2.5 Million Crime Records Released by FindMyPast

The following News Release was just received from FindMyPast:

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This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 2.5 million historic crime records in association with The National Archives. The release marks the final installment of the Crime, Prisons and Punishment collection, the largest searchable database of English and Welsh crime and punishment records available online, containing over 5.5 million records.

England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935 Phase 3

New Series added to the collection include:
• PCOM 4: Home Office and Prison Commission: Female Licences – notes of licences to female convicts and in some cases, transfer papers. Each file can include a photograph (from 1871 onward), letters or notes from the prisoner, a Medical History sheet, reports of misconduct whilst in prison, the court of conviction, details of crime and of previous crimes.

• HO 26: Home Office: Criminal Registers, Middlesex – registers of all persons charged with indictable offences showing the results of the trials, the sentences in case of conviction, and dates of execution of persons sentence to death; some of the registers contain personal information respecting the prisoners.

• HO 27: Home Office: Criminal Registers, England and Wales – registers of all persons in England and Wales charged with indictable offences showing the results of the trials, the sentences in case of conviction, and dates of execution of persons sentence to death; some of the registers contain personal information respecting the prisoners.

Additional records have also been added to:

• HO 8: Home Office: Convict Hulks, Convict Prisons and Criminal Lunatic Asylums: Quarterly Returns of Prisoners 1824-1876
• HO 47: Home Office: Judges’ Reports on Criminals 1784-1830
• HO 140: Home Office: calendar of prisoners
• PCOM 2: Home Office and Prison Commission: prison records
• PCOM 3: Home Office and Prison Commission: Male Licences 1853-1887

England & Wales, Crime, Prisons & Punishment, 1770-1935 – Browse
Browse over 3,417 volumes of English and Welsh crime records held by The National Archives. The browse function allows you explore individual documents in their entirety including volumes of criminal calendars, prisoner registers, male and female prison licenses and more. Descriptions of each of the series included are available at the bottom of the search page.

Britain, Chronicles of Crime or the New Newgate Calendar, vols I & II, pub 1841
The Newgate Calendar contains more than 81,000 records that packed with fascinating tales of arson, murder, piracy, embezzlement, conspiracy, and treason. The records consist of a “series of memoirs and anecdotes of notorious characters who have outraged the laws of Great Britain from the earliest period” up to 1841.

Tasmania Convict records 1800-1893
Search more than 81,000 records to discover whether your ancestor transported to Van Diemen’s Land as a convict between 1800 and 1893. This varied collection contains records from over 20 different sources held by the Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office.

Irish Newspapers
1,041,492 articles from two brand new titles have been added to our collection of historic Irish newspapers.
· Belfast Telegraph – 944,404 articles covering 1871 – 1881, 1886 – 1892, 1897 – 1899, 1903 – 1909
· Cork Constitution – 97,088 articles covering 1890 – 1891

Findmypast Publishes over 911,000 Royal Navy Pension Records Online for the First Time

The fallowing news release is from Find My Past
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Today, 09 April 2016, over 911,000 records of British Royal Navy pensions have been published online for the first time at Findmypast.

The publication, released in association with The National Archives, consists of an assortment of documents kept by the Greenwich Hospital and the Royal Hospital Chelsea to record the details of Greenwich Pensioners.

The British Royal Navy & Royal Marines service and pension records span over 230 years of British naval history from to 1704 to 1934 and contain over 270,000 scanned colour images. The collection will allow family historians to uncover fascinating details of their ancestor’s career with the Royal Navy, such as their period of service, where they served, when they joined and if they were wounded in the line of duty.

Since 1804, The Royal Greenwich Hospital has paid small out-pensions to large numbers of deserving applicants who had served in either the Navy or Marines, as well as admitting a fixed number to live as in-pensioners of the hospital. This is the first time that records relating to these payments have been made available online, allowing more people than ever before to learn about the lives of their naval ancestors.

The collection includes:

  • Registers of Greenwich Hospital out-pensioners and candidates
  • Service records of both officers’ & ratings’ between 1802 and 1919
  • Indexes of Greenwich Hospital pensioners and out-pensioners
  • Royal Hospital Chelsea payment returns for England, Scotland, Wales and Jersey
  • Royal Hospital Chelsea admission books, registers and papers

To coincide with the upcoming centenary of the Battle of Jutland, Findmypast has also released over 40,000 records of Royal Navy & Royal Marines personnel who served at Jutland. The Battle, which took place off the coast of Denmark between the 31st May and 1st June 1916, was the largest naval engagement of the First World War and cost the lives of nearly 7,000 British sailors.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast, says:
“As an island nation we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the men and women who have served Great Britain at sea. These naval pension records, indexed and published online for the first time, shed new light on our naval ancestors and will open up fresh lines of enquiry for thousands of people. This release cements Findmypast’s reputation for having the most comprehensive online collection of British naval records.”

Bruno Pappalardo, Principal Maritime Records Specialist at The National Archives, said:
“The complexity, diversity and nature of eighteenth and nineteenth century Royal Navy pension records has previously made the searching of such documents speculative and difficult to undertake. The release of these key pension records will be an essential contribution to opening up these records for research purposes.”

About Findmypast
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

About The National Archives
The National Archives is a government department and an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice (MoJ). As the official archive of the UK government and England and Wales, we look after and make available to the public a collection of historical records dating back over 1,000 years, including records as diverse as Domesday Book and MI5 files.

Our 21st-century role is to collect and secure the future of the record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible as possible. We do this by devising technological solutions to ensure the long-term survival of public records and working to widen access to our collection. The National Archives also advises on information management across government, publishes all UK legislation, manages Crown copyright and leads the archive sector. We work to promote and improve access to public sector information and its re-use. www.nationalarchives.gov.uk www.legislation.gov.uk

10 Million New Irish Catholic Parish Registers With FREE Access Through March 7, 2016!

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The following was received from FindMyPast:

We’re excited to reveal the launch of 10 million new Irish Catholic Parish Registers on Findmypast today. Covering the majority of Ireland, this incredible record set includes 40 million names, 3,500 registers and over 1,000 parishes. To celebrate, we’re making all 110 million Irish records free for everyone until 7th March. Click on the links or on the illustration to search.

FindMyPast Announces the Launch of 10 Million Irish Parish Registers

The following news release is from Alex Cox, with FindMyPast:

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Salt Lake City: 5 February 2016 – Leading family history site, Findmypast, announced today at Rootstech that it will launch 10 million Irish Catholic Parish Registers, one of the most important Irish record collections, in March 2016.

Covering over 200 years from 1671-1900 and over 1,000 parishes, Findmypast has worked to transcribe the National Library of Ireland’s online image collection of 3,500 baptism and marriage registers. This is the first time that the collection has been indexed with the images linked online, making the search much easier and the records more accessible. As a result, family historians will now be able to make all important links between generations with the baptism records and between families with the marriage registers. These essential records cover the entire island of Ireland, both Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.

Ben Bennett, Executive Vice-President North America and International for Findmypast said:
“The Irish Parish Registers will be a gold mine for anyone with Irish heritage. The 10 million baptism and marriage records will help even more people to trace their Irish ancestors. In addition to being able to search this valuable collection, customers with family trees on Findmypast will benefit from leads that automatically connect the records related to their family directly to their trees. The Catholic Parish Registers are a hugely important addition to Findmypast’s Irish collection, the largest and most comprehensive source for online Irish family history research.”

Click on the link’s to go to the FindMyPast website.

FindMyPast Announces USA Marriage Collection of 450 Million+ – 33M Names FREE thru Feb 15

FindMyPast has a huge booth here at RootsTech 2016. Their big announcement was made this morning, stating that they will release millions of marriage records every quarter and aims to complete the entire digitization project by the end of 2017. Thirty-three million records have been launched and are available for free access through the 15th of the month. The following announcement was made by FindMyPast.

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FINDMYPAST ANNOUNCES LARGEST ONLINE COLLECTION OF U.S. MARRIAGES FROM 1650-2010 100 MILLION RECORDS, 450 MILLION+ NAMES

Salt Lake City: 4 February 2016 – Time: 7am MT, 9am EST, 2pm GMT: Leading family history company, Findmypast , announced today at RootsTech that, in partnership with FamilySearch International, it will launch the single largest online collection of U.S. marriages in history.

Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America. More than 60 per cent of these marriage records have never before been published online. When complete, this collection will only be found in its entirety exclusively on Findmypast.

To kick start the collection, Findmypast has launched the first 33 million records of this ambitious project today and is offering them to the public for free from now until 15 February. The records include marriage date, bride and groom names, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names. Customers with family trees on Findmypast will benefit from leads connecting relatives on their trees with the marriage records, thus generating a whole new source of research.

Those seeking a bit of star dust will find the marriage records for actors from Bette Davis to Jimmy Stewart, actor turned President, Ronald Reagan, founding father Samuel Adams, writers including F. Scott Fitzgerald and John Steinbeck, jazz great Duke Ellington and baseball legend Babe Ruth to name but a few among the hundreds of millions of names.

Commenting, Annelies van den Belt, CEO, Findmypast said:
“We are delighted to be working with FamilySearch to bring this hugely important collection online. The launch of the U.S. marriages project is central to our growth strategy in the U.S. The millions of new U.S. records will complement Findmypast’s massive collection of British and Irish data allowing us to provide many more connections and a more comprehensive experience to family historians in the US and all over the world.

Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch said:
“We greatly value our close working relationships with our partners and record archives. They enable us as a community to get important records available to family history researchers online much, much faster. The US marriage records agreement with Findmypast is an excellent example. We are delighted to assist making these records available.”

Findmypast and Sister Site Mocavo Come Together

The following is from FindMyPast:

· Findmypast aims to deliver a more focussed, efficient and comprehensive service to US family historians

· The move is part of Findmypast’s plans for continued expansion in the US

January 18, 2016 – Leading family history website Findmypast, has today announced that sister site Mocavo will be incorporated into Findmypast to create a single experience for customers interested in discovering more about their family history.

The move forms an important part of the US growth strategy set out by Annelies van den Belt, CEO of Findmypast, and will bring the best aspects and features of both sites into one place.

The two websites are currently working together to transfer Mocavo’s strengths and expansive record collections over to Findmypast.

The transition will begin immediately and is expected to be completed within the next few months.

The move is part of Findmypast’s continued expansion and growth in the US market. By merging the two brands, Findmypast will create a more focussed and efficient business that will offer a more comprehensive experience to US customers while continuing to offer the industry’s best British and Irish collections.

In 2016, Findmypast will also be publishing hundreds of millions of new and exclusive US records to further enhance the experience for US family historians.

As part of Findmypast’s commitment to sustain Mocavo’s ‘free forever’ promise, Mocavo subscribers will continue to enjoy free access to all of the same records that were previously published for free on Mocavo. In addition, they will be invited to take advantage of a subscription to Findmypast equivalent to their existing Mocavo subscription. Mocavo customers can easily import their family trees onto Findmypast and can immediately start to receive hints opening the door to new discoveries that they never knew existed. A subscription to Findmypast will allow them access to the site’s entire collection of records, containing over eight billion names, as well as the thousands of new records released by Findmypast every week.

Findmypast Announces Free Weekend 22-25 January 2016

Findmypast Announces Free Weekend 22-25 January 2016

FindMyPast.Com

· Findmypast announces free access to historical records this weekend
· Billions of records available to everyone to search for free
· Local subscribers granted World access, and World subscribers enjoy 3 days added to their subscription

London, UK, 20th January 2016 Findmypast has announced that this weekend, they will be opening up their archives and giving unlimited free access to billions of records and newspaper pages from all over the world. From 7am on Friday, January 22nd to 7am on Monday, January 25th (EST), absolutely everyone will have access to Findmypast’s comprehensive collections of historical records and innovative research tools, including:

· Millions of records you won’t find anywhere else, including fascinating WW2 Prisoner of War records, millions of England & Wales Crime records and the incredible British in India collection
· The largest online collection of England & Wales Electoral registers, containing over 220 million names
· Birth, marriage and death records dating back to the 18th century
· The largest online collection of UK parish records, dating back to 1538
· Historical newspapers from across the world, including nearly 13 million British newspaper dating all the way back to 1710
· The most comprehensive collection of UK military records anywhere online
· The largest collection of Irish family history records available online
· Passenger lists for ships sailing to and from Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and the USA
· An easy to use online family tree builder, which allows you to import and export your tree if you’ve built it elsewhere
· Our Family Tree hints feature, which will suggest potential matches between the ancestors in your tree and records from our archives

Family historians will also have free access to the millions of other records available to search on Findmypast. Access to the 1939 Register has not been included and pay as you go credits will be required in order to unlock household records.

Extended access for existing users
It’s not only new users who’ll enjoy special family history research opportunities this weekend. Those with current Findmypast Local subscriptions (with an active Britain, Ireland, US & Canada or Australia & New Zealand subscription) will be able to access Findmypast’s historical World records during the free access weekend, and those with active World subscriptions will have an additional three days added to their subscription.

Find out more at Findmypast’s dedicated Free Weekend page.

British WWII Prisoners of War Records Published Online as Britain Marks 70th Anniversary

The following is from FindMyPast:

FindMyPast.Com

Today, 4 September 2015, one million records of service men, women and civilians who were taken captive during World War II are published online for the first time at Findmypast.

The publication, in association with The National Archives, marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II on all fronts on 2 September and the anniversary on 5 September of the liberation of the notorious Changi Prison camp, located on the eastern side of Singapore.

For the first time online, relatives and historians can search through the records of some of the most infamous POW camps of World War II. Included are the records for Stalag Luft III, the Nazi camp renowned for the mass escape by British and Commonwealth prisoners that inspired the film The Great Escape, and the Far East Prisoner of War camps immortalised in films such as The Railway Man.

The records cover the period 1939-1945 and contain the names, ranks and locations of Prisoners of War, along with the length of time spent in camps, the number of survivors, details of escapees and the nationalities of prisoners. Britons represent the largest number in the collection, followed by Dutch, Americans and Australians. In addition to this type of data, the collection comprises 360,000 images, including pages from personal diaries and photographs. Many official World War II records remain classified, making this an invaluable resource enabling members of the public to research the histories of relatives and those held captive during the war.

Prisoners of War 1939-1945 forms part of the wider Prisoners of War 1715-1945 collection. To find out more about these fascinating records, visit www.findmypast.com/prisonersofwar.

Included in the records are:
· Ronald Searle, whose harrowing sketches depicting the inhumanity of life in the camps of the Far East are in stark contrast to the much-loved St Trinian’s cartoons for which he is most known

· Immunologist Dr Bill Frankland: at 103 years old (and still a practising doctor), he is just one of many prisoners who did not speak of their experiences until very recently

· Eric Lomax, whose defining account of life in the camps, The Railway Man, was made into a major feature film starring Colin Firth

· The names of the 76 escapees from Stalag Luft III, immortalised in The Great Escape, grouped according to their fates

· Archibald Henry Flanagan, father of the Australian novelist Richard Flanagan, whose haunting traumatic experiences as a Far East POW inspired The Road to the Deep North which won the Man Booker Prize in 2014

· Accounts showing that the shooting of British POWs by the Nazi’s – in defiance of the Geneva Convention – was conducted at the ‘express personal orders’ of Hitler.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast, says: ‘Many of those who were captured during WWII endured barbaric conditions and found it difficult on their return to discuss the experience. Today’s publication allows the public to explore their story, and learn more about this dark period.’

David Langrish, Military Records Specialist at The National Archives says: ‘Extraordinary stories of ordinary men and women whose lives were caught up in the calamities of war have been told for years, but the online publication of these records makes it much easier for a wider audience to research this period and even find members of their own family. The National Archives are committed to widening access to our shared national records and the publication of these files is a significant development in facilitating this.’

About Findmypast
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

About The National Archives
The National Archives is a government department and an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice (MoJ). As the official archive of the UK government and England and Wales, we look after and make available to the public a collection of historical records dating back over 1,000 years, including records as diverse as Domesday Book and MI5 files.

Our 21st-century role is to collect and secure the future of the record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible as possible. We do this by devising technological solutions to ensure the long-term survival of public records and working to widen access to our collection. The National Archives also advises on information management across government, publishes all UK legislation, manages Crown copyright and leads the archive sector. We work to promote and improve access to public sector information and its re-use. www.nationalarchives.gov.uk www.legislation.gov.uk

New FamilySearch Collections Posted the Week of July 13, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

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Family historians hungry for historic Irish records will enjoy FamilySearch’s new collection, Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912. These indexed court documents bring 22 million records to your fingertips. These records were originally filmed at the National Archives of Ireland and the index was created by findmypast.com. See the table below for additions to over 60 historical record collections, including 46 million US obituaries. Click on the collection’s link to start your discovery.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Australia New South Wales Census (fragment) 1891 – 0 – 21,315 – Added images to an existing collection
Belgium Antwerp Civil Registration 1588-1910 – 0 – 1,670 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil Pernambuco Civil Registration 1804-2014 – 0 – 164,642 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 1,642,660 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863 – 970 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Germany Saxony Dresden Citizens’ Documents and Business Licenses 1820- 1962 – 0 – 855,956 – Added images to an existing collection
India Bihar Koilukh Pandit Kirtinand Jha Maithil Brahmin Genealogical Records 1750-1990 – 0 – 175,363 – Added images to an existing collection
India Hindu Pilgrimage Records 1194-2015 – 2,782,487 – 2,843,557 – New indexed records and images collection
Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers 1828-1912 – 21,833,839 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Italy Caltanissetta Civil Registration (State Archive) 1820-1935 – 0 – 318 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Cremona Civil Registration (State Archive) 1744-1942 – 0 – 1,325,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Grosseto Civil Registration (State Archive) 1851-1907 – 0 – 393,814 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy L’Aquila Civil Registration (State Archive) 1809-1865 1911-1943 – 0 – 111,837 – Added images to an existing collection
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Pesaro Civil Registration (State Archive) 1808-1813 1861- 1865 – 0 – 75,456 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Pesaro e Urbino Urbino Civil Registration (State Archive) 1866-1942 – 0 – 709,381 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Ragusa Civil Registration (State Archive) 1900-1940 – 0 – 111,281 – New browsable-image collection.
Italy Toscana Civil Registration (State Archive) 1804-1874 – 0 – 80,833 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Baja California and Baja California Sur Catholic Church Records 1750-1984 – 0 – 363 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Chihuahua Catholic Church Records 1632-1958 – 0 – 195 – New browsable-image collection.
Mexico Guanajuato Catholic Church Records 1519-1984 – 0 – 1,077 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Hidalgo Catholic Church Records 1546-1971 – 0 – 574 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Michoacán Catholic Church Records 1555-1996 – 0 – 2,758 – Added images to an existing collection
Mexico Tamaulipas Catholic Church Records 1703-1964 – 0 – 1,294 – Added images to an existing collection
Peru Callao Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 42,583 – Added images to an existing collection
Perú Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996 – 0 – 111,769 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Negros Occidental Roman Catholic Diocese of Bacolod Parish Registers 1755-1976 – 0 – 95,820 – New browsable-image collection.
Spain Province of Valencia Miscellaneous Records 1251-1950 – 0 – 850,597 – Added images to an existing collection
Sweden Halland Church Records 1615-1904; index 1615-1860 – 0 – 972 – Added images to an existing collection

Canada: Newfoundland Vital Records 1840-1949 – 347,134 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Births 1864-1877 – 0 – 6,103 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Deaths 1864-1877 – 0 – 20,661 – Added images to an existing collection
Canada: Nova Scotia Marriages 1864-1918 – 0 – 15,831 – Added images to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index – 1,513,553 – 1,513,553 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

United States Records

United States Census 1790 – 1,606 – 62 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Census 1800 – 20 – 18,454 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
United States Freedmen’s Bureau Hospital and Medical Records 1865-1872 – 4,641 – 44,734 – New Indexed records and images collection
United States GenealogyBank Obituaries 1980-2014 – 46,769,836 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Index to Service Records War with Spain 1898 – 123,334 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California Death Index 1905-1939 – 2,086,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Delaware Vital Records 1680-1971 – 624,395 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Marriages 1811-1950 – 83,822 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Illinois County Marriages 1810-1934 – 504,033 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1915 – 0 – 9,802 – Added images to an existing collection
Iowa State Census 1925 – 5,573,816 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Kentucky Vital Record Indexes 1911-1999 – 9,865,944 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Louisiana First Registration Draft Cards compiled 1940-1945 – 39,967 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Boston Passenger Lists Index 1899-1940 – 1,577,127 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1627-2001 – 0 – 182 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Births 1867-1902 – 0 – 1,428 – Added images to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries 1820-2006 – 1,389,458 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
North Carolina Probate Records 1735-1970 – 0 – 1,952 – Added images to an existing collection
South Dakota School Records 1879-1970 – 2,807,212 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Tennessee County Marriages 1790-1950 – 3,024,053 – 1,831,660 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Utah Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel Database 1847-1868 – 58,333 – 0 – New indexed record collection
Utah Uintah County Discharge Records 1893-2009 – 0 – 2,362 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Land and Property Records 1888-2004 – 0 – 195,963 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Marriage Records 1888-2015 – 0 – 8,687 – New browsable-image collection.
Utah Uintah County Naturalization and Citizenship Records 1888-1929 – 0 – 409 – New browsable-image collection.
Vermont St. Albans Canadian Border Crossings 1895-1924 – 6,696,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Vermont Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1732-2005 – 0 – 458,533 – Added images to an existing collection

Help Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

National Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast

The following news release is from the National Genealogical Society:

NGS

ARLINGTON, VA, 6 July 2015 — The National Genealogical Society (NGS) has made a special arrangement with Findmypast (FMP), one of the leading genealogical records companies, to provide NGS members a free, one-year subscription to Findmypast US and Canada collection.

Members can use this opportunity to extend their own FMP US and Canada subscriptions beyond their current expiration date. Also available to NGS members is a one-year subscription to Findmypast World collection at a significantly discounted rate.

Current and new NGS members are encouraged to visit the NGS website for additional details and to take advantage of this limited-time offer.

Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogical research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes more than two billion family history records—from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a valuable resource for building family trees and making family connections through its historical records and advanced search tools.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

More details can be found online at www.ngsgenealogy.org

644,000 New Records & Newspaper Articles At FindMyPast

The following is from the June 26, 2015 FindMyPast Friday Announcement at FindMyPast:

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Australia Convict ships 1786-1849

Containing over 188,000 records, Australia Convict ships 1786-1849 date back the ships of First Fleet and include the details of some of the earliest convict settlers in New South Wales. These records are made up of five separate sets of musters and indents held by the the State Records Authority of New South Wales. They do not cover every convict who arrived in Australia on those early ships as many have been lost or scattered to other places. Indents records were used in the early settlements to keep track of the convict population while musters lists of who was on board a ship were taken at the port of embarkation.

Each record contains a transcript and a black and white image of original documents. Indents can include a variety of information about individual convicts such as their native place, details of their offence and sentence, a physical description and details of their family members. Musters usually only give a name, date and place of trial and sentence. Musters were also taken after disembarkation.

Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867

Containing almost 27,000 records, the Australia Convict Conditional and Absolute Pardons 1791-1867 list the details of convicts who built new lives in New South Wales. The records list the details of pardons by the Governor and date back to the earliest days of the colony. Pardons were generally handed out to convicts serving life sentences but in the earliest years of the colony the Governor had the power to grant both free and conditional pardons as rewards for good behavior, for special skills or for carrying out special duties or tasks. Conditional pardons meant that a convict was free as long as they stayed within the colony, known as “Government limits”. Most convicts received a conditional pardon. Absolute pardons meant that a convict’s sentence was completely remitted. They were free with no conditions and could move beyond the limits of the colony or even return to Britain.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of original documents. As well as listing the names of pardoned convicts, the records also include the name of the ship they arrived on, the term of the sentence they served , any additional notes, and details of their release.

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851

New South Wales Registers Of Convicts’ Applications To Marry 1825-1851 contains over 26,000 records. Convicts in Australian penal colonies were actually encouraged to marry as Governors believed that marriage and family life were good for both the morality and stability. Convicts who did marry could apply for tickets of leave or pardons as well as assistance in establishing a household. In the early years of the colonies, many convicts married even if they had wives or husbands back home. The Governor had to give permission before any marriage could take place and copies of the banns would be sent by the local clergy to the Colonial Secretary.

Each record contains a transcript as well as an image of the original document. The registers list the convict’s name, the name of their spouse, their profession and the length of their sentence as well as the sip they arrived on and when they were given their freedom. Some approved marriages did not go ahead so you might find more than one successful application for your ancestor.

Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1960

Over 7,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Prison Registers 1855-1948. The new additions are taken from the Central Register of Female Prisoners, held by the Public Record Office Victoria. The register kept a record of prisoners that passed through Pentridge prison in Coburg, Victoria. Pentridge was built in 1850 and was the central prison in the Melbourne region from about 1860. Each record includes a transcripts and scanned image of the original registers and many include mug shot photographs of individual’s prisoners.

They list fascinating details about not only the prisoners’ offences, sentences and incarceration, but also biographical information such as their name, date of birth, country of origin and occupation. Remarks on the register may also include the name of the ship on which the prisoner arrived if they were not born in Australia.

Sligo Workhouse Admission and Discharge Registers 1848-1859

Containing of over 9,000 records, the Sligo workhouse registers 1848-1859 consist of handwritten registers taken by the Sligo Union workhouse, one of three workhouses in the County Sligo. Levels of poverty in Ireland were far higher than in England and the workhouse was often an inescapable part of life that would have touched many, if not most Irish families. They were designed for the most destitute of the poor who could not support themselves. Conditions were harsh and inhuman. Inmates were stripped of their dignity, they were no longer a person but instead a pauper inmate.

The records pre-date civil registration and will be valuable resource to those with Sligo ancestors given the lack of 19th century census material available in Ireland. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document. The registers list the names of new arrivals and details including their age, occupation, religion, any illnesses or infirmities, family members, local parish, their condition on arrival (usually describing clothes or cleanliness) and when they were discharged or died.

Clare Poor Law Unions Board Of Guardians Minute Books

Containing over 63,000 records, the Clare Board of Guardian Books were taken from the Kilrush and Ennistymon unions, two of eight poor law unions located in County Clare. The minute books recorded weekly reports on the number of inmates, new arrivals, births, deaths and discharges. They also recorded expenditures including food supplies and salaries as well as the number of inmates receiving medical treatments.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of the original handwritten minutes. The amount of information contained in the image can be considerable. The minute books recorded what was said at each meeting of the Board of Guardians, including correspondence and contracts but also individual cases that came before the Board. These include the day-to-day running of the workhouses, disciplinary matters concerning both staff and inmates, individual case histories, foundling children’s fostering and upkeep and the hiring of foster mothers and wet nurses.

Irish newspaper update

Over 308,000 new articles have been added to our collection of historic Irish Newspapers. Substantial additions have been made to Saunder’s News-Letter, a title that dates all the way back to 18th century Ireland and now contains nearly 950,000 fully searchable articles.

The entire collection now covers over 175 years of Irish history (1748-1924) and contains over 9.1 million articles from 72 national, local and regional titles from every province and major city in Ireland.

North West Kent Baptisms

Nearly 2,000 new records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish baptisms. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the parish of Southfleet.

Each baptism includes a transcript of the original parish record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the child’s name, date of birth, date of baptism, place of baptism, mother’s name, father’s name, father’s occupation, residence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Marriages

Over 500 records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish marriages. The new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Southfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original marriage record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most transcripts will include the couple’s names, date of marriage, place of marriage, marital status, whether they were married by banns or licence and any additional notes.

North West Kent Burials

Over 1,500 burial records have been added to our collection of North West Kent parish records. These new additions were transcribed by the North West Kent Family History Society and cover the Parish of Sothfleet.

Each of the records includes a transcript of the original burial record. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include the deceased’s name, burial date, place of burial, residence, age at death, description and any additional notes.

Prisoners of War 1715-1945

Over 71,000 fascinating Prisoner of War records containing the details of American soldiers captured during the War of 1812 have just been released in partnership with the National Archives. The new records form the second phase of the wider Prisoners of War 1715-1945 collection, the first phase of which was launched in April with the release of over 43,000 World War 1 records. The records are taken from British Foreign Office, Colonial Office, Admiralty and Air Force papers held by the National Archives.

The latest additions record the details of Danish, French, Prussian and American prisoners captured by British Forces during the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. They reveal when and where they were captured, where they were held and many include full physical descriptions such as hair, colour eye colour, build, complexion and any distinguishable marks. Records were also kept of their provisions and the supplies they received for example blankets, clothing, beds, etc. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original handwritten document. The amount of information in each record can vary depending on the type of document and the amount of detail recorded at the time of the event.

British Newspapers

Over 2.8 million new searchable articles have been added to our collection of historic British Newspapers. The latest additions include 3 brand new titles, the Cornish Times, Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, Tadcaster Post, and the General Advertiser for Grimstone, as well as substantial updates to 37 existing titles.

The total collection now stands at over 124 million articles and 341 unique titles, covering 245 years of British history (1710-1955).

FindMyPast Library Edition Now Available in United States Libraries

The following news release is from FindMyPast:

FindMyPast.Com

  • Findmypast, a global leader in family history, announces the availability of a library edition within the United States
  • Provides access for libraries, archives, and other organizations to billions of records from England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States
  • Free, no obligation, 90-day trial available

Salt Lake City – June 25, 2015Findmypast, a global leader in family history, announced today the official release of their product for libraries and organizations in the United States. The Findmypast Library Edition gives library access to billions of records from Findmypast’s wide array of collections from the United States, Ireland, England, Wales, Scotland, and other areas of the world. Collection highlights include:

Amongst the billions of records now available to library patrons is the new PERiodical Source Index (PERSI). PERSI, a popular tool used by genealogists, includes more than 2.5 million indexed entries from thousands of genealogical and local history publications. For the first time, images of articles have been included in the collection – with more being added on a regular basis.

“We are delighted to bring the best resource for British and Irish family history to America’s library market,” said Annelies van den Belt, CEO of Findmypast.

The Library Edition provides tools for patrons to work in tandem with a library’s subscription and at home. Individual user accounts allow patrons to build their own family tree, save records from the library’s subscription, and continue working on their family tree. Library patrons will also have access to Findmypast’s Hints, which aids in the discovery of records from their own family tree.

Librarians can contact librarysales@findmypast.com for further information, pricing, and to start a free 90-day free trial of the product.

Secrets of London’s Infamous “Bedlam” Mental Hospital Revealed at Findmypast

The following news release is from findmypast.com:

· Findmypast is working with Bethlem Museum of the Mind at Bethlem Royal Hospital, in London, UK, popularly known as Bedlam, to make its extensive patient records from 1683 – 1932 available online for the very first time

· Over 248,000 records, many including photos, reveal the lives and stories of its inmates

· Highlights of the detailed records show why people were committed included stabbing people with cutlery, insatiable appetite for pleasure, condemnation of sinful behaviour from public officials, objecting to a forced marriage, religious fervour, paralysis, women dressing as men and more

London, UK, 19 March 2015 – Leading family history website, Findmypast, today announced an exciting partnership with Bethlem Museum of the Mind to release Bethlem Royal Hospital’s extensive patient records online for the very first time. The records are being released today to mark the official reopening of the museum in Beckenham, with Findmypast making scans of the original patient case notes and staff registers available online for browsing and searching by everyone.

As one of the world’s oldest hospitals for the treatment of mental illness, Bethlem Royal Hospital has a chequered past in how it determined not only who was insane, but also in its treatment of patients. The records released today go into detail about each patient, in many cases documenting their mental state and including photographs of the inmates once photography became available.

The records also detail the reasons why they had been deemed insane, with first-hand accounts of the behaviour of the inmates and their families. Some of the more unusual reasons for incarceration given in the records include:

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· Attempted royal assassination with a dessert knife: Margaret Nicolson was sent to Bethlem Royal Hospital in August 1787 for attempting to stab King George III with a pearl-handled dessert knife. Her records from Bethlem Royal Hospital show that she was sent to Bethlem Royal Hospital “by the Order of the Committee” i.e. by parliament vote, as opposed to by an individual or family, and a trial followed in September 1787. Nicholson spent the rest of her life in Bethlem Royal Hospital, dying there in May 1828

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· An insatiable appetite for pleasure, including lounging in the fashionable shopping streets of London: Ingrid Schwitzguebel was admitted in July 1909 by her husband. His reasons for committing her was that she was “living almost exclusively for pleasure, in fact her desire for theatres, musicals, lounging in the London fashionable streets, looking at shops etc, is insatiable.” However, other motives may have been at play as the records go on to show that she suspected her husband of an “immoral life of going with other women”, and had “threatened to attack him with a hat pin”

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· Objecting to a forced marriage with a cousin: Kate Jeffery was sent to Bethlem Royal Hospital for Melancholia in October 1910, with her blaming her relatives for attempting to force her into a marriage with a cousin whom she thought immoral. An original letter from Jeffery herself is included in the records in which she rails against imprisonment, saying that “my uncle and brother must have thought themselves very fortunate to meet with Dr Gooding and the Aldridges. People will know where to send their unwanted relatives”

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General paralysis: Richard Cook Thompson was admitted to Bethlem Royal Hospital in February 1901 with general paralysis as the official diagnosis. That said, the records show more clearly why he was sent to a mental institution and not a regular hospital, with the notes recording that “he is one of the Apostles, he has a message from Almighty God to go to Windsor Castle, these things are not true”. Thompson was not the only one to believe he was a messenger of God, with James Duggan also incarcerated in October 1906 for saying “he is the pope of Rome”

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· Overtaxed brain due to writing a dictionary: At 66 years old, Alexander Tolhausen, was one of the older inmates at Bethlem Royal Hospital when he was committed in July 1886 for an overtaxed brain. Tolhausen’s illness was attributed to working on a technological dictionary in French, English and German with symptoms including “gets up and dresses and undresses himself sometimes six times a day”, “threw his breakfast at his wife” and “that his house was unhealthy”

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· Belief in themselves as a persecuted God: Ethel Julia Ouselay Collins was committed for “mixing of her ideas with religious matters,” including believing that she had “not been born yet” and was “a God chained on a pedestal.” It was also documented that she had “delusions of suspicion and persecution.”

“These records provide an extraordinary level of detail about the patients of the Bethlem Royal Hospital as far back as the 17th century,” said Debra Chatfield, family historian at Findmypast. “Containing letters written in their own words and handwriting, photographs at different stages of their illness, and reports on their day to day behaviour by close family members and the medical staff at the hospital, these records provide, for the very first time online, real insight into life in this infamous institution. It’s hard not to empathise with the inmates as you learn about their often harrowing and tragic stories. Publishing these records online allows those stories to be told for the first time to a wider audience, and you might discover that you had an ancestor who was sent to Bedlam.”

To discover more about the inmates at Bethlem Royal Hospital and see the full images and transcripts of the records, please visit www.findmypast.com/bethlem

FindMyPast Free Weekend – March 6-9 2015

The following announcement is from FindMyPast:

FindMyPast-FreeWeekend-Mar-2015

Findmypast Announces Free Weekend 6-9 March 2015

· Findmypast announces they will be giving free access to all their historical records this weekend

· Over 2 billion records available to everyone to search for free

· Local subscribers granted World access, and World subscribers granted 3 extra days to their subscription

· Getting Started video and Finding Women in the Records webinar will be available to view this weekend

London, UK, 4 February 2015 Findmypast has announced that this weekend, they will be opening up their archives and giving unlimited free access to billions of records and newspaper pages from all over the world. That means that between midday on Friday, March 6th and midday on Monday, March 9th (GMT), absolutely everyone will have access to their comprehensive collections of historical records and innovative research tools, including:

· Over 900 million census records from across the UK, USA and Ireland
· Passenger lists for ships sailing to and from Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and the USA
· Birth, marriage and death records dating back to the 18th century, and the largest online collection of UK parish records
· The most comprehensive collection of UK military records anywhere online
· The largest collection of Irish family history records available online
· Historical newspapers from across the world, including more than 10 million British newspaper pages from as long ago as 1710
· An easy to use online family tree builder which allows you to import and export your tree if you’ve built it elsewhere
· Our automatic Hints feature, which automatically searches our records for you and suggests potential matches to the people you add to your family tree

As well as millions of other records that will give everyone the opportunity to explore their family history and bring their past to life.

Webinar and new Getting Started video
To celebrate International Women’s Day, at 7am EST on Sunday 8th March, Findmypast will be hosting a webinar on searching for women in their historical records. As, historically, women’s names changed or were not recorded, finding female ancestors can be tricky. This webinar will help users trace maternal lines and get further with their family tree.

To help everyone make the most of the free weekend, Findmypast have also created a new Getting Started video which will be available to view from this weekend.

Extended access for existing users
It’s not only new users who will be able to take their family history research further this weekend. Those with current Findmypast Local subscriptions (with an active Britain, Ireland, US & Canada or Australia & New Zealand subscription) will be able to access Findmypast’s historical World records during the free access weekend, and those with active World subscriptions will have an additional three days added on to their subscription.

Find out more at Findmypast’s dedicated Free Weekend page.

Terms & conditions: Free access lasts from 12:00pm midday (GMT) on Friday 6th March 2015 until 11:59am (GMT) on Monday 9th March 2015. To access the records you will need to be signed in at Findmypast: you can register for free using your name, email address and country of residence. The free access excludes the UK Electoral Registers (2002-2013) and the UK Companies House Directors (2002-2013) record sets. Free access is subject to our fair usage policy: each account may view up to a maximum of 1,000 records per day.

Findmypast Releases More Than 101 Million US, UK & Australian Records

The following is from FindMyPast

FindMyPast.Com

Findmypast is thrilled to be adding over 101 million UK, US and Australian records as part of this week’s Findmypast Friday.

Every Friday, thousands of new records are released on our dedicated Findmypast Friday page to explore over the weekend. This week’s new additions include Australian Will Books from New South Wales, English Parish Record Indexes from the county of Gloucestershire and substantial updates to the PERiodical Source Index.

Over 100 million new records have also been added to Findmypast’s collection of US records. Extensive additions have been made to our US Military, Census & Substitutes, Life Events and Immigration & Travel collections. Visit the Findmypast Friday page to find out more about our new US records and how to search them.

New South Wales Will Books
The New South Wales Will Books, 1800-1952, contain over 415,000 wills containing beautiful images of the original handwritten documents only available online at Findmypast. The records are copies of original Will Books held by the State Records Authority of New South Wales and include the wills of a number of individuals from other states and countries, typically in cases where the individual was a resident of New South Wales but their last place of residence was outside the state, or where they had originated from overseas and left legacies to family members back home.

The Will books can be used to discover more about your family tree or simply investigate how the rich and famous lived. Famous figures that can be found within the Will books include the first Prime Minister of Australia and Justice of the High Court, Edmund Barton; legendary soldier, engineer and administrator, Sir John Monash; and Ludwig Leichhardt, the Prussian explorer, who famously vanished during an expedition in 1848.

Gloucestershire Parish Record Indexes
Over 861,000 Baptism, Marriage and Burial records from the English county of Gloucestershire have been added to our collection of UK Parish records. The Gloucestershire, Bristol baptism index 1660-1914 contains over 411,000 records, the Gloucestershire, Bristol marriage index 1644-1939 contains over 273,000 records and Gloucestershire, Bristol burial index 1625-1950 contains over 176,000 records. Each record consists of a transcription of the original document.

PERSI update
The PERiodical Source Index (PERSI) has once again been updated with the addition of over 12,000 images. This update includes images from publications around the United States and beyond, including historical society yearbooks, genealogy magazines, State-specific collections and county registers to name but a few. New Images, only available to view at Findmypast, have been added to 32 existing titles that span 200 years of American history (1827-2012). Searching PERSI has never been easier as Findmypast’s powerful search tools allow you to find exactly what you’re looking for quickly and easily. You can filter your PERSI searches by name, location, subject, periodical title, publisher, year of publication and keywords.

US Records
Visit our dedicated Findmypast Friday page to see full lists of and learn more about the 100 million plus records that have just been added to our US collections.

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.