Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist”

lu19Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist, provided insight to Autosomal tests and what they are, with coverage on SNPs or SNiPs and the idea that “your genetic pedigree is not the same as your genealogical pedigree. In Diahan Southard’s latest guide, Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist,” provides greater coverage of Autosomal DNA and much more.

“23andMe has a wide variety of content on their website that can easily distract you from the genetic genealogy tools they are offering. This guide will help you focus your efforts on the top genetic genealogy tools at 23andMe and how you can use them to verify and extend your family history.”

This guide is about helping you get the most of your DNA test results by using tools at 23andMe. A big section of the guide covers the main match page where you will “spend the majority of your time,” and “which displays a list of your genetic cousins.” The final page of the guide is dedicated to the admixture tool, or the “ethnicity tool, at 23andMe is called the Ancestral Composition view.” In other words, there is a lot for you to do and learn at 23andMe, and this guide will help you make the most of the site.

Understanding 23andMe is part of a series of guides on DNA genealogy. Each guide in the series follows the popular standard as four laminated pages with a simple center fold for easy storage and portability.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • Autosomal DNA and More
  • Your Health Information
  • Smart Communications
  • Talking Tips
  • Post Your Genealogy at 23andMe
  • Main Match Page
    • Names at 23andMe
    • Relationships
    • Ancestral Information
    • Haplogroups
    • Communicating with Matches
    • Map View
    • Surname View
  • Family Inheritance: Advanced
  • Admixture at 23andMe

 

About Author Diahan Southard (In her words):

“After getting bitten by the DNA bug as a high school student, I went on to study at Brigham Young University where I earned a bachelors degree in microbiology. I worked before and after graduation for the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation, one of the first efforts to create a correlated genetic and genealogical database.

Growing up with the budding genetic genealogy industry lead me to my current position as Your DNA Guide, where I provides personalized, interactive experiences to assist individuals and families in interpreting their genetic results in the context of their genealogical information. That means I can take you step by step through any kind of DNA test in a way that you will understand, and even enjoy!”

Diahan Southard has produced a series of colorful, laminated guides that outline all the basics one needs to understand DNA for genealogists. Her guides include:

 

All of Southard’s guides are available, along with Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist”, from Family Roots Publishing.

Understanding 23andMe: A Companion Guide to “Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist” is available in hard copy as well as electronic (PDF format, available by clicking here).

Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’ – On Sale for 10% Off

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Elizabeth Shown Mills is an expert researcher and family historian. Her works include top selling books on proving and citing sources: Evidence!: Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian and Evidence Explained, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. Mills has also written a number of Quicksheets covering research methodologies designed to improve the accuracy and success of the overall research process.

Elizabeth has authored a 2 page laminated guide called Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’. According to Mills, proof is a conclusion we reach from a body of evidence. No single source can serve as proof. No one piece of information can provide it. No one bit of evidence can stand alone.

This guide is available for 10% Off, making it just $6.26 through Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Click here to order.

In a clean and clear format, Mills provides a most basic, yet useful, overview to evaluating historical resources to find the Proof. Here is what you will find in the guide:

Side 1

A precise definition and explanation of ‘proof,’ followed by a brief explanation on ‘Evaluating the Source,’ ‘Evaluating the Information,’ and ‘Evaluating and Processing the Evidence.’ In three-short, bulletized columns, you learn the basics to identifying useful sources and their reliability.

Side 2

A clear and simple chart, a ‘Process Map,’ outlining historical research from the source through evidence and down to ‘Proof.’

Trust me, when you read the guide this will all make sense!

Get your copy of Elizabeth Shown Mills’ new guide, Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’, from Family Roots Publishing

MyHeritage.com Cheat Sheet

MyHeritage.com Cheat SheetThere is a new entry in the world of ever popular laminated quick guides for genealogists. This latest entry is for anyone who has, or has been considering, signing up with MyHeritage.com. The guide: MyHeritage.com Cheat Sheet by Sunny Jane Morton.

The guide gets going with an easy to follow check list for getting started on MyHeritage.com. The first page also offers a quick description of the six main tabs or sections on the site (Home, Family Tree, Discoveries, Photos, Apps, and Research). The page ends with six easy steps to customizing your welcome page.

Page 2 shows a copy of the family tree page with bubble descriptions for each primary element on the page. There is also a descriptions about what each individual’s box contains and what the various symbols mean, as well as details about personal profiles.

The third page covers the process of researching records and trees, along with automated search tools and the process for syncing your family tree with your home computer.

The guide ends with two charts on the final page. The first chart will offers a list of navigational options and how to get there on the MyHeritage site. For example, where to upload a tree, or where to create and print custom family tree charts as PDFs. The second chart clearly explains membership options on the site. This will allow new users to easily choose what level of subscription may interest them, and allow existing users to see the advantage of upgrading their subscription.

Like virtually all quick guides, this guide is a four-page, full-color laminated brochure, meant to be easily stored, easily referenced while working, and sized to take with you on the road.

You can order MyHeritage.com Cheat Sheet from Family Roots Publishing.

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Quick Notes: Downloading/Upgrading Stitching Software

Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Quick Note: Download Files / Upgrade SD CardDo you have a Flip-Pal mobile scanner? If not, you may want to consider obtaining one of these easy to use little scanners to add to your portable research kit.

However, if you do have a Flip-Pal scanner, when was the last time you updated the software? Do you remember how to quickly make the update? Could you use some help, or a quick reminder of how to do this?

Family Roots Publishing has available copies of Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Quick Notes: Downloading/Upgrading Stitching Software. This simple 2 page laminated guide, with pictures, covers the 10 easy-to-follow steps in finding, downloading, updating and storing on SD card the most recent upgrades available for you scanner’s stitching software.

If you have a Flip-Pal scanner, then get a copy of Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner Quick Notes: Downloading/Upgrading Stitching Software from Family Roots Publishing, and keep your scanner up-to-date.

The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research

All “Portable” guides are two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research guide covers three main topic areas:

  • Settlement and migration patterns
  • Records
  • Scholarly resources

This guide starts with an introduction to this period of early immigration; including, a list of common records often available in research.

The Settlement and Migration Patterns section includes coverage for “Waves of Migration” and “Settlement,” which names the primary settlements with years of existence.

Resources begins with “Locating Records.” Included is chart listing records types, a description of “what you may find and records notes,” along with resources for more information. This section also includes segments on “Finding Aids” and “Study Projects.”

There are also five “NEHGS Tips” in this guide.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

Understanding AncestryDNA

Why is DNA research so difficult to understand? Simple, it is a very complex topic.

You first learned about DNA in high school biology. You probably then did your best to forget about DNA until about a decade ago when DNA testing became a reality as an affordable, relatively speaking, individual identifier and tool for tracking one’s family history. Now every genealogist is a DNA expert. Right? Of course not. The language and process of DNA testing is still a science with words that belong to scientists. In addition, there have been so many recent books and articles on the subject it can be easy to get confused over all the types of tests, let alone just trying to get a general understanding of the whole practice.

Understanding AncestryDNAHowever, there is a much simpler way to grow your understanding of this complex topic. Diahan Southard has produced a series of six, colorful, laminated guides that outline all the basics one needs to understand DNA for genealogists. Her guides include:

Each guide follows the popular standard as four laminated pages in a single center folded guide measuring 8.5 x 11 inches.

Understanding AncestryDNA specifically explains Ancestry’s DNA testing and its major components. The guide will help you understand the test itself and what you can expect to gain from your test.

Here is a contents list based on specific headers in the guide:

  • Best Matches
  • First- Link Your Pedigree
    • Simple Pedigree
  • Why DNA Circles?
    • So Who is Invited?
  • Deciphering DNA Circles
  • Using the Main Match Page
  • One to One Matching
  • Genetic Tools
  • Try This!
  • What Next?

Diahan Southard holds a degree in Microbiology and has worked with the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation.

 

Order copies of Understanding AncestryDNA from Family Roots Publishing.

The Portable Genealogist: Applying to Lineage Societies

The Portable Genealogist: Applying To Lineage SocietiesAcross the country, and the globe, there are thousands of genealogical societies ready to welcome both new and experienced genealogists into their midst. Over the years I have had the opportunity to lecture and teach classes to many such groups and have observed the bonds of friendship and family that grow among various members. I have also seen some unique bonds develop among friends when they discover they are related; call them cousin connections. No matter how many generations separate cousins, genealogist just seem to seem to get all giddy over discovering a shared ancestry. Perhaps this is why some societies form around specific family lines or a common heritage centered on historical events.

Joining a lineage-based society is not always as simple as joining a local genealogical society. Usually, these types of organizations require a formalized application process. A recently published guide, The Portable Genealogist: Applying to Lineage Societies, focuses on helping genealogists apply for membership in just this type of organization. The introduction from this New England Historic Genealogical Society published guide explains further:

“A lineage or hereditary society is a member-based group that is organized around a common ancestor or ancestors of historical importance. For example, members of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants can trace their lineage to one of the original passengers from the Mayflower. These societies aim to preserve the memory of their common ancestry, participate in historical conversations and eduction, and may provide original scholarship or a specialized facility to aid family historians.

Although no society is the same, each provides and environment for members to share their common ancestry. This Portable Genealogist provides information on a number of lineage societies, the general application process, and tips for completing your application.”

All “Portable” guides are two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. This guide covers four topic areas:

  • Popular hereditary societies
  • Application process
  • Locating vital records
  • Dos and don’ts

The most obvious requirement in the application process is to establish your ancestral line. Some may think they are too new or inexperienced, or simply lack the necessary research, to apply for membership in a lineage-based society; however, having a better understanding of general requirements and the membership process common to many such organizations may help you better make note and prepare for the day when your research has proven a valid shared ancestral connection.

The third section of this guide specifically covers vital records research, an important source for verification of ancestral data. Just the information your application will require.

The guide ends, as most of these guides do, with a list of recommended resources to further your understanding of the topics covered. Also, don’t forget to read the NEHGS tips in this, and other Portable Genealogist guides.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Applying to Lineage Societies and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

The Portable Genealogist: Editorial Stylesheet

The Portable Genealogist: Editorial StylesheetThe New England Historic Genealogical Society continues to release new publications under their laminate guide series The Portable Genealogists. Leland recently returned from the SCGS Jamboree with several of these guides. He already posted a review on The Portable Genealogist – Using DNA in Genealogy. There are several more guides we will review on this site, including the subject of this blog: The Portable Genealogist: Editorial Stylesheet.

All “Portable” guides are two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. This guide covers four topic areas:

  • Basic guidelines
  • Register-style format
  • Ahnentafel format
  • Specific style guidelines

The Editorial Stylesheet guide examines “conventions for presentation of genealogical information.” The guide will help you work on presentation of your research, referencing people and places, and implementing an overall style, while working on traditional grammatical elements like punctuation.

Essentially, when presenting genealogical data in either Register or ahnentafel style/format, consideration should be given to standards or conventions in presentation. This guide covers the basics of those standards.  This guide will help you get started or it can serve as a reminder as your work.

Don’t forget to read the NEHGS tips in this, and other, Portable Genealogist guides.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Editorial Stylesheet. and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

The Portable Genealogist: Indexing

Portable Genealogist: IndexingThe New England Historic Genealogical Society continues to release new publications under their laminate guide series The Portable Genealogist. Leland recently returned from the SCGS Jamboree with several of these guides. He already posted a review on The Portable Genealogist – Using DNA in Genealogy. There are several more guides we will review on this site, including the subject of this blog: The Portable Genealogist: Indexing.

All “Portable” guides are two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. This guide covers four topic areas:

  • Indexing names and places
  • Creating an index
  • Formatting your index
  • Using Word for indexing

The last page in this guide provides a “sample index with formatting suggestions;” plus, a short list of additional resources.

Indexing name and places covers items that include, surnames, dealing with ambiguity, indexing married women (multiple surnames), alternate spellings, etc.

The using Word section covers tagging names in the text and building an index. The sample page offers clear suggestions for form and layout, something most just assume will be easy, but trust me when I say it can be most difficult to get right and make legible; especially, for complex indexes. There are also four “NEHGS Tips” in this guide.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Indexing and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

Genealogy At A Glance: Ohio Genealogy Research

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Settlement Background

Record Sources

Birth and Death Records

Marriage and Divorce Records

Land Records

Probate Court Records

Supplementary Source

Common Pleas Court Records

Quandrennial Enumeration

Naturalization Records

Major Repositories

Online Resources

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Ohio Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing.

A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists

Online U.S. Name Lists Insta-GuideWilliam (Bill) Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing continue to to produce new guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists in their series, titled, A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide. The latest titles have focused Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. One of the newest guides is A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists.

Unique to Online U.S. Name Lists

Internet websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of the U.S. were extracted from Dollarhide’s Name Lists books (Family Roots Publishing Co, Orting, WA, 2013-2015). Using the PDF version of this Insta-GuideTM, every website address is hot linked to the Internet – just one click away.

The 144 databases listed here include Censuses and Census Substitutes, i.e., Name Lists derived from Federal Census Records, Immigration Lists, Historical Books & Documents, Land Records, Federal Tax Lists, National Vital Records, and U.S. Military Lists (including Lists of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Veterans, and Pensioners). Together, all of the databases listed have 1.526 billion searchable records/images. Keep in mind that one record/image may have dozens of names on it. Use these databases to locate the name and residence of an ancestor or relative anywhere in the United States.

The databases are identified by their inclusive dates, the name of the database, and the number of records/images in each.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online U.S. Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or, you can order just the electronic format.

 

Other titles in the series include:

 

and those in the name lists group include:

 

A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists

Online Maine Name Lists - A GenealogistsWilliam (Bill) Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing continue to to produce new guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists in their series, titled, A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide. The latest titles have focused Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. One of the newest guides is A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists.

Unique to Online Maine Name Lists

Internet websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of Maine were extracted from Dollarhide’s Maine Name Lists, 1623-2012 (Family Roots Publishing Co, Orting, WA, 2015). Using the PDF version of this Insta-GuideTM, every website address is hot linked to the Internet – just one click away.

The 138 databases listed here include censuses and census substitutes, i.e., name lists from Maine’s early censuses, court records, directories, histories, land records, militia lists, tax lists, vital records or voter lists.

First, find a Maine name list – then find the name of your Maine ancestor.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Maine Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or, you can order just the electronic format.

 

Other titles in the series include:

 

and those in the name lists group include:

 

A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Kentucky Name Lists

A little over a year ago, William Dollarhide and Family Root Publishing created a new series of guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists. The series, titled A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide, now includes several titles, including:

Online Kentucky Name Lists - A GenealogistsAdding to these great titles, Dollarhide and FRPC have released several new guides focused on Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. These new guides include A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Kentucky Name Lists.

This new guide lists websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of Kentucky were extracted from Dollarhide’s Kentucky Name Lists, 1773-2000.

Like all Insta-Guides, this guide comes either as a four-page, color, printed and laminated guide sheet or in electronic format, PDF file. In the PDF version, every website is hot linked for quick, one-click access to each site.

Contents of Online Kentucky Names Lists

The 140 databases listed here include censuses and census substitutes, i.e., name lists from Kentucky’s early censuses, court records, directories, histories, land records, militia lists, tax lists, vital records or voter lists. Although Kentucky’s first two federal censuses (1790 & 1800) were lost, census substitutes can identify virtually all of the heads of household in Kentucky during that period.

First, find a Kentucky name list – then find the name of your Kentucky ancestor

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Kentucky Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or, you can order just the electronic format.

A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists

A little over a year ago, William Dollarhide and Family Roots Publishing created a new series of guides, or quick reference sheets, for genealogists. The series, titled A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide, now includes several titles, including:

Online Louisiana Name Lists - A GenealogistAdding to these great titles, Dollarhide and FRPC have released several new guides focused on Dollarhide’s popular name lists books. These new guides include A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists.

This new guide lists websites with databases, indexes, or eBooks documenting the early residents of Louisiana were extracted from Dollarhide’s Louisiana Name Lists, 1679-2001.

Like all Insta-Guides, this guide comes either as a four-page, color, printed and laminated guide sheet or in electronic format, PDF file. In the PDF version, every website is hot linked for quick, one-click access to each site.

Contents of Online U.S. Names Lists

The 164 databases listed here include censuses and census substitutes, i.e., name lists from Louisiana’s early censuses, court records, directories, histories, land records, militia lists, tax lists, vital records or voter lists.

About Name Lists

Bill’s Name List books give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

 

 A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide: Online Louisiana Name Lists is available from Family Roots Publishing. With the purchase of the print format also comes an electronic copy in PDF format, or order just the electronic format.

Genealogy At A Glance: Massachusetts Genealogy Research

After 1840, more and more immigrants came from other parts of Europe, plus a huge influx of Irish. This new guide to Massachusetts research considers all these immigrants as it provides an historical background along with information to key genealogical resources.

Like many of the guides, this one begins with some quick facts relevant to the subject, which include:

  • Plymouth, incorporated in 1620, is the oldest town and largest by square miles. Boston, incorporated in 1820, is the oldest city and largest by population.
  • Between 1848 and 1891 more than one million immigrants entered through the Port of Boston.

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color laminated brochure, meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research. In this guide, Larson provides plenty of additional tips and further references to please the most avid researcher.

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Settlement Background

Town and County Records

Vital Records

Archives

Libraries

Ethnic and Historical Societies

Online Resources

Published Resources on Early Massachusetts Genealogy

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Masachusetts Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing.