New FamilySearch Database Collections Update as of May 2, 2016

FamilySearch-Logo-2014p

Millions of new US an international records this week including Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984, New Zealand Archives New Zealand Probate Records 1843-1998, Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1626-2001, France Saône-et-Loire Military Conscriptions 1867-1940, Russia Tatarstan Church Books 1721-1939, Paraguay Catholic Church Records 1754-2015, and Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920. Find these and more by following the links below.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

France Saône-et-Loire Military Conscriptions 1867-1940 – 244,795 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Lesotho Evangelical Church Records 1874-1983 – 0 – 20,396 – New browsable image collection.
New Brunswick Saint John Saint John Burial Permits 1889-1919 – 0 – 13,902 – New browsable image collection.
New Zealand Archives New Zealand Probate Records 1843-1998 – 10,511 – 363,839 – Added images to an existing collection
New Zealand Auckland Waikumete Cemetery Records 1886-1948 – 27,054 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ontario County Marriage Registers 1858-1869 – 0 – 9,447 – New browsable image collection.
Paraguay Catholic Church Records 1754-2015 – 397,638 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Lambayeque Civil Registration 1873-1998 – 339,222 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Peru Puno Civil Registration 1890-2005 – 0 – 248,882 – Added images to an existing collection
Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984 – 0 – 1,741,178 – Added images to an existing collection
Russia Tatarstan Church Books 1721-1939 – 0 – 444,585 – Added images to an existing collection
Russia Tver Church Books 1722-1918 – 0 – 905 – Added images to an existing collection
Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1734-1920 – 0 – 205,216 – Added images to an existing collection

United States Databases

Arkansas Ex-Confederate Pension Records 1891-1939 – 172,347 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California Fresno and Napa Counties Obituaries 1974-1997 – 65,850 – 76,098 – New indexed records and images collection
Iowa Church and Civil Marriages 1837-1989 – 13,474 – 0 – New indexed records collection
Iowa County Marriages 1838-1934 – 67,489 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Clerk Vital and Town Records 1626-2001 – 472,449 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Massachusetts Town Records ca. 1638-1961 – 58,412 – 87,781 – New indexed records and images collection
Michigan Church Marriages 1865-1931 – 2,303 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Michigan County Marriages 1820-1940 – 62,733 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New Hampshire Birth Certificates 1901-1909 – 104,327 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Pennsylvania Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records 1865-1936 – 14,100 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Carolina Deaths 1915-1965 – 157,759 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Historical Manuscripts, NEW Second Edition

m0027Germans have long been a scattered people. Millions of Americans identify their ancestral roots as German. For many, however, their ancestors spoke German but never lived in what constitutes modern Germany. Some “Germans” never even lived is what could be called a German states or territories. From the middle ages on, German-speaking communities have thrived all across Europe, especially in the Eastern countries. Many identified themselves by their language, culture, and customs as German, but may have lived nowhere near modern Germany. The result is many German documents exist across a large geographical area in Europe. German, as a language, was used in written vital records across Europe. Documents were also written in other languages but by German hands; in particular, French and Latin were common.

Learning to read and transcribe these documents can be a stumbling block. The Gothic alphabet alone can be difficult to read, even if you speak fluent German. Fortunately, Roger Minert has taken his more than 20 years of experience and applied it to producing Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Historical Manuscripts. The original book is considered by many to be the preemptive guide on the subject. This new second edition extends the offerings, and will to serve those with German ancestry.

This book is so much more than a basic treatment of Old German Script or Gothic letters. This book examine the history, the development, the alphabet, and the handwriting of not only the German language, but also Latin and French in German documents. In the author’s own words, he as added the following features to this book, not previously handled by other authors:

  • “a brief but scholarly review of the history of handwriting styles and alphabets in German-speaking regions of Europe
  • the introduction of a computerized, normed set of Gothic alphabet characters
  • the inclusion of examples consisting of illustrations taken from genuine records
  • a methodology for deciphering Latin texts in German source documents
  • a methodology for deciphering French texts in German source documents
  • the introduction of the only modern technology to be applied to the deciphering of words and names in old handwritten German documents — the reverse alphabetical index”

In addition to all this well-defined and unique information, the author facilitate the learning process with over 150, now, 200 illustrations. These documents are used step by step along the path taught in this guide to decipher German handwriting. In many cases, the author has provided a transliteration to a modern typeset face of the sample’s text, a translation into English, and a useful analysis to better understand both the type of document as well as key points in the deciphering of the contents.

The following are new to this second edition:

  • In-depth examinations of the Fraktur, Gothic, and Latin alphabets
  • Extensive techniques for analyzing texts
  • 44 new documents from many subject areas
  • Nearly 200 images from original records
  • A new computer font more closely resembling the handwriting of original documents
  • Lists of genealogical terms in German, Latin, and French (both alphabetical and reverse alphabetical)

The new edition has 271 pages plus another 10 of front matter, totaling 281 pages. The first edition had a total of 192 pages. So – there are an additional 89 pages in the volume, with no upward change in price.

[A full table of contents is listed below]

 

Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Vital Records Written in Germany is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: M0001, Price: $27.44.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

How to Use this Book

Chapter 1: The Evolution of Handwriting Styles in Germany

  • Introduction
  • Early Handwriting Styles
  • Handwriting Styles after the Middle Ages
  • The Standardization of Handwriting Styles
  • The End of the Gothic Alphabet in Daily Use
  • Determining the Language of the Handwritten Document
  • Notes

Chapter 2: Deciphering German Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Gothic Handwriting Alphabet
  • Lower Case Gothic Characters
  • Upper Case Gothic Characters

Consonant Clusters and Doubled Consonants

  • Diacritical Marks and Punctuation
  • Crossing the t and Dotting the i
  • Abbreviations
  • Similar and Confusing Characters
  • Numbers and Dates
    • Numerals
    • Days of the Week
    • Months
    • Time of Day
    • Seasons of the Year
    • Cardinal Numbers vs. Ordinal Numbers
    • Feast Dates
    • French Republican Calendar Dates
  • Learning to Write in the Gothic Alphabet
  • German Language Tools
    • German Grammar
    • German Syntax and Word Order
    • German Vocabulary
    • Archaic German Language and Dialect Variants
  • Personal Names
  • Place Names
  • Determining the Type of Record
  • Basic Tactics in Deciphering German Handwriting in Vital Record Entries
    • Extraction
    • Transliteration
    • Translation
  • Additional Tactics in Deciphering German Handwriting in Vital Records
    • Index
    • Chronology
    • Alphabet Sampler
    • Vowel/Consonant Environments
    • Syntactic Analysis
  • Deciphering Sample Vital Record Entries
    • Church Birth/Christening Records
    • Civil Birth Records
    • Church Marriage Records
    • Church Death/Burial Records
    • Civil Death Records
    • Other Types of Records
    • Summary
  • Notes

Chapter 3: Deciphering Latin Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Latin Alphabet as Used in German Vital Records
  • Abbreviations in Vital Records entries in Latin
  • Numerals
  • Dates
  • Latin Grammar
  • The Elements of a Typical Latin Church Book Entry
    • Column Entries
    • Sentence Entries
    • Paragraph Entries
  • Tactics for Deciphering Latin in Vital Records in German Documents
  • Summary
  • Notes

Chapter 4: Deciphering French Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Practice of French Record-keeping in Germany
  • Church Vital Records in the French Language
    • Civil Registry Vital Records in the French Language
    • Civil Registry Pre-printed Entry Forms
    • Numerals and Dates
  • The French Republican Calendar
  • French Grammar and Language Tools
    • Gender
    • Number
    • Capitalization
    • Syntax
    • Vocabulary
    • Placement of Adjectives
  • Analyzing French Entries in German Church Records
    • Column-entry Church Records
    • Paragraph-entry Church Records
  • Analyzing French Entries in German Civil Records
    • Paragraph French Entries in German Church Records
    • Pre-printed French Entries in German Civil Records
  • Summary
  • Notes

Chapter 5: Additional Documents of Historical Importance

  • Introduction
  • Autobiography
  • Church Certificate
  • Personal Letter
  • Postcard
  • Telegram
  • Business Letter
  • Employment Identification
  • Recommendation
  • Business License
  • Public Schools
  • Government Family Records
  • Court (Guardianship)
  • Court (Divorce)
  • Court (Name Change)
  • Marriage Contract
  • Military
  • Report of Death in Battle
  • Proof of Military Service
  • Last Will and Testament
  • Citizenship
  • Residential Registration
  • Passenger Lists
  • Emigration Application
  • Passport
  • Trans-Atlantic Travel
  • Church Records
  • Standards for Church Records
  • Church Birth Certificate
  • Church Marriage Certificate
  • Baptismal Entry
  • Confirmation Entries
  • Marriage Entry
  • Death Entry
  • Family Record
  • Membership List
  • Parish Constitution
  • Church Council Minutes
  • Baptismal Entry in Latin

Conclusions

Foreign Language Competence

How to Use a Reverse Alphabetical Index

Annotated Bibliography

  • Works Cited in This Book
  • Additional Works Recommended to Family History Researchers

Glossary

Appendices

  1. The Printed Gothic/Fraktur Alphabet
  2. German Genealogical Vocabulary
  3. German Genealogical Vocabulary: Reverse Alphabetical Order
  4. Latin Genealogical Vocabulary
  5. Latin Genealogical Vocabulary: Reverse Alphabetical Order
  6. French Genealogical Vocabulary
  7. French Genealogical Vocabulary: Reverse Alphabetical Order
  8. Common Genealogical Symbols Found in Vital Records in Germany
  9. German Empire Civil Registry Entry Forms (1876–1918)
  10. Computer Translation of Old Church book Entries

Index

Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy

cf8465Let me start with a simplified, and probably more than you will ever need, introduction to Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy. In short, surnames of 17th and 18th century colonists have changed over 400 years. This dictionary provides a brief, yet thorough, explanation of these linguistic changes along with a substantial list of surnames with their meaning and/or origin. Entries also provide some or all of the following information: the name of the first French-Canadian bearer of the name, the name of his parents, his place of origin in France, the name of his spouse and the names of her parents, and the place of his marriage.

That synopsis should just about cover it for most people, but for those who like big words, here is the advanced version, in the words of the author:

“Some 400 years later, it should come as no surprise to find that important differences, both linguistic and distributional, have developed between the surnames found in France and those of its erstwhile colony. Indeed, there are enough such differences to make francophone onomastic research in North America a field of study unto itself, one that, surprisingly, has received very little serious attention when one considers how much time and effort have been invested in the genealogical study of these names.”

The author goes on to explain the division, or categorization, of ‘Canadian French’ surnames, along with subdivisions and types. The subsequent 12 pages go into detail about how and why names change. Coverage include topis like orthographical changes and phonological changes. There is also coverage for foreign names; English, German, Basque and Breton names and others; which are found in the same area of Canada. The discussion also covers French-Canadian surname modifications in English Canada and the US, with coverage on types of anglicization, direct translations, partial translations, near translations, and mistranslations.

So why would you want this book? The names. Remember, most of this book serves as a dictionary of names. Here is a sample entry taken from the author’s own ancestry, showing the value of common entries in this book:

“Picard, from Picard, the nickname of a native of Picardie, a former province in France. — Amer. Peacor, Pecor, Pecore.

— Philippe Destroismaison dit Picard (Adrien and Antionete Lerous) from Montreuil in Pasde-Calais (Nord-Pas-de-Calais) m. Maritine Crosnier (Pierre and Jeanne Rotreau) in Chateau-Richer, QC in 1669.”

Let me go back to simple. Many surnames have changed with time and this dictionary will help trace your ancestor’s names through history.

Get your copy of Dictionary of Americanized French-Canadian Names: Onomastics and Genealogy from Family Roots Publishing; Price: 21.51

Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania

Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania. This is one title that just about says it all. Of course, the expanded title page gives even greater clarity as to the origin of these names:

A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French, and Other Immigrants in Pennsylvania From 1727 to 1776,

with a

Statement of the names of Ships, whence they sailed, and the data of their arrival in Philadelphia,

Chronologically Arranged, Together with the Necessary Historical and other Notes,

Also,

An Appendix containing Lists of more than one thousand German and French Names in New York prior to 1712

by

Prof. I. Daniel Rupp,

Reprint of the Second Revised and Enlarged Edition with an Added Index

 

This book has been reprinted many times from 1876 second edition, including the 1931 third-edition index. The latest reprint comes from 2006. In his own words, Rupp makes clear what the genealogical value of this book:

“It has been truthfully said: ‘That comparatively few of the living millions in the United States can tell when their forefathers came to this country.’ by the aid of this Collection, thousands of the descendants of early immigrants, can with certainty, determine the year of the arrival of their progenitors.”

Nearly 140 years have passed since Rupp made this statement. The number of descendants of these immigrants has surely grown to number in the tens of thousands; maybe, even the millions. This book can help researchers link their ancestors to their Old World origins. The Introduction, the Prolegomena, the brief on names, and notes throughout the book appear in both English and German. As the title states, names are arranged chronologically by date of arrival, listed by ship. This book makes an excellent addition to society and genealogical libraries, as well as to personal libraries for researchers who know of their Pennsylvanian-European family origins.

 

Contents

General Introduction

Prolegomena

Names of German, Swiss and other Immigrants

Addenda

Appendix:

  1. Names of first settlers at Germantown and vicinity, from 1683 to 1710
  2. Names of early settlers of Berks and Montgomery Counties, originally Philadelphia, County, &c., &c.
  3. Swiss and German settlers in Lancaster county, from 1709 to 1730
  4. Names, age and occupation of those, who accompanied Rev. Joshua Kocherthal, &c. &c.
  5. Names and ages of the heads of families remaining in the City of New York, 1710
  6. Names and ages of male children, apprenticed by Governor Hunter, 1710 to 1714
  7. Names of male Palatines, above twenty-one years old, in Livingston Manor, N. Y., &c.
  8. Names of the first Palatines in North Carolina, as early as 1709 and 1710
  9. Names of males, Salzburgers, settled in Georgia, 1734 to 1741
  10. .
  11. German settlement in North Carolina, 1709, 1710
  12. Germanna
  13. Names of males at New Rochelle in 1710
  14. Names of early settlers in Tulpehocken, Berks and Lebanon Counties
  15. List of members of the German Reformed Church, between 1735 and 1755
  16. Four Hundred and sixty-five names of German, Dutch and French inhabitants of Philad’s Co., &c., &c.

Interpretation of Names

Index by Ernest Wecken

Index to Ships

 

Order a copy of Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $42.63.

French Holocaust Records Released

Did you that in just two days, July 16 and 17, 1942, over 13,000 French Jews were rounded up by police and sent to Auschwitz. For the first time, police records of these events have been released. Read more about it in the following article found at ajc.com:

French Holocaust records exhibited for 1st time

By THOMAS ADAMSON

The Associated Press

PARIS — They are among France’s darkest days: Police dragged over 13,000 Jews from their homes, confined them in a Paris cycling stadium with little food or water, and then deported them to their deaths in the concentration camp at Auschwitz. But even in France, one of the most brazen collaborations between authorities and the Nazis during World War II is unknown to many in the younger generation.

Police are hoping to change that, opening up their archives on France’s biggest single deportation of French Jews for the first time to the public on Thursday.

The often chilling records are being exhibited in the Paris Jewish district’s city hall to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the two-day “Vel d’Hiv” roundup, named for the Velodrome d’Hiver, or Winter Velodrome. Many thousands were rounded up on July 16 and 17, 1942, then holed up in miserable conditions in the stadium, just a stone’s throw from the Eiffel Tower, before being bused to the French camp at Drancy and then taken by train to Auschwitz.

Tallies list the daily count of men, women and children detained, alongside stark black and white photographs of deportees. A registry of those forced to wear the yellow star and a Jewish census show how police knew who to take. Meticulous handwritten lists detail personal possessions handed over to police. Others list the value of property, such as jewelry, confiscated — often forcibly — during the deportation.

France struggled for years to come to terms with the extent of its wartime collaboration with the Nazis, but over the decades officials have been showing greater willingness to acknowledge the shameful period in its history.

Click here to read the full article.

German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Vital Records Written in Germany

Germans have long been a scattered lot. Millions of Americans identify their ancestral roots as German. For many of these individuals, their ancestors spoke German but never lived in what constitutes modern Germany or even any previously identified German states or territories. From the middle ages on, German-speaking communities have thrived all across Europe, especially in the Eastern countries. Many identified themselves by their language, culture, and customs as German, but may have lived nowhere near modern Germany. The result is many German documents exist across a large geographical area in Europe. The language was used in written vital records across Europe. So where documents written in other languages but by German hands. Learning to read and transcribe these documents can be a stumbling block. Fortunately, Roger Minert has taken his more than 20 years of experience and applied it to producing Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Vital Records Written in Germany; a book considered by many to be the preemptive guide on the subject.

This book is so much more than a basic treatment of Old German Script or Gothic letters. This book examine the history, the development, the alphabet, and the handwriting of not only the German language, but also Latin and French in German documents. In the author’s own words, he as added the following features to this book, not previously handled by other authors:

  • “a brief but scholarly review of the history of handwriting styles and alphabets in German-speaking regions of Europe
  • the introduction of a computerized, normed set of Gothic alphabet characters
  • the inclusion of examples consisting of illustrations taken from genuine records
  • a methodology for deciphering Latin texts in German source documents
  • a methodology for deciphering French texts in German source documents
  • the introduction of the only modern technology to be applied to the deciphering of words and names in old handwritten German documents — the reverse alphabetical index”

In addition to all this well-defined and unique information, the author facilitate the learning process with over 150 illustrations. These include 131 examples taken from authentic German vital records. These documents are used step by step along the path taught in this guide to decipher German handwriting. In many cases, the author has provided a transliteration to a modern typeset face of the sample’s text, a translation into English, and a useful analysis to better understand both the type of document as well as key points in the deciphering of the contents.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

How to Use this Book

Chapter 1: The Evolution of Handwriting Styles in Germany

  • Introduction
  • Early Handwriting Styles
  • Handwriting Styles after the Middle Ages
  • The Standardization of Handwriting Styles
  • The End of the Gothic Alphabet in Daily Use
  • Determining the Language of the Handwritten Document
  • Notes

Chapter 2: Deciphering German Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Gothic Handwriting Alphabet
  • Lower Case Gothic Characters
  • Upper Case Gothic Characters
  • Consonant Clusters and Doubled Consonants
  • Diacritical Marks and Punctuation
  • Crossing the t and Dotting the i
  • Abbreviations
  • Similar and Confusion Characters
  • Numbers and Dates
    • Numerals
    • Days of the Week
    • Months
    • Time of Day
    • Seasons of the Year
    • Cardinal Numbers vs. Ordinal Numbers
    • Feast Dates
    • French Republican Calendar Dates
  • Learning to Write in the Gothic Alphabet
  • German Language Tools
    • German Grammar
    • German Syntax and Word Order
    • German Vocabulary
    • Archaic German Language and Dialect Variants
    • Personal Names
    • Place Names
    • Determining the Type of Record
  • Basic Tactics in Deciphering German Handwriting in Vital Record Entries
    • Extraction
    • Transcription/Transliteration
    • Translation
  • Additional Tactics in Deciphering German Handwriting in Vital Records
    • Index
    • Chronology
    • Alphabet Sampler
    • Vowel/Consonant Environments
    • Syntactic Analysis
  • Deciphering Sample Vital Record Entries
    • Church Birth/Christening Records
    • Civil Birth Records
    • Church Marriage Records
    • Church Death/Burial Records
    • Civil Death Records
    • Other Types of Records
    • Summary
    • Notes

Chapter 3: Deciphering Latin Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Latin Alphabet as Used in German Vital Records
  • Abbreviations in Vital Records entries in Latin
  • Numerals
  • Dates
  • Latin Grammar
  • The Elements of a Typical Latin Church Book Entry
    • Column Entries
    • Sentence Entries
    • Paragraph Entries
  • Tactics for Deciphering Latin in Vital Records in German Documents
  • Summary
  • Notes

Chapter 4: Deciphering French Handwriting in German Documents

  • Introduction
  • The Practice of French Record-keeping in Germany
  • Church Vital Records in the French Language
    • Civil Registry Vital Records in the French Language
    • Civil Registry Pre-printed Entry Forms
    • Numerals and Dates
  • The French Republican Calendar
  • French Grammar and Language Tools
    • Gender
    • Number
    • Capitalization
    • Syntax
    • Vocabulary
    • Placement of Adjectives
  • Analyzing French Entries in German Church Records
    • Column French Entries in German Church Records
    • Paragraph French Entries in German Church Records
  • Analyzing French Entries in German Civil Records
    • Paragraph French Entries in German Church Records
    • Pre-Printed French Entries in German Civil Records
  • Summary
  • Notes

Conclusions

Foreign Language Competence

The Reverse Alphabetical Index

Annotated Bibliography

  • Works Cited in This Book
  • Additional Works Recommended to Family History Researchers

Glossary

Appendices

  1. Normal Fraktur Printed Alphabet
  2. German Genealogical Vocabulary
  3. German Genealogical Vocabulary – Reverse Alphabetical Order
  4. Latin Genealogical Vocabulary
  5. Latin Genealogical Vocabulary – Reverse Alphabetical Order
  6. French Genealogical Vocabulary
  7. French Genealogical Vocabulary – Reverse Alphabetical Order
  8. Common Genealogical Symbols found in German Vital Records
  9. German Empire Civil Registry Forms (1876–1918)

Index

 

Deciphering Handwriting in German Documents: Analyzing German, Latin, and French in Vital Records Written in Germany is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: M0001, Price: $26.41.

Genealogy at a Glance: French Genealogy Research

If you are looking for French-Canadian research, there are plenty of resources available to help you out; including, a Genealogy at a Glance: French-Canadian Research. However, there are precious few book on researching one’s French ancestors, as in, from France. This makes Genealogy at a Glance: French Genealogy Research, that much more important as a tool to researchers. According to this guide’s “Quick Facts”:

  • 8.3 million Americans (about 3% of the population in 2000) claim French ancestry
  • 2.4 million American (or just shy of 1% in 2000) claimed French-Canadian or Acadian ancestry
  • The majority claiming French ancestry reside in Louisiana, New England, and the Midwest

French Genealogy Research was put together by Claire Bettag, CG, CGL. Like all the Genealogy At A Glance sheets, this guide is a four-page, full-color limited brochure meant to be easily stored and sized to take with you when conducting related research.

This guide is packed with information to help family historians discover their immigrant ancestors, locate their ancestor’s town of origin, and other key historical points. Discussion cover important resource types and locations; including printed and online resources. Additional tips and “further references” provide reader interest and added research value.

Like each At A Glance, the top of the first page provides Contents and Quick Facts. The Contents of this sheet include:

Immigration/Emigration

  • Major Periods of French Immigration
  • Who Were the Immigrants
  • Emigration/Immigration Records

Unlocking French Family History

  • Pinpointing the Town of Origin
  • Family Names
  • Huguenots

Political/Archival Organization

Major Record Sources

  • Parish Registers, 16th century–1792
  • Civil Registrations, 1792–present
  • Notarial Records, 16th century–present
  • Censuses

Other Records

Repositorties

Online Resources

Other Records includes subsections for land records, military records, municipal/communal archives, departmental archives, archives in Paris, national archives, and the Family History Library.

 

Find the help you need, and carry it with you, with your own copy of Genealogy At A Glance: French Genealogy Research available at Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPC479, Price: $8.77

Reading Non-English Records

Tracing one’s history in their own native language offers plenty of challenges. Changes in writing styles and in handwriting, problems with damage and discoloration, both added to transcription and indexing errors can make record finding and reading difficult at times. However, at some point most researchers find themselves with an even greater challenge: finding and deciphering records in another language. Once a genealogist traces his/her ancestral roots to another country, language barriers add to overall complexity in research. Following the Paper Trail: A Multilingual Translation Guide by Jonathan D. Shea and William F. Hoffman was written to help researchers with this very problem.

Following the Paper Trail not only acknowledges the need for language assistance, but recognizes that many researches will need help in more than one additional language. This book looks at many languages, dividing them into linguistic families. Similarities within a single family make it easier to identify words and commonalities in other associated languages. For example, the Latin or “Romance” language include French, Latin, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish, which together make up one section of the book.

Each language appears in the book with their alphabet in both printed and cursive forms. Sample documents are provided with an analysis, including translation to English, of their components. Selected vocabulary terms round out each language. All the documents are representative of the typical records genealogist seek or that their immigrant ancestors may have had in their possession. The authors refer to this volume as “an introduction to the translation of such documents.”

As such an introduction, this book makes an excellent resources for those just starting out with their immigrant ancestors research, or as a volume for regular reference.

 

Table of Contents

About the Authors

Introduction

The Germanic Languages

German

  • The German Alphabet
  • The German Language
  • German Pronunciation
  • Document #1: A Family Record
  • Document #2: A Birth and Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #3: A German-Ukrainian Military Passport
  • Document #4: A Death Certificate
  • Document #5: A Contract for Passage on a Ship
  • German-English Word List
  • Personal Names

Swedish

  • The Swedish Alphabet
  • Swedish and the Other Scandinavian Languages
  • Document #1: A “Moving Certificate” (Exit Permit)
  • Document #2: A Report Card
  • Document #3: A Swedish Passport
  • Document #4: An Emigration Contract
  • Document #5: A Swedish-American Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #6: A Confirmation Certificate
  • Document #7: A Marriage Certificate
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected First Names

The Romance Languages

French

  • The French Alphabet
  • Document #1: A Civil Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: A Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #3: A French Passport
  • Document #4: A Steamship Ticket
  • Document #5: A Death Certificate
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • French Personal Names

Italian

  • The Italian Alphabet
  • Document #1: A Steamship Ticket
  • Document #2: A Civil Family Registration Booklet
  • Document #3: Parish Family Registration Documents
  • Document #4: Civil Family Registration Documents
  • Document #5: An Italian Passport, Booklet Form
  • Document #6: A Long-Form Birth Certificate
  • Document #7: A Short-Form Birth Certificate
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Italian Personal Names

Latin

  • The Latin Alphabet
  • The Use of Latin in Genealogical Records
  • Document #1: A Slovenian Birth Certificate (Latin-Italian)
  • Document #2: A Polish Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #3: A Slovak Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #4: A Ukrainian Baptismal Certificate
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Personal Names

Portuguese

  • The Portuguese Alphabet
  • Document #1: An Identity Card from the Azores
  • Document #2: A Birth Certificate from the Azores
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Portuguese First Names

Romanian

  • The Romanian Alphabet
  • Document #1: A Romanian Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: A Romanian Passport
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms

Spanish

  • The Spanish Alphabet
  • Document #1: A Civil Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: An Identity Card
  • Document #3: A Consular Records
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Personal Names

The Slavic Languages

Czech

  • The Czech Alphabet
  • Czechs, Bohemians, Moravians, Slovaks, and Their Languages
  • Document #1: A Czech Birth and Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #2: A Parish Family Registration Document
  • Document #3: A Slovak Passport
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Personal Names

Polish

  • The Polish Alphabet
  • The Polish Language
  • The Format of Long-Form Documents
  • Template for Birth Records
  • Template for Death Records
  • Template for Marriage Records
  • Document #1: A Long-Form Polish Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: A Short-Form Polish Birth Certificate
  • Document #3: A Jewish Birth Certificate (Polish-Hebrew)
  • Document #4: A Polish/German Birth and Baptismal Certificate
  • Document #5: A Passport Application
  • Document #6: A Republic of Poland Passport
  • Document #7: A Polish/German Passport from the Austrian Sector
  • Document #8: A German/Polish/Ukrainian Employment Booklet
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Personal Names

Russian

  • The Russian Alphabet
  • The Russian Language
  • Document #1: A Russian Orthodox Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: Long-Form Roman Catholic Birth Record
  • Document #3: A Short-Form Certificate
  • Document #4: A Jewish Birth Certificate
  • Document #5: An Islamic Birth Record
  • Document #6: A Russian Booklet-Type Passport
  • Document #7: A Single-Sheet Russian Passport
  • Document #8: A Ship Ticket
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Selected Personal Names

Other Languages

Hungarian (Magyar)

  • The Hungarian Alphabet
  • The Hungarian Language
  • Document #1: A Hungarian Birth Certificate
  • Document #2: A Hungarian Passport
  • Selected Vocabulary Terms
  • Personal Names

Lithuanian

  • The Lithuanian Alphabet
  • The Lithuanian Language
  • Document #1: Lithuanian Baptismal Certificate I
  • Document #2: Lithuanian Baptismal Certificate II
  • Document #3: A Lithuanian Passport
  • Additional Useful Terms

Appendix A: Bibliography

Appendix B: A List of Genealogical Organizations

 

Following the Paper Trail: A Multilingual Translation Guide is available from Family Roots Publishing for $28.42; Item #: AV346.