Scottish Jews Finally Get Their Own Tartan

The following teaser is from an article posted on uk.news.yahoo.com
scott

Scottish Jews Finally Get Their Own Tartan – After 300 Years

Scotland’s Jewish community finally has its own tartan – a 100% kosher design approved by the Scottish Tartans Authority.

The design was approved by Rabbi Mendel Jacobs, the only Scottish born Rabbi living in Scotland.

Read the full article.

The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish” — 10% Off for a few days only

hbl0788The Irish and the Scots have a nearly inseparable history, if examined on the basis of origin. Scottish Highlanders originally came from Ireland and the two peoples have long been connected by blood, language, and religion. Both, have also, played a significant role in the founding and growth of America, dating back to the earliest colonies. The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor tell of the lives and history of these two groups. The discussion covers both the historical and ethnic background to the Irish and Scots as well as their place in early America.

This book is comprised of several independent publications produced between 1888 and 1895. Thus, the book is broken into three main sections in concert with those publications:

  • “The Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish”
  • “How the Irish Came as Builders of the Nation”
  • “Supplementary Facts and Comments”

In the historical review, reader learn of the relationships between Celts, Saxons, Normans, and various religions practiced by these groups. The Gaelic language is also reviewed. In examining American contributions, the book tells of Irish settlers who played prominently in early American and U.S. history. Adding value to genealogists, the book lists the surnames for many Irish immigrants of the 1700s. There are also lists of surnames of Irish natives who received land grants or had land set apart in the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s. There is also a list of Scottish names derived from Irish names.

Copies of The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor from Family Roots Publishing and at 10% off for a short time.

The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”

hbl0788The Irish and the Scots have a nearly inseparable history, if examined on the basis if origin. Scottish Highlanders originally came from Ireland and the two peoples have long been connected by blood, language, and religion. Both, have also, played a significant role in the founding and growth of America dating back to the earliest colonies. The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor tell of the lives and history of these two groups. The discussion covers both the historical and ethnic background to the Irish and Scots as well as their place in early America.

This book is comprised of several independent publications produced between 1888 and 1895. Thus, the book is broken into three main sections in accordance with those publications:

  • “The Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish”
  • “How the Irish Came as Builders of the Nation”
  • “Supplementary Facts and Comment”

In the historical review, reader learn of the relationships between Celts, Saxons, Normans, and various religions practiced by these groups. The Gaelic language is also reviewed. In examining American contributions, the book tells of Irish settlers who played prominently in early American and U.S. history. Adding value to genealogists, the book lists the surnames for many Irish immigrants of the 1700s. There are also lists of surnames of Irish natives who received land grants or had land set apart in the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s. There is also a list of Scottish names derived from Irish names.

Obtain a copy of The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBL0788, Price: $16.17.

Tracing Your English & Scottish Ancestors

Moorshead Magazines is the publisher of Family Chronicle, Internet Genealogy, and Discovering Family History. Every so often the company collects the best articles on a particular subject from each of the three magazines and combines them into a special edition. Tracing You English & Scottish Ancestors is one such release.

Produced in 2011, this 56-page special edition features 19 articles relevant to English and Scottish research. A complete list of article can be found below. In addition, before publication articles were updated to ensure source materials and online references were up to date. While some references may change with time, having the source names can help researches find any altered sites usually with some ease. The cover helps describe the contents: “From parish records, birth registrations and electoral rolls to old newspapers, telephone directories and online databases, we’ll show you what you need and where to find it!” Perhaps the best descriptor of contents, in this case, come from the actual list of contents, which can be found below.

This guide covers topics which can help the researcher find more recent ancestors, even kin still living in the UK or Scotland. Other articles focus on older collections and helpful topics like reading older-style handwriting. This guide works equally well for those with British ancestors but they themselves live in other countries, as well as, British and Scottish citizens researching their past in country.

 

Contents

British WWII Merchant Vessel Cards

David A. Norris examines an under-appreciated genealogical resource

WII Guest Children

John D. Reid looks at the records of children evacuated from Britain

British Poor Records in the Parish Chest

Richard Crooks tells you how to unlock parish chest records

Online Catalogs and Databases of English County Record Offices

Alan Stewart takes you on a tour of what is available at English county record offices

Newsworthy Genealogy: British Newspaper Archives

John D. Reid read up on family history in online newspaper archives

Researching Your Scottish Ancestry

Marian Press looks at the wealth of resources available from Scotland

Net Notes: UK Telephone Directories

Halvor Moorshead looks at a great website that is sure to be of interest

Researching Your Trafalgar Ancestors

If your ancestors fought at Trafalgar, David A. Norris can help you find them

Finding and Using English and Welsh BMDs

George G. Morgan looks at what you can learn from British civil registration records

35 Top Sites for Scottish Research

Marian Press takes you on a virtual tour of the top sites for Scottish resources

Locate Anglican Parish Records in England

George G. Morgan shows you how to take advantage of this great resource

Olde English Handwriting: An Online Course

Diane L. Richard looks at an online course for deciphering old handwriting

Home Children: British Child Immigrants to Canada

Janice Nickerson looks at genealogy’s forgotten orphans and how you can find them

British Electoral Rolls

According to Garrick Webster, voters lists are a great way to find long-lost British kin

Finding Old UK Maps Online

Rachel Newcombe shows you how to map out a strategy for finding your family

The Business of Putting British Records Online

Jenny Roche shares several sources on how to do your British research

Cornish Online Parish Clerks

Julia Mosman describes a genealogy initiative that we hope will spread

Canmore: Scottish Archives Online

David A. Norris browses through Scotland’s historical archives

Copies of Tracing Your English & Scottish Ancestors are available from Family Root Publishing; Price: $7.95.

Scottish-American Court Records: 1733-1783

Many early Scottish immigrants were enterprising individuals. In fact, many were engaged in such economic endeavors like the tobacco trade, which prior to the Revolution was controlled by Glasgow-based merchants and their factors. As is always the case, where there are business transactions there are lawsuits. Scottish-American Court Records: 1733-1783 lists North American residents engaged or involved in litigation in Scotland and came before the Court of Session (the highest civil court) or the High Court of the Admiralty (which oversaw all seafaring and maritime cases).

Each name is listed with its corresponding reference. Each is also listed with the names of those on whom the litigation is against, usually with a location and date. Some of these entries include the names of  relatives. Here are a few examples:

  • Craigdallie, Janet. Janet Craifdallie, daughter of Hugh Craigdallie, surgeon in Princess Anne County, Virginia, eldest son of Gilbert Craigdallie, glover in Perth, V. Thomas Anderson, merchant in Perth, & Lawrence Reid, maltman in Perth, 14 Feb. 1776.
  • Crawford, George. George Crawford, merchant in Glasglow then in Jamaica, V. Andrew Crawford in Fearlinebank, 7 Aug. 1777.

There are over 800 names listed in the index.

 

Scottish-American Court Records: 1733-1783 is available at Family Root Publishing; Price: $17.64.

 

The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”

The Irish and the Scots have a nearly inseparable history, if examined on the basis if origin. Scottish Highlanders originally came from Ireland and the two peoples have long been connected by blood, language, and religion. Both, have also, played a significant role in the founding and growth of America dating back to the earliest colonies. The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor tell of the lives and history of these two groups. The discussion covers both the historical and ethnic background to the Irish and Scots as well as their place in early America.

This book is comprised of several independent publications produced between 1888 and 1895. Thus, the book is broken into three main sections in accordance with those publications:

  • “The Irish Scots and the Scotch-Irish”
  • “How the Irish Came as Builders of the Nation”
  • “Supplementary Facts and Comment”

In the historical review, reader learn of the relationships between Celts, Saxons, Normans, and various religions practiced by these groups. The Gaelic language is also reviewed. In examining American contributions, the book tells of Irish settlers who played prominently in early American and U.S. history. Adding value to genealogists, the book lists the surnames for many Irish immigrants of the 1700s. There are also lists of surnames of Irish natives who received land grants or had land set apart in the Plantation of Ulster in the early 1600s. There is also a list of Scottish names derived from Irish names.

Obtain a copy of The Irish Scots and the “Scotch-Irish”: An Historical and Ethnological Monograph, With Some Reference to Scotia Major and Scotia Minor from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBL0788, Price: $16.17.

 

Clans and Tartans

Clans and Tartans, by Charles Maclean, is a small but insightful introduction to the Scottish clans and the tartan’s they wore. In just a few short pages, the reader is introduced to “Scotland’s most enduring symbols.” This book introduces the origins of the clans and the importance and meaning tartans. The author also adds a couple of pages on tracing one’s ancestors.

According to the cover of the book: “The Highland clans were defiantly independent: they spoke a different language, were loyal to their own chiefs, and fiercely proud of their Name. Most distinctively, they wore, and have kept, their own traditional costume.” This book examines the leading clans.

For each clan there is a history along with an illustration for a swatch of the clans tartan colors. Illustrations were provided by David McAllister. Each name is given two pages. Each begins with the same three elements: the clan’s lands, the clan slogan, and plant badges.

Contents of the book:

The Origins of Clans and Tartans

Tracing Your Ancestors

family names and their tartans:

  • Buchanan
  • Cameron
  • Campbell
  • Fraser
  • Gordon
  • Grant
  • Lamont
  • Macdonald
  • Macdougall
  • Macgregor
  • Macinnes
  • Mackay
  • Mackenzie
  • Mackinnon
  • Mackintosh
  • Maclachlan
  • Maclean
  • Macleod
  • Macnab
  • Macneil
  • Macpherson
  • MacRae
  • Munro
  • Robertson
  • Ross
  • Stewart

For those with a Scottish heritage or who have a simple curiosity about clan history, Clans and Tartans can be obtained from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: PP916, Price: $9.75.

Scottish Ancestry: Research Methods for Family Historians

Scottish blood running through your veins? If so, Scottish Ancestry: Research Methods for Family History is one of the more pleasurable reads you will find on the topic. Sherry Irvine writes as though the topic were a person. She adds life and interest to the descriptions and techniques provided for each topic. Irvine recognizes it is impossible to be everything to everyone. While some books take the subject on as a step by step guide, some focus on specific time periods, while others try to identify every possible source out there. Each book type has its pros and cons. However, Irvine kept her goal simple, yet unique: she hoped to provide a “readable tour of the records with enough background and enough about technique to eradicate the feelings of frustration and of being overwhelmed that we all know so well. I also steer you to more detailed information when you need it or when your curiosity is aroused.”

This volume covers everything one would expect in a research guide. Identification of resources. Explanation of how to access and interpret records. What can be found online and what requires an onsite visit? Add a little history and background and the result is a thorough guide to standard research topic with an emphasis on Scotland. However, this book adds a bit more.

The author has a unique writing style. Indeed, her writing style combined with structure make the book read more like a narrative than a guide or textbook. Her prose are descriptive and full of opinion, while lighthearted enough to encourage continued reading.  In one instance, Irvine likens newspapers to trunks:

“Dipping into old newspapers is akin to lifting the lid of an ancient trunk in the attic. There is a fascinating mix of fact, opinion, and odd detail which throws considerable light on the loves and viewpoints of our ancestors and their communities. Context and opinion, dictated as they were by a desire to sell newspapers, can become an object of study in themselves.”

In other words, despite the fact that newspapers suffered from the need to write on subjects and in a way as to best sell papers, they are a fascinating tool anyway, full of excitement and mystery. See why the way she writes is so fun?

Every topic is covered in the book this way—paragraph form, even when introducing records sources and means to find and interpret these records. The book does have enough tables, charts, and examples to satisfy the avid text book junkie. For both an educational as well as entertaining review of Scottish ancestral records consider picking up a copy of Scottish Ancestry: Research Methods for Family Historians.

The book is available from Family Root Publishing; Item #: TP277, Price: $19.55.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

1 • Prudent Preliminaries

  • About Scotland
  • Scottish Emigration
  • Pitfalls
  • The Internet
  • Conclusion

2 • Well Begun is Half Done

  • Develop Skills
  • Objectives and Strategy
  • Organization
  • Seeking Assistance
  • Build Knowledge and Experience
  • The Records
  • Historical Context
  • Geographical Context
  • Building a Reference Library

3 • Civil Registration

  • Details
  • Searching in Edinburgh
  • Searching at Home with Scotland’s People
  • Resources at FamilySearch
  • Manual Searches
  • Selecting a Search Method
  • Thinking it Through
  • Conclusion

4 • Bridging Decades and Centuries

  • When, What, and Where
  • Using the GROS Census Records
  • Using Other Census Records
  • The 1881 Census
  • Strategy, Tips, and Pitfalls
  • Directories and Electoral Rolls
  • Newspapers
  • Conclusion

5 • Records of the Church of Scotland

  • Historical Background
  • Major Indexes — On Computer
  • Major Indexes — Other Formats
  • Other Finding Aids
  • Thinking About Indexes
  • The Registers
  • Monumental Inscriptions
  • Kirk Sessions
  • Irregular Marriages
  • Conclusion

6 • Records of Secessionists and Other Denominations

  • Finding the Records
  • The Records

7 • Disposition of Goods and Property

  • Testamentary Records
  • The Online Index to Testaments
  • Service of Heirs
  • Register of Sasines
  • Conclusion

8 • Trades and Occupations

  • Government Employees and the Professions
  • Merchants and Manufacturers
  • Craftsmen and Tradesmen
  • Ships and Railways
  • Farmers and Laborers
  • Conclusion

9 • Taxes and Contracts

  • A Word on Local Administration
  • Tax Records
  • The Registry of Deeds
  • Conclusion

10 • Special People

  • The Poor
  • The Records of the Poor
  • Lawbreakers and Litigants
  • Migrants
  • Conclusion

11 • Problem Solving

Appendix A • Church of Scotland Baptisms and Marriages

Appendix B • The Family History Library Catalog

Appendix C • Parlimentary Papers

Appendix D • List of Useful Addresses and Websites

Bibliography

Index

 

17th Century Scots in the West Indies

Since the earliest colonial days, Scots have immigrated to the New World in sizable numbers. In the 17th Century there were many Scottish colonies established, though some were short lived. Nova Scotia (1629), East Jersey (1683), and South Carolina (1684), are prime examples. Many of these early immigrants were religious dissidents. There were also a number of deported criminals and prisoners of war sent to the Americas during the century. However, the northern colonies, which would one day become part of Canada and the U.S., were not the only destination point of Scottish emigrants.

“The Scottish connection with the Caribbean started in 1611 with the voyage to the West Indies of the Janet of Leith. It was not until after 1626, however, that Scots actually settled in the Caribbean. In 1627 King Charles I appointed James Hay, Earl of Carlisle, a Scot, as Governor of the Caribbees, and this led to a steady trickle of Scots to Barbados and other islands…During the 1660s the Glasgow-based organization called the Company Trading to Virginia, the Caribbee Islands, Barbados, New England, St. Kitts, Montserrat, and Other Colonies in America established economic links with the West Indies. By the latter part of the seventeenth century, Scots merchants, planters, seafarers, and transportees were to be found throughout the English and Dutch colonies of the Caribbean. In total, it is believed that as many as 5,000 Scots settled temporarily or permanently in the Caribbean before the Act of Union in 1707… The settlement of Scots in the West Indies was important from the point of view both of the colonist and the home country. Many of the colonists used the islands as a stopping-off point before continuing on to the mainland of America, where they then settled. Alexander Hamilton and Theodore Roosevelt are numbered among those who descend from Scots who initially settled in the Caribbean”

The Original Scots Colonists of Early America: Caribbean Supplement 1611-1707, by David Dobson, lists hundreds of colonists who settled in the West Indies. The book is an extract of names and information regarding migrations, such as ship names, dates, and any other relevant information the author was able to pull from existing information. Here are a couple of examples form the book:

DOWNIE, JAMES, from Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, a Sailor on the Unicorn from Leith to Darien 14 July 1698, cnf Edenburgh 21 October 1707 [SRO.CC8.8.83]

MILLER, THOMAS, son of Baillie Thomas Miller of Stirling, a surgeon’s mate on the Hope subscribed to a deed of factory in Stirling 15 August 1699 before sailing to Darien. [SRO.GD406, bundle 162, p40/4]

This book focuses on records and information prior to the union between Scotland and England. Information for post-1707 immigration is easier to come by, making this pre-1707 extract all the more valuable. Both primary and secondary sources for this volume come from both the U.K. and the U.S. A complete list of references, both archives and publication, with associated abbreviations, can be found at the beginning of the book.

 

Order a copy of The Original Scots Colonists of Early America: Caribbean Supplement 1611-1707 for your library from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC1472, Price: $19.60.