Escalation

Part II: Defeat, 1754-1755

  1. The Albany Congress and Colonial Disunion
  2. General Braddock Takes Command
  3. Disaster on the Monogahela
  4. After Braddock: William Shirley and the Norther Campaigns
  5. British Politics, and a Revolution in European Diplomacy

Part III: Nadir, 1756-1757

  1. Lord Loundoun Takes Command
  2. Oswego
  3. The State of the Central Colonies
  4. The Strains of Empire: Causes of Anglo-American Friction
  5. Britain Drifts into a European War
  6. The Fortunes of War in Europe
  7. Loudoun’s Offensive
  8. Fort William Henry
  9. Other Disasters, and a Ray of Hope
  10. Pitt Changes Course

Part IV: Turning Point, 1758

  1. Deadlock, and a New Beginning
  2. Old Strategies, New Men, and a Shift in the Balance
  3. Montcalm Raises a Cross: The Battle of Ticonderoga
  4. Amherst at Louisbourg
  5. Supply Holds the Key
  6. Bradstreet at Fort Frontenac
  7. Indian Diplomacy and the Fall of Fort Duquesne
  8. Educations in Arms

Part V: Annus Mirabilis, 1759

  1. Success, Anxiety, and Power: The Ascent of William Pitt
  2. Ministerial Uncertainties
  3. Surfeit of Enthusiasm, Shortage of Resources
  4. Emblem of Empire: Fort Pitt and the Indians
  5. The Six Nations Join the Fight: The Siege of Niagara
  6. General Amherst Hesitates: Ticonderoga and Crown Point
  7. Dubious Battle: Wolfe Meets Montcalm at Quebec
  8. Fall’s Frustrations
  9. Celebration of Empire, Expectations of the Millennium
  10. Day of Decision: Quiberon Bay

Part VI: Conquest Completed, 1760

  1. War in Full Career
  2. The Insufficiency of Valor: Levis and Vauquelin at Quebec
  3. Murray Ascends the St. Lawrence
  4. Conquest Completed: Vaudreuil Surrenders at Montreal
  5. The Causes of Victory and the Experience of Empire
  6. Pitt Confronts an Unexpected Challenge

Victory Recollected: Scenographia Americana

Part VIII: Vexed Victory, 1761-1763

  1. The Fruits of victory and the Seeds of Disintegration
  2. The Cherokeet War and Amherst’s Reforms in Indian Policy
  3. Amherst’s Dilemma
  4. Pitt’s Problems
  5. The End of an Alliance
  6. The Intersections of Empire, Trade, and War: Havana
  7. Peace
  8. The Rise of Wilkes, the Fall of Bute, and the Unheeded Lesson of Manila
  9. Anglo-America at War’s End: The Fragility of Empire
  10. Yankees Invade Wyoming—and Pay the Price
  11. Amherst’s Reforms and Pontiac’s War
  12. Amhert’s Recall

Part VIII: Crisis and Reform, 1764

  1. Death Reshuffles a Ministry
  2. An Urgent Search for Order: Grenville and Halifax Confront the Need for Revenue and Control
  3. The American Duties Act (The Sugar Act)
  4. The Currency Act
  5. Postwar Conditions and the Context of Colonial Response
  6. An Ambiguous Response to Imperial Initiatives
  7. Pontiac’s Progress
  8. The Lessons of Pontiac’s War

Part IX: Crisis Compounds, 1765-1766

  1. Stamp Act and Quartering Act
  2. Grenville’s End
  3. The Assemblies Vacillate
  4. Mobs Respond
  5. Nullification by Violence, and an Elite Effort to Reassert Control

Part X: Empire Preserved? 1766

  1. The Repeal of the Stamp Act
  2. The Hallowness of Empire
  3. Acrimonious Postlude: The Colonies after Repeal
  4. The Future of Empire

Epilogue: Mount Vernon, June 24, 1767

Notes

Acknowledgements

Index

 

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $22.54.

Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764

hbd0300Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764 was originally published in 1891 by the New-York Historical Society. Heritage Books reprinted this book in 2007. The contents of this book are straight forward and simple, it contains:

“Muster Rolls of the various regiments and smaller organizations of troops raised and put in the field by the province of New York, which served during the Seven Years’ War in America, or, as it was later called ‘The Old French War’— that war which forever terminated the power of France in the New World.”

The rolls in this book cover the entire war period from 17855 to 1763, except for 1757. The 1757 records have gone missing from the archives for the State of New York in Albany. All the other records are held in the state archives, just as they were originally filed in the office of the Provincial Secretary of the Colony of New York. The rolls provide such information as name, date of enlistment, age, birthplace, and trade of the soldier.

The book has three main parts, the rolls, an appendix, and an extensive index. The appendix offers a great deal of vital history information through documents, also found in the state archives. “These show the action of the Governors of the province, the colonial legislature and other provincial authorities, not only in relation to their own troops, but to the carrying on of the war generally by the people of the province of New York, its legislature, and its Governors.” These documents include:

  • A list of all acts of the legislature of the province—17 in all
  • Official order, directions, and proclamations of three Governors
  • Lists of commissioned officers, as far as they were obtainable
  • Lists of deserters
  • Lists of  commissions signed by the Governors
  • Book of military appointments
  • Lists of commissions issued for the provincial regiments
  • List of warrants issued to captains for bounty and enlistment monies

For insight into a war most Americans probably know little about, this book presents both a great historical insight as well as vital information for researching ancestors who may have served in the Provincial military.

Order Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764 from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $45.08.

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766

vb01Do you think you know what the Seven Years’ War was about? Do you really understand it influence on shaping the colonies as a precursor to the American Revolution? After reading The Crucible of War you may just change your mind.

Winston S. Churchill called the Seven Years’ War the first world war. North Americans associate it primarily with the British conquest of Canada. But the conflict — in which Britain and Prussia opposed France, Austria and Spain — spread to Europe, the Caribbean, West Africa, India and the Philippines. Though it formally lasted from 1756 until 1763, the war’s first shots were fired in the spring of 1754 between French troops asserting their country’s claim to the Ohio Valley and Virginians commanded by the 22-year-old George Washington. Two of America’s most eminent historians devoted years of research and writing to the great contest for empire. In the 20th century Lawrence Henry Gipson published a three-volume history. In the 19th century Francis Parkman considered his ”Montcalm and Wolfe” to be his crowning achievement. Now Fred Anderson, a professor of history at the University of Colorado, has written a panoramic narrative of the North American phase of the Seven Years’ War, an ambitious undertaking he discharges superbly. ~ CHARLES ROYSTER, New York Times Book Review (New York Times on the Web; Article Link)

Fred Andres is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His goal, like that of many historians, was to write a “book accessible to general readers that will also satisfy [his] fellow historian’s scholarly expectations.” In the Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766, Fred Anderson succeeded marvelously. This book is an historical narrative describing the events, people, and politics associated with what the colonists called the French and Indian War. In these pages you learn how and where many future leaders of the American Revolution developed their political view points and honed their military skills.

“Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven Year’s War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history. Demonstrating that independence was not inevitable or even at first desired by the colonists, he shows how removal of the threat from France was essential before Americans could develop their own concepts of democratic government and defy their imperial British protectors. Of great interest is the importance of Native Americans in the conflict. Both the French and English had Indian allies; France’s defeat ended a diplomatic system in which Indian nations, especially the 300-year-old Iroquois League, held the balance between the colonial powers. In a fast-paced narrative, Anderson moves with confidence and ease from the forests of Ohio and battlefields along the St. Lawrence to London’s House of Commons and the palaces of Europe. He makes complex economic, social, and diplomatic patterns accessible and easy to understand. Using a vast body of research, he takes the time to paint the players as living personalities, from George III and George Washington to a host of supporting characters. The book’s usefulness and clarity are enhanced by a hundred landscapes, portraits, maps, and charts taken from contemporary sources. Crucible of War is political and military history at its best; it never flags and is a pleasure to read. ~ JOHN STEVENSON, Professor/Dean at the University of Colorado

Few people have a true appreciation for the role of The Seven Years’ War in both America as well as the world at large. Few historians have the knack for narrative that Anderson excels at within these pages. The pages turn as easily as those in a favorite novel.

Here is more praise for this historical work:

“A wonderful book. Fred Anderson brings to life  a war that irrevocably shaped our nation. I wish all history were written this well.” ~ SEBASTIAN JUGER, author of The Perfect Storm.

“Reading Crucible of War is an enriching experience…Anyone who thinks that individuals have no significant effect on the fate of nations should ponder Mr. Anderson’s cast of characters.” ~ The Wall Street Journal

 

Contents

List of Illustrations

Introduction: The Seven Years’ War and the Disruption of the Old British Empire

Maps

Prologue: Jumonville’s Glen, May 28, 1754

Part I: The Origins of the Seven Years’ War, 1450-1754

  1. Iroquoia and Empire
  2. The Erosion of Iroquois Influence
  3. London Moves to Counter a Threat
  4. Washington Steps onto the Stage…
  5. …And Stumbles
  6. Escalation

Part II: Defeat, 1754-1755

  1. The Albany Congress and Colonial Disunion
  2. General Braddock Takes Command
  3. Disaster on the Monogahela
  4. After Braddock: William Shirley and the Norther Campaigns
  5. British Politics, and a Revolution in European Diplomacy

Part III: Nadir, 1756-1757

  1. Lord Loundoun Takes Command
  2. Oswego
  3. The State of the Central Colonies
  4. The Strains of Empire: Causes of Anglo-American Friction
  5. Britain Drifts into a European War
  6. The Fortunes of War in Europe
  7. Loudoun’s Offensive
  8. Fort William Henry
  9. Other Disasters, and a Ray of Hope
  10. Pitt Changes Course

Part IV: Turning Point, 1758

  1. Deadlock, and a New Beginning
  2. Old Strategies, New Men, and a Shift in the Balance
  3. Montcalm Raises a Cross: The Battle of Ticonderoga
  4. Amherst at Louisbourg
  5. Supply Holds the Key
  6. Bradstreet at Fort Frontenac
  7. Indian Diplomacy and the Fall of Fort Duquesne
  8. Educations in Arms

Part V: Annus Mirabilis, 1759

  1. Success, Anxiety, and Power: The Ascent of William Pitt
  2. Ministerial Uncertainties
  3. Surfeit of Enthusiasm, Shortage of Resources
  4. Emblem of Empire: Fort Pitt and the Indians
  5. The Six Nations Join the Fight: The Siege of Niagara
  6. General Amherst Hesitates: Ticonderoga and Crown Point
  7. Dubious Battle: Wolfe Meets Montcalm at Quebec
  8. Fall’s Frustrations
  9. Celebration of Empire, Expectations of the Millennium
  10. Day of Decision: Quiberon Bay

Part VI: Conquest Completed, 1760

  1. War in Full Career
  2. The Insufficiency of Valor: Levis and Vauquelin at Quebec
  3. Murray Ascends the St. Lawrence
  4. Conquest Completed: Vaudreuil Surrenders at Montreal
  5. The Causes of Victory and the Experience of Empire
  6. Pitt Confronts an Unexpected Challenge

Victory Recollected: Scenographia Americana

Part VIII: Vexed Victory, 1761-1763

  1. The Fruits of victory and the Seeds of Disintegration
  2. The Cherokeet War and Amherst’s Reforms in Indian Policy
  3. Amherst’s Dilemma
  4. Pitt’s Problems
  5. The End of an Alliance
  6. The Intersections of Empire, Trade, and War: Havana
  7. Peace
  8. The Rise of Wilkes, the Fall of Bute, and the Unheeded Lesson of Manila
  9. Anglo-America at War’s End: The Fragility of Empire
  10. Yankees Invade Wyoming—and Pay the Price
  11. Amherst’s Reforms and Pontiac’s War
  12. Amhert’s Recall

Part VIII: Crisis and Reform, 1764

  1. Death Reshuffles a Ministry
  2. An Urgent Search for Order: Grenville and Halifax Confront the Need for Revenue and Control
  3. The American Duties Act (The Sugar Act)
  4. The Currency Act
  5. Postwar Conditions and the Context of Colonial Response
  6. An Ambiguous Response to Imperial Initiatives
  7. Pontiac’s Progress
  8. The Lessons of Pontiac’s War

Part IX: Crisis Compounds, 1765-1766

  1. Stamp Act and Quartering Act
  2. Grenville’s End
  3. The Assemblies Vacillate
  4. Mobs Respond
  5. Nullification by Violence, and an Elite Effort to Reassert Control

Part X: Empire Preserved? 1766

  1. The Repeal of the Stamp Act
  2. The Hallowness of Empire
  3. Acrimonious Postlude: The Colonies after Repeal
  4. The Future of Empire

Epilogue: Mount Vernon, June 24, 1767

Notes

Acknowledgements

Index

 

Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $22.54.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England

hbh3291“A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time.” Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada

french warWhat do really know about any given historical event? Who were the major players? What smaller events led up to the bigger event? How did these events effect people living at that time? History books can do more than simply elaborate or expand on the short version of any event we learned about in high school. Books can offer insight into the lives of our ancestors, as well as providing insight into possible sources of information and records. Occasionally, books come to light that tell the story, the history, we otherwise may never hear or learn. A history does not need to be a new treatment on a subject to be of value. Time and again, we have reviewed great books on this site which are reprints of volumes originally published decades, if not centuries, ago. A History of The French War, is just such a book.

Originally published in 1882, the expanded title reads, Minor Wars of the United States, A History of The French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada with A Preliminary Account of the Early Attempts At Colonization and Struggles for Possession of the Continent. In this history, reprinted by Heritage Books, the reader will find an expanded timeline leading up to and including the French War.

This books starts by looking back at some of the earliest explorers and claims by different European countries over New World territory. These explorations, dating to the early 1500s, laid the ground work, and territorial claims, for later colonization from southern Florida on up the coast to lower Canada. The history go on, detailing event and individuals over roughly a  250 year period, on up to the major events of the war. While some of the author’s statements don’t meet today’s standards of political correctness, the fact the copy for this book is over 100 years old does not diminish its value.

 

A History of the French War can be obtained through Family Roots Publishing; Price: $30.87.

Contents

Chapter I – Early Voyages

  • Claims of European Nations to American Territory
  • Contests of the English and French
  • The Indians in War
  • The Cabots
  • Cortereal
  • Spanish Explorers
  • Decree of Alexander
  • Verrazzano
  • Cartier
  • Stadacone
  • Hochelaga
  • Donacona

Continue reading “A History of the French War: Ending in the Conquest of Canada”

Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764

Muster Rolls New YorkOrder Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764 was originally published in 1891 by the New-York Historical Society. Heritage Books reprinted this book in 2007. The contents of this book are straight forward and simple, it contains:

“Muster Rolls of the various regiments and smaller organizations of troops raised and put in the field by the province of New York, which served during the Seven Years’ War in America, or, as it was later called ‘The Old French War’— that war which forever terminated the power of France in the New World.”

The rolls in this book cover the entire war period from 17855 to 1763, except for 1757. The 1757 records have gone missing from the archives for the State of New York in Albany. All the other records are held in the state archives, just as they were originally filed in the office of the Provincial Secretary of the Colony of New York. The rolls provide such information as name, date of enlistment, age, birthplace, and trade of the soldier.

The book has three main parts, the rolls, an appendix, and an extensive index. The appendix offers a great deal of vital history information through documents, also found in the state archives. “These show the action of the Governors of the province, the colonial legislature and other provincial authorities, not only in relation to their own troops, but to the carrying on of the war generally by the people of the province of New York, its legislature, and its Governors.” These documents include:

  • A list of all acts of the legislature of the province—17 in all
  • Official order, directions, and proclamations of three Governors
  • Lists of commissioned officers, as far as they were obtainable
  • Lists of deserters
  • Lists of  commissions signed by the Governors
  • Book of military appointments
  • Lists of commissions issued for the provincial regiments
  • List of warrants issued to captains for bounty and enlistment monies

For insight into a war most Americans probably know little about, this book presents both a great historical insight as well as vital information for researching ancestors who may have served in the Provincial military.

Order Muster Rolls of New York Provincial Troops 1755-1764 from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $45.08.

 

Officers & Soldiers Serving From Pennsylvania During the French & Indian War 1744-1765

Do you have ancestors who may have been soldiers serving with Pennsylvania Regiments during the French and Indian War (aka Anglo-French Rivalry {by Canadians}; and La guerre de la Conquête (“The War of Conquest” by the French-Canadians). The actual war itself technically ran from 1754 to 1763, but warring conflicts with the French and their native American allies went back as early as 1688.

The Pennsylvania Archives, Series 5, Volume 1 includes lists officers and soldiers in the service of the Province of Pennsylvania from 1744 to 1765. Free access is extremely valuable date is found at Fold3.com. You may search this database, in fact the entire Pennsylvania Archives, by name or you may browse pages. The listing from the Pennsylvania Regiments during the French and Indian War are found on 368 pages. I found it fascinating to browse the pages, picking up all kinds of details about the troops during this most difficult period in American history.

The following listings give the names and often personal details of thousands of Pennsylvania soldiers, many of whom were directly involved in the American expanion into the Ohio country. In studying the many listing of muster rolls, and recruits, it’s immediately evident that many, if not most, of these soldiers were mountain men, Scots-Irish and German immigrants whose natural inclination was to move west into the largely unsettled areas of the Applachians and the Ohio country.

John Deimer’s Company; Sept 1746; p 6-8
Capt. William Trent’s Company; Sept 1746; p 8-11
Capt John Shannon’s Company; Sept 1746; p 11-14
Samuel Perry’s Company; 4 Aug 1746; p 14-17
Officers of the Assoc. Regiment of Foot of Philadelphia; Dec 17, 1747; p 17-18
Officers of Assoc. Regiment of Bucks County; 1747-1748; p 18-19
Officers of the two Assoc. Regiments of Chester County; 1747-1748; p 20-22
Officers of the Regiment of the West End of Lancaster County; 1747-1748; p 22
Officers of Assoc. Regiments or the West End of Lancaster County, on the Susquehanna; 1747-1748; p 22-24
Officers of the Assoc Regiment of Lancaster County, Over the River Susquehanna; 1747-1748; p 24-25
Officers of the Two Regiments of New Castle County; 1747-1748; p 25-27
Officers of the Associated Companies of Kent County; 1747-1748; p 27-28
Officers of the Assoc Regiment in the County of Philadelphia; 1748; p 28-29
Richard Gardiner’s Comp’y Belonging to the PA Regiments, Commanded by William Denny; 1749; p 29-30
Provincial Officers; 1754; p 30
Officers of Provincial Service; 1755; p 31-32
Officers Present, Killed & Wounded on the banks of the Monongahela 9 July 1755; 600 soldiers killed & wounded including General Braddock; p 32-37
Inhabitants of Cumberland County “Heartily” Joined as a Company; 7 Aug 1755; P 37-38
Captain John Venetta’s Allegation of Solder’s; 12 Jan 1756; p 38-39
Company of Foot, New Town, Bucks County; 7 March 1756; p 39-40
Independent Company of Foot, Philadelphia; 1756; p 40-41
Men of Captain Jameson’s Company Killed or Wounded near McCord’s Fort (Franklin County); 2 April 1756; p 41
Station of the Provincial Forces; June 1756; p 41-42
Officers in the Province Pay by Dates of Their Commissions; 1755-57; (includes lists of soldiers killed at Kittanning; Sept 1756; In 1756, the Indian village was destroyed by John Armstrong, Sr. at the Battle of Kittanning during the French and Indian War. During the attack, a blast from the explosion of gunpowder stored in Captain Jacobs’s house was heard in Pittsburgh, 44 miles away.) p 42-47
Associated Companies, York County; 1756; p 47-48
St. Vincent & Puke’s Land Association; 10 May 1756; p 48-49
Philadelphia Regiment. 1756; p 49
Independent Troop of Horse, Philadelphia; 1756; p 50
Independent Company of Foot, Philadelphia; 1756; p 50-51
Assoc Battery Company of Philadelphia; 1756; p 51
Officers of the Lower Regiments, Newcastle County; 1756; p 52-53
Officers of the Upper Regiments, New Castle County; 1756; p 53-54
Officers for the Regiment of Militia for Kent County, upon Delaware; 1756; p 54-56
Officers for the Regiment of Sussex County; 1756; p 56-57
Assoc Companies, Lancaster County; 1756; p 57
Assoc Companies, Bucks County; 1756; p 58
Muster Roll of Capt Joseph Shippen’s Company in the First Regiment of Foot in the Pay of the Province of PA; 1756; p 58-59
Muster Roll of Major Burd’s Company in Province of PA; 1756; p 60
The First Regiment of Foot in the Pay of PA; 1756?; p 61
Officers in the Province Pay with Dates of Their Commissions; 1756-1757; p 62-63
Soldiers Enlisted by James Burd at Fort Granville With Amount of Money Advanced; 3 June 1756; p 64
An Account of the Provincial Clothing delivered to the Soldiers of Captain Shippen’s Company; 4 Aug -1 Oct 1756; p 65-66
Names of Persons Killed, Wounded and Missing out of Several Companies in the Expedition Against Kittanning; p 67-68
Prisoners Retaken From the Indiana at Kittaning; 14 Sept 1756; p 68-69
Officers in the Province Pay with Dates of Their Commissions; 1756-1757; p 70-72
A Return of Col Clapham’s Regiment; Fort Augusta; 18 Oct 1756; p 73
First Battalion of the Pennsylvania Regiment; 20 Nov 1756; p 73-74
Capt Joseph Shippen’s Company; 1756-1757; p 74-79
Soldiers and Their Clothing Distributed Within Capt Shippen’s Company; Fort Augusta; 1 May 1756-1 May 1757; p 79-81
Report of 7 Companies of Col William Clapham’s Regiment of Foot in the Pay of the Province of PA; Fort Augusta; 19 January 1757; p 82-83
Muster Roll of Capt Joseph Shippen’s Company in the First PA Regiment of Foot in Garrison at Fort Augusta, Major James Burd – Commander; 10 May 1757; p 84-85
James Patterson’s Company; 25 June 1757; p 85-86
Officers, Seamen and Landsmen Belonging to the Province Ship Pennsylvania; 17 Aug 1757; p 86-88
Officers in the Pay of the Province of PA; Dec 1757; p 88-91
Muster Roll of Jame’s Burd’s Company of the Augusta Regiment of Foot; 10 May-1 Oct 1757; p 92-94
The Augusta Regiment of Foot commanded by James Burd; Fort Augusta; 1 Dec 1757; p 95-97
Officers & Soldiers, PA Regiment of Foot; 1757; 98-99
Battoe [Bateaux–flat bottomed double ended shallow draft boat] Men Hired by the Province of PA; 1757; p 100-101
Return of the Augusta Regiment of Foot, 8 companies commanded by Major James Burd, Fort Augusta; 1 Jan 1758; p 102-104
Officers in the Pay of the Province of Pennsylvania; 1757-1758; p 105-109
Return of the Augusta Regiment of Foot, 8 companies commanded by Major James Burd, Fort Augusta; 1 Feb 1758; p 110-115
Return of the First Battalion of the PA Regiments, Commanded by Col William Denny; 24 Feb 1758; p 115-116
Muster Roll of James Patterson’ Company; 1757-1758; p 116-17
Muster Roll of Men Enlisted for 3 years in Captain John Nichols Weatherholt’s Company, stationed in Heydelberg Township, Northampton County; Mar-Apr 1758; p 118-119
Officers in the Pay of the Province of Pennsylvania; 1757-1758; p 120-122
Return of Fort Augusta, detachments from the 1st & 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment, Lt Col James Burd, Commandant; 1 May 1758; p 123-125
Capt John Singleton Enlistments; May 1-8, 1758; p 126-127
PA Regiment of 3 Battalions, William Denny Colonel in Chief; 1758; p128-132
Recruits Raised by Capt Robert Boyd for the PA Regiment; 15 May 1858; p 133-134
Recruits by Capt John Blackwood for the PA Regiment, Philadelphia; 15 May 1858; p 135-140
Recruits by Capt John Bull for the PA Regiment; 16 May 1758; p 141
Return of a Full Company Enlisted for the Campaign in the Lower Counties by Capt John McClughan; 17 May 1758; p 142-144
Recruits by Capt John Singleton, PA Regiment at Philadelphia; 17 May 1758; p 145-147
Men to be Reviewed, signed by Robert Eastburn; 19 ay 1758; p 148
Capt John Hasslet’s Company; 21 May 1758; p 148-149
Recruits Raised by Robert Boyd for the PA Regiment; 22 May 1758; p 150
Capt John Blackwood’s Company of PA Regiment; 22 May 1758; p 151-157
Return of Recruits by Capt Richard Walker for the PA Regiments; 25 May 1758; p 158-161
Return of Recruits by Capt Robert Eastburn for the PA Regiment at Philadelphia; 15 May 1758; p 162-165
Return of Recruits by Capt John Bull; 24 May 1758; p 166
Recruits Raised by Capt Paul Jackson for the PA Regiment; May 1758; p167-171
Return of Recruits by Capt Charles McClung for the PA Regiment; May 1758; p 172-173
Return of 23 New Companies of the PA Regiment [Officers]; May 1758; p 174-175
Return of Capt French Battell’s Company of the Lower County Provincials; 1758; p 176-177
The PA Regiment Consisting of 3 Battalions Commanded by Col. William Denny; p 177-180
Second Battalion Officers [includes a brief first-hand account of the march on Fort Du Quesne (now Pittsburg)]; 1757-1758; p 180-183
Third Battalion Officers; 1758; p 183-185
New Levies; May 1758; p 185-186
Return of Men Enlisted by Lieut M’Clay for Capt Montgomery; May-June 1758; p 186
Return of the Recruits Raised by Capt Benjamin Noxon; 1758; p 186-189
Muster Roll of Lieut Col James Burd’ Company of the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment of Foot; 10 Sept-1 June 1758; p 190-193
Muster Roll of Major Joseph Shippen’s Company of Foot of the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment, commanded by Col James Burd; 10 Sept 1757-1 June 1758; P 194-196
Recruits Raised by Capt Paul Jackson for the PA Regiment; Apr-May 1758; p 197-199
Return of Fort Augusta, commanded by Capt Levy Trump; 2 June 1758; 200-201
Letter from George Stevenson at York dealing with wagons, clothing, with names of officers and their commission dates; 6 June 1758; p 202
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses (by twp) from Northampton County; 10 June 1758; p 203
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Whitehall twp, Northampton County (with owners names); 8 June 1758; p 204-205
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Weisenbarg twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 206
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Heidelberg twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 206-208
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Macunge twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 208-209
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draft and Back Horses from Bathleham twp, (with owners names); 8 June 1758; p 210
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Mountbethel twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 211
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses from Lower Socam twp, (with owners names); June 1758; p 212-213
A List of the Wagons, and Horses of the inhabitants in William twp, Northampton County (with owners names); 1758; p 214-215
Wagons, and Horses Taken Ton (?) in Upper Sacum twp, Northampton County (with owners names); 5 June 1758; p 215-216
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses in Linn twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 217
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses of Salesbury twp, Northampton County (with owners names); 1758; p 218
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses of Foarks twp, Northampton County (with owners names); 1758; p 219
A List of the Number of Wagons, Draught and Pack Horses in Easton twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 220-221
A List of the Number of Wagons, and Horses in Upper Milford twp, (with owners names); 1758; p 222-223
Officers and Soldiers in Camp at Carlisle; 27 June 1758; p 224-225
Capt John Singleton’s Company at Carlisle Camp; 28 June 1758; p 226
Return of Soldiers in John Bull’s Company; 1 July 1758; p 227-228
Return of Capt Samuel Jones’ Company; 1758; p 228-229
Militia Officers for the Lower District of Mother-Kill Hundred, Kent County, in Delaware; Mar 1758; p 230
Militia Officers for the Upper District of Mother-Kill Hundred; Mar 1758; p 230
Militia Battalion for Sussex County, in Delaware; 18 Mar 1758; p 230-232
List of Officers of the Lower Government on Delaware; 1758-1759; p 232-233
Return of Soldiers in My {Capt Eastburn’s} Company; 1 July 1758; p 234-238
List of Officers & Soldiers Killed & Wounded at the Attack of Ticonderoga; 8 July 1758; p 239-240
Return of the Disposition of the Provincial Troops a Posts Eastward of the Susquehannah for the defense of the Frontier Inhabitants; Lists Forts, Blockhouses, Ferries, posts; 9 July 1758; p 241
Companies of the PA Regiment Wanting Kettles and Canteens; 10 July 1758; p 242
Return of Capt Hambright’s Troop of Horse Camp at Rays Town; 11 July 1758; p 242-244
Return of Fort Augusta, commanded by Capt Levi Trump; 1 Aug 1758; p 244-245
Return of Fort Augusta, commanded by Capt Levi Trump; 1 Sept 1758; p 246-247
Return of the 1st Battalion of the PA Regiment, commanded by Col John Armstrong, camp at Loyal Hannon; 10 Sept 1758; p 248-252
Officers & Soldiers Killed, Missing & Returned From Action Near Fort Du Quesne; 14 Sept 1758; p 253-254
Muster Roll & Pay List of Col Burd’s Company in the 2nd Batt. Of the PA Regiment; 1 Aug-1 Oct 1758, Exclu. Camp Loyalhanning, the 30th Sept 1758; p 255-257
Return of 1st Battalion of the Royal American Regiment Loyalhannon; 2 Sept 1758; p 258-259
Name of Sarg & Privates of the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment that are to Stay at Fort Aygyle; 2 Nov 1758; P 260-261
Return of Fort Augusta, Commanded by Capt Levi Trump; 1 Dev 1758; p 262-263
Officers who Served in the PA Regiment of 3 Battalions with Their Ranks They were Promoted to After That Time; 1758-1759; p 264-267
Return of the 1st Battalion of the PA Regiment commanded by Col John Armstrong, Carlisle; 17 Jan 1759; p 268-270
Return of the 1st & 2nd Battalions of the PA Regiment, William Denny Col in Chief; 17 Jan 1759; p 271-274
Men Killed in the Battoe; 28 Mar 1759; p 275
Muster Roll of Capt John Singleton’s Company of New Levies; 6 May 1759; p 276-277
Roll of Recruits Enlisted into Capt John Wright’s Company; 11 May 1759; p 278-279
Roll of Recruits Enlisted into Capt Johnston’s Company; 12 May 1759; p 279-280
Recruits Enlisted by Capt Samuel Grubb to Serve in the PA Regiment; 16 May 1759; p 281-284
Recruits Enlisted by Capt John Haslet; 20 May 1759; p 285-286
Recruits Enlisted for PA Service by Capt David Hunter; 26 May 1759; p 286-287
Men Enlisted by Capt James Armstrong for the PA Regiment; 1 June 1759; p 287-288
Men Recruited by Capt Andrew McDowell for the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment; 4 June 1759; p 288-289
Return of Capt Hn. Van Bibber’s Company of the Lower Counties on Delaware Troops, New Castle; 4 June 1759; p 289-290
Recruits Enlisted by Captain John Mather Jr.; 15 June 1759; 290-291
Return of Capt Robert Boyd’s Company; May-June 1759; p 292-293
Return of Capt Charles Stewart’s Company; June 1759; p 293-294
Recruits Raised by Capt Richardson of the 3rd Battalion in the Provincial Service; 1759; p 294-295
List of Officers of the New Levies & Dates of Their Commissions; 1759; p 295-297
Officers of the PA Regiment; 1759; p 298
Return of the Recruits Raised by Capt Robert Curry, Belonging to the PA Regiment; June 1759; p 298-299
Officers of the 3rd Battalion of the PA Regiment; 1759; p 300-301
List of the Detachment PA Regiment in Garrison at Fort Before Under the Command of Lt Col Joseph Shippen, 24 Jan 1760; p 302-307
Roll of Col Burd’s Company; 1760; p 308
Roll of Men Belonging to Mr Hunter’s Party Received at Harris’s & Recruited by Col Burd & Major Clayton & Arrived at Augusts 24 Dec 1760; p 309-310
The Philadelphia Company; 1760; p 311
List of officers for the PA Regiment; 1760; p 311-314
Return of Ordnance, Tools & Store Belonging to Fort Augusta; 1 Apr 1761; p 315
List of James Bird’s Company; 10 May 1761; p 316-317
Col James Burd’s Company on Their March to Pitsburg, Lancaster; 22 May 1761; p 317-318
Roll of Capt John Little’s Company; 26 May 1761; p 319-320
Men Enlisted for 3 Months Under the Command of Capt Jacob Wetterholt, stationed at Lor Shmit Fill twp; July 1763’ p 321-323
Return of the Strength, Arms, Ammunition, etc of the 1st Battalion of the PA Regiment of Foot (not including 2 companies at Fort Augusta); 2 July 1764; p 324-325
Muster Roll & Pay List of Col James Burd’s Company in Garrison at Fort Augusta; 1 Nov 1763-1 June 1764; 326-328
Return of the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment Commanded by Lt Col Asher Clayton, at Carlisle; 31 July 1764; 329
Return of Deserters from the 2nd Battalion of PA Regiment, commanded by Lt Col Clayton, Camp at Ft Loudon; 25 Aug 1764; p 330
List of Deserters from the 1st Battalion of the PA Troops, Commanded by Lt Col Turbett Francis Since the Officers Received Orders to Levy Recruits for Said Battalion; 1764 with no date; p 331-334
A List of Officers of the PA Regiment Commanded by Hon. J Penn, Esq’r; 1764; p 334-337
A Return of the Troops Commanded by Major Asher Clayton, Stationed on the Frontiers of Lancaster, Berks and Northampton Counties; 1 June 1764; p 337-338
Report of the 3 Companies on the Northern Frontiers; 2 Oct 1764; p 338
Fort Augusta Pay Certificates; 10 June 1765; p 338-339
List of Sundry Stores Left at Fort Augusta for Want of Sufficient Craft to Carry Them Down, by Order of Col Turbut Francis; 11 June 1765; p 339-342
Muster & Pay Roll of Captain Caleb Graydon’s Company at Fort Augusta; 1 Jan-13 June 1765; p 343-346
Oath of Alexander Quay; p 346
Nomination of Thomas Edwards, Captain of the Militia Company of Foot, Earl Town, Lancaster County; p 346-347
List of Persons Employed in the Sept of the Deputy Quarter Master General and Their Pay; p 348-350
List of Lt Col Shippen’s Company in the 2nd Battalion of the PA Regiment; p 351-352
Roll of Col Burd’s Company; p 352-353
Officers & Soldiers, Rays Town; 3 Oct 1758; p 354
Absent Officers (many prisoners of the French); p 355-356
Return of Recruits by Capt William Biles of the PA Regiment; p 357-361
How the Forces are to be Posted Between the Susquehanna and the Delaware; p 362
Return of Recruits Raised by Capt Samuel Neilson for the PA Regiment; p 363-368