The Compendium of American Genealogy

cf6100I have used such words as massive, voluminous, gigantic, thorough, exhaustive, and enormous to describe books before. However, these words may not do just for The Compendium of American Genealogy, a seven volume set. This massive work may not compare to the Encyclopedia Britanica, Wikipedia and online references, or the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy (sorry, fictional pop culture reference); however, this seven volume set does comprise 6,283 pages, making it massive work for a genealogy.

Published between 1925 and 1942, this work represents an collection of genealogies for America’s first families, dating from 1790 through living representatives at the time of publication. Every lineage extends 8 to 9 generations. This project was an effort to compile a national genealogy before the population got too large to allow for such. That said, what may have really spurred the project along was war.

“It remained, however, for the catastrophe of the greatest war in history to impress upon many thinking people the need for an authoritative work containing the lineages contemporary Americans…”

While not all families are represented, almost every name distinguished in any way in the early history of the country will be found within its pages.

“The Compendium was compiled largely from lineage records and manuscript genealogies submitted by individuals selected for inclusion, many illustrated with photographs, portraits, and coats of arms. Each record was checked and edited, then typed up in the form of a “proof” and returned to the submitter for final review before ultimately being printed in one of the volumes. Thus prepared at great expense of time and labor, and with painstaking care, the seven massive volumes contain more than 54,000 lineage records, with indexes listing upwards of 425,000 names, making it, without doubt, the first reference and research source in colonial era American genealogy.”

So, the book is not small, and, in truth, the information is all available online. However, some people really like paper copies. The index makes it easy to find name within each volume. The set would make a nice shelf collection for any library. Considering the overall price, and size of the set, it would be mostly libraries that would show  an interest in this book. But I am sure any certain any public or family history library would gladly accept a copy as a generous donation.

Individuals or libraries interested in their own copy of The Compendium of American Genealogy should visit the Family Root’s Publishing’s website.

Pennsylvania German Marriages: Marriages and Marriage Evidence in Pennsylvania German Churches

gpc2968dAvailable as a two volume set, Pennsylvania German Marriages: Marriages and Marriage Evidence in Pennsylvania German Churches, by Donna R. Irish, is perhaps the most important collection of Pennsylvania-German source materials to appear since the publication of Strassburger and Hinke’s Pennsylvania German Pioneers over fifty years ago. The book provides documentation on some 50,000 persons of German origin or descent. Based on records in the collection formed by Dr. William J Hinke–records of approximately 100 churches in eastern Pennsylvania–the compiler has developed herein not merely a list of marriages but a genealogical record of the Pennsylvania Germans.

“This is primarily a collection of Pennsylvania German Reformed Church marriage records. Also included are some Luther Church records, a few Union church records (combined Reformed and Lutheran), and records of the North and Southampton Dutch Reformed Church. The records cover eastern Pennsylvania from Philadelphia west to Cumberland county during the time period 1710 and 1860. The largest number of entries represent actual marriages, although evidence of marriage —taken from baptismal, confirmation, communion, burial, and tombstone records—is given where available.”

Volume I covers the approximate 50,000 names in 600 pages. Volume II is an index to volume I, taking 217 pages to cover the names found in the collection.

The records of actual marriages, which form the basis of the work, generally give the names of the bride and groom, the date of marriage, names of parents, place of residence, and sometimes place of origin, date of birth, and previous marital status; while records of marriage deriving from baptismal entries, burial records, etc., variously give names of parents (usually the maiden name of the mother), names of grandparents and sponsors, place and date of birth and/or baptism, names of children, and date of death. Many of the records transcribed here are capsule pedigrees, some identifying three or more generations in a direct line of descent. There is, besides, an abundance of out-of-the-way and unexpected information. Considered as a whole, Pennsylvania German Marriages must rank as one of the premier sources in all of Pennsylvania-German genealogy.

If you do pick up this set, be sure to read the foreword, it contains many great hints. For example, the book notes that “until about 1820 most of the ministers who made these records were German or Swiss born…Thus the records themselves reflect the German spelling and pronunciation of names which may not themselves be German.” The author also covers information regarding women’s names and changes, along with other insightful information.

As these records cover a time period from 1710 to 1860, these 50,000 individuals easily represent the ancestry of millions of people today. Are you one of them?

Get a copy for yourself or your local library of Pennsylvania German Marriages: Marriages and Marriage Evidence in Pennsylvania German Churches from Family Roots Publishing.

Indiana Source Book: Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1982-1984, Volume 5 with Index

ihs029In recent blogs I have review the Indians Source Book, covering four volumes and an independent index to the first three volumes. These four volumes represent the work of Willard Heiss. He took upon himself the task of copying and printing into a single series of books all the abstracts of vital and genealogically important records which had previously been published in The Hoosier Genealogist, a quarterly of the Indiana Historical Society. He described the contents in the first volume as thus:

“The Hoosier Genealogist first appeared in 1962. Its editorial policy was an still is ‘to publish transcripts of original county records (such as marriage, land, will, and probate records), also church, Bible, and cemetery records.”

The abstracts come from many different sources, predominately covering the records from the 1800s. Heiss completed four volumes of work, covering nearly 20 years of the Hoosier Genealogists. Fortunately, especially for those with an historical or genealogical interest in Indiana, Rebah M. Fraustein took up where Heiss left off, and has given us Indiana Source Book: Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1982-1984, Volume 5 with Index. Fraustein had this to say about the book [taken from the Introduction]:

“Innovations appear, such as ship passenger lists of persons who indicated their destinations as Indiana, naturalization records, graphics, such as ship lanes from Ireland and England, and brands for cattle…Extracts from early local newspapers are continued, giving one an historical perspective of the times and the mode of life. Many articles were too long to [be] published in one issue; they were continued in later issues.

THG editorial policy has always been to print as much material as possible. Of the ninety two Indiana counties, some sort of material concerning over one third of them appeared in these twelve issues.”

 

Copies of Indiana Source Book Vol. 4; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979 and other volumes in this set are available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.00

 

Table of Contents

Cambridge City Presbyterian Church

Extra ts from Indiana Gazette

Facts from 1826 Indiana Gazette

Dearborn County Voters 1805

Jeremiah Farmar (Farmer) Bible

Early School Records, Fall Creek Township, Maison County

Crawford county Naturalizations

La Grange County Nationalizations, 1825-1829

David Martin Bruce Bible

Duplicate Tax List, Wabash County, 1835

Branum-Ball Bible Reocrds

Vincennes Celebrates Founding 250 Years Ago

Extracts from 1826 Indiana Gazetteer

John W. Bone Family bible records

Linus Eberhard (Eberhart0Bible Reocrds

Marshall County Tax Duplicates, 1843

Earliest Ripley County Nationalizations, 1818-1843

An “Orphan Train” Stops at Danville

Christian Mylin Family bible

Baptist Cemetery, Wills Township, Laporte County

Roberts Family bible

The Western Ranger, Porter Co., 1847-1849

Extracts from 1826 Indiana Gazetteer

Lasselle Papers Post Vincennes, 1788

Extracts from Fayette Observer, 1826

Orange County Nationalizations, 1840-1905

Marchall Co. Tax Duplicates

Shaw Family Bible Reocrd

Yoder Family bible

Aliases in Marion county Will Index

Harvey & Phebus Cemetery

Indiana Records Fond in “Loose Papers: Franklin County, Tnnessee

Born in Indiana, Died in Illinois

Marriages, Waldron Circuit, Methodist Episcopal Church, Southeast Indiana Conference, 1864-1900

Shenandoah Co. Virginia to Indiana

Summerfield Vawter Cemetery, Center Township, Jennings County

Andrew Boorkover Family Bible Records

White County Original Will and Estate Papers

Valentine Morgan Bible

Census of Head of Families Resident Population and Legal Voters Plainfield, Guilford Township, Hendricks County, Indiana

Warren County Stock Marks, 1827-1831

Extracts from The Philanthropist, 1838

Extracts from the 1833 Indiana Gazetteer

Darius Pattterson bible

Mordecai Davis bible

Family Record of Issac and Sarah R. Fowler from the Account Book of Isaac Fowler

Cass County Naturalization Applications???

Immigrants to Indiana from Ship Passenger Lists at New York

Extract from Evansville Gazette, 1821

Vanderburgh Co. in 1826, 1833 & 1850 Gazetteers

McBride Bible Records

Bowman Family bible

Account Book of Dr. Solomon W, Biddiger of Decatur and Bartholomew counties

The Updike Family bible and Barkley Family Reocrds

Heffley Family Records

Wabash & Erie Canal

“Stray” Hosiers who died or married in Vancouver, British Columbia

James Hammond Bible

The Wm. P. Bryan & Henry Clauson Bibles

Konsanke Funeral Home Records, Kouts, Porter Co., Indiana

Wells County Naturalization Final Otaths

Lee (Methodist_ Cemetery, Cotton township, Switzerland County, Indiana

Fort Wayne in the 1833 Gazetteer

Born in Indiana, Died in Illinois

Abstracts of Notices of Death from the “Morgan County Gazette”, 1853-1854

Pupils of Snow Hill School, 1867-68 and 1870-71, Whitewater Township, Franklin County, Indiana

Some Vincennes Residents in 1805, form the Lasselle Mss. Collection

Family Traditions vs Facts

Immigrants to Indiana from Customs Ship Passenger Lists to New Orleans and New York

William McManaman Account Book

No W.P.A. Indexes

Wayne County, In. Nationalizations book #2, 1853-54

Account book of Stewart William Kellems, m.D., Dubois County

Seventh Federal Census of Prisoners in Indiana State Penitentiary

Bibles of Isaac Wason Blake and Charles Abel Blake, Parke County

Warren county Bounty for Wolf Scalps

Kellems Family Rocrds

Biographical Sketches of Indiana Civil War veterans

Bible records Gilbert Hayes Family, 1790-1906

Decatur County 1896 School Enumeration

Hamilton County & Noblesville in the 1826, 1833 & 1850 Gazetteers

Land Purchased in Marion County 1821-1824

More Immigrants to Indiana from Customs Ship Passenger Lists to New Orleans

Immigrants to Indiana 1853-1855 from Customs Ship Passenger Lists to New York

The Daniel Family Bible & Records

Hamilton County Marriages, 1837-1843

Graves Cemetery, Van Buren, Twp. Clay County

Blake Bibles

Shipping Lanes & Port Maps, England & Ireland

Immigrants to Indiiana

Land Purchased in Marion County

Biggers to Minnesota

Obits of Former Hoosiers who did in Illinois

Marvin Bible

Cox Family of Parke County Indiana Bible Records

Smiths in Nettle Creek Cemetery, Wayne County

Henry & Mary Barkman Family Bible

Index

Indiana Source Book Vol. 4 with Index; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1979-1981

ihs028I have recently review three volumes of the Indiana Source Book. They are as follows:

In the introduction of the third volume, the editor, Willard Heiss, gives the impression that the third volume would be the last. But, he didn’t stop. There is a forth volume,  Indiana Source Book Vol. 4 with Index; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1979-1981. The first thing you may note, is this volume come with an index. This was a large project, dating just far enough back to lack the advantages of digital reproduction and character recognition software. Creating such an index was a monumental job, but a huge boon to the reader.

As stated, my impression was Heiss had not intention of creating a forth volume. However, in 1979, a new editor took over for The Hoosier Genealogist. In Hiess’ own words, he said, “Rebah M. Fraustein, C.G., had assumed the editorial responsibility for The Hoosier Genealogist with Volume 19 (19790) and has continued the tradition of excellence established by her predecessors.” It was this quality of production, along with the “quantity of information” that allowed for this forth volume of Indiana resources to come to light.

 

Copies of Indiana Source Book Vol. 4; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979 and other volumes in this set are available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.00

 

Contents

County Records

Adams

  • Zion (German Reformed) records

Allen

  • Adoption & other records

Bartholomew

  • Marriages for 1860’s

Boone

  • Marriages, 1831-1844

Carroll

  • Marriages, 1828-1847

Continue reading “Indiana Source Book Vol. 4 with Index; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1979-1981”

Indiana Source Book Vol. 3; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979

ihs027Indiana Source Book Vol. 3; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979 is the third, and thus far, largest volume is a set of books contains abstracts from a wide variety of early Indiana records of genealogical value. So far I have covered Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966 and Indiana Source Book Vol. 2; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1967-1972.

These are a collection of abstracts previously printed in The Hoosier Genealogist, a journal of the Indiana Historical Society. The editor, Willard Heiss, has copied these records exactly as how they appeared in the journal.

Covering the years 1973-1979, this volume completes coverage for 18 years worth of publications in The Hoosier Genealogist. In all, there are an estimated 168,000 to 175,000 names in these three volumes. A significant feet and a great blessing to researchers with Hoosier ancestors.

 

Copies of Indiana Source Book Vol. 3; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979 and other volumes in this set are available at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.00

 

Volume 3 Contents

County Records

Adams

  • Marriage, 1836-1844
  • School enumerations, 1846

Bartholomew

  • Sharon Baptist Church
  • Negro register
  • Pioneer physicians

Continue reading “Indiana Source Book Vol. 3; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1973-1979”

Indiana Source Book Vol. 2; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1967-1972

ihs026In my recent article, Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966, I introduced this four volume series on historical Indiana records of genealogical value.. The editor, Willard Heiss, extracted in full the previously collected abstracts as printed in The Hoosier Genealogist, a journal of the Indiana Historical Society.

This volume takes from the years 1967 to 1972, having the full title, Indiana Source Book Vol. 2; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1967-1972. Heiss had this to say about this second volume:

“Dorothy Ricker was the editor [of The Hoosier Genealogist] during this period. It will be noted that the quality and quantity of material is much improved. Dorothy did much of the transcribing and copying of the various records.”

Most of the records covered in this volume cover the early to mid 1800s. Read the following contents list to get a good idea of the records available herein:

 

Contents

School Enumeration Pike-Gibson Counties, 1844-1846

Abstracts of Early Wills o f Harrison County, 1827-1832

Marriages Performed by Elder John Wilson, Washington County

James A. Wilson bible Records

Owen County Marriage Records, 1819-1834

Census of Brookville, 1827

Woodruff Death Records

Delaware County Wills, 1831-1845

Martin County Marriages, 1820-1840

Bartholomew county Marriages, 1821-1832

Bartholomew county Probate Records, 1821-1829

Revolutionary War Prisoners Living in Indiana 1835

Indiana Residents on 1835 Pension Rolls

Burkhart Cemetery, Brown County

Tombstone Orders and Inscriptions of Wabash Valley, 1865-1866

Abstracts of Laporte County Wills, 1844-1871

The Bowen Family

Members and Friends of Little Pigeon Baptist Church, Spencer County, 1816-1840

March Cemetery, Jennings County, Indiana

Notes from Vermillion County Commissioner’s Record, 1824-1826

Hancock County Marriage Records, April 3, 1928-January 7, 1941

Cemetery Records in Genealogy Division, Indiana State Library

Patterns of Migration in the Colonial Period

Patterns of Post Revolutionary Migration

Parke County Wills, 1833-1841

Parke County Wills, 1842-1849

Voters in Deatborn County, Indiana Territory, August 3, 1812

Decatur County Marriage Records, 1822-1829

Decatur County Marriage Records, 1929-1837

Purchasers of Lots in the Town of Vernon, Jennings county, September 7-8, 1815 & June 17, 1817

Gibson County Marriage Records, 1813-1822

Children’s Indentures, Tippecanoe County, 1832-1835

Gibson County Marriage Records, 1823-1832

Crawford County Marriage Records, 1818-1835

Morgan County Marriage Records, 1822-1835

Masonic Mutual benefit Society of Indiana-Mortality Records, 1869-1877

Shelby County Marriages, 1830-1849

Indiana Post Offices, 1816-1825

Reminiscences of George Lowe, A Pioneer of Boone county

Posey County Marriage Records, 1814-1831

Land Purchases in Harrison County, 1807-1810

Students of Wolcottville (Indiana) Young Ladies Seminary, 1851-1853

Spencer County Marriages, 1818-1835

The Apprenticing of Children

Reminiscences of John Barner of Frankfort, Indiana

Franklin County Taxpayers, 1811

Dekalb County Marriages, 1837-1857

Fayette County Taxpayers, 1829

Washington County Marriages, 1815-1833

Abstracts of Ripley County Wills, 1819-1839

Index to 1840 – Census of Marion County, Indiana

Excerpts from the Lawrence Burg Oracle, 1820-21

Records of Vernal Baptist Church, Monroe County, 1817-1850

 

Order Indiana Source Book Vol. 2; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1967-1972 from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.00

Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966

ihs025“The Hoosier Genealogist first appeared in 1962. Its editorial policy was an still is ‘to publish transcripts of original county records (such as marriage, land, will, and probate records), also church, Bible, and cemetery records.’

In this volume I have attempted to cull everything of permanent genealogical value from the first six years of The Hoosier Genealogist.”

This excerpt comes from the preface to Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966. The publication in question is from the early sixties, but the records copied within date back to the early 1800s. These records contain everything from simple date entry for marriage to more detailed abstract from will. In all, there are thousands of names for early Hoosiers.

Perhaps one of the more surprisingly useful bits of information found in this book comes from the inside cover. The author took the time to list, by county, all known courthouse fires with information on what records were lost. Sad, but nice to know when searching for records which simply won’t be there.

In addition to the records listed above, this book includes items like cemetery inscriptions and enumerations of children. While not the easiest book to find family in, there is no index, the volume of information more than makes up for it. A little leg work to search these pages for those who know, or think, they may have an early Indiana ancestry may yield some exciting results. These thousands of names must belong to someone. See where they come form in the contents listed below.

Get your own copy of Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966 from Family Roots Publishing for only $15.00.

 

Contents

County Records

Allen

Marriage, 1824-1837

Blackford

Tract book (1836)

Cass

Unclaimed letters, 1832

Kirklin Cemetery

Daviess

Marriages, 1817-1829

Marriages, 1830-1840

Delaware

Marriages, 1827-1837

Marriages,  1838-1841

First Presbyterian Church records

Studebaker Cemetery

Continue reading “Indiana Source Book Vol. 1; Genealogical Material From “the Hoosier Genealogist” 1961-1966″

Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska Civil War Veterans – Compilation of the GAR Death Rolls

Over 36,000 Civil War Union veterans from just three states listed in a single book. This is the Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Department of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948. Taken from the Journals of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.), this exhaustive work by Dennis Northcott, contains the names; ranks; company, regiment or ship; post, age, death date; and Journal entry for Union veterans who died in Iowa, Kansas, or Nebraska.

The G.A.R. was the largest association of Union veterans to exist after the war. Begun in 1866, membership reached its peak in 1890, with the last member dying in 1956. Membership was limited to “Soldiers and sailors of the United States Army, Navy or Marine Corps.” Individuals must have served between April 12, 1861 and April 9, 1866 in the “war for suppression of the rebellion, and those having been honorably discharged therefrom.” The organization created departments on a state level, one per state. Each year the departments would requested the death rolls from local branches for those who had passed. These rolls were usually published in the annual Journal. Each year’s listing was usually a compilations of those who had passed the year before its issue. In other words, someone who died in 1901 probably did not get listed until the publication at the end of 1902.

Sometimes the Journals listed obituaries for the deceased. These are not included in this book. However, where they did appear the author made a reference note and has provided an appendix listing to the original Journal reference for those who have an associated obituary. In addition to the Introduction, which elaborates the preceding information, page ix lists abbreviations the reader will encounter throughout the book. The author also provides a brief “How to Use This Book” page. Here are the basics from this section:

  • Records are listed alphabetically, with all three states grouped together
  • The last column for each record provides the reference data from which Journal of the Annual Encampment from which the record was extracted
  • How to follow the reference for which Post the person served at or in
  • Additional information regarding G.A.R. members may exist in those cases where original G.A.R. records have survived

These death roll records are another great piece to the puzzle of the lost 1890 census. Leads to information missing in the lost census may be found through these death roll records, and other G.A.R. held information.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Abbreviations

How to Use This Book

Death Rolls (over 600 pages)

Appendix A: Roster of Department of Iowa post names and locations

Appendix B: Roster of Department of Kansas post names and locations

Appendix C: Roster of Department of Nebraska post names and locations

Appendix D: References to Grand Army of the Republic members with obituaries

Appendix E: Statistical summary of states and territories from which comrades in this book served

Appendix F: Annotated bibliography of Grand Army of the Republic department-level rosters and indexes

 

Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska Civil War Veterans: Compilation of the Death Rolls of the Department of Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic, 1883-1948  is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: DN03. Click on the link to purchase.

West Virginia 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows

Although the majority of the 1890 census was burned when a fire razed the Commerce Department Building in 1921, and the few remaining fragments destroyed by 1935, there is one group of the population whose records have endured. In addition to the regular schedules taken in the census, a special census of Union Civil War veterans and their widows was taken at the same time. The idea was for war comrades to have the means to find each other and establish through affidavits their eligibility for veteran’s benefits. Each state has been collected in a series of books indexing the names from this census. This review covers West Virginia 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows.

The 1890 Census put the West Virginian population at 762,794. Union veterans in the state totaled 1,628, including widows. Confederate veterans were reported at 9,117 and 703 widows. Not surprising is that a southern state would have so many more confederate veterans, but perhaps a little surprising that there were so many Union vets. This index lists 18,873 individuals. Most likely some of the names are for Confederate veterans. There are also a number of names which are likely listed twice. Transcription errors and other problems pop up in any indexed record.

This index can help the researcher find original census entries. Entries include the individuals name, the county, locale or city, the supervisor’s district number, and the enumerators district. The index is sorted alphabetically by surname. According to the introduction, best efforts were made to account for handwriting and other issues, but the researchers are reminded to  remain flexible so as not to miss names due to minor spelling errors and other misinterpretations. The book contains a Table of Common Interpretations to help identify where interpretation errors most often occur. An example given is “Warren might appear as WARNER or Warner as WARREN.” Bryan Lee Dilts, the books compiler, has made effort to ensure the flexible researcher can find the records (s)he seeks.

 

Contents

Preface

Introduction

Table of Common Interpretations

1890 West Virginia Veterans Census Film Numbers

Misplaced Enumeration Districts

Abbreviations Used in Locale Names

Map of 1880-1920 West Virgina

1890 West Virginia Veterans Census Index

 

West Virginia 1890 Census Index of Civil War Veterans or Their Widows is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: X928SB, Price: $15.15.

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maine

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790 is a series of books which provide abstracts from the 1790 U.S. Census for the heads of house for each state. This volume covers Maine. Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maine was reproduced by Heritage Quest. Original printing was in 1908 by the U.S. Government Printed Office.

The introduction provides an excellent review of the 1790 census, including the process Congress took to fund the census and make sure it took place. There is also a copy of the Congressional Act to conduct the census.

Names in the census are organized by county, with the counties appearing alphabetically. An index at the end provides a listing of all names in alphabetical order. The book offers a brief background to the census and includes a copy of An Act Providing For the Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the United States, as approved by Congress on 1 March 1790. The abstract offered in this book includes the following columns of information:

  • Name of Head of Family
  • Free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families
  • Free white males under 16 years
  • Free white females including heads of families
  • All other free persons
  • Slaves

There were over 17,000 heads of house in Maine recorded in the census. If you have early American ancestors, this book may just contain a name you are looking for.

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, New Hampshire is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: A0299, Price: $16.17.

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, New Hampshire

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790 is a series of books which provide abstracts from the 1790 U.S. Census for the heads of house for each state. This volume covers New Hampshire. Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, New Hampshire was reproduced by Heritage Quest. Original printing was in 1908 by the U.S. Government Printed Office.

Names are organized by county, with the counties appearing alphabetically. An index at the end provides a listing of all names in alphabetical order. The book offers a brief background to the census and includes a copy of An Act Providing For the Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the United States, as approved by Congress on 1 March 1790. The abstract offered in this book includes the following columns of information:

  • Name of Head of Family
  • Free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families
  • Free white males under 16 years
  • Free white females including heads of families
  • All other free persons
  • Slaves

There were over 24,000 heads of house in New Hampshire recorded in the census. If you have early American ancestors, this book may just contain a name you are looking for.

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, New Hampshire is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: A0309, Price: $19.00.

Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maryland

There is not much to say about Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maryland. The book is exactly what the title says it is, an abstract from the 1790 U.S. Census for the heads of house in the state of Maryland. However, if you have early American ancestors, this book may just contain a name you are looking for.

The book offers a brief background to the census and includes a copy of An Act Providing For the Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the United States, as approved by Congress on 1 March 1790. The abstract offered in this book includes the following columns of information:

Name of Head of Family.

Free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families.

Free white males under 16 years.

Free white females including heads of families.

All other free persons.

Slaves.

Originally printed in 1908 by the U.S. Government Printed Office, the book was reprinted in 2000 by Heritage Quest. Names are organized by county, with the counties appearing alphabetically. An index at the end provides a listing of all names in alphabetical order. In all, there are over 34,500 names listed in this book.

You can obtain a copy of Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790, Maryland from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: A0303, Price: $19.95.

New York in the Revolution as Colony and State

In 1894, James A. Roberts became the comptroller for the State of New York. During his first term he took action to systematically order, “for the purpose of easy reference,” the old records of the comptroller’s department. Records and papers relating to the service of New Yorkers in the Revolutionary War were discovered during this process. The discovery contained muster and pay-rolls of different organizations. General Know, first secretary of war, in a report to Congress, identified 17,781 New Yorkers who participated in the Revolutionary War. However, the records discovered in the comptroller’s office showed that actually 43,645 New York “soldiers in good standing” served in the war.

The subsequent result of this discovery and its review is a list of New York soldiers with names, ranks, and organizations. This list is presented in New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, second edition. This book is credited to and was published by Roberts, as comptroller, 1898. A second volume, compiled by Frederic G. Mather, was added in 1901.

The second volume is a compilation of documents and records from the office of the state comptroller. Volume II gives a “condensed history of the War as shown by the documents” found under Roberts’ direction. In effect, this volume is a summary of the whole body of papers. The original records are described as various papers “long since detached from their original file packages,” and were, “promiscuously scattered through great masses of old vouchers and files.” Now, these two volumes of work are available as a single book. In 1996, the Genealogical Publishing Co. reprinted the two volumes into a single book. The contents of which are as follows:

 

Contents Volume I (Part 1 of this book)

Introductory

Index to Illustrations

The Line

  • 1st Regiment
  • 2nd Regiment
  • 3rd Regiment
  • 4th Regiment
  • 5th Regiment
  • Additional Regiment (Battalion)
  • Congress Regiment
  • Additional Corps, Green Mountain Boys
  • Additional Corps
  • Additional Corps
  • Artillery, 2nd Regiment
  • Artillery, 3rd Regiment
  • Artillery, Provincial
  • Artillery Regiments
  • Cavalry, 2nd Regiment Light Dragoons
  • Calvary, 4th Regiment Light Dragoons
  • Artificers
  • Miners

The Levies

  • Col. John Harper
  • Col. Frederick Weissenfels
  • Col. William Malcom
  • Col. Lewis Dubois, Lt. Col. Brinton Paine
  • Col. Morris Graham, Lt. Col. Benjamin Birdsall, Lt. Col. Henry Livingston
  • Col. Albert Pawling
  • Col. Marinus Willett, Lt. Col. John McKinstry
  • Independent Corps of 1,000 Men

The Militia

  • Albany County
    • 1st Regiment
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • 5th Regiment
    • 6th Regiment
    • 7th Regiment
    • 8th Regiment
    • 9th Regiment
    • 10th Regiment
    • 11th Regiment
    • 12th Regiment
    • 13th Regiment
    • 14th Regiment
    • 15th Regiment
    • 16th Regiment
    • 17th Regiment
  • Charlotte County
    • Company of Minute Men
  • Cumberland County
  • Dutchess County
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • 5th Regiment
    • 6th Regiment
    • 7th Regiment
    • Associated Exempts
    • Associated Exempts
    • Regiment of Minute Men
    • Rangers
  • Orange County
    • 1st Regiment
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • Associated Exempts
  • Suffolk County
    • 1st Regiment of Minute Men
    • 3rd Regiment of Minute Men
    • Regiment of Minute Men
  • Tryon county
    • 1st Regiment
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • 5th Regiment
    • Battalion of Minute Men
    • Associated Exempts
    • Rangers
    • Rangers
    • Rangers
  • Ulster County
    • 1st Regiment
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • Independent Company
    • Light Horse
    • Rangers
  • Westchester County
    • 1st Regiment
    • 2nd Regiment
    • 3rd Regiment
    • 4th Regiment
    • Associated Exempts
    • Separate Exempts
  • Miscellaneous Organizations
    • Col. John Lasher’s Regiment
    • Col. John Nicholson’s Regiment
    • Col. Cornelius D. Wynkoop’s Regiment
    • Maj. John Wheelock’s Independent Company
    • Ens. John Fondey, Jr.’s Party
    • Capt. John A. Bradt’s Rangers
    • Capt. John Reilay’s Rangers

The Militia (Land Bounty Rights)

  • The Several Organizations are referred to (by page) above, in the order of their respective counties.

Naval Service

  • Privateers

Lists and Indexes

  • Sundry Persons whose service is evidenced by original documents and manuscripts on file in the office of the State Comptroller, but whose names are not found on the papers of any of the regular organizations
  • Pensioners and Applicants for Pensions
  • Contents of the Volumes of Original Documents in the office of the State Comptroller
  • General Index, Explanations

 

Contents Volume II (Part 2 of this book)

The Military and Naval Service

  • The Army
    • The Calling Out of the Militia
    • Courts-Martial
    • Deserters
    • The Pay of the Militia
    • The Pay of the Continental Army
    • Bounties
    • Pensions
    • American Prisoners of War
    • Hospitals
  • The Indians
  • Fortifications
    • The Secret Committee
    • The Chains Across the Hudson River
  • Military Roads
  • Military Stores
    • Cannon
    • Muskets
    • Lances
    • Powder
    • Flints
    • Lead
    • Flags
    • Horses
    • Forage
  • Clothing
    • The Commissary of Congress
    • The Flax Committee
    • Shoes and Stockings
    • The State Clothier
    • The Commissioners of Clothing
    • Uniforms
  • Provisions
    • The Commissary of Congress
    • Spirits
    • Pork
    • Beef
    • Tea
    • Peas
    • Grain
    • Flour
    • Bread
    • Salt
  • Privateers
    • The Marine Committee
  • Ships

The Civil Service

  • The Judiciary
    • Courts and Judges
  • The Legislative
    • The Provincial Congress
      • First
      • Second
      • Third
      • Forth (or Convention)
        • Aid to the Families of Soldiers
        • The Poor who came out of the City of New York
        • The Poor and Distresses Inhabitants
        • The Refugees from Long Island to Connecticut
    • The Committee of Safety
      • The Refractory Militia
      • The County Committees
    • The Councils of Safety
      • The New Haven Convention
    • The Legislatures
      • First Session
      • Second Session
      • Third Session
      • Forth Session
      • Fifth Session
      • Sixth Session
    • The Continental Congress
  • The Executive
    • The Governor
      • Account of Gov. Clinton
      • Entertainments
      • Pledges by the State
      • The Temporary Government in the Southern District
      • The Council of Appointment
      • The Private Secretary
    • The Lieutenant-Governor
    • The Attorney-General
    • The Secretary of State
    • The Auditor-General
      • Claims Against the State
      • Claims for Damages by the Enemy
      • Claims of the State against the United States
      • Specie Requisitions
    • The Treasurer
      • The Subscription Rolls
      • The Loan Office
      • Taxation
    • The Surveyor-General
      • The Census
      • Land Bounty Rights
  • The Executive Bodies
    • The State Agent
      • The Assistant State Agent
    • The Committee for Conspiracies
    • The Commissioners of Conspiracies
      • The Disaffected, Suspected and Tories
        • Disturbance in the Counties of Albany and Dutchess
      • British Prisoners of War
        • The Fleet Prison
        • Prisoners sent to other States
    • The Commissioners of Sequestration
      • Claims for Damages by the American Army
      • Estates Confiscated
    • The Commissioners of Specie
    • The Commissioners of Forfeitures
      • Estates Forfeited

Miscellaneous

  • Title pages of the fifty-two volumes of original documents in the office of the comptroller
  • Index of names

 

You can get a copy of New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, second edition from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC4967, Price: $58.80.

Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume II

A few days ago I provided a review on Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume I. Volume II adds additional Monthly Meeting abstract from the Society of Friends in Indiana, from as early as 1823 through the first few years of the 20th century.

Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume II reprints the same great introduction by Willard Heiss found in Volume I. The introduction by Heiss provides a telling summary of the origin of the Society of Friends and its growth in America. This volume extends the first by adding the individual Monthly Meeting groups’ records and minutes. To learn more about the two book set, please see the review for Volume I.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgement

Introduction

Abbreviations

Wayne County

  • Chester Monthly Meeting
  • Dover Monthly Meeting
  • Economy Monthly Meeting
  • Milford Monthly Meeting (Hicksite)
  • New Garden Monthly Meeting
  • Newport Monthly Meeting (Antislavery)
  • West Grove Monthly Meeting (Hicksite)

Union County

  • Salem Monthly Meeting (Antislavery)
  • Silver Creek/Salem Monthly Meeting

Index

 

To order a copy of Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume II please visit Family Roots Publishing; Item #: IHS005, Price: $39.20.

Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana

“The Society of Friends or Quakers (the terms are synonymous) had its beginning in the middle of the seventeenth century in England. It was in this period of religious and political turmoil and uncertainty that George Fox and others discovered “Truth” as they saw it. Quakerism was but one of the new sects that grew out of those unsettled times. This Society was one that thrived on adversity, grew strong, and left its imprint on subsequent generation.”

This quote, by Willard Heiss,  comes from the introduction of the 1962 edition of Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume I. The original edition was compiled by Willard and his introduction has been reprinted in the books current 1996 edition. This current edition was revised by Ruth Dorrel and Thomas D. Hamm and is published by the Indiana Historical Society.

The introduction by Heiss provides a telling summary of the origin of the Society of Friends and its growth in America. The introduction covers a lot of historical detail, containing the following sections:

  • Origin of the Society of Friends and Its Spread to America
  • The Society of Friends in Indiana
    • Indiana Yearly Meeting
    • Western Yearly Meeting
    • Indiana Yearly Meeting (Hicksite)
    • Indiana Yearly Meeting (Anti-Slavery)
    • Western Yearling Meeting (Conservative)
  • Later Divisions of Yearly Meetings
  • Organizational Structure
    • Yearly Meetings
    • Quarterly Meetings
    • Monthly Meetings
    • Preparative Meetings
    • Meetings for Worship
    • Indulged Meetings for Worship
  • The Friends Meeting House
  • Types of Records
    • Monthly Meeting Minutes
      • Removals
      • Disownments
      • Received in membership
      • Birthright membership
      • Conclusion
    • Marriage Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Removal Certificate Record
  • Friends Burying Grounds and Funerals
  • Reference Material
  • Locations of Original Records
  • Orthodox Monthly Meetings in Indiana Prior to 1850
  • Hicksite Meetings in Indiana After Separation in 1829
  • Anti-Slavery Friends Monthly Meetings in Indiana After Separation in 1843
  • Conservative Monthly Meetings in Indiana After Separation in 1877

Meeting minutes and records were critical to the Society of Friends. Monthly meeting minutes were transcribed twice a year into permanent record books. As noted above, meeting minutes include removals (when families moved from one area to another), disownments (disciplinary act to remove membership), additions or requests for new memberships, and the inclusion of minor children of new members. The society also maintained birth, marriage, and death records. Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana contains information from both the meetings and the other vital records kept by the Society in Indiana. Records cover 1809 through 1902, from the time the first “meeting” was established in the Indiana Territory.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Abbreviations

Whitewater Monthly Meeting

Springfield Monthly Meeting

Index

 

Copies of Abstracts of the Records of The Society of Friends in Indiana, Volume I are available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: IHS004, Price: $58.80.