Tennessee K-12 Students Get Free Classroom Access to Ancestry.com

According to an AP article posted on October 8 at the ksl.com website, the Tennessee State Library and Archives has further collaborated with Ancestry.com, offering all K-12 classrooms in the state free access to Ancestry.com. Hmmm… smart move on Ancestry’s part. Get ’em hooked early-on and they just may be hooked for life…

Read the article at KSL.com.

Casper and Catherine Move to America: An Immigrant Family’s Adventures, 1849-1850

ihs039The holidays are upon us and gift giving presents an opportunity for parents and grandparents to give the gift of family history to the next generation. Finding ways to interest youngsters in genealogy is not always easy. Family Roots Publishing has many guides and manuals and lesson books to help with an introduction. But, sometimes the best introduction is just a good story. Casper and Catherine Move to America: An Immigrant Family’s Adventures, 1849-1850 is the perfect picture book from which to help introduce kids to family history.

Casper and Catherine tells the story of how and why the Hasler family came to America. Author Brian Hasler, with illustrations by Angela M. Gouge, tells this tale as he heard it from his father, as passed down through the family over the years. The story takes the reader on a trip by sailing ship, stagecoach, flat-bottom boat and covered wagon. Casper went to America first, to work and garner enough wages to bring his family to America. Eventually, the entire family makes it to America. The same sort of passage and family trials many of your own ancestors may have taken.

The 27 page story is followed by a short Afterword on Researching Family History which includes a sample from the 1850 census and and 1858 marriage record.

Take advantage of the holidays to give this fun family tale and picture book to a youngster in your family. You can order Casper and Catherine Move to America: An Immigrant Family’s Adventures, 1849-1850 direct from Family Roots Publishing.

Zap the Grandma Gap, Book and Workbook

The Book

jh01Zap the Grandma Gap: Connecting with Your  Family by Connecting Them to Their Family History takes an old idea and breathes new life into sharing family history. I don’t know many genealogists who haven’t complained about how difficult it is to get the next generation interested and involved in their family history. Some offer up stories of selective success, while others offer creative ideas that always seem to go untested. Janet Hovorka has a better idea. In this new and lively book, Janet offers some of the most creative and inspiring ideas for getting children and grandchildren actively involved in their family history. However, the ideas in this book go beyond a few simple strategies by suggesting more than a few ways to make family history an integral part of the family members’ daily lives.

Hovorka uses a metaphorical superhero grandmother who has all the necessary tools and gadgets to cleverly, and enjoyably, make her family’s history a part of their lives. Ideas range across the board; including, using charts as every present wall art, learning about grandma through her favorite recipes, and having children get involved by using the latest technology gadgets to perform searches. These are just some of the basic ideas. The list of ideas goes on and on. Many of these ideas could be implemented with little effort. In many ways, its the constant reminder, the constant effort to share that will win family members over in the end.

The author believes so deeply in the value of family history she feels it is “one of the most important tools you can use to empower your children and help them become well adjusted adults.” Who am I to argue? I don’t think there is a genealogists out there who would disagree. While no family tree is without its scoundrels, neither is there a tree without heroes. “Super Grandma” is here to show everyone the way. Many of the ideas include activities that will help “bridge the generation gap.”

Taking these ideas anyone can turn the “snoring and boring to exciting and inviting.” Take both ideas and encouragement from these tried and tested ideas and make them part of your routine. You may not get a household full of genealogists from trying these ideas, but your family will surely find a greater connection and appreciation for the past and an improved outlook for the future.

The Workbook

jh02Where the book provides ideas and creative solutions to involving younger family members in family history, this workbook provides “step by step instructions, procedures, templates and resources that will help you teach the next generation to love their heritage.” Zap the Grandma Gap: Power Up Workbook is a akin to a lesson manual. Chapter by chapter parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, or even older siblings, can help younger relatives learn about their family’s background.

This workbook is so much more than the traditional guide to pedigrees and worksheets. This book offers FUN! The first section gets everyone thinking, “brainstorming,” about their family. Then there are the projects. This is where family history becomes exciting. Help to create visual displays, take an heirloom inventory, or work with social networks—this is where the kids may teach the adults a thing or two. The book will even help you work on organization skills, not by telling someone what to do, but by seeking their input. Learn to let youth find their own way, where the adult helps to nurture a sense of accomplishment.

When it comes to making family history fun for the youth, Janet Hovorka is as creative as I have found. Her ideas strike at the heart of encouragement through participation. What better way to spend an hour with a youth than helping them learn about their family. Unless, you would rather sit in front of the TV and not talk?

About the Author

Janet Hovorka owns Family ChartMaster, a genealogy chart printing company. She writes “The Chart Chick” blog and has written many other genealogical publications. She is the current President of the Utah Genealogical Association and teaches genealogy and library science at Salt Lake Community College.

 

Contents for each book are listed below.

Family Roots Publishing is offering a temporary discount on Zap the Grandma Gap. Get a copy for only $19.95, nearly 17% off the cover price; $19.95 – Regular $23.95.

Get copies of Zap the Grandma Gap: Power Up Workbook for yourself and for each of those budding genealogists in the family from Family Roots Publishing; Get a copy for only $19.95, nearly 17% off the cover price; $19.95 – Regular $23.95.

Continue reading “Zap the Grandma Gap, Book and Workbook”

Zap the Grandma Gap: Power Up Workbook

About 2 months ago I had the opportunity to review Zap The Grandma Gap, by Janet Hovorka. Here is the opening paragraph from that review:

Zap the Grandma Gap: Connecting with Your  Family by Connecting Them to Their Family History takes an old idea and breathes new life into sharing family history. I don’t know many genealogists who haven’t complained about how difficult it is to get the next generation interested and involved in their family history. Some offer up stories of selective success, while others offer creative ideas that always seem to go untested. Janet Hovorka has a better idea. In this new and lively book, Janet offers some of the most creative and inspiring ideas for getting children and grandchildren actively involved in their family history. However, the ideas in this book go beyond a few simple strategies by suggesting more than a few ways to make family history an integral part of the family members’ daily lives.

Now Hovorka is back with a workbook to accompany her book. Where the book provides ideas and creative solutions to involving younger family members in family history, this workbook provides “step by step instructions, procedures, templates and resources that will help you teach the next generation to love their heritage.” Zap the Grandma Gap: Power Up Workbook is a akin to a lesson manual. Chapter by chapter parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, or even older siblings, can help younger relatives learn about their family’s background.

This workbook is so much more than the traditional guide to pedigrees and worksheets. This book offers FUN! The first section gets everyone thinking, “brainstorming,” about their family. Then there are the projects. This is where family history becomes exciting. Help to create visual displays, take an heirloom inventory, or work with social networks—this is where the kids may teach the adults a thing or two. The book will even help you work on organization skills, not by telling someone what to do, but by seeking their input. Learn to let youth find their own way, where the adult helps to nurture a sense of accomplishment.

When it comes to making family history fun for the youth, Janet Hovorka is as creative as I have found. Her ideas strike at the heart of encouragement through participation. What better way to spend an hour with a youth than helping them learn about their family. Unless, you would rather sit in front of the TV and not talk?

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Brainstorm

  • Your Family
  • Relative Resources
  • Your History
  • Ancestral Assets
  • Your Current Family
  • Reflection Questions
  • Lessons to Learn
  • Pick a Few Heroes

Projects

  • Pictures
  • Visual Displays
  • Scrapbooks
  • Books
  • Organization
  • Heirloom Inventory
  • Flowers and Gardens
  • Family History Travel
  • Antique Games
  • Social Networking

Templates

  • Calendar
  • Indexing Chart
  • Pedigree Charts
  • Paper Doll Family
  • Recipe Cards
  • Family History Baking
  • Family History Parties
  • Family History bingo
  • Games to Adapt
  • Scavenger Hunt
  • Family Playing Cards
  • Activity Books
  • Family Ornaments
  • Resources
  • Family History Gifts
  • Interview Questions
  • Internet Sites for Kids
  • Books
  • Incentives
  • Starting Places

Energize and Mobilize

  • The Plan

 

Get copies of Zap the Grandma Gap: Power Up Workbook for yourself and for each of those budding genealogists in the family from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $23.47.

Genealogy Primer for Kids — An Excellent Gift Idea for the Budding Genealogist

It’s that time of year when parents and grandparents struggle to find the perfect gift of the children in their lives. Finding the balance between personal and thoughtful gifts balanced with the pressures to find the “popular” but short-lived gift of the moment. Well good news, genealogy’s popularity has never been higher. Around the world, people are tuning in to television shows and popular websites, getting excited about their own histories, and actively participating in this expanding hobby. Ok, I may be playing it up a bit, but why not use this popularity to help get kids actively involved. Plus, getting started was never easier with Susan Provost Beller’s book Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People. Here is a review previously posted on this site:

I often hear discussed the need to get children involved in family history. We all know children are the future. Getting children involved in family history at an early age can help ensure someone in the family will be around to take over the research of older generations, protect the work, and cherishing the memories left behind. However, the questions always remain, how to get youth involved and how to teach them the research skills they need in a way they will understand?

Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People helps answer these questions. Unlike other books intended to help adults get children involved, this book is written for the children themselves. Basing this book on a 12 week course she created, Susan Provost Beller, leads young readers through a step-by-step process to understanding, appreciating, and actively doing genealogy.

In this book, children will learn the meaning of new words like vital records, generations, and probate. They will learn to fill in pedigree charts and family group records. Kids will discover the joy of finding their ancestors in census, church, and cemetery records. Kids will learn the joy of successful research. Most importantly, kids will learn of their ancestors in a way as to gain a true appreciation for their own family’s story.

Table of Contents

Introduction to the Second Edition

Preface

1 An Introduction to Genealogy

2 You and Your Family

3 Your Parents’ Families

4 Asking Questions: Genealogy as Oral History

5 Putting It All Together

6 Kinds of Records Found Locally

7 Finding Local Records on the Internet

8 Kinds of State and National Records

9 Online Searching in Genealogy Databases

10 Evaluating Your Information

11 Research Around the World on Your Computer

12 The Ultimate Field Trip

Appendices

  • Blank Forms
  • Resources for Researching your Family

Index

 

Give the gift of family history to a child, order Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People  from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $21.56.

 

Take advantage of Family Roots Publishing’s Holiday Shipping Special…FREE Shipping on any Order over $25. Good though Midnight MST 20 December 2012.