Researching Irish Genealogy at the Library of Congress Primer

Irish Central just posted an nice little article on its site titled How to research your Irish genealogy using the Library of Congress. Here is an except:

Starting your research on Irish genealogy can be a daunting task. Where do I start? Where are the best places to look? What kind of information can lead me on the path to my ancestors?

The list of possible places where you could find information on your family is long but luckily, the Library of Congress (the research library that officially serves the United States Congress) has put together this small but useful referencing guide to help you get out of the blocks and begin researching Irish genealogy and local Irish history.

This reference guide will give you at least a place to start in researching your family history.
This reference guide will give you at least a place to start in researching your family history. Photo by: Public Domain / WikiCommons

Although the library admit that it is far from a comprehensive list, and as you get further into your research you may need to look to more specific resources, the guide acts as a great starter aid to get you over that intimidating first hurdle: working up the courage to start.

Not only can the aid be used within the Library of Congress but any other large library is likely to hold the same content as listed below.The Library of Congress will help you fill out your family tree. Image: Getty images.

Here are some of the Library’s suggestions:

1. Handbooks

Although some of them are now quite dated, there have been a number of handbooks published that aim to guide you through the genealogy research process. The LOC recommends “Pocket guide to Irish genealogy” (1991) by Brian Mitchell or “Irish family history” (1990) by Marilyn Yurdan among others.

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Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors, 2nd Edition – On Sale for 15% off thru Sept. 1

Mayo-2nd-Edition-cover-300pw

Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors has been out of stock in the FRPC warehouse for some time. We just got a new stock in and FRPC is making it available for 15% off through Sept. 1, 2015.

The entire Irish county research series of “Tracing Your Ancestors” and “Finding Your Ancestors” was created to help researchers both at home [Ireland] and abroad trace their family tree on a county by county basis. Essentially, each book in the series provides a listing of record and document resources within the given county. Each county has its own rich history, with a variety of key settlers, like the Normans, the Vikings, and other groups establishing the first communities and towns. With so many Irish descendents living outside the country, having a county by county resource could prove the very thing needed for finding one’s family in Ireland.

Mayo county sits on the northwest coast and is the second largest county in Ireland. The entire county’s population is around 124,000, down over 215,000 since 1841. Its heritage is a mixture of native Gaelic, Norman, and immigrant Gaelic from Northern Ireland; plus, the normal mixture, if in small numbers, of other ethnic groups from other places.

According to the author, “Mayo, like many other western Irish counties does not have a rich store of records. Therefore it is important that the full range of sources available are used effectively. These sources vary widely in their genealogical content…” This book lists available records of genealogical interest, with details about each source, their location, and reference.

Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Chapter 1. Introduction

Chapter 2. How to Use This Book

Chapter 3. Administrative Divisions

Chapter 4. Civil Registration

Chapter 5. Census and Census Substitutes

Chapter 6. Church Records

Chapter 7. Wills, Administration and Marriage Licenses

Chapter 8. Land Records

Chapter 9. Commercial and Social Directions

Chapter 10. Newspapers

Chapter 11. Gravestone Inscriptions

Chapter 12. Surnames, Family Names and Histories

Chapter 13. Mayo in 1789

Chapter 14. Further Reading

Chapter 15. Library, Archives and Society Addresses

Index

 
Order Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: FLP017; Sale Price: $16.96 – Reg. $18.95.

101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History — 15% Off through Midnight Thursday, April 24

ig02A month and a half before we put on our sombreros, sing about a drunk cockroach, and eat too many tacos in the cultural celebration acknowledging our southern neighbors on Cinco de Mayo, we will first don a little green and hope for a little luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day. Most you have probably heard the legend of St. Patrick driving snakes out of Ireland. But, what do you really know about the man? Did you know St. Patrick:

  • Was of British Celt ancestry?
  • Came to Ireland as its Bishop around 432?
  • Is credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland?
  • Used the shamrock (three-leafed clover) to teach about the Trinity?
  • Argued with High King Laoghaire on behalf of Christianity?
  • Was on “speaking terms with both God and an angel?”
  • Wrote the prayer “Saint Patrick’s Breastplate.”

Image what else you don’t know about Ireland and the Irish. How about Vikings in Ireland? Who was Kevin of Glendalough, the tree hugger, or other Irish saints? How was Dublin founded? What about Gaelic? Irish communities around the world? There is a rich history and heritage from which millions the world over have descended. Many know they come from an Irish heritage, and most probably know more of the myths than they do the truths of the Emerald Isle. 101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Traditions of the Emerald Isle was written to help those of Irish descent better know the homeland of their ancestors, as well as any other reader with a broad interest in history.

Authors Ryan Hackney and Amy Hackney Blackwell created this reference to educate the reader on:

  • the lives of the ancient Celts before the British invasions
  • famous Irish including Michael Collins, Charles Parnell and Bono!
  • the potato famine and emigration (were there really gangs of New York?)
  • Irish music and dance, and much more…

The guide even provides an Irish language prime and pronunciation guide. The book is compact in size to make reading easy; yet, full of the historical information useful to have at hand when researching Irish ancestry. Plus, the book is simply fun to read. I have always found interesting historical evidence for where myth is derived from truth. There are four sections and two appendices as outlined below in the Contents.

10% Off of 101 Things You Didn’t Know about Irish History: The People, Places, Culture, and Traditions of the Emerald Isle for a short time only from Family Roots Publishing

 

Contents

Introduction

Part One: Prehistory and Mythology of Ancient Ireland

  1. The Earliest Inhabitants
  2. Mesolithic Age and the First Farmers
  3. Legends and Archaeology
  4. The Bronze Age
  5. Iron Come to Ireland
  6. Who Were The Celts and Kings
  7. Gaelic and Indo-European Languages
  8. Celtic Ireland
  9. Wild and Crazy
  10. The Seat of Ancient Kings
  11. Brehon Laws
  12. The Celtic Class System
  13. The Learned: Druids
  14. Celtic Art and Poetry
  15. Celtic to the End: The Never Conquered Nation
  16. The Celtic Pantheon
  17. The Otherworld
  18. Celtic Festivals
  19. Creation Myths
  20. The Battle of Magh Tuirdh and the Invasions of Milesians
  21. The Tain
  22. Heroic Deeds of Cuchulain
  23. Conchobar and Deirdre
  24. Finn MacCool
  25. Christianity Arrives

Part Two: The Arrival of Christianity (and the British Too!)

  1. Who Was St. Patrick?
  2. St. Brigid the Generous
  3. St. Columcille, Felonious Monk
  4. St. Columbanus, Missionary to Europe
  5. Wild and Crazy Irish Saints
  6. Irish Blend: Christian Traditions
  7. Monasteries in Ireland
  8. Schools and Universities
  9. The Pre-Xerox Age: A Life of Copying
  10. The Book of Kells
  11. The Rise and Fall of Irish Dynasties
  12. Anglo-Saxons in Britain
  13. Bring On the Vikings
  14. Dublin is Founded
  15. Life with Vikings
  16. What Would Brian Boru Do?
  17. An Ireland Unified
  18. The Normans  Are Here!
  19. The Irish Strike Back
  20. I’m Henry VIII, I Am: Tudor Colonization
  21. The Protestant Reformation
  22. Elizabeth I’s Reign
  23. The 1641 Rebellion and Oliver Cromwell
  24. The Williamite War
  25. Protestants Take Hold
  26. Catholic Life
  27. The Second City of the British Empire
  28. Protestant Irish Nationalism
  29. Wolfe Tone’s REbellion
  30. Hasta La Vista, Baby: Daniel O’Connel, the Liberator
  31. Catholic Emancipation

Part Three: Preserving Irish Culture and History

  1. Before the Reformation
  2. Ireland’s Counter-Reformation
  3. Religious Tensions in the North
  4. Modern Catholicism
  5. Scandals in the Church
  6. Traditional Irish Life
  7. Irish Language
  8. Irish Music
  9. Before There Was Riverdance…
  10. Death and the Supernatural
  11. Irish Sports
  12. Rich Folklore and Heritage
  13. Potatoes, for Better or Worse
  14. Life During the Famine
  15. Help! Responses to the Famine
  16. Results of the Famine

Part Four: Emigration to Modern Life

  1. Why the Irish Left–and Where They Went
  2. The Hardships of Emigration
  3. The Immigrant Experience in the United States
  4. Irish Communities in Other Lands
  5. The Rebirth of Nationalism
  6. The Home Rule Party
  7. A Celtic Revival
  8. An Ireland Divided
  9. World War I and the Easter Rebellion
  10. War of Independence
  11. Irish Civil War
  12. Irish Free State
  13. De Valera and the Fianna Fail Path
  14. World War II
  15. A New Republic
  16. Trouble in the North
  17. Sunday, Bloody Sunday
  18. The Peace Process
  19. The Good Firday Agreement
  20. Ireland’s Celtic Tiger
  21. Ireland and the European Union
  22. Modern Irish Politics
  23. The Liberalization of Ireland
  24. Women’s Rights
  25. Family Life
  26. Irish Food: Potatoes, Beef, and More Potatoes–and a Cuppa!
  27. For the Love of Irish Beer and Whiskey
  28. Irish Contributions to Literature and Art
  29. Tracing Your Roots

Appendix A: A Primer of the Irish Language

Appendix B: Irish Proverbs and Blessings

Index

 

Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City — 10% Off for a short time only

gpc776From the late 1600s on, millions of Irish Immigrants have landed on the shores of North America. One million alone came during the Irish Famine, from 1846 to 1851. A significant majority of these immigrants landed, and many stayed, in New York. This has been covered many times and in many publications. Now, however, someone has finally put together a comprehensive research guide for finding and using sources of Irish records in New York. Joseph Buggy has created and published for 2014 Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City.

Just what does this new book offer? I think the author introduces the book nicely in his Introduction:

“The aim of this book is to present a comprehensive overview for anyone wishing to trace their Irish ancestors within the five boroughs of New York City. It is especially beneficial for those researching ancestors form the beginning of the 19th century to the early 20th. The Irish immigrant ancestor who arrived in New York offers researchers a good chance of finding the place of origin in Ireland, whether he or she settle in the city for generations or moved on soon after arrival. Helping you find the at place of origin is one of the central objectives of this book. To assist you in your search, detailed information about records, resources, and strategies are provided.

The history of Irish emigration to the United States, and to New York City in particular, has been covered extensively and has been detailed in a number of excellent publications. This book does not set out to retell that story. Instead, it provides resources and strategies for tracing Irish ancestors in New York City.”

Inside this guide you will find a healthy dose of information about Irish immigrants. For those who stayed in New York, discover where they settled; Catholic churches in Irish areas and records kept; newspapers; vital records; cemeteries; and more. The book is a little bit history and a lot of resources. Even those ancestors who only stopped briefly in New York, after disembarking there, left records that can help lead back to their homes of origin.

Get a copy of Finding Your Irish Ancestors in New York City at 10% Off for a limited time from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Contents

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

1. Introduction

  • What’s Inside?
  • Where do I Start?
  • Why Not Go Straight to Irish Records?

2. Introductory Record Sets

  • U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1940
  • Vital Records, 1795-Present
  • City Directories, 1786-1934
  • Naturalization Records
  • Wills and Letters of Administration
  • Institutions
  • Useful Resources

3. Underutilized Records

  • Almshouse Collection
  • Potter’s Field
  • Public Sector Employment
  • Nwespapters
  • A Black Sheep in the Family: Criminal Ancestors
  • Lesser Known New Your City Censuses

4. Strategies for Tracing the Irish in New York City

  • Spelling Variations-Irish Accents and Illiteracy
  • Irish Name Formations
  • Did Your Ancestors Marry or Have Children in Ireland before Emigrating?
  • Was There a Priest in the Family?
  • It’s Not All About the Immigrant
  • Your Ancestors’ FAN Club

5. Where the Irish Lived in New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

6. Sources for the Place of Origin in Ireland

  • Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank
  • Census of Inmates in Almshouses and Poorhouses
  • Headstone Transcriptions
  • Newspapers
  • Travel Writing
  • Marriage Records, Diocese of Brooklyn
  • Church of the Transfiguration Marriage Register
  • Passenger Lists
  • Irish Immigrant Girls Organization
  • Naturalization Records
  • Chronological Bibliography of Sources

7. The Roman Catholic Church

  • Parish Publications

8. Roman Catholic Parishes of New York City

  • Manhattan
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Bronx
  • Staten Island

9. Cemeteries

  • Catholic Cemeteries
  • Public, Nondenominational, and Institutional

10. Periodicals

  • Periodical Index
  • Periodical Abbreviations
  • Periodicals

11. Websites and Publications to Compliment Your Research

  • Websites
  • Publications

Notes and Index

The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish” — 10% Off for a few days only

hbl0788The Irish and the Scots have a nearly inseparable history, if examined on the basis of origin. Scottish Highlanders originally came from Ireland and the two peoples have long been connected by blood, language, and religion. Both, have also, played a significant role in the founding and growth of America, dating back to the earliest colonies. The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor tell of the lives and history of these two groups. The discussion covers both the historical and ethnic background to the Irish and Scots as well as their place in early America.

This book is comprised of several independent publications produced between 1888 and 1895. Thus, the book is broken into three main sections in concert with those publications:

  • “The Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish”
  • “How the Irish Came as Builders of the Nation”
  • “Supplementary Facts and Comments”

In the historical review, reader learn of the relationships between Celts, Saxons, Normans, and various religions practiced by these groups. The Gaelic language is also reviewed. In examining American contributions, the book tells of Irish settlers who played prominently in early American and U.S. history. Adding value to genealogists, the book lists the surnames for many Irish immigrants of the 1700s. There are also lists of surnames of Irish natives who received land grants or had land set apart in the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s. There is also a list of Scottish names derived from Irish names.

Copies of The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor from Family Roots Publishing and at 10% off for a short time.

The Portable Genealogist: Problem Solving in Irish Research

ne34A couple of days ago I mentioned the New England Historic Genealogical Society had recently released a number of additional laminated guides, part of The Portable Genealogists Series. Here is the second review of the three, on The Portable Genealogist: Problem Solving in Irish Research.

Like all the Portable guides so far, this one is a two-color, four-page, three-hole-punched laminated guide, folded to 8.5″ x 11″. In addition to the core contents described below, there are added tips and a list of recommended resources.

Here’s what you will find in this new guide:

Page 1 introduces the topic along with describing ‘common brick walls’ the research may face. Strategies are suggested to help avoid pitfalls

Page 2 helps the reader look beyond their own direct ancestor, or rather to find their ancestor, by looking for relatives. A chart lists records sources/types along with ideas of what to look for

Page 3 suggests the researcher gives greater consideration to the context of a search. For example, the chart on this page suggest looking at U.S. and state census records for clusters of Irish name, as well as other such details.

Page 4 reminds the reader to not makes assumptions. In this case, in relation to Irish research, the reader should not assume their ancestors were poor, that their ancestors came alone and had no siblings, nor assume that oral history cannot be wrong.

For those researching their Irish ancestry, this guide makes a lot of sense. It is easy to carry and review, and is full of information on just a few well organized pages.

Order The Portable Genealogist: Problem Solving in Irish Research and many other popular laminated guides from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81

The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”

hbl0788The Irish and the Scots have a nearly inseparable history, if examined on the basis if origin. Scottish Highlanders originally came from Ireland and the two peoples have long been connected by blood, language, and religion. Both, have also, played a significant role in the founding and growth of America dating back to the earliest colonies. The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor tell of the lives and history of these two groups. The discussion covers both the historical and ethnic background to the Irish and Scots as well as their place in early America.

This book is comprised of several independent publications produced between 1888 and 1895. Thus, the book is broken into three main sections in accordance with those publications:

  • “The Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish”
  • “How the Irish Came as Builders of the Nation”
  • “Supplementary Facts and Comment”

In the historical review, reader learn of the relationships between Celts, Saxons, Normans, and various religions practiced by these groups. The Gaelic language is also reviewed. In examining American contributions, the book tells of Irish settlers who played prominently in early American and U.S. history. Adding value to genealogists, the book lists the surnames for many Irish immigrants of the 1700s. There are also lists of surnames of Irish natives who received land grants or had land set apart in the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s. There is also a list of Scottish names derived from Irish names.

Obtain a copy of The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBL0788, Price: $16.17.

The Famine Immigrants, Volume V—Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846-1851

Arguably,  the most recognized mass emigration in modern history are the Irish during the Great Potato Famine. While not as large as other migrations, the effect it had on the overall population of an entire country stands unique in recent times. Hundreds of thousands of Irish fled their homes, peaking at around 200,000 a year for both1849 and 1850. Emigrants fled to many different parts of the world, but the New World, received more than any other destination. Ports in Canada and the American Colonies were flooded with immigrants. A rare multi-volume set of books titled The Famine Immigrants listed the port of arrival for many of these migrants. Volume V of the set covers Irish immigrants to arrive at the port of New York between October 1849 and May 1850.

The passenger lists found in The Famine Immigrants are arranged by ship and date of arrival in New York, and each person is identified with respect to age, sex, occupation, and family relationships where such was indicated in the original manifests. Additionally, every volume boasts of an extensive index containing all of the passenger names in the text.

In the period covered in this volume, October 1849-May 1850, about 60,000 Irish men, women, and children arrived in New York, and all of the data located on them is provided, and their names are all indexed.

Family Root Publishing is selling its remaining hardback copies of The Famine Immigrants, Volume V—Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846-1851 for only $22.50. “Very limited numbers of this volume are available. This is the only volume still available in the hardback printing. When it goes into soft cover only, it will sell for $75.00.”

Finding Irish Church Records

Church records may be the most prevelant record available in Irish genealogical research. And, not just church records for one church either. There are historically eight major religions in Ireland. Irish Church Records: Their history, availability, and use in family and local history research details the records for each of these eight major religions, including:

  • Roman Catholic
  • Church of Ireland
  • Presbyterian
  • Methodist
  • Quaker
  • Huguenot
  • Jewish
  • Baptist

Irish church records are among the earliest and most comprehensive sources of genealogical information for Irish individuals, families, and social histories. However, there are few book or other published sources detailing the full nature of these records. Little is provided regarding how they were compiled or details on their contents and format. This book was produced in an effort to rectify this issue in some measure.

Irish Church Records is a collection of chapters written by different researchers and experts for each of these religious segments. Irish history and its settlement plays a large part in the religious makeup and geographical spread throughout the country. The introduction provides a brief historical background and each chapter provides an historical perspective for the given religion. Each chapter also defines the policies of each church on record keeping; plus, record survival, and current availability of the records. Each chapter also describes the types of records and their relevance to Irish family, church and local history. The locations of the records of each church, and guidelines for their access are also provided. The guide is extensively illustrated and indexed.

 

Contents

Acknowledgements

Contributors

Chapter 1 Introduction by James G.Ryan

Chapter 2 Irish Quaker Records by Richard S. Harrison

Chapter 3 Records of the Church of Ireland by Raymond Refaussé

Chapter 4 Presbyterian Church Records by Christine Kenealy

Chapter 5 Catholic Church Records by James G. Ryan

Chapter 6 Methodists Records in Ireland by Marion Kelly & Robin P. Roddie

Chapter 7 Irish Jewish Records as a Genealogical Source by Raphael Siev

Chapter 8 Irish Huguenot Records by Vivien Costello

Chapter 9 Irish Baptist Church Records by H. D. Gribbon

Index

 

Irish Church Records: Their history, availability, and use in family and local history research is available from Family Roots Publishing.

North America’s Maritime Funnel: The Ships that Brought the Irish 1749-1852

The Maritimes, a.k.a the Maritime Provinces or the Canadian Maritimes, consist of the eastern Canadian provinces of New Brunsick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. Ports on these islands became a major debarkation point for European emigrants. From these ports people spread all over North America. One major group to come through these ports are the Irish. North America’s Maritime Funnel: The Ships that Brought the Irish 1749-1852, by Terrence M. Punch, provides information on the about 1,050 voyages from Ireland to the Maritimes.

Punch lays out a year-by-year listing of known voyages from Ireland to the Maritimes. This includes maps showing the movement of populations from areas in Ireland to the Maritimes, and tables with port-by-port statistics. In addition, he uncovers as many passenger names as possible. Only 123 passenger lists of the 1,050 voyages survive today. However, additional names were uncovered through the meticulous extraction of information from other sources like land records, newspapers.

To add to the layers of detail this book offers, there are also several useful appendixes, including: “(1) Irish among the Founders of Halifax; (2) Ulster Irish Arrivals before 1773; (3) Irish Emigrant Petitioners for Land in Nova Scotia; and (4) Emigrants in the Ordnance Survey Memoirs, 1830s. These four appendixes alone contain the names of 1,523 people, and the book concludes with a ship index and an index of surnames.”

 

Contents

Section I Introduction

Section II Ireland’s Mounting Demographic Crisis

  • Table 1 – Ireland’s Population
  • Table 2 – People per Square Mile
  • Table 3 – Population by County

Section III The Concept of Catchment Areas

  • Map 1 – River Hinterland of Waterford
  • Map 2 – River Hinterland of Londonderry
  • Map 3 – Origin of Londonderry Passengers 1847/49

Section IV The Irish Ports in 1837

  • Map 4 – Ireland’s Emigration Ports
  • Table 4a – Emigration by Named Port
  • Table 4b – Emigration, Port Unspecified

Section V Ships from Ireland to the Maritimes, 1749-1852

  • Bibliographic Key
  • List of Voyages by Year and Port

Section VI Annual Number of Voyages from Ireland to the Maritimes

  • Table 5 – Year-by-Year Statistics

Section VII The Number of Irish Emigrants to the Maritimes

Section VIII Maritime Ports of Arrival

  • Map 5 – Maritime Provinces Ports of Arrival
  • Table 6 – Port-by-Port Statistics

Section IX Tonnage and the Passenger Acts

Section X Confusion in the Passenger Lists

Appendix I Irish among the Founders of Halifax, 1749

Appendix II Ulster Irish Arrivals before 1773

Appendix III Irish Emigrant Petitioners for Land in Nova Scotia

Appendix IV Emigrants in the Ordnance Survey Memoirs, 1830s

Appendix V A Coffin Ship: The Aldebaran, 1847

Ship Index

Index of Surnames

Topical Index

 

Order North America’s Maritime Funnel: The Ships that Brought the Irish 1749-1852  from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price – 10% off: $29.70 (Reg. $33.00).

Tracing Your Clare Ancestors

Flyleaf Press released Tracing Your Clare Ancestors, by Brian Smith and Gerry Kennedy in 2013.

“Clare is the northern-most county in the province of Munster and famous for its music and scenery, including the Cliffs of Moher and the Burren. It is bounded on the West by the Atlantic Ocean and on the East by the river Shannon. Although unaffected by the 1798 rebellion it was troubled by agrarian disturbances during the 1800s.”

Clare sits on the west coast below Galway in the Connaught province and above Limerick. Clare was once part of the Kingdom of Thomond, under the old Gaelic system. Gaelic families known as the Dalcassian families, or main families of the area are the O’Briens, O’Loughlines, McNamaras and McMahons.

When the British established the county boundary system in 1565, Clare was originally under Connaught. In 1602 it became a part of Munster. The Great Famine brought the death or emigration of some 50,000 residents. After the famine the population continued to decline. By 1911 the population had dwindled down to little more than 100,000.

Like the other books in this series, this publication is designed to help researchers find and identify their Irish family origins. All the standard sources are evaluated with explanatory introductions and full references.

 

Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2: Getting Started

Chapter 3 Administrative Divisions

Chapter 4 Civil Registration Records

Chapter 5 Censuses and Census Substitutes

Chapter 6 Church Records

Chapter 7 Wills and Administrations

Chapter 8 Land Records

Chapter 9 Commercial and Social Directories

Chapter 10 Newspapers

Chapter 11 Gravestone Inscriptions

Chapter 12 Family Names and Histories

Chapter 13 Further Reading

Chapter 14 Library, Archive and Society Addresses

Index

 

Copies of Tracing Your Clare Ancestors are available at a 15% off sale price for a limited time from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $18.66 (Reg. $21.95)

 

Other titles in this Irish research series include:

Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research

With so many Irish descendents living outside of Ireland, it is not surprising that Irish research is so popular amongst genealogists. There are plenty of books, though perhaps not enough to satisfy the advanced researcher, on researching Irish records. However, sometimes having a small compact guide is perfect for quick reference and fast help.

Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research, by Brian Mitchell was the first publication in the Genealogy at a Glance series. This issue covers a background to Irish immigration along with vital records sources and census returns. According to this guide, a major contribution to Irish immigration came during the 1820s with most emigrants leaving from three major provinces; Connaught, Munster, and Leinster. Most of the emigrants were Roman Catholic and under the age of 25. With a look at passenger lists, vital records resources, and per-twentieth century census returns, this guide has something for everyone.

Like many of the guides, this one begins with some quick facts relevant to the subject. Some Irish quick facts include:

  • Today, the population of Ireland stands at nearly 6 million people (4.23 million in the Republic of Ireland and 1.71 million in Northern Ireland)
  • An additional 3.5 million identify more specifically with scotch-Irish ancestry
  • 32.6 million Americans, nearly 12% of the population, claim Irish Ancestry

Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color limited brochure meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research. In this guide, Humphrey provides plenty of additional tips and further references to please the most avid researcher.

 

Contents for this guide:

Quick Facts

Irish Emigration Background

  • The Scotch-Irish
  • Passenger Lists

Unlocking Irish Family History

  • Place of Origin
  • Surnames

Record Sources

  • Civil Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths
  • Church Registers of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials
  • Gravestone Inscriptions

Census Returns

  • Mid-19th-Century Griffith’s Valuation
  • Early 19th-Century Tithe Applotment Books
  • 17th- and 18th-Century Substitutes

Record Repositories

Other Online Resources

 

Order Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC349, Price: $8.77.

 

Other Genealogy at a Glance guides available at Family Roots Publishing:

Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

“From trade directories, petty sessions, and DNA to Currency, Ships and even Irish-American Soldiers in the US Civil War, we’ll show you the resources you need to find your Irish ancestors!”

That is the splash on the front cover of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. Moorshead Magazines is the publisher of Family Chronicle, and Internet Genealogy. Every so often the company collects the best articles on a particular subject from each of the three magazines and combines them into a special edition. Like the recently reviewed Tracing You English & Scottish Ancestors, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors is one Moorshead’s special genealogical releases.

Produced in 2012, this 66-page special edition features 12 articles relevant to Irish research (a complete article list is provided below). As the cover text states, articles cover a wide variety of topics. Many article are printed with images and sample to get a better feel for the topic. Alan Stewart’s article on Internet-based Irish research covers over 50 websites, with full URLs and a brief summary of each. Page by page, the reader is taken through the various topics covered by each author’s area of expertise.

Even though each article appeared previously in one of Moorshead’s three magazines, before publication articles were updated to ensure source materials and online references were up to date. While some references may change with time, having the source names can help researches find any altered sites usually with some ease.

Whether the research lives in Ireland or is the descendant of an Irish immigrant, the information from these articles is highly relevant. With modern communications, the world seems to shrink more each year. The cost of communicating and accessing documents and records located around the world is faster and cheaper than ever before.

 

Contents

Can You Get a Certificate of Irish Heritage

Hilda McGauley looks at a fun, and informative, way to recognize your Irish heritage

Your Irish Ancestry Online: A Definitive Guide

Alan Stewart goes online in search of the top Internet-based Irish research resources

Online Irish Family History Resources

From Ireland’s local governments and libraries, David A. Norris looks at what is on the ‘Net

The Court of Petty Sessions

David A. Norris looks at Irish court records that might contain many ancestors names

City and Trade Directories

David A. Norris looks at an important resource for researching your Irish roots

Locating the Exact Origin of Your Irish Ancestor

Marie Daly looks at some important resources for researching your Irish ancestor

Six Steps to Research Success: Irish Style!

Brian Michell documents the six crucial steps necessary to reach your online research goal

Ancestors, Ships and the Sea

David A. Norris looks at the online resources available if your Irish ancestor was a sea rover

Ireland’s Money and Your Genealogy

David A. Norris looks at the local currency your Irish ancestor would’ve used

Finding Help With Your Scots-Irish Line

Cindy Thomas looks at the resources available to assist you with your Scots-Irish research

Surnames and Genetics in Ireland

Anthony Adolph explains how ancient surnames and modern genetics make perfect partners

Civil War Soldiers

David A. Norris looks at the resources available if your Irish ancestor fought in the Civil War

 

Order copies of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price: $6.76; Reg. Price: $7.95.

New Searchable Collections Added Online For Brazil, China, England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Spain, & the USA

The following was received from FamilySearch December 28, 2012:

FamilySearch added an additional 38.5 million new, free indexed records and images this week to its collection. Notable additions include the 6,095,759 indexed records in the new United States World War II Army Enlistment Records collection, the 4,068,907 indexed records for the new United States Germans to America Index from 1850-1897, the 2,922,943 added to the England and Wales Census of 1871, and the 2,608,645 added to the Denmark Estate Records collection from 1436-1964. Other new searchable collections online were added this week for Brazil, China, England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, Spain, and the United States. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Brazil, Rio Grande do Sul, Miscellaneous Records, 1748-1980 – 0 – 133,932 – New browsable image collection.
China, Collection of Genealogies, 1239-2010 – 0 – 1,078,765 – New browsable image collection.
Denmark, Estate Records, 1436-1964 – 0 – 2,608,645 – Added images to an existing collection.
England and Wales Census, 1871 – 2,695,024 – 227,919 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
England, Manchester, Miscellaneous Records, 1700-1916 – 853,243 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
England, Westminster, Parish Registers, 1538-1912 – 1,276,875 – 43,393 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
Ireland, Landed Estate Court Files, 1850-1885 – 682,055 – 53,799 – New indexed records and images collection.
Italy, Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 193,658 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Messina, Patti, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1823-1941 – 0 – 143,597 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Pesaro e Urbino, Urbino, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 323,971 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Potenza, Potenza, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1910 – 0 – 298,330 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Siena, Montepulciano, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-1929 – 0 – 181,893 – Added images to an existing collection.
Russia, Simbirsk Church Books, 1768-1939 – 0 – 994,870 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Diocese of Santander, Catholic Church Records, 1538-1984 – 0 – 757,418 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Diocese of Segovia, Catholic Church Records, 1533-1987 – 0 – 8,311,103 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Cádiz, Municipal Records, 1784-1931 – 0 – 316,188 – New browsable image collection.
Ukraine, Western Ukraine Catholic Church Book Duplicates, 1600-1937 – 0 – 264,777 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., California, San Francisco, World War I Enemy Alien Registration Affidavits, 1918 – 6,545 – 33,870 – New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., California, County Marriages, 1850-1952 – 1,439,474 – 1,962,567 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
U.S., Florida, Tampa, Passenger Lists, 1898-1945 – 50,103 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
U.S., New York, New York, Index to Passenger Lists, 1820-1846 – 526,400 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
United States, Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1820-1908 – 0 – 941,009 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Famine Irish Passenger Index, 1846-1851 – 604,596 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Germans to America Index, 1850-1897 – 4,068,907 – 0 – New indexed record collection.
United States, Italians to America Index, 1855-1900 – 845,287 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Russians to America Index, 1834-1897 – 527,394 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 – 6,095,759 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

Tracing Your Westmeath Ancestors

Like the other county books in this series, Tracing Your Westmeath Ancestors, by Gretta Connell, describes the records available for County Westmeath. Descriptions include the location of these resources, how they can be accessed, and how they can be used in tracing local families.

“Westmeath is an inland county in the province of Leinster, it is often referred to as ‘The Lake County’. It is primarily agricultural, with prime grazing land and a reputation for its beef. The main towns are Athlone, Mullingar, Castlpollard, Kilbeggan and Moate.”

Ironically, the county’s population was less affected by the Great Famine than most of the country. However, that has not stopped the populations from declining from 141,000 in 1845 to around 86,000 today.

The original population was predominately Gaelic. The main Gaelic surnames in the county are:

  • O’Flanagan
  • MacAuley
  • MacGeoghegan
  • Brennan
  • O’Coffey
  • O’Mulleady
  • O’FInlan
  • O’Growney
  • O’Melaghlin
  • O’Daly

The 1169 Norman invasion brought the following names to the area:

  • DeLacy
  • Plunkett
  • Nugent
  • Tuite
  • Petit
  • Delamar
  • Dalton

And, of course, other names were added during the Cromwellian period; including:

  • Ledwich
  • Dardis
  • Gaynor

Many of the sources listed in this book are common to other counties as well. For example, the National Archives, serves all areas. There are, however, plenty of local resources to examine and learn about.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Abbreviations

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Conducting Family Research

Chapter 3 Administrative Divisions

Chapter 4 Civil Registration

Chapter 5 Censuses and Census Substitutes

Chapter 6 Church Records

Chapter 7 Land Records

Chapter 8 Will, Administrations and Marriage Bonds

Chapter 9 Newspapers

Chapter 10 Directories and Occupational Sources

Chapter 11 Memorial Inscriptions

Chapter 12 Education

Chapter 13 Family Names and Histories

Chapter 14 Further Reading

Chapter 15 Repositories and Useful Addresses

Index

 

Copies of Tracing Your Westmeath Ancestors are available from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price: $18.66; Reg. Price: $21.95