Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England & the Female Index – on sale for 20% Off thru March 28

This weekend Family Roots Publishing is offering one of the greatest works ever published on New England genealogy, along with a female index, which make the 4-volume set all that much more valuable.

CLICK ON THIS LINK TO PURCHASE THE BUNDLE

They are:

Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England; in four volumes; by James Savage

and

Female Index to Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England by James Savage; Patty Barthell Myers, compiler

We negotiated a reduced price with the publisher, and are able to offer the 4-volume Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England and the Female Index for 20% Off, making the bundle of 5 books only $190.32 (Reg. $237.90). This is a large set of books, so the postage comes to $15.50. Allow about three days for them to be shipped, and anywhere from 3 to 10 days for their arrival in the USA. The sale runs through Monday, March 28, 2016. Click on this link to purchase – or if you need only one or the other, click on the links to the individual books, and get them at 10% off during the sale.

Following are detailed descriptions of each one:

Photo-of-Savage-Set-5170-200pw

Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England; by James Savage; Published: 1860-1862; Reprinted: 2008; Paper; Four Volumes; 2,541 pp total; ISBN: 9780806307596; Item #: GPC5170D.

This four-volume set is the basic genealogical dictionary of early New England settlers, giving the name of every settler who arrived in New England before 1692 regardless of their station, rank, or fortune. Alphabetically arranged for each it gives the dates of his marriage and death, dates of birth, marriage and death of his children, and birthdates and names of the grandchildren. According to the author, “nineteen twentieths of the people of these New England colonies in 1775 were descendants of those found here in 1692, and probably seven-eighths of them were offspring of the settlers before 1642.”

Owners of this series will also want to purchase the Female Index to “Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England,” which indexes all the females scattered throughout Savage’s four volumes by both maiden and married names.

“Probably the greatest work on genealogy ever compiled for the New England area.”–P.W. Filby, American & British Genealogy & Heraldry

EDITORIAL REVIEWS

“There is little doubt that this is probably the greatest work on genealogy ever compiled for the New England area…Essential for those with genealogy and history collections.”–AMERICAN REFERENCE BOOKS ANNUAL (1982).

“We welcome the reprint of this old friend…Comment as to the usefulness of Savage’s work is unnecessary. It is a classic.”–NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY, Vol. 65, No. 4.

“In the field of genealogical research certain standard reference works have come to be regarded as foundation blocks. James Savages’s monumental four-volume Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, for example,…is a work which must be literally at the elbow of every student of genealogy.”–OLD-TIME NEW ENGLAND, Vol. LVII, No. 3.

“…it is one of the best reference works on genealogy, particularly for those tracing New England ancestry. It is also useful for historians and biographers, and should therefore be in most reference collections.”–LIBRARY JOURNAL.

—————————–

Female-Index-to-Savage-3986-200pw
Female Index to Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England by James Savage; by Patty Barthell Myers; paper; 2008; 350 pp; ISBN: 9780806317854; Item #: GPC3986D.

It is generally agreed that James Savage’s Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England is one of the greatest works ever published on New England genealogy. The first edition came out in 1860, and as the four volumes were published in alphabetical sequence by family name, the males were usually found by checking their surname. The females were scattered throughout the four volumes. Some were listed under their fathers’ names, some were listed under their husbands’ names, and many women had three or more spouses. All were difficult to find, and if the husbands’ names were unknown, these ladies could not be found.

In 1884 O.P. Dexter prepared a “Genealogical Cross Index” which appeared in all reprints. However, it is a surname index only and has all the deficiencies of such an index, and it does not make the job of searching for women any easier. This new Female Index, however, published almost 150 years after Savage’s Dictionary first came out, lists all the females alphabetically by maiden name and married names (over 50,000 names altogether), and now they are as easy to locate as the males.

Every researcher of New England genealogy who owns the four-volume Dictionary by Savage, every genealogical society library that has Savage, and every public library that has Savage will want this index.

About the Author
Patty Barthell Myers has been involved in genealogy since the mid-1960s. She is the author of Joseph Barthel and his wife Christina Lutz (1991), Ancestors and Descendants of Lewis Ross Freeman with related families (1995), Cargill/Cargile/Cargal of the South and Southwest (1997), The Hughes Family from Virginia to Oregon (1999), and Ancestors and Descendants of Thomas Rice Lyon and his wife Harriet Wade Rice (2003). She has found over three hundred American immigrants in her family tree and descends from five Mayflower passengers and twenty-two Revolutionary War soldiers and patriots.

Again, we negotiated a reduced price with the publisher, and are only able to offer the 4-volume Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England and the Female Index for 20% Off, making the bundle of 5 books only $190.32 (Reg. $142.74) for a few days. The sale runs through Monday, March 28, 2016. Click on this link to purchase – or if you need only one or the other, click on the links to the individual books, and get them at 10% off during the sale.

2 Books on New England Captives Carried to Canada During the French & Indian War -10% Off thru March 8

This weekend we are featuring two books that deal with New England captives that were carried off into Canada during the French and Indian Wars. I happen to find this era of American history fascinating, and have found both of these books extremely helpful. Both are offered at 10% off through March 8, or while supplies last.

New-England-Captives-149pw

New England Captives Carried to Canada Between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars; by Emma Lewis Coleman; foreword by Donald R. Friary; 455 pp; paper; 6×9; Published: 2012; ISBN: 9780880822923; Item # NE25; 10% Off Through March 8, 2016 – $26.96 – Reg. $29.95 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase.

Originally published in two volumes in 1925, New England Captives Carried to Canada represents decades of research conducted by Coleman and C. Alice Baker (author of True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada, 1897).

This work names all the captives the two women discovered, provides biographical data for each, and paints a detailed picture of the Indian attacks on New England communities over the eighty-year period. Includes sources, a comprehensive index, and an appendix with greater explanation of terms, key people, and places mentioned in the text. For nearly a century, this has been the go-to resource and the it’s said it’s the most definitive work ever published on the subject.

From the Table of Contents:
I. The Wars – Defense
II. Missions and Missionaries
III. Concerning Indians
IV. Redemptions, Ransoms, and Naturalization
V. Hatfield and Deerfield
VI. At the Eastward – Dover
VIII. Salmon Falls, Casco Bay, Sandy Beach (Rye) and River St. John
IX. The Attacks Upon York
X. Oyster River and Groton
XI. The Massachusetts Frontier – Squackig, Billerica, Lancaster, Worcester, Pascomuck, Marlborough, Dunstable, Brookfield, Northampton
XII. The Lower Merrimac and Exeter
XIII. Kittery, Eliot and Berwick
XIV. The Tragedy at Wells

True-Stories-of-New-England-Captives-149pw
True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars; by C. Alice Baker; 420 pp; Paper; 5.5×8.5, Published: 1896, Reprinted: 2004; ISBN: 1556134207; index; Item # HBB0420; 10% Off through March 8, 2016 – $30.60 – Reg. $34.00 – Click on the links or illustration to purchase..

In a day and age where selecting the perfect title for a book, a movie, or even a magazine article is often more a marketing question than a practical one, it is nice to find books whose titles declare exactly what the contents are. Of course, when I do find such a title it is often the reprint of a book originally published 100 plus years ago. So it is with True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada During the Old French and Indian Wars.

New England Captives was written by C. Alice Baker, and originally published in 1897. In her preface, Baker mentions reading the words “Carried captive to Canada whence they came not back.” These words peeked Baker’s curiosity. What happened to those captives? Curiosity turned to mission and this book is the result of C. Alice Baker’s efforts.

These pages provides detailed accounts of attacks on the following towns:

  • Well and York, Maine
  • Dover, New Hampshire
  • Hatfield, Haverhill, and Deerfield, Massachusetts

These stories focus on the points of view of just a few individuals, but offer extensive genealogical and biographical data. In particular, the following family names are treated:

  • Baker
  • Nims
  • Otis
  • Plaisted
  • Rishworth
  • Rising
  • Sayward
  • Sheldon
  • Silver
  • Stockwell
  • Stebbins
  • Wheelwright
  • Williams

From the Table of Contents
Christine Otis (A romance of real life on the frontier as told in the records.)
Esther Wheelwright
Story of a York Family
Difficulties and Dangers in the Settlement of a Frontier Town 1670
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Two Captives ( A romance of real life two hundred years ago)
A Day at Oka
Thankful Stebbins
A Scion of the Church in Deerfield,. Joseph-Octave Plessis (Written for the two hundredth anniversary of the founding of the church in Deerfield.)
Hertel De Rouville
Father Meriel – Mary Silver
Appendix
Christinr Otis
Esther Wheelwright
Eunice Williams
Ensign John Sheldon
My Hunt for the Captives
Thankful Stennins
Index

NEHGS Partners with the Congregational Library & Archives to Digitize Early Church Records

The following news release is from NEHGS:

Page-from-Diary-of-Thomas-Josselyn-(1702-1782)-300pw

New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Partners with the Congregational Library & Archives to Digitize Early Church Records

January 7, 2016—Boston, Massachusetts — New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) is pleased to announce its participation in New England’s Hidden Histories: Providing Public Access to the Manuscripts of New England’s First Churches, Incubators of American Democracy. NEHGS, the Congregational Library & Archives (CLA), the Phillips Library of the Peabody Essex Museum, and the Connecticut Conference of the United Church of Christ have received a grant of $210,000 from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) in support of the New England’s Hidden Histories program. The grant will enable the digitization of 28,000 pages of manuscript church records, personal papers of pastors and deacons, and ministerial conference records, dating from 1641 to the mid-1800s.

“As part of its ongoing effort to digitize the genealogical and historical treasures in its collections and make them available to a wide audience online, NEHGS is proud to be a co-recipient of the prestigious CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections grant and to participate in this important project,” said Jean Maguire, Director of the NEHGS Library. “This partnership will open up to researchers our rich holdings of early American church membership and vital records, correspondence, diaries, and family papers, including those of Michael Wigglesworth, the well-known Puritan minister and author of America’s first ‘best seller,’ The Day of Doom.”

“These documents cast more light on early New England life and culture than any other discrete set of sources,” said James Cooper, Director of New England’s Hidden Histories. “We are pleased to make them available to scholars and the public, and we are delighted to establish a foundation for ongoing partnerships with the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the Phillips Library, and the Connecticut UCC Archive, with whom we share so many scholarly goals.”

The grants were awarded to collections of “high scholarly value” at libraries and repositories with commitments to digitization and wide public accessibility. New England’s Hidden Histories is one of just eighteen funded projects out of 165 applicants. Established in 2005, New England’s Hidden Histories is an ongoing program of the Congregational Library and Archives that seeks to secure, archive, digitize, transcribe, and make available online New England’s early manuscript church records. Documents contributed by NEHGS will also be made available through AmericanAncestors.org.

Learn more about the project and see the CLIR announcement of awards.

About American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society

The founding genealogical society in America, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) was established in 1845. Today it has a national collecting scope and serves more than 150,000 constituents through an award-winning website, www.AmericanAncestors.org. Since 1845, NEHGS has been the country’s leading comprehensive resource for genealogists and family historians of every skill level. Today NEHGS provides constituents with worldwide access to some of the most important and valuable research tools anywhere.

American Ancestors is the public brand and user experience of NEHGS representing the expertise and resources available for family historians of all levels when researching their origins across the country and around the world. NEHGS’s resources, expertise, and service are unmatched in the field and their leading staff of on-site and online genealogists includes experts in early American, Irish, English, Scottish, Italian, Atlantic and French Canadian, African American, Native American, Chinese, and Jewish research. Expert assistance is available to members and nonmembers in a variety of ways. The NEHGS library and archive, located at 99 – 101 Newbury Street in downtown Boston, is home to more than 28 million items, including manuscript documents, genealogical records, books, photographs, and other items dating back hundreds of years.

Free Cemetery Records Databases at AmericanAncestors.org October 30 through November 7, 2015

The following was received from NEHGS:

Cemetery-Databases-Free-NEHGS-2015-350pw

October 30, 2015 — Boston, Massachusetts — “Your ancestors have been dying for you to uncover them. NEHGS has opened the cemetery gates so you can start digging!”

Just in time for the Halloween celebrations and to add some fun to ancestral research this holiday, AmericanAncestors.org and New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) have made their complete collection of American cemetery databases accessible for FREE to guest users on their data-rich website.

The collection of more than 100 databases comprising more than one million records is accessible FREE from Friday, October 30, through midnight on Saturday, November 7. The collection includes cemetery transcriptions from New England and other states and was compiled from many different sources to create a unique group of cemetery offerings.

Registration at AmericanAncestors.org is required as a FREE Guest Member to gain access to these valuable resources. Guest User accounts allow web visitors to use a limited suite of databases on AmericanAncestors.org and to access web content such as making purchases from the NEHGS online store. Unlimited access to more than one billion online records on the website and to other benefits is through membership at NEHGS.
Family historians may start digging for their ancestors in these historic American cemeteries at: http://www.americanancestors.org/free-cemetery-databases.

The cemetery databases included in this special offering and FREE Access event are:

  • American Jewish Historical Society – New England Archives: Jewish Cemeteries in Massachusetts
  • Boston, MA: Old Cemeteries of Boston
  • Brooklyn, NY: Cemetery Inscriptions, 1686-1882
  • Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections
  • Charleston, SC: Inscriptions in Old Jewish Cemeteries, 1762-1903
  • Dedham, MA: Church and Cemetery Records 1638-1845
  • Gloucester, MA: Burials in Gloucester Cemeteries
  • New York: Long Island Cemetery Inscriptions, 1652-1910
  • North Andover, MA: Burials in Ridgewood Cemetery, 1848-1950
  • Northampton, MA: West Farms Cemetery
  • Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries Database Index
  • Sharon, MA: Sharon Memorial Park Cemetery
  • Sterling, MA: Leg Cemetery Records
  • Westbrook, CT: Cemetery Inscriptions
  • Western Massachusetts: Jewish Cemeteries of Western Massachusetts

About American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society
The founding genealogical society in America, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) was established in 1845. Today it has a national collecting scope and serves more than 130,000 constituents through an award-winning website, AmericanAncestors.org.

NEHGS’s resources, expertise, and service are unmatched in the field, and their leading staff of on-site and online genealogists includes experts in early American, Irish, English, Scottish, Italian, Atlantic and French Canadian, African American, Native American, Chinese, and Jewish research. The NEHGS library and archive, located at 99–101 Newbury Street in downtown Boston, is home to more than 28 million items, including artifacts, documents, records, journals, letters, books, manuscripts, and other items dating back hundreds of years.

The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research

All “Portable” guides are two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research guide covers three main topic areas:

  • Settlement and migration patterns
  • Records
  • Scholarly resources

This guide starts with an introduction to this period of early immigration; including, a list of common records often available in research.

The Settlement and Migration Patterns section includes coverage for “Waves of Migration” and “Settlement,” which names the primary settlements with years of existence.

Resources begins with “Locating Records.” Included is chart listing records types, a description of “what you may find and records notes,” along with resources for more information. This section also includes segments on “Finding Aids” and “Study Projects.”

There are also five “NEHGS Tips” in this guide.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Seventeenth-Century New England Research and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

FamilySearch Adds Nearly 11.1 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Brazil, Canada, England, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, & the USA

The following was received from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch.org

FamilySearch has added close to 11.1 million indexed records and images to collections from Barbados, BillionGraves, Brazil, Canada, England, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Puerto Rico, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,703,529 indexed records from the U.S., Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1846–1910, collection; the 766,368 indexed records and images from the new Canadian Headstones, collection; and the 2,917,490 indexed records from the England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570–1907, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the worldís historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org .

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Barbados, Church Records, 1637–1887 – 253,209 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

BillionGraves Index – 534,057 – 534,057 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804–2013 – 0 – 109,743 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canadian Headstones – 766,368 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

England, Cornwall and Devon Parish Registers, 1538–2010 – 171,083 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

England, Kent, Register of Electors, 1570–1907 – 2,917,490 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Mexico, Archdiocese of Guadalajara, Miscellaneous Marriage Records, 1539–1939 – 0 – 65,075 – Added images to an existing collection.

Peru, Huánuco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 – 0 – 137,860 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Lamego, Diocesan Records, 1529–1963 – 0 – 237,263 – Added images to an existing collection.

Puerto Rico, Catholic Church Records, 1645–1969 – 0 – 1,329 – Added images to an existing collection.

South Africa, Cape Province, Civil Deaths, 1895–1972 – 11,622 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

South Africa, Orange Free State, Estate Files, 1951–2006 – 10 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784–1956 – 0 – 106,020 – Added images to an existing collection.

Sweden, Kalmar Church Records, 1577–1907; index 1625–1860 – 30,025 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1991 – 275,482 – 0 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Iowa, County Marriages, 1838–1934 – 223,134 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, Yates County, Swann Vital Records Collection, 1723–2009 – 63,947 – 87,588 – New indexed records and images collection.

U.S., North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663–1979 – 30,607 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Texas, County Tax Rolls, 1846–1910 – 2,610,151 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787–1931 – 0 – 7,940 – Added images to an existing collection.

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798–1892 – 1,703,529 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States, Obituaries, American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1899–2012 – 3,322 – 4,154 – New indexed records and images collection.

United States Social Security Death Index – 213,017 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 4.5 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Brazil, China, Ghana, Italy, Netherlands, Philippines, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 4.5 million indexed records and images to collections from Brazil, China, Colombia, Ghana, Italy, Netherlands, Paraguay, Philippines, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 1,165,725 indexed records from the U.S., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, collection; the 469,903 images from the Ghana Census, 1984; and the 415,997 indexed records from the United States Census, 1860 . See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2013 – 6,762 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

China, Collection of Genealogies, 1239-2011 – 0 – 241,296 – Added images to an existing collection.

Colombia, Military Records, 1809-1958 – 0 – 157,477 – Added images to an existing collection.

Colombia, Valle del Cauca, Miscellaneous Records, 1549-1955 – 0 – 73,428 – Added images to an existing collection.

Ghana Census, 1984 – 0 – 469,903 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Campobasso, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1918 – 138,524 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Italy, Napoli, Serrara Fontana, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 2,122 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Netherlands, Zeeland Province, Church Records, 1527-1907 – 0 – 41,808 – Added images to an existing collection.

Paraguay, Catholic Church Records, 1754-1981 – 0 – 4,501 – Added images to an existing collection.

Philippines, Manila Civil Registration, 1899-1994 – 0 – 1,710 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Beja, Catholic Church Records, 1550-1913 – 0 – 21,665 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Passport Registers and Application Files, 1800-1946 – 0 – 152,477 – Added images to an existing collection.

Spain, Diocese of Lugo, Catholic Parish Records, 1550-1930 – 121,614 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Spain, Province of Málaga, Municipal Records, 1760-1925 – 0 – 52,346 – Added images to an existing collection.

Spain, Province of Tarragona, Municipal Records, 1430-1936 – 0 – 16,334 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., California, San Pedro, Immigration Office Special Inquiry Records, 1930-1936 – 0 – 143 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., District of Columbia, Glenwood Cemetery Records, 1854-2013 – 0 – 52,042 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Missouri, Probate Records, 1800-1959 – 0 – 40,269 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787-1931 – 0 – 142 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New Hampshire, County Probate Estate Files, 1769-1936 – 0 – 3,056 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, New York City, Church of the Transfiguration Records, 1847-1938 – 0 – 79,398 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Ohio, Jefferson County Court Records, 1797-1947 – 0 – 28,813 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Pennsylvania, County Marriages, 1885-1950 – 24,961 – 16,984 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

U.S., Texas, Laredo Arrival Manifests, 1903-1955 – 0 – 459,405 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970 – 1,165,725 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States Census, 1850 – 59,379 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States Census, 1860 – 415,997 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

United States Headstone Applications for U.S. Military Veterans, 1925-1949 – 0 – 671,180 – Added images to an existing collection.

FamilySearch Adds Over 145 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from BillionGraves, England, Russia, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 145 million indexed records and images to collections from BillionGraves, England, Russia, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 65,593,352 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Birth Index, 1800–1920, collection, the 35,117,915 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Marriage Index, 1800–1920, collection, and the 40,618,506 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Death Index 1800–1920, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

BillionGraves Index – 292,519 – 292,519 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

England and Wales, Birth Index, 1800-1920 – 65,593,352 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

England and Wales, Death Index 1800-1920 – 40,618,506 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

England and Wales, Marriage Index, 1800-1920 – 35,117,915 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

Russia, Tatarstan Church Books, 1721-1939 – 0 – 333,592 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Michigan, Eastern District, Naturalization Index, 1907-1995 – 0 – 577,690 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Montana Naturalization Records, 1868-1999 – 0 – 52,264 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Montana, Teton County Records, 1881-2012 – 0 – 98,268 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., New England, Seamen’s Identification Cards, 1918-1940 – 0 – 104,825 – New browsable image collection.

United States, Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 0 – 90,827 – New browsable image collection.

United States Revolutionary War, Virginia Pension Application Files, 1830-1875 – 0 – 220,787 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Wisconsin, Milwaukee Petitions to Naturalization, 1848-1991 – 0 – 78,845 – New browsable image collection.

Review of “Planters of Early New England”

cf9931Of course we judge books by their covers. The cover is the first indication of what is inside. However, there are times when looking beyond the cover may reveal an unexpected treasure. Such is the case with Planters of Early New England: A Sketch of Roger Mowry Mann’s Seventeenth-Century Ancestors. The subtitle would keep almost anyone from even picking the book up, unless you know your related to this Roger Mowry Mann. That, however, may be a big mistake. Let me explain.

Mann (1944—2002), like many today, could trace his ancestry to early New England. After three hundred plus years, those early settlers of New England have millions of descendents. Mann’s history, put together by his sister and brother-in-law, reveals “much about life in seventeenth-century New England — land development, public service, religion, and other aspects of daily existence.” There is information within this book on many well-known early settlers and their families. “Planters” refers to those who founded colonies as well as referring to farmers. These early settlers were often both.

This book covers and documents the founding and early settling of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, many of whom were the ancestor of Roger Mann. These are the ancestors to many more people than just Roger Mann. To demonstrate just how diverse and large the decedents pool is from these early settlers, chapter IX lists 9 U.S. Presidents who also trace their ancestry back to this group. “The work is organized as an historical description of the period, but Chapter II and the ancestor index assure that it is also a genealogical record… Also included in this work is significant other previously unpublished material transcribed from records of deeds and wills from many different towns and counties in New England, including transcriptions of town records in Concord, Massachusetts and Guilford, Connecticut.”

The table of contents provides a good overview of what the reader can expect in these pages. There is also and index of 256 names found in this book [see below]. Perhaps one of your ancestors is there, if not this book tells a great historical story anyone could find interesting.

Note: Presidents listed in Chapter IX:

  • Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (VP under Gerald Ford)
  • Franklin Pierce (14th President)
  • Abraham Lincoln (16th President)
  • James Garfield (20th President)
  • William Howard Taft (27th President)
  • Chester A. Arthur (21th President)
  • Gerald R. Fort (39th President)
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd President)
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (41st President)
  • George Walker Bush (43rd President)

Obtain your own copy of Planters of Early New England from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Chapter I – Immigration to New England by 1652

  1. The First Wave of the Great Migration: 1630-1635
  2. Possible Participants in the First Wave of the Great Migration
  3. The Second Wave of the Great Migration: 1635-1639
  4. The Continued Expansion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1640-1652
  5. Ancestors Migrating to Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
  6. Ancestors Migrating to Connecticut
  7. Ancestors Migrating to Plymouth Colony
  8. Ancestors Immigrating to Northern New England
  9. Summary

Chapter II – Family Evolution

  • Pedigrees and Index of the Early Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

Chapter III – The Acquisition and Use of Land

  1. Place of Initial Settlement during the Great Migration
  2. Land Acquisition
  3. Immigration and Migration Continue: 1636-1650
  4. Challenges after 1650 in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  5. Indian Deeds
  6. Mortgages
  7. Early Business Enterprise: Manufacturing, Mining and Milling
  8. Common Land in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  9. Travel
  10. Analysis of Land Matters

Continue reading “Review of “Planters of Early New England””

Planters of Early New England

cf9931Of course we judge books by their covers. The cover is the first indication of what is inside. However, there are times when looking beyond the cover may reveal an unexpected treasure. Such is the case with Planters of Early New England: A Sketch of Roger Mowry Mann’s Seventeenth-Century Ancestors. The subtitle would keep almost anyone from even picking the book up, unless you know your related to this Roger Mowry Mann. That, however, may be a big mistake. Let me explain.

Mann (1944—2002), like many today, could trace his ancestry to early New England. After three hundred plus years, those early settlers of New England have millions of descendents. Mann’s history, put together by his sister and brother-in-law, reveals “much about life in seventeenth-century New England — land development, public service, religion, and other aspects of daily existence.” There is information within this book on many well-known early settlers and their families. “Planters” refers to those who founded colonies as well as referring to farmers. These early settlers were often both.

This book covers and documents the founding and early settling of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, many of whom were the ancestor of Roger Mann. These are the ancestors to many more people than just Roger Mann. To demonstrate just how diverse and large the decedents pool is from these early settlers, chapter IX lists 9 U.S. Presidents who also trace their ancestry back to this group. “The work is organized as an historical description of the period, but Chapter II and the ancestor index assure that it is also a genealogical record… Also included in this work is significant other previously unpublished material transcribed from records of deeds and wills from many different towns and counties in New England, including transcriptions of town records in Concord, Massachusetts and Guilford, Connecticut.”

The table of contents provides a good overview of what the reader can expect in these pages. There is also and index of 256 names found in this book [see below]. Perhaps one of your ancestors is there, if not this book tells a great historical story anyone could find interesting.

Note: Presidents listed in Chapter IX:

  • Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (VP under Gerald Ford)
  • Franklin Pierce (14th President)
  • Abraham Lincoln (16th President)
  • James Garfield (20th President)
  • William Howard Taft (27th President)
  • Chester A. Arthur (21th President)
  • Gerald R. Fort (39th President)
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd President)
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (41st President)
  • George Walker Bush (43rd President)

Obtain your own copy of Planters of Early New England from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Chapter I – Immigration to New England by 1652

  1. The First Wave of the Great Migration: 1630-1635
  2. Possible Participants in the First Wave of the Great Migration
  3. The Second Wave of the Great Migration: 1635-1639
  4. The Continued Expansion of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1640-1652
  5. Ancestors Migrating to Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
  6. Ancestors Migrating to Connecticut
  7. Ancestors Migrating to Plymouth Colony
  8. Ancestors Immigrating to Northern New England
  9. Summary

Chapter II – Family Evolution

  • Pedigrees and Index of the Early Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

Chapter III – The Acquisition and Use of Land

  1. Place of Initial Settlement during the Great Migration
  2. Land Acquisition
  3. Immigration and Migration Continue: 1636-1650
  4. Challenges after 1650 in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  5. Indian Deeds
  6. Mortgages
  7. Early Business Enterprise: Manufacturing, Mining and Milling
  8. Common Land in the Massachusetts Bay Colony
  9. Travel
  10. Analysis of Land Matters

 

Chapter IV – Public Service

  1. Establishment of the Colonial Government
  2. Service in Governing Bodies
  3. Jury Service in New England
  4. Town Offices
  5. Deputed Tasks by the Massachusetts General Court, Counties and Towns
  6. Summary
  • Supplement: Seventeenth-Century Deputies to the Massachusetts General Court
  • Supplement: Assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Colony: 1630-1645

Chapter V – Religious Environment

  1. The Puritan Environment
  2. Church Leadership
  3. Church Membership
  4. Support for Town Ministers
  5. Shortage of Ministers
  6. Education
  7. Minister and Parishioner Movement within New England
  8. Religious Dissent within Churches and with the General Court
  9. Quaker Persecution
  10. Witchcraft
  11. Summary

Chapter VI – Indian Wars and Military Service

  1. The Pequot War: 1637-1638
  2. King Philip’s War: 1675-1676
  3. King William’s War: 1689-1697
  4. Military Service
  5. Summary

Chapter VII – Secondary Aspects of Ancestors’ Lives and Deaths

  1. Non-Agricultural Activities
  2. Services Performed by Agreement with the Town of Residence
  3. Old Age and Transfer of Estates
  4. Personal Disputes
  5. Dangers
  6. Ties with England
  7. Destitute Settlers
  8. Black Sheep
  • Supplement: Probate Records

Chapter VIII – The Three Most Significant Seventeenth-Century Ancestors of Roger Mowry Mann

  1. John Johnson
  2. Hopestill Foster
  3. Obadiah Holmes
  4. Summary

Chapter IX – Relationships of Direct Ancestors to Presidents of the United States

Colony and Town Record Abbreviations

Bibliography

Appendix A. English Origins of Roger Mowry Mann’s Ancestors

Appendix B. Occupations of Early Ancestors

Ancestor Index

Place Index

 

Index of the Seventeenth-Century Ancestor of Roger Mowry Mann

There are a few non-relatives included in this list who appear in the book. Women are listed by maiden name with married name in parenthesis.

  1. Aldrich, George
  2. Aldrich, Jacob
  3. Aldrich, Joseph
  4. Aldrich, Moses
  5. Aldrich, Ruth (Arnold)
  6. Aldrich, Samuel
  7. Aldrich, Sarah (Bartlett)
  8. Allen, John
  9. Allen, Sarah
  10. Allen, Samuel
  11. Allen, Sarah (Stratton)
  12. Allen, Walter
  13. Allen, Rebecca [Wyman]
  14. Angell, Alice (Whipple)
  15. Angell, John
  16. Angell, John
  17. Angell, Mary (Arnold)
  18. Angell, Thomas
  19. Arnold, Daniel
  20. Arnold, Elizabeth (Comstock)
  21. Arnold, John
  22. Arnold, Richard
  23. Arnold, Richard
  24. Arnold, Richard Daniel
  25. Arnold, Thomas
  26. Arnold, Thomas
  27. Ashton, Alice (Angell)
  28. Axtell, Mary_____ (Maynard)
  29. Ballou, Bathsheba (Arnold)
  30. Ballou, Maturin
  31. Ballou, James
  32. Bartlett, Jacob / Bartlett, Sarah
  33. Bartlett, John
  34. Bate, James
  35. Bate, Mary (Foster)
  36. Besbeech, Mary (Browne)
  37. Besbeech, Thomas
  38. Bigg, Patience (Foster)
  39. Blackmar, James
  40. Blackmar, John
  41. Browne, Chad
  42. Browne, John
  43. Browne, Sarah (Pray)
  44. Browne, Patience (Stone)
  45. Browne, Thomas
  46. Browne, William
  47. Bulkeley, Martha (Mellowes)
  48. Roger Burlingame
  49. Burlingame, Elizabeth (Arnold)
  50. Clemence, Richard
  51. Clemence, Sarah (Angell)
  52. Clemence, Thomas
  53. Clemence, Elizabeth
  54. Comstock, Hazadiah
  55. Comstock Samuel
  56. Comstock, Ann [Tucker] his wife
  57. Comstock, Samuel
  58. Comstock, William
  59. Copeland, Lawrence
  60. Copeland, Lydia (White)
  61. Dakin, Dorothy (Hubbard)
  62. Darkin, Joseph
  63. Dakin, Thmos
  64. Dakin, Susannah_____ (Stratton)
  65. [Daniel], Elizabeth (Comstock)
  66. David, Dolor
  67. Davis, Samuel
  68. Davis, Simon
  69. John, Field
  70. Field, Ruth [Fairbanks]
  71. Field, Ruth (Angell)
  72. Fletcher, Elizabeth (Stratton)
  73. Fletcher, Francis
  74. Fletcher, Robert
  75. Fletcher, [—-]
  76. Foster, Hopestill
  77. Foster, Patience (Browne)
  78. French, Judith (Rogers)
  79. Frost, Elizabeth (Rice) (Whale)
  80. Frost, Thomasine (Rice)
  81. Frye, Mary (Stratton)
  82. Gibson, John
  83. Gibson, Rebecca [Thompson] his wife
  84. Gibson, Martha (Newell)
  85. Gleason, Joseph
  86. Gleason, Joyce (Newell)
  87. Gleason, Thmos
  88. Glover, Alice
  89. Goldston, Sarch (Merriam)
  90. Goodenow, Mary (Ross)
  91. Goodenow, Thomas
  92. Goodenow, Jane [Ruddock]
  93. Goodrich, Hannah (Maynard)
  94. Goodrich, John
  95. Goodrich, Elizabeth
  96. Gourd, Elizabeth (Haynes)
  97. Harwood, Margaret (Hawkins)
  98. Hawkins, Mary (Blackmar)
  99. Hawkins, William
  100. Haynes, David
  101. Haynes, John
  102. Haynes, Walter
  103. Hayward, Juldah (Thayer)
  104. Hayward, William
  105. Heald, Dorothy (Davis)
  106. Heald, Israel
  107. Heald, John
  108. Holmes, Mary (Browne)
  109. Holmes, Obadiah
  110. Hopkins, Elizabeth (Inman)
  • Hubbard, Daniel
  1. Hubbard, George
  2. Hubbard, Mary
  3. Hubbard, John
  4. Hubbard, Jonathan
  5. Hyde, Katherine (Holmes)
  6. Iggleden, Elizabeth [Bennett] Meadows
  7. Inman, Edward
  8. Inman, Joanna (Mowry)
  9. Johnson, Davy
  10. Johnson, Mary
  11. Johnson, Mary (Ludden)
  12. Johnson, John
  13. Johnson, Mary (Mowry)
  14. Kenny, Henry
  15. Kenny, Ann
  16. Kenny, Henry
  17. Kenny, Jemima (Blackmar)
  18. King, Elizabeth (Rice)
  19. King, Thomas
  20. King, Ann
  21. Knight, Margery (Hayward)
  22. Knight, Mary (Osborne)
  23. Lewis, George
  24. Lewis, [Ann]
  25. Lewis, Philip
  26. Lewis, Priscilla (Kenny)
  27. Lippitt, John
  28. Lippitt, Martha
  29. Lippitt, Mary (Barlingstone) (Burlingame)
  30. Ludden, James
  31. Ludden, Mary (Puffer)
  32. Martin, Racheal (Bigg)
  33. Maynard, John
  34. Maynard, Moses
  35. Maynard, Zachariah
  36. Meadows, Mary (Davis)
  37. Meadow, Philip
  38. Mellowes, Abraham
  39. Mellowes, Elizabeth (Barrett) (Wright)
  40. Mellowes, Oliver
  41. Merriam, Joseph
  42. Merriam, Mary (Hubbard)
  43. Moore Benjamin
  44. Moore, Hezekiah
  45. Moore, John
  46. Moore, Mary (Ward) (Stone)
  47. Mowry, John
  48. Mowry, Mary
  49. Mowry, John
  50. Mowry, Mary (Arnold)
  51. Mowry, Nathaniel
  52. Mowry, Roger
  53. Newell, Abraham
  54. Newell, Frances
  55. Newell, Jacob
  56. Newell, Jacob
  57. Noyes, Dorothy (Haynes)
  58. Noyes, Peter
  59. Osborne, John
  60. Osborne, Patience (Aldrich)
  61. Page, Susannah (Gleason)
  62. Parkhurst, George
  63. Parkhurst, Phebe (Dan) (Arnold)
  64. Parrat, Elizabeth (Worcester)
  65. Parrat, Francis
  66. Parrat, Elizabeth [Northend]
  67. Pike, Hannah (Ballou)
  68. Pike, Robert
  69. Pike, Catherine
  70. Pray, Catherine (Comstock)
  71. Pray, John
  72. Pray, Mary (Woodward)
  73. Pray, Quinton
  74. Pray, Joan
  75. Pray, Richard
  76. Pray, Mary
  77. Puffer, George
  78. Puffer, James
  79. Puffer, Jane (Aldrich)
  80. Rice, Edmund
  81. Rice, Elizabeth [Whale] (Moore)
  82. Rice, Hannah (Hubbard)
  83. Rice, Samuel
  84. Rogers, John
  85. Rogers, Lydia (White)
  86. Ross, James
  87. Ross, Jane (Allen)
  88. Royle, Dorothy (Heald)
  89. Russell, Martha (Gleason)
  90. Russell, William
  91. Russell, Martha
  92. Seald, Katherine
  93. Sedley, Elizabeth (Puffer)
  94. Sharparowe, Elizabeth (Browne)
  95. Smith, John
  96. Smith, Alice
  97. Smith, John
  98. Smith, Sarah (Clemence)
  99. Stone, Daniel
  100. Stone, Daniel
  101. Stone, Gregory
  102. Stone, John
  103. Stone, Ann [Treadway]
  104. Stone, Tabitha (Haynes)
  105. Stratton, Samuel
  106. Stratton, Alice (Beeby)
  107. Stratton, Samuel
  108. Stratton, Samuel
  109. Stratton, Samuel
  110. Thayer, Ferdinando
  111. Thayer, Hulday (Aldrich)
  112. Thayer, Thomas
  113. Townsend, Lydia (Copeland)
  114. Upson, [Stephen]
  115. Upson, Elizabeth
  116. Upson, Hannah (Wright)
  117. Whales, Philemon
  118. Wheeler, Elizabeth (Fletcher)
  119. Wheeler, George
  120. Wheeler, Katherine
  121. Wheeler, Margery (Thayer)
  122. Whipple, Eleazer
  123. Whipple, John
  124. Whipple, Sarah
  125. Whipple, Sarah (Smith)
  126. Whipple, Margaret / Margery (Mowry)
  127. White, Hannah (Aldrich)
  128. White, Joseph
  129. White, Joseph
  130. White, Thomas
  131. White, Hannah [Workman]
  132. Whitman, Susanne (Ballou)
  133. Whitman, Valentine
  134. Whitman, Mary
  135. Williard, Margery (Davis)
  136. Woodward, Joseph
  137. Woodward, Mary (Arnold)
  138. Worcester, Dorothy (Dakin)
  139. Worcester, Samuel
  140. Worcester, William
  141. Worcester, Sarah
  142. Wright, Dorothy
  143. Wright, Dorothy (Moore)
  144. Wright, Edward (Sudbury)
  145. Wright, Edward (Concord)
  146. Wright, Martha (Heald)

FamilySearch Adds Over 39.5 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Italy, Mexico, Spain, & the SUA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 39.5 Million indexed records and images to Collections from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, El Salvador, France, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 24,856,324 indexed records and images from the U.S., New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909-1957, collection, the 2,284,230 indexed records and images from the Canada Passenger Lists, 1881-1922, collection, and the 3,399,062 indexed records from the U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1891, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Belgium, Antwerp, Civil Registration, 1609-1909 – 238,573 – 27,020 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Brabant, Civil Registration, 1582-1912 – 8,758 – 2,811 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1598-1906 – 167,757 – 125,349 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Hainaut, Civil Registration, 1600-1911 – 176,150 – 11,447 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Limburg, Civil Registration, 1798-1906 – 40,818 – 39,720 – New indexed records and images collection.

Belgium, Liège, Civil Registration, 1621-1910 – 55,048 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Belgium, Luxembourg, Civil Registration, 1608-1912 – 0 – 13,317 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, Namur, Civil Registration, 1800-1912 – 0 – 33,287 – Added images to an existing collection.

Belgium, West Flanders, Civil Registration, 1582-1910 – 160,737 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Brazil, Mato Grosso, Civil Registration, 1848-2013 – 0 – 127,795 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2013 – 0 – 207,023 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Miscellaneous Records, 1748-1998 – 0 – 461,811 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, Santa Catarina, Civil Registration, 1850-1999 – 0 – 1,845 – Added images to an existing collection.

Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980 – 0 – 328,694 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada, Quebec, Notarial Records, 1800-1900 – 0 – 244,429 – Added images to an existing collection.

Canada Passenger Lists, 1881-1922 – 2,201,052 – 0 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Chile, Santiago, Cemetery Records, 1821-2011 – 0 – 525,106 – Added images to an existing collection.

El Salvador Civil Registration, 1704-1977 – 406,035 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

France, Protestant Church Records, 1612-1906 – 33,342 – 4,712 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

Italy, Agrigento, Agrigento, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1942 – 0 – 418,594 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Messina, Messina, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1939 – 0 – 141,128 – Added images to an existing collection.

Italy, Modena, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1806-1942 – 0 – 1,358,232 – New browsable image collection.

Italy, Napoli, Barano d’Ischia, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 14,861 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

Japan, Passenger Lists, 1893-1941 – 94,842 – 0 – New indexed records collection.

Mexico, San Luis Potosí, Miscellaneous Records, 1570-1882 – 0 – 151,711 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Beja, Civil Registration and Miscellaneous Records, 1609-1950 – 0 – 291,199 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Coimbra, Passport Registers and Application Files, 1835-1938 – 0 – 444,466 – Added images to an existing collection.

Portugal, Évora, Civil Registration and Miscellaneous Records, 1554-1938 – 0 – 237,371 – Added images to an existing collection.

Spain, Cádiz, Testaments, 1531-1920 – 0 – 226,453 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Georgia, Probate Records, 1742-1990 – 0 – 18,842 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906-1991 – 0 – 187,480 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Louisiana, First Registration Draft Cards, 1940-1945 – 107,706 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 – 1,362,179 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Missouri, Cole County Circuit Court Case Files, 1820-1926 – 0 – 37,377 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Missouri, County Marriage Records, 1802-1969 – 0 – 5 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Montana, Big Horn, County Records, 1884-2011 – 0 – 27,135 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787-1931 – 0 – 153,903 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909-1957 – 24,856,025 – 299 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

U.S., New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1891 – 3,399,062 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

U.S., Oklahoma Applications for Allotment, Five Civilized Tribes, 1899-1907 – 0 – 33,418 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Wisconsin, Probate Estate Files, 1848-1948 – 0 – 122,317 – Added images to an existing collection.

United States Index to Service Records, War with Spain, 1898 – 181,326 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection.

New Book! Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Virginia)

Every parent has the fear that their child might disappear. And I can tell you that grandparents also have the same fear. As a grandparent of 3 small children, when they are under my care, I watch them like the proverbial hawk.

Believe it or not, based on an English law passed in 1659, minor children could be kidnapped by justices of the peace if they happened to be begging, or just seemed to be vagrant. These children were shipped to the plantations as servants without indentures. According to the author of “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Viginia),” the younger the child, the longer the sentence, and the county courts were the judges of their ages. The judges decided their age – and many of the kids were placed in servitude to the very judges who sentenced them.

Over 5000 children were picked up in Ireland, Scotland, England and New England, and shipped to Virginia and Maryland between 1660 to 1720. The names of these kids, their assigned age, the owner, and the date they appeared in court are found in Richard Phillips brand new book, “Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Virginia).” The book also contains an index to ships and their captains that imported the children. A surname index is included.

Without-Indentures

If you are wondering if your surnames of interest are included in the book, email me with the surname in the subject line of the email. Please – just the surname, no more. I will reply with just one word – yes or no. Send index checking requests to me at Lmeitzler@gmail.com .

I got really excited about the volume when, on page, 88, I found an entry for Charles County, Maryland that reads thus: Cornute, Hendrick, 14 June 1670, age 20, John Okeane. I’ve got to wonder, is this possibly a progenitor, sibling or cousin pertaining to my Cornute/Cornett family line? This Cornute is on of the earliest I’ve seen in America. This is a lead I didn’t have before.

Exacting information is given in the book as to where to locate digitized, microfilmed and in some cases original copies of the County Court books from where to the information for this book was taken. Now I can take the next step and view the original document. In my Cornute case mentioned above, the data is actually digitizing and available online!

The following is from the table of contents:

  • Preface
  • Guide to the Records
  • Guide to the Indexes
  • Northampton County, VA
  • Accomack County, VA
  • Somerset County, MD
  • Talbot County, MD
  • Queen Anne’s County, MD
  • Kent County, MD
  • Cecil and Dorchester Counties, MD
  • Baltimore County, MD
  • Anne Arundel County, MD
  • Prince George’s County, MD
  • Charles County, MD
  • Stafford County, VA
  • Westmoreland County, VA
  • Northumberland County, VA
  • Lancaster County, VA
  • Old Rappahannock County, VA
  • Richmond County, VA
  • Essex County, VA
  • Middlesex County, VA
  • York County, VA
  • Charles City County, VA
  • Henrico County, VA
  • Surry County, VA
  • Isle of Wight County, VA
  • Norfolk County, VA
  • Princess Anne County, VA
  • Index to Ship Captains
  • Index to Ship Arrivals
  • Surname Index
  • Appendix: Jacobite Rebels
  • I recommend this book to anyone researching early colonial American relatives, especially for those with New England, Maryland and Virginia ancestry.

    Without Indentures: Index to White Slave Children in Colonial Court Records (Maryland and Virginia); by Richard Hayes Phillips, Ph.D.; Baltimore MD; 2013; 320 pp, 5.5×8.5; Item #:GPC4606 $29.35.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England

hbh3291“A Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians in New England, From the first Planting thereof to the present Time.” Thus begins The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677. An apt beginning it is, for it well defines this content of this book.

The History of the Indian Wars in New England is a two volume reprint as one book, published by Heritage Books. The original book was produced by Rev. William Hubbard in 1677 and later revised by Samuel G. Drake in 1864. Drake added a new historical preface, a biography and genealogical chart on Hubbard. Hubbard was an early immigrant, minister, and historian. Drake was a bookseller, antiquarian, and historian. Drake’s expertise, and the only subject he wrote on, was Indians in New England.

The book provides an interesting view into the historical observations made of the conflicts with the Indians by someone who actually lived through at least a part of the period. It is clear that the author’s religious beliefs and European background somewhat sway his opinion of Indians. However, the history does acknowledge the difficult situation the Indians found themselves with a flood of immigrants with a decisively different culture, more powerful weapons, and an eagerness to change the way the Indians lived.

Drake identified people and places, expanding well upon the original text. This expansion carries some of his own opinion as well. However, despite the personal interjections in the book, there is so much detail and actual facts of events that this history warrants a review by anyone interested in the time period, or who had ancestors living in New England at the time.

This two volumes in one book, The History of the Indian Wars in New England: From the First Settlement to the Termination of the War with King Philip, in 1677, is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH3291, Price: $45.08.

The Original Lists of Persons of Quality: 1600-1700

In another of the fantastic books reprinted in 2012 by the New England Historical and Genealogical Society (NEHGS), the 1874 book The Original Lists of Persons of Quality: 1600-1700, by John Camden Hotten, provides individual names compiled from documents listing seventeenth-century English immigrants to New England, the Chesapeake, and the Caribbean. The current reprint comes with a foreword by Robert Charles Anderson, director of The Great Migration Study Project.

From the Introduction, the author speaks to this work:

“Little could even the most sanguine of the early emigrants to America have contemplated the subsequent effect which their action would work upon the world’s history. Some of them, it is true, were men of position at home, with wealth and all its concomitant advantages at their disposal, but by far the greater number was composed of comparatively obscure men—men of little means, but possessed of hears and consciences of too honest a nature to permit them quietly to submit to the intolerance which was forced upon them at home. But those whose names are recorded in the following pages, with many others of whom no such minute particulars have come down to us, were the seed-grains from which the mighty Republic has sprung—the rapid growth of which has no parallel in the world’s history.”

The author goes on to assure the reader this book is not a work of history in regards to the colonies and their eventual independence, but simply to highlight some of the causes for early emigration of English families to American and to provide an “assistance in making genealogical researches in the mother country.” Predominately, this nearly 600 page book contains lists of names with a few notes. The contents listed below detail the listings and their nature.

“Despite the passage of more than a century, and despite the publication of several more versions of some of these records in the intervening years, this volume by Hotten remains the best source for seventeenth-century passenger records, and should be preferred to all others.” – foreword by Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Study Project

 

Copies of The Original Lists of Persons of Quality: 1600-1700 are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $27.39.

 

Contents

Register of the Names of all the Passengers from London During One Year, Ending Christmas, 1635

In the Ship:

  • Bonaventure
  • Bonaventure
  • Hopewell
  • Christian
  • Planter
  • Peter Bonaventure
  • Hopewell
  • Elizabeth
  • Rebecca
  • Paul
  • Eliza & Ann
  • Encrease
  • Sussan & Ellen
  • Falcon
  • Expectation
  • Ann & Elizabeth
  • Abigail
  • Alexander
  • Plain Joane
  • Matthew
  • Speedwell
  • Thomas & John
  • Truelove
  • James
  • Defence
  • Defence
  • Blessing
  • Philip
  • America
  • Tansport
  • Paul
  • Pied Cow
  • Love
  • Alice
  • Hopwell
  • Assurance
  • Primrose
  • Merchant’s Hope
  • Elizabeth
  • Bachelor
  • Globe
  • Safety
  • George
  • Thomas
  • William & John
  • David
  • Truelove
  • Dorset
  • Hohn
  • Amity
  • Constance
  • Abraham
  • Expedition
  • Friendship

Passengers by the Commission and Soldiers According to the Statute, Christmas, 1631, to Christmas, 1632

Entries Relating to America, From the Patent Rolls

Lists of the Living and Dead in Virginia, 16 Feby., 1623

Walloons and French Emigrants to Virginia

Musters of the Inhabitants of Virginia (Circa) 1626

Returns of Those Who Embarked from Ipswich and Weymouth for New England, 1634 to 1637

  • From Ipswich, in the Ship Francis
  • From Ipswich in the Ship Elizabeth
  • From Weymouth, in the Ship _____ [1635]

Register of Persons About to Pass into Foreign Parts, from March to Sept., 1637

  • From Ipswich, in the John & Dorothy
  • From Yarmouth, in the Rose
  • From Southampton, in the Virgin [1639]
  • From Southampton, in the Bevis [1638]

The Summer Islands, 1673 to 1679

  • Names of the Governor and council of the Assembly, Aug., 1673
  • Account of the Lands belonging to the Summer Islands Company, taken out of Mr. Richard Norwood’s Survey Book, made in 1662-3

Monmouth Rebellion of 1685: —Lists of Convicted Rebels Sent to the Barbadoes and Other Plantations in America

  • Receipt for 100 Prisoners to be transported from Taunton, by John Rose, of London, Merchant
  • Invoice of 68 Men-servents shipped on Board the Jamaica Merchant, Capt. Chas. Gardner, for Account of John Rose & Compy., they being to be sold for 10 Years
  • Receipt for 100 Prisoners on Mr. Nepho’s Account, to be sent to Barbadoes. [Prisoners in Dorchester Gaol to be transported.]
  • Prisoners in Exeter Gaol to be transported
  • Prisoners at Wells to be transported
  • List of the Convicted Rebels on Board the Betty, of London, at the Port of Weymouth
  • List of 72 Rebels Granted by his Majesty to Gerome Nepho, with the Names of their Masters in Barbadoes
  • Sir Wm. Booth’s Receipt for 100 Prisoners, on Account of James Kendall [Prisoners in Dorchester Gaol to be transported]
  • Certificate of Disposal of Capt. Kendall’s Rebels.—A List of 90 Rebels by the Happy Return, with the Names of their Masters to whom they were disposed
  • Sir Wm. Booth’s List of Prisoners sent to Barbadoes, with the Names of the Towns in Somersetshire and Devonshire from whence they came
  • A List of 77 Convicted Rebels, imported from Bristol in the John Frigate
  • Sir Wm Booth’s Receipt for 100 Prisoners—56 from Bridewell at Taunton, 33 from Bridgewater Prison at Taunton, and 11 from Exeter
  • The Sale of 67 Rebels, delivered by Capt. Charles Gardner, of the Jamaica Merchant

Tickets Granted to Emigrants from Barbadoes to New England, Carolina, Virginia, New York, Antingua, Jamaica, Newfoundland, and Other Places, 1678-9

Barbadoes:—Parish Registers—Births and Deaths—Lists of Inhabitants—Landed Proprietors—Servants, & c., 1678-9

  • Parish Registers of St. Michael’s Baptisms
  • Parish Registers of St. Michael’s Burials
  • List of Inhabitants of St. Michael’s, with their Hired Servants, ‘Prentices, Bought Servants, and Negroes
  • List of the Jews of St. Michael’s
  • Alphabetical List of Landowners in St. Michael’s, with the Number of their Acres, Hired Servants, Bought Servants, and Negroes
  • Owners of Land in the Parish of St. George, Number of Acres, White Servants, and Negroes [1679]
  • Parish Registers of St. George—Baptisms [1678-9]
  • Parish Registers of St. George—Burials
  • Parish Registers of St. Andrews—Owners of Lands, Number of Acres, Servants, Negroes, Christenings, Burials
  • Parish Registers of Christchurch—Landowners, Acres, Servants, Negroes
  • Parish Registers of Christchurch—Baptisms [167809]
  • Parish Registers of Christchurch—Burials [167809]
  • Parish Registers of St. James’—Baptisms
  • Parish Registers of St. James’—Burials
  • Parish Registers of St. James’—Landowners, Servants, Negroes [1678-9]
  • Parish Registers of St. John’s—Baptisms [1678-9]

 

The Dark Side of Genealogy

The following article was written by my friend, Thomas Fiske
Thomas Fiske

Who knew there was a dark side to genealogy? I certainly did not know until today. It was news to me before I figured it out.

While looking at an Internet epistle from Family Roots, I saw two books that looked mighty interesting. As a fan of Amateur Radio and Genealogy, I was long accustomed to being disappointed at Christmas when I opened packages of socks and underwear. No one knew what to give me. This last year I decided to take matters into my own hands and get something I really wanted: genealogy books. Besides, my chest of drawers were full and my shelves were empty. This year I opened two packages containing books and I loudly thanked an obscure aunt who lives in Kentucky. I even wrote her a note of gratitude for the volumes. But I didn’t mail the envelope.

The first book, titled something like Ontario People, contains information about those folks who were loyalists when the Revolutionary War ended. I read that Americans offered them a hanging with all the appropriate amenities, while King George III offered them land in Ontario, Canada. Most people wanted to escape the rope and III wanted to fill Ontario with his subjects. Outside of the cold weather, it was a match made in heaven, proving that III was no fool.

Now, it just so happened that among the loyalists were a group of folks named Shippee who lived in Rhode Island. They quickly fled to Ontario. Over the next 100 years the Shippee/Shippy clan worked their way in a south-westerly direction until they found the American border. There they slipped across and traveled until they got to Iowa, where they settled.

The second book was titled Expansion of New England. It seems that my ancestor, a man named Fiske, had with his ancestors, been living in Rhode Island for some hundred years or so. There was a big recession in the area in 1837, so he took his small family and left for Southern Indiana near the Ohio River. He settled in New Albany, across the Ohio River from the city of Louisville, Kentucky. There, he had many children and all of them lived to maturity. In 1866, just after the close of the Civil War, Fiske moved across the Ohio to that wonderful city of Louisville where his number one son took up residence and established a profitable business. The river was about 3/4 of a mile wide without bridges, so the move was no small thing.

The Fiske family settled down and waited for me to be born. Eventually I showed up and there was great rejoicing. But I did not lead them. I tried several cities such as Cleveland, Schenectady, and Ontario, California before settling down.

And it was in Southern California that I met a pretty young woman from Iowa. Her maiden name was Shippy.

We had a wonderful courtship and then we married. While in middle age I took up the august hobby of genealogy. After several years of recording facts about my family, I began looking into my wife’s family. Her uncle had been doing the same thing, so his records were a wonderful help. My wife is an identical twin whose husband is also a genealogist.

All three of our records showed the same thing. The Shippee/Shippy family were loyalists who fled from Rhode Island and went to Ontario as guests of King George III.

Only my records showed that my Fiske ancestor was a captain his local militia. His side won the War and was charged with the responsibility of hanging loyalists.

I tried very hard to keep this information from my wife and her family, but eventually it leaked. I found out when I came home from work one day and noticed the silence. My wife was not speaking to me that day. She had discovered that the Fiskes were wanting to hang the Shippees. Or could have been; it made no difference. It made for a dark day.

When I saw these two very interesting books for sale on the Family Roots web site, I was reminded of that time and how much pain it brought to my wife. Oddly enough, it brought me no pain at all. Did I buy the books anyway? You can bet your bottom dollar I did.

But I may keep them hid behind my collection of various texts about the intricacies of Amateur Radio.