RootsPoint – A Facebook for the Dead?

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RootsPoint is a global community centered around the 1940 US census. It aims to make genealogy accessible to enthusiasts of all ages. Data spans the 110 years before the census (1830-1940) and includes social sharing tools.

RootsPoint is for living people to interact with each others via dead people — essentially a Facebook for the dead.

RootsPoint just launched at RootsTech 2014, on February 6, 2014. The company is a Bronze sponsor for RootsTech and is the sponsor of the RootsTech Unforum.

They are new on the scene, and made their launch of the site here at RootsTech, right now. Always a scary proposition!

The consensus at RootsTech 2013 was that there were four main shared outcomes of the keynote speeches and the various classes offered (some points below thanks to the late Carolyn L. Barkley):

  • COLLECTING STORIES IS VITAL
  • GENEALOGY AND FAMILY HIsTORY SHOULD BE AFFORDABLE, ACCESSIBLE, AND GLOBAL
  • WILL ATTRACT YOUNGER GENERATIOsN THROUGH TECHNOLOGY
  • POWER OF THE CROWD IS VITAL

In other words:

  1. The process of collecting, preserving and sharing stories is vital to breathing life into our ancestors.
  2. We need to attract a wider community, particularly the younger generations, to genealogy by insuring that genealogy and family history is an adventure that is affordable, accessible and global.
  3. As the profession seeks to broaden its appeal and attract a younger generation, it recognizes that technology is the mechanism by which that growth will be successful.
  4. The power of the crowd is what is required to accomplish the above processes. We can’t accomplish all there is to do by ourselves.

Click on over to RootsPoint

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research

cbb01An excellent Genealogist uses every tool at their disposal in order to uncover the truth of their ancestors. Today, that may mean using tools which were not available just a few years ago; including, social media. This can be scary for many people. Do you still feel a little lost when people, talk of texting, of twittering, or of blogging? Are you still a little confused on just what social media is and what it covers? You are not alone. Many are still lost on what exactly social media is and how genealogists can make use of it. If you are in that category, don’t worry. A guide to this mysterious world has just been released. Genealogy expert Claire V. Brisson-Banks has written and published The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research: Applying Web 2.0 Strategies.

Claire makes understanding and getting started using social media a little easier. Just look at the table of contents below to see just how much this book covers. For example, do you know what a Wiki is? I know you see the term just about everywhere. Wikipedia is a famous wiki-based online encyclopedia with entries written by its users. A wiki, in fact, as explained by Claire in chapter five, is an Hawaiian term for “quick.” A practical uses of wikis for genealogist can be found at FamilySearch’s Research Wiki. Information about wikis, the Research wiki, and other wiki uses are for the learning in The Social Media Guide.

Sometimes the best way to describe a book is through the praise given by others; for example, this quote from Beth Taylor, BS, CGSM Reference Consultant, Family History Library:

“This book defines the next great wave of technological support for genealogists of all skill levels, Understanding the capabilities and uses of social media is a must for all genealogists and relatives around the world.”

Claire V. Brisson-Banks, BS, MLIS, AG, a native of Rhode Island, is accredited in England, a lecturer and a professional research for United States, Canada, Scotland and Web 2.0 technologies. She owns Timeless Genealogies and is on staff at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. She is a member of multiple societies, is published in genealogical and academic journals and currently serves as a board member for CCLA and ICAPGen.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Social Media

Chapter 2: Electronic Mail and Mailing Lists

Chapter 3: Instant Messaging, SMS, Twitter

Chapter 4: Blogs

Chapter 5: Wikis

Chapter 6: Forums

Chapter 7: Real Simple Syndication

Chapter 8: Social Bookmarking

Chapter 9: Sharing Digital Images

Chapter 10: Sharing Video Files

Chapter 11: Podcasts and Vodcasts

Chapter 12: E-Learning and Online Classes

Chapter 13: Social Networking and Online Communities

Chapter 14: Family History Games

Conclusion

Index

 

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research is available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.95.

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research

An excellent Genealogist uses every tool at their disposal in order to uncover the truth of their ancestors. Today, that may mean using tools which were not available just a few years ago; including, social media. This can be scary for many people. Do you still feel a little lost when people, talk of texting, of twittering, or of blogging? Are you still a little confused on just what social media is and what it covers? You are not alone. Many are still lost on what exactly social media is and how genealogists can make use of it. If you are in that category, don’t worry. A guide to this mysterious world has just been released. Genealogy expert Claire V. Brisson-Banks has written and published The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research: Applying Web 2.0 Strategies.

Claire makes understanding and getting started using social media a little easier. Just look at the table of contents below to see just how much this book covers. For example, do you know what a Wiki is? I know you see the term just about everywhere. Wikipedia is a famous wiki-based online encyclopedia with entries written by its users. A wiki, in fact, as explained by Claire in chapter five, is an Hawaiian term for “quick.” A practical uses of wikis for genealogist can be found at FamilySearch’s Research Wiki. Information about wikis, the Research wiki, and other wiki uses are for the learning in The Social Media Guide.

Sometimes the best way to describe a book is through the praise given by others; for example, this quote from Beth Taylor, BS, CGSM Reference Consultant, Family History Library:

“This book defines the next great wave of technological support for genealogists of all skill levels, Understanding the capabilities and uses of social media is a must for all genealogists and relatives around the world.”

Claire V. Brisson-Banks, BS, MLIS, AG, a native of Rhode Island, is accredited in England, a lecturer and a professional research for United States, Canada, Scotland and Web 2.0 technologies. She owns Timeless Genealogies and is on staff at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. She is a member of multiple societies, is published in genealogical and academic journals and currently serves as a board member for CCLA and ICAPGen.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Social Media

Chapter 2: Electronic Mail and Mailing Lists

Chapter 3: Instant Messaging, SMS, Twitter

Chapter 4: Blogs

Chapter 5: Wikis

Chapter 6: Forums

Chapter 7: Real Simple Syndication

Chapter 8: Social Bookmarking

Chapter 9: Sharing Digital Images

Chapter 10: Sharing Video Files

Chapter 11: Podcasts and Vodcasts

Chapter 12: E-Learning and Online Classes

Chapter 13: Social Networking and Online Communities

Chapter 14: Family History Games

Conclusion

Index

 

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research is available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.95.

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research

An excellent Genealogist uses every tool at their disposal in order to uncover the truth of their ancestors. Today, that may mean using tools which were not available just a few years ago; including, social media. This can be scary for many people. Do you still feel a little lost when people, talk of texting, of twittering, or of blogging? Are you still a little confused onsd just what social media is and what it covers? You are not alone. Many are still lost on what exactly social media is and how genealogists can make use of it. If you are in that category, don’t worry. A guide to this mysterious world has just been released. Genealogy expert Claire V. Brisson-Banks has written and published The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research: Applying Web 2.0 Strategies.

Claire makes understanding and getting started using social media a little easier. Just look at the table of contents below to see just how much this book covers. For example, do you know what a Wiki is? I know you see the term just about everywhere. Wikipedia is a famous wiki-based online encyclopedia with entries written by its users. A wiki, in fact, as explained by Claire in chapter five, is an Hawiian term for “quick.” A practical uses of wikis for genealogist can be found at FamilySearch’s Research Wiki. Information about wikis, the Research wiki, and other wiki uses are for the learning in The Social Media Guide.

Sometimes the best way to describe a book is through the praise given by others; for example, this quote from Beth Taylor, BS, CGSM Reference Consultant, Family History Library:

“This book defines the next great wave of technological support for genealogists of all skill levels, Understanding the capabilities and uses of social media is a must for all genealogists and relatives around the world.”

Claire V. Brisson-Banks, BS, MLIS, AG, a native of Rhode Island, is accredited in England, a lecturer and a professional research for United States, Canada, Scotland and Web 2.0 technologies. She owns Timeless Genealogies and is on staff at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. She is a member of multiple societies, is published in genealogical and academic journals and currently serves as a board member for CCLA and ICAPGen.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Social Media

Chapter 2: Electronic Mail and Mailing Lists

Chapter 3: Instant Messaging, SMS, Twitter

Chapter 4: Blogs

Chapter 5: Wikis

Chapter 6: Forums

Chapter 7: Real Simple Syndication

Chapter 8: Social Bookmarking

Chapter 9: Sharing Digital Images

Chapter 10: Sharing Video Files

Chapter 11: Podcasts and Vodcasts

Chapter 12: E-Learning and Online Classes

Chapter 13: Social Networking and Online Communities

Chapter 14: Family History Games

Conclusion

Index

 

The Social Media Guide for Ancestral Research is available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.95.