American Place Names Of Long Ago — 50% OFF

 

A Family Roots Publishing Holiday Special: 50% OFF American Place Names Of Long Ago

 

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gpc225George Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World contains an index of over 100,000 place names of “every county, city, town, village, and post-office in the United States and shows the population of the same according to the Census of 1890.American Place Names Of Long Ago is a republication of the Index to Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas of the World, as Based on the Census of 1890. Assembled and with an Introduction by Gilbert S. Bahn, Ph.D.

So why an index, a list, of places names from over 120 years ago? Well, when you consider how many nineteenth-century place names have changed or disappeared in the intervening years, and that 45 percent of the places listed in this index were too small or obscure to have their population counts listed by the census taker, the importance of such a work is self-evident. Indeed, there may be no official record of many of these places, and Cram’s index may be the only tool to guide you from an obscure location to the correct county courthouse.

Bahn further explains the value and purpose of this index:

“There are a variety of reasons why a place name that served its purpose well enough long ago may not be found in a modern finding tool. When one is looking for persons—one’s own ancestors or someone else’s—the story behind the disappearance of a place name is immaterial. Just finding where on a map that place was, in order to search for records, is the objective. Moreover, as I believe always to be the case in American genealogy, the test is to place the locality within the correct county where the appropriate records may be expected to reside—if they were indeed created and if they survived over time.”

Cram had the benefit of working with the 1890 census before it was destroyed. According to Gilbert Bahn, census enumerators listed all place names on their tabulation sheets, even when the population counts were too small to warrant recording. Thus, Cram was able to compile an extremely detailed list of place names–and an accurate list, at that, because the names were recorded by local enumerators and automatically tied in to their respective counties! It is fair to say that the compilation of such a list would have been impossible without the 1890 census.

The original index as published in the 1898 edition of Cram’s Unrivaled Atlas occupied 106 pages, each with six columns. For purposes of this reprint edition, the six columns have been rearranged into three; otherwise there has been no change to the original text. Each entry, in alphabetical order within states, gives the place name, the county in which the place is located, and the population of the place at the time of the census. State capitals and large cities are in caps, county seats are in boldface, post offices are in roman type, and places that are not post offices are rendered in italics. Places that were too small for a population count are indicated by an X.

This index is an unexpectedly rich source of information, and thanks to Dr. Bahn we are now able to place it before an appreciative audience.

 

Order American Place Names Of Long Ago from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC225

Mississippi 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans and Their Widows

Although the majority of the 1890 census was burned when a fire razed the Commerce Department Building in 1921, and the few remaining fragments destroyed by 1935, there is one group of the population whose records have endured. In addition to the regular schedules taken in the census, a special census of Union Civil War veterans and their widows was taken at the same time. The idea was for war comrades to have the means to find each other and establish through affidavits their eligibility for veteran’s benefits. Each state has been collected in a series of books indexing the names from this census. This review covers Mississippi 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows.

Mississippi’s population in 1890 was 1,289,600. Union veterans in the state totaled 6,362 with 1,140 surviving widows. Confederate veterans were reported at 26,728 and 3,830 widows. Not surprising is that a southern state would have so many more confederate veterans, but perhaps a little surprising that there were so many Union vets. This index lists 9,340 individuals. Most likely some of the names are for Confederate veterans. There are also a number of names which are likely listed twice. Transcription errors and other problems pop up in any indexed record.

This index can help the researcher find original census entries. Entries include the individuals name, the county, locale or city, the supervisor’s district number, and the enumerators district. The index is sorted alphabetically by surname. According to the introduction, best efforts were made to account for handwriting and other issues, but the researchers are reminded to  remain flexible so as not to miss names due to minor spelling errors and other misinterpretations. The book contains a Table of Common Interpretations to help identify where interpretation errors most often occur. An example given is “Warren might appear as WARNER or Warner as WARREN.” Bryan Lee Dilts, the books compiler, has made effort to ensure the flexible researcher can find the records (s)he seeks.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Table of Common Transcription and Interpretation Errors

Counties in Order of Appearance

Abbreviations Used in Local Names

Map of Mississippi, 1890–1900

Census Index

Mississippi 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: X916SB, Price: $9.45.

 

The Historical Biographer’s Guide to Finding People in Databases & Indexes

Elizabeth Shown Mills, is an expert researcher and family historian. Her works include top selling books on proving and citing sources: Evidence!: Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian and Evidence Explained, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. Mills has also written a number of Quicksheets covering research methodologies designed to improve the accuracy and success of the overall research process. This review examines The Historical Biographer’s Guide to Finding People in Databases and Indexes.

Mills provides a basic premise for this guide: “Databases and indexes are valuable tools for research. As finding aids, they can shortcut the process of discovery…Historical records, however, involve vagaries that defy technical formulas.” She suggests that databases and indexes can limit, or even prohibit, discoveries if the researcher does not apply an analytical strategy. Genealogical research requires understanding the nature of those people being studied. Computers cannot understand people and their unique needs. However, one can understand the nature of both one’s ancestors and the systems or tools one uses. Finding solutions begins with understanding problems.

The guide suggests strategies to help overcome database and index related issues in finding people. Some strategies provide a pro-active approach. The author lists seven considerations to keep in mind. Three full pages in this four page guide, are dedicated to a single table. The table lists “anomaly types” along with the associated “typical problem” and examples. For example, the “Anomaly Type” for Translated Names offers two “Typical Problems”. One problem for Given Names and one for Surnames. Examples included the translation for the French name Reine is Regina in English. Such a translation is helpful in searching indexes and databases that cannot make the translations assumptions for you.

Contents

Basic Premise

Pro-Active Strategies

Major Considerations

  1. Erratic spelling
  2. Family names vs. surnames
  3. Female name usage
  4. Penmanship
  5. Regional dialects
  6. Translations and adaptations
  7. Composition of finding aid
    • Arrangement of entries
    • Selection criteria applied

Table: Common Anomalies & Errors

 

Order The Historical Biographer’s Guide to Finding People in Databases and Indexes from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC3869, Price: $8.77.

See other Quicksheets available at Family Roots Publishing:

QuickSheet: Citing Online African-American Historical Resources

QuickSheet: Citing Online Historical Resources

QuickSheet: Citing Ancestry.com Databases & Images

Quicksheet: The Historical Biographer’s Gide to Cluster Research (the FAN Principle)

QuickSheet: The Historical Biographer’s Guide to the Research Process

QuickSheet: Genealogical Problem Analysis, A Strategic Plan

Missouri 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows

Missouri 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows was created from special schedules used to identify Union Civil War veterans as a means of locating persons entitled to pensions or disability benefits. Though intended to serve only Union veterans and their wives, mistakes allowed for some Confederate soldiers or their wives to be listed.

This index is for every name listed in the 1890 Census Schedules of Union Civil War veterans or widows for the state of Missouri. Alias names used during the war are included. Names crossed out or identified as Confederates were included and treated the same as Union veterans. The purpose of this book to serve research efforts and not to identify who served which side in the war. The population of Missouri in 1890 was 2,679,185, with 63,747 surviving Union vets. 17,558 Confederate vets and 1,940 Confederate widows lived in Missouri at that time.

This index lists 91.090 entries, though some names are likely repeats and others repeated for alternate interpretations. The index provides details meant to help the researcher quickly find the original census entry. The index is sorted alphabetically by surname. According to the introduction, best efforts were made to account for handwriting and other issues, but the researchers are reminded to  remain flexible so as not to miss names due to minor spelling errors and other misinterpretations. The book contains a Table of Common Interpretations to help identify where interpretation errors most often occur. An example given is “Warren might appear as WARNER or Warner as WARREN.” Bryan Lee Dilts, the books compiler, has made effort to ensure the flexible researcher can find the records (s)he seeks.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Table of Common Interpertations

1890 Missouri Veterans Census File Numbers

Misplaced Enumeration Districts

Abbreviations Used to Locale Names

Map of 1880–1920 Missouri

1890 Missouri Veterans Census Index

 

Missouri 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: X917SB, Price: $45.55.

The Atlantic Bridge to Germany: Nordrehin-Westfalen

Since 1845 about a third of central and eastern Europe’s emigrants to other continents took passage from Hamburg, Germany. Hamburg is a key city in the densely populated and industrialized Nordrhein-Westfalen area of Germany. The Atlantic Bridge to Germany, Volume VII, is a historical survey, with indexes, of Nordrhein-Westfalen.

This volume, written and compiled by Charles M. Hall,  indexes approximately 3,000 repositories of genealogical records. These repositories consist predominately of research for events prior to civil registration, which began in earnest around 1792. There are also records from 50 state and city archives along with 60 counties.

A Gemeinde (“Community”) Index takes up the majority of this book. The index includes maps and cross-references for each parish, its county, date of oldest available records, and time periods for which records are present. The index notes which entries have a civil records office. Full contents are listed below.

 

Table of Contents

Foreword and Introduction

Preface and Acknowledgements

Section I – Historical Orientation

Section II – Bibliography

Section III – General Helps

  1. Archives and Societies
  2. Stadtkreise (City Districts)
  3. Landkreise (New County’s) Index
  4. Case Studies

Section IV – General Maps

Section V – 1:300,000 Maps

Section VI – Gemeinde Index

Section VII – Supplementary Index

 

Order a copy of The Atlantic Bridge to Germany, Volume VII from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: EV0002, Price: $13.72.

Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives

The 2009 publishing of the Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives is the twelfth revision of this book since 1963. This guide to the Archives holdings include state agency records, county records, private manuscript collections, and Civil War material. This edition covers more than “13,000 bound volumes and 22,000 boxes of loose records, as well as over 24,000 reels of microfilm, all of which are available to researchers in the State Archives, as of March 1, 2009.”

This latest edition adds a new list of records to each county, noted as CRX. These are records that were outside of the individual county’s possession until they were transferred to the State Archives for permanent preservation. This latest edition also adds a table of contents, an index, and a glossary. Finally, a map had been added showing which counties have experienced record losses.

Each county starts with a date of establishment and a note regarding record loss. For example, Johnston County was “established in 1746 from Craven County. No record of fires, but many records missing.”

Typical records, both original and microfilm sources, listed for each county include:

  • Bonds
  • Court Records
  • Election Records
  • Estate Records
  • Land Records
  • Marriage, Divorce, and Vital Statics
  • Military and Pension Records
  • Miscellaneous Records
  • Officials, County
  • Roads and Bridges
  • School Records
  • Tax and Fiscal Records
  • Wills
  • CRX Records

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Map of counties with record losses

County Records

  • Alamance
  • Albemarle [defunct]
  • Alexander
  • Alleghany
  • Anson
  • Ashe
  • Avery
  • Bath [defunct]
  • Beaufort
  • Bertie
  • Bladen
  • Brunswick
  • Buncombe
  • Burke
  • Bute [defunct]
  • Cabarrus
  • Caldwell
  • Camden
  • Carteret
  • Caswell
  • Catawba
  • Chatham
  • Cherokee
  • Showan
  • Clay
  • Cleveland
  • Columbus
  • Craven
  • Cumberland
  • Currituck
  • Dare
  • Davidson
  • Davie
  • Dobbs [defunct]
  • Duplin
  • Durham
  • Edgecombe
  • Forsyth
  • Franklin
  • Gaston
  • Gates
  • Graham
  • Granville
  • Greene
  • Guilford
  • Halifax
  • Harnett
  • Haywood
  • Henderson
  • Hertford
  • Hoke
  • Hyde
  • Iredell
  • Jackson
  • Johnston
  • Jones
  • Lee
  • Lenoir
  • Lincoln
  • Macon
  • Madison
  • Martin
  • McDowell
  • Mecklenburg
  • Mitchell
  • Montgomery
  • Moore
  • Nash
  • New Hanover
  • Northampton
  • Onslow
  • Orange
  • Pamlico
  • Pasquotank
  • Pender
  • Perquimans
  • Person
  • Pitt
  • Polk
  • Randolph
  • Richmond
  • Robeson
  • Rockingham
  • Rowan
  • Rutherford
  • Sampson
  • Scotland
  • Stanly
  • Stokes
  • Surry
  • Swain
  • Translyvania
  • Tryon [defunct]
  • Tyrrell
  • Union
  • Vance
  • Wake
  • Warren
  • Washington
  • Watauga
  • Wayne
  • Wilkes
  • Wilson
  • Yadkin
  • Yancey

Glossary

Index

 

Order Guide to County Records in the North Carolina State Archives from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: NC3420, Price: $21.78.

An Index to Some of the Family Records of the Southern States

An Index to Some of the Family Records of the Southern State: 35,000 Microfilm References from the N.S.D.A.R. Files and Elsewhere was compiled by E. Kay Kirham. Kirham best describe the contents of this index in her introduction:

“The genealogical library in Washington, D.C. of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, is one of the a few great genealogical libraries of this country. A part, but not all, of the records of this organization were microfilmed a few years ago. The index that follows is a partial index to one part of that library”

While this index itself was put together a number of years ago, the content remain relative and useful. The greater part of this index covers the southern states; however, a few hundred references are from other states. Apart from using this index at the DAR library in Washington, D.C., where original materials are available, items will be found on microfilms. This means using a library with access to the films, like the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, or “if possible, through the branch library system of the Mormon Church.”

The index is a compilation of family Bibles, family records, family histories, and cemetery records. Family records, denoted by FR in the index, a of at least several pages. FH, family history, records are of at least 15 pages in length. All state are denoted in the index by there standard two letter abbreviation. The index also covers the Leonardo Andrea collection of South Carolina genealogies of some twelve hundred typescripts of extensive genealogies, and are given their own code SCA. The films covered also include over 3,000 California pioneer genealogies, denoted with an asterisk (*).

Get a copy of An Index to Some of the Family Records of the Southern State: 35,000 Microfilm References from the N.S.D.A.R. Files and Elsewhere for yourself or a library from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: EV0003.