Swiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania — 50% OFF

gpc1700History is the key to our future. You have heard this before. However, history is also the key to our past. You have probably heard this before as well.

Understanding at least some of the general history; including government, laws, religion, economy, along with specific events; of where your ancestors came from is necessary to finding records for your ancestors, but also critical to understanding your ancestor and the lives they led. You probably already know this as well.

So, for those of you with German and Swiss ancestors in early America, who can appreciate the value of history, here is a history book worthy of your time: Historic Background and Annals of the Swiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania, and of Their Remote Ancestors.

Compiled originally in 1917 by H. Frank Eshleman, this book examines “an authentic history, from original sources,” the leading events during “several centuries before and especially during the two centuries following the Protestant Reformation,” as these relate to the lives of early Swill and Palatine Mennonites and other Germans of eastern Pennsylvania, and particularly of Lancaster County.

Annals in this book are presented chronologically, beginning as early as 1009 with “Earliest Authentic Appearance of the Herrs” and progressing forward through 1782. These pages document the lives and the migrations of thousands seeking religious freedom and salvation from persecution throughout Europe, and ultimately the drive west across the ocean to settle in mass in the areas of the Susquehanna and Schuylkill valleys and outward from there.

There are two indices in this book. The first serves is an index of items which servers as something of a non-chronological, but alphabetical table of contents. The second is an index of personal names. There are 19 1/2 pages of names listed for an estimated 1800+ surnames for individuals and families.

If your family history includes colonial period German and/or Swiss ancestry, then Historic Background and Annals of the Swiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania, and of Their Remote Ancestors may very well be the book you need to read. Available from Family Roots Publishing. Now on Sale, 50% OFF through Thanksgiving, 2015.

 

 

 

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German & Swiss Immigrants to America – 15% Off Thru August 3, 2015

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is an attempt to explain the genealogical mysteries associated with so many immigrant families. Why are there so many different spelling changes for family names? What drove people to move around? What factors contributed to the turbulent environment so many lived in? What was life like on the move? These questions are examined through the stories of two men and their descendants as they immigrated form place to place, and with a review of other historical factors considered to have been key elements in the politically, religiously, and economically difficult times endured by so many.

Across the Atlantic and Beyond opens and closes with a family story. The first is the tale of Gerrit Hendricks(ca. 1649-1691) and three generations of his migratory descendents. The final chapter concludes by counting the tale of Jacob Marzolf (1780-1870), an American immigrant. The intermediate chapters takes the reader through a step-by-step analysis of how these family histories were derived and the motivation behind these families migratory patterns. Genealogist encounter many frustrations and difficulties in their research. Name changes, plus map and border changes, are just a couple of the problems one may encounter in researching their immigrant ancestors. As to why people move from place to place, he obvious answer is war, famine, and disease. However, the author, Charles R. Haller, digs deeper looking for a root cause, or a collection of changes which moved the political and economic landscape.

The inner chapters of this book examines events such as the development of the moveable type printing press, the Reformation as begun by Martin Luther and advent of religious sects outside of the Catholic church, as well as the effects of industrialization. Many names are encountered withing this study. “As a necessary diversion, the changes in spelling of representative Germanic names is documented through various family histories from its origin in a European country to its modern occurrence, often Anglicized, in America.” In addition to all the above, the book gives an account of transportation in and around the Rhine River. Transportation along this major thoroughfare is examined from the earliest use to the time of steamboats.

 

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Preface

Acknowledgments

Prolgue

Part 1: Gerritt Hendricks of Krisheim, Germany

Part 2: Changes in German Surnames and Personal Names

  • Hendriks and Hendricks
  • Surnames and Personal Names
  • Mechanics of Name changes
  • Heinrich Buchholtz alias Henry Pookeholes

Part 3: Changes in City and Village Names

  • City and Village Names
  • Griesheim / Krisheim / Kriegsheim
  • Old European Maps
  • Early American Maps

Part 4: Mennonites, Quakers and the Settlement of Pennsylvania

  • The Wandering Menno Simons
  • The Beginnings of English Quakerism
  • William Penn’s Travels in Europe
  • Early german Quakers: A Small Minority
  • The Frankfort Companie
  • Germantown and the Susquehanna Subscribers

Part 5: Protestantism and books: Driving Forces Behind the German Migration

  • Mainz and Gutenberg
  • Frankfurt and the Book Fair
  • Martin Luther and the Book Wars
  • The Froschauer Presses of Zurich
  • Matthaus Merian and the House of Merian
  • The Rhine Travel Guides

Part 6: The Push and the Pull

  • The German Americans
  • The Land of Wars
  • Of Kings and Queens and Lesser Nobility
  • The Rhine as a Migration Route
  • Across the Atlantic and Beyond
  • Bridging the Prairies of Kansas

Part 7: Jacob Marzolf and Alsace

Glossary

Index

 

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH0697, Sale Price: $29.75; Reg. $35.00.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies — 50% OFF thru January 15

gpc1780Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies is a two volume set printed in one binding, and represents an authoritative work on Swiss emigration to the Carolinas and Pennsylvania in the 18th century. Volume I identifies approximately 2,000 emigrants from the Canton of Zurich during the period 1734-1744, most references comprising such useful data as age, date of birth or baptism, trade, name of wife, names of children, and place of origin and destination. Volume II extends the scope of investigation to Bern (1706-1795) and Basel (1734-1794) and surpasses Volume I in the quantity and variety of assembled data.

Volume I was actually discovered by the editor, and author of the introduction, Albert Bernhard Faust, while he researched at the State Archives in Zürich. Faust describes the listings as, “the most valuable single document relating to America contained in the Swiss archives, being quite as important for its historical as for its genealogical and statistical materials. The whole history of Swiss emigration in the eighteenth century is epitomized in this valuable document.” In addition, Faust wrote a 25 page introduction providing a significant insight into the history of Swiss emigration to America.

Volume II was the result of the success of volume I. Coming at the request of many researchers who found volume I so appetizing in their research, Faust returned with co-editor Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh to painstakingly extract a similar manuscript on emigrants from Bern and Basel. Under the direction of the state archivist, the team hired assistants and spent 12 months extracting, verifying, and organizing the contents of this second volume. This second volume also includes significant additional writings and history contributed by the state archivist G. Kruz. There is also an Introduction to the State Archives of Basel section by A. Gerber, PhD.

These books were first published in 1920 and 1925, then combined and published in 1976 with added “Notes on Lists of Swiss Emigrants,” as excerpted form the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (March 1972). Latest printing was in 2007.

Lists of Swiss Emigrants in the Eighteenth Century to the American Colonies is currently available from Family Roots Publishing on On Sale: 50% OFF through January 15, 2015.

 

Table of Contents

Volume I

Preface, by Albert B. Faust

Introduction: Swiss Emigration to the American Colonies in the Eighteenth Century. Reprinted from the American Historical Review, by Albert B. Faust

The Manuscript: Zürich to Carolina and Pennsylvania, 1734-1744

Appendix: Movements of Swiss Emigrants in the American Colonies, by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

Index

Volume II

  1. Preface, by Albert B. Faust

State Archives of Bern

  1. Special Investigation, by G Kruz, state archivist
    1. The First Bernese Emigrants to America
    2. The Bernese Colonists of New Bern
    3. Bernese Soldiers in America
    4. From the Years of the Rabies Carolinae
    5. Newspaper Reports, 1735
  2. Lists of Emigrant Families, from Various Districts, 1733-1793
  3. Names of about 200 Emigrant Families, with numerous items of information concerning them, 1706-1795

State Archives of Basel

  1. Preface, by A. Gerber
  2. Introduction: The Canton of Basel and the Conditions of its Inhabitants in the Country Districts, by A. Gerber
  3. Lists of Swiss Emigrants from the Canton of Basel in Chronological Order, 1734-1794, and
  4. Emigrants of Uncertain Dates, by A. Gerber
  5. Index, prepared by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania

Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania. This is one title that just about says it all. Of course, the expanded title page gives even greater clarity as to the origin of these names:

A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French, and Other Immigrants in Pennsylvania From 1727 to 1776,

with a

Statement of the names of Ships, whence they sailed, and the data of their arrival in Philadelphia,

Chronologically Arranged, Together with the Necessary Historical and other Notes,

Also,

An Appendix containing Lists of more than one thousand German and French Names in New York prior to 1712

by

Prof. I. Daniel Rupp,

Reprint of the Second Revised and Enlarged Edition with an Added Index

 

This book has been reprinted many times from 1876 second edition, including the 1931 third-edition index. The latest reprint comes from 2006. In his own words, Rupp makes clear what the genealogical value of this book:

“It has been truthfully said: ‘That comparatively few of the living millions in the United States can tell when their forefathers came to this country.’ by the aid of this Collection, thousands of the descendants of early immigrants, can with certainty, determine the year of the arrival of their progenitors.”

Nearly 140 years have passed since Rupp made this statement. The number of descendants of these immigrants has surely grown to number in the tens of thousands; maybe, even the millions. This book can help researchers link their ancestors to their Old World origins. The Introduction, the Prolegomena, the brief on names, and notes throughout the book appear in both English and German. As the title states, names are arranged chronologically by date of arrival, listed by ship. This book makes an excellent addition to society and genealogical libraries, as well as to personal libraries for researchers who know of their Pennsylvanian-European family origins.

 

Contents

General Introduction

Prolegomena

Names of German, Swiss and other Immigrants

Addenda

Appendix:

  1. Names of first settlers at Germantown and vicinity, from 1683 to 1710
  2. Names of early settlers of Berks and Montgomery Counties, originally Philadelphia, County, &c., &c.
  3. Swiss and German settlers in Lancaster county, from 1709 to 1730
  4. Names, age and occupation of those, who accompanied Rev. Joshua Kocherthal, &c. &c.
  5. Names and ages of the heads of families remaining in the City of New York, 1710
  6. Names and ages of male children, apprenticed by Governor Hunter, 1710 to 1714
  7. Names of male Palatines, above twenty-one years old, in Livingston Manor, N. Y., &c.
  8. Names of the first Palatines in North Carolina, as early as 1709 and 1710
  9. Names of males, Salzburgers, settled in Georgia, 1734 to 1741
  10. .
  11. German settlement in North Carolina, 1709, 1710
  12. Germanna
  13. Names of males at New Rochelle in 1710
  14. Names of early settlers in Tulpehocken, Berks and Lebanon Counties
  15. List of members of the German Reformed Church, between 1735 and 1755
  16. Four Hundred and sixty-five names of German, Dutch and French inhabitants of Philad’s Co., &c., &c.

Interpretation of Names

Index by Ernest Wecken

Index to Ships

 

Order a copy of Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $42.63.

Across the Atlantic and Beyond!

 

 

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is an attempt to explain the genealogical mysteries associated with so many immigrant families. Why are there so many different spelling changes for family names? What drove people to move around? What factors contributed to the turbulent environment so many lived in? What was life like on the move? These questions are examined through the stories of two men and their descendants as they immigrated form place to place, and with a review of other historical factors considered to have been key elements in the politically, religiously, and economically difficult times endured by so many.

Across the Atlantic and Beyond opens and closes with a family story. The first is the tale of Gerrit Hendricks(ca. 1649-1691) and three generations of his migratory descendents. The final chapter concludes by counting the tale of Jacob Marzolf (1780-1870), an American immigrant. The intermediate chapters takes the reader through a step-by-step analysis of how these family histories were derived and the motivation behind these families migratory patterns. Genealogist encounter many frustrations and difficulties in their research. Name changes, plus map and border changes, are just a couple of the problems one may encounter in researching their immigrant ancestors. As to why people move from place to place, he obvious answer is war, famine, and disease. However, the author, Charles R. Haller, digs deeper looking for a root cause, or a collection of changes which moved the political and economic landscape.

The inner chapters of this book examines events such as the development of the moveable type printing press, the Reformation as begun by Martin Luther and advent of religious sects outside of the Catholic church, as well as the effects of industrialization. Many names are encountered withing this study. “As a necessary diversion, the changes in spelling of representative Germanic names is documented through various family histories from its origin in a European country to its modern occurrence, often Anglicized, in America.” In addition to all the above, the book gives an account of transportation in and around the Rhine River. Transportation along this major thoroughfare is examined from the earliest use to the time of steamboats.

 

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Preface

Acknowledgments

Prolgue

Part 1: Gerritt Hendricks of Krisheim, Germany

Part 2: Changes in German Surnames and Personal Names

  • Hendriks and Hendricks
  • Surnames and Personal Names
  • Mechanics of Name changes
  • Heinrich Buchholtz alias Henry Pookeholes

Part 3: Changes in City and Village Names

  • City and Village Names
  • Griesheim / Krisheim / Kriegsheim
  • Old European Maps
  • Early American Maps

Part 4: Mennonites, Quakers and the Settlement of Pennsylvania

  • The Wandering Menno Simons
  • The Beginnings of English Quakerism
  • William Penn’s Travels in Europe
  • Early german Quakers: A Small Minority
  • The Frankfort Companie
  • Germantown and the Susquehanna Subscribers

Part 5: Protestantism and books: Driving Forces Behind the German Migration

  • Mainz and Gutenberg
  • Frankfurt and the Book Fair
  • Martin Luther and the Book Wars
  • The Froschauer Presses of Zurich
  • Matthaus Merian and the House of Merian
  • The Rhine Travel Guides

Part 6: The Push and the Pull

  • The German Americans
  • The Land of Wars
  • Of Kings and Queens and Lesser Nobility
  • The Rhine as a Migration Route
  • Across the Atlantic and Beyond
  • Bridging the Prairies of Kansas

Part 7: Jacob Marzolf and Alsace

Glossary

Index

 

Across the Atlantic and Beyond: The Migration of German and Swiss Immigrants to America is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBH0697, Price: $34.30.