The Pocket Genealogist: Genealogical Numbering

NE29 Pocket GenealogistThere has been a recent rush in the genealogy publishing market to produce two to four page laminated guides. These guides have proven very popular as they typically provide a high density of basic information on a single topic. Guides reviewed on this site cover everything from researching a specific ethnic group or nationality to areas of specific research, like Ellis Island records or U.S. Census Records, and even dating specific types of photographs. Now the New England Historic Genealogical Society has jumped on the bandwagon, and is producing a series of laminated guides called The Pocket Genealogist.

One guide from this new series is The Pocket Genealogist: Genealogical Numbering. Whether you are producing a report from your genealogy software, using an online system, or writing a custom list of family information, number systems are important. Following standardized numbering systems will help your reader follow your intentions. This numbering guide is intended to help you “navigate and implement these basic numbering systems in your writing.

In addition to covering standardized numbering practices, this guide shows the reader how to use the automatic numbering feature in Microsoft Word. Along with this main content, there are a couple of tips which stand out in their own shaded boxes. The NEGHS guides are three-color, four-page laminated guides, pre-punched for insertion into a three-ringed binder.

 

Topics Covered

Ancestor table numbering

Register-style numbering

Automatic numbering in Microsoft Word

Generational numbering

 

Order The Pocket Genealogist: Genealogical Numbering from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $6.81.

Click here to see a full list of laminated guides.

Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists

Almost anyone who has spent any serious time in family history knows the name William Dollarhide. He has authored 13 books and countless articles.  He has also spoken at over 700 national and local events and societies in almost every state in the country.  Through his experience in working with his own family history records, Dollarhide devised an enhanced numbering system for genealogical databases. Though he never gave this system an official name, over years other genealogists came to call it the Dollarhide Numbering System.

In a book by Brian R. Smith, the author formalizes the Dollarhide numbering system, organizing its principles and describing it in plain English. Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists – An Authorized Guide for the Serious User is a step-by-step guide to using the Dollarhide numbering system.

Smith first explains the two most common systems used in genealogy, Ahnentafel numbering for ancestors and the Henry system for descendants. The Dollarhide system combines the two, creating a single system capable of indexing almost any relationship one could find within an extended family. (This system allows for not only indexing direct relations but also relatives such as multiple spouses (including former and later marriages), half siblings, adopted and step children, other non-blood relations, and much more.)

This authorized guide can help improve the indexing system of any genealogist. Unfortunately, most software lacks the ability to index with the depth of the Dollarhide system. However, to use the Dollarhide system within family history software, the user can easily manually enter each person’s number. This may be too much work for some, but for those looking to create a comprehensive catalog of their database the Dollarhide Numbering system is for you.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Statement by William Dollarhide

Brief Biography of William Dollarhide

Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists

Ahnentafel Numbers

Henry Numbering

Henry Number Sets for Different Focus Ancestors

Dollarhide Numbering

Setting up a Dollarhide Number System

Symbols

Sorting Issues and Tricks

Some Benefits of Using Dollarhide Numbering

Limitations of Numbering Systems

Appendix A. Automatic Number Generation

Appendix M. Multiplel Marriage Mayhem – Numbering Half-Siblings

Bibliography 1. Relevant Writings of William Dollarhide

Bibliography 2. Other Sources

Epilogue

Endnotes

 

Too get a good handle on working with this system, look no further than Brian R. Smith’s handbook, Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists, available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.63.

Dollarhide Numbering Explained

Almost anyone who has spent any serious time in family history knows the name William Dollarhide. He has authored 13 books and countless articles. He has also spoken at over 700 national and local events and societies in almost every state in the country.  Through his experience in working with his own family history records, Dollarhide devised an enhanced numbering system for genealogical databases. Though he never gave this system an official name, over years other genealogists came to call it the Dollarhide Numbering System.

In a newly published book, author Brian R. Smith formalizes the Dollarhide numbering system, organizing its principles and describing it in plain English. Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists – An Authorized Guide for the Serious User provides a step-by-step guide to using the Dollarhide numbering system.

Smith first explains the two most common systems used in genealogy, Ahnentafel numbering for ancestors and the Henry system for descendants. The Dollarhide system combines the two, creating a single system capable of indexing almost any relationship one could find within an extended family. (This system allows for not only indexing direct relations but also relatives such as multiple spouses (including former and later marriages), half siblings, adopted and step children, other non-blood relations, and much more.)

This authorized guide can help improve the indexing system of any genealogist. Unfortunately, most software lacks the ability to index with the depth of the Dollarhide system. However, to use the Dollarhide system within family history software, the user can easily manually enter each person’s number. This may be too much work for some, but for those looking to create a comprehensive catalog of their database the Dollarhide Numbering system is for you. Too get a good handle on working with this system, look no further than Brian R. Smith’s new handbook, Dollarhide Numbering for Genealogists.