Archives.com Publishes Millions of Lutheran Church Records

The following is from Matthew Deighton at Ancestry.com:

Archives.com is thrilled to announce the release of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) birth, marriage and death record collections! These three collections total nearly 4.6 million records. Archives.com, in partnership with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Archives, digitized and indexed approximately one thousand rolls of microfilmed records from churches now affiliated with the ELCA. These records have never before been online.

The records in these collections date from the mid-1800s through 1940 and include births, baptisms, confirmations, marriages, deaths, and burials. Details vary from church to church, but often include parents’ names, dates and places of the event, and other biographical details.

Many of the churches were founded by immigrants from Norway, Sweden, and Germany and had immigrant families as their members. These records could hold the key to finding your origins in the Old World.

Researching in church records can be challenging, as you often don’t know exactly which church your ancestors attended. With the ELCA collections, you don’t need to know the specific church your ancestors belonged to. These collections brings together all of the pre-1940 records for churches affiliated with the ELCA.

The ELCA collections add to the 2.5 billion records that are currently available to Archives.com members. Not a member? Sign up today for a seven day free trial! Archives.com makes family history simple and affordable.

I understand that the collection includes:

· 778,837 images

· 4,599,836 records

· Contains birth, baptism, confirmation, marriage, death and burial records

· Approximate dates: 1793-1940

· These records came from approximately 1,000 rolls of microfilm

Archives.com Expands U.S. Vital Records Collections by 58 Million

The following information is from Julie Hill at Archives.com:

With the holidays behind us, it’s time to dig into finding more ancestors and Archives.com is here to help. We recently added more than 58 million United States vital records. These 27 new collections contain birth, death, or marriage information from 21 states.

To learn more about these collections and to begin your search, please visit the Collections page.

Highlights Include:

Connecticut Town Marriage Records and Connecticut Town Death Records (popularly known as the Barbour Collection) cover pre-1870 marriages and deaths and are considered a standard Connecticut reference.

Georgia Death Records covers 1919 through 1998. Information includes the person’s name, birth date, death date, and place of death.

Indiana Marriage Records covers marriages from 1800 through 1941. This will be indispensable for researching your ancestors in the Hoosier State.

New Jersey Birth Index includes births from 1660 through 1931. Records vary in content, but could include not only the parents’ names, but also the names of the grandparents.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Death Index will help your research in a state that can be difficult. This collection contains deaths from 1803 through 1915. Depending on who gave the information, records could contain parents’ names, the spouse’s name, and place of burial.

Visit the Archives.com Collections page anytime to stay up-to-date on recent additions! You can also watch this blog, follow us on Twitter (@archivescom), or “like” us on Facebook.

Monahan’s Sales of Archives.com Just the First of Many?

The following excerpt is from an article posted in the September 14, 2012 San Francisco Business Times.

Brian and Matthew Monahan’s sale of Archives.com last month was the first $100 million exit for their Redwood City-based company, Inflection LLC. They’re confident it won’t be the last.

While the deal with genealogy giant Ancestry.com turned heads, the two young brothers — “chief idea guy” and CEO, respectively — say their profitable, 125-person company is only getting started using its technology for mining public records to spin off businesses. Brian Monahan is 25, and Matthew Monahan is 28.

Read the full article.

Ancestry.com Completes Their Aquisition of Archives.com

I see that Ancestry.com has completed thier 100 Million dollar purchase of Archives.com – and that they lost 6% of their stock value in heavy trading today. Interesting…

The following is from Marketwatch.com:

PROVO, Utah, Aug 17, 2012 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX): Ancestry.com Inc. ACOM -4.34% today announced the completion of its acquisition of Archives.com, a leading family history website, for approximately $100 million in cash and assumed liabilities.

Archives.com is a great addition to the Ancestry.com family. It is a fast-growing business that has expanded the addressable family history market through a simple and affordable approach,” said Tim Sullivan, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com. “We are excited to increase our ability to help more individuals discover their family history.”

Archives.com was owned and operated by Inflection LLC, a Silicon Valley-based technology company. Since Archives.com‘s launch in January 2010, the site has rapidly grown to more than 440,000 paying subscribers who pay approximately $39.95 a year. Archives.com offers access to over 2.2 billion historical records, including birth records, obituaries, immigration and passenger lists, historical newspapers, as well as U.S. and U.K. Censuses.

Ancestry.com plans to operate Archives.com separately, retaining its brand and website. Many Inflection employees, including key marketing, product and engineering executives, will join the Ancestry.com team.

10.3 Million Records in 24 Hours Indexed by 46,000 Vounteers – Mainly for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project


SALT LAKE CITY–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Online volunteers surpassed the previous one-day mark for indexing (transcribing) genealogical records, including the 1940 U.S. Census, as part of the “Five Million Record Challenge” issued by the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. Aiming to propel volunteer contributions past the previous high of nearly 4.9 million records set April 30, the challenge motivated more than 46,000 volunteers to index 10.3 million records in a single 24-hour period that began July 1 at 6:00 p.m. (MDT) — more than twice the previous record.

“We continue to be amazed by the number of compassionate volunteers donating their time so others can trace their family history. Their enthusiasm for indexing historic genealogical records to make them searchable online is astounding and incredibly gratifying.”

Most of the volunteers who participated are currently working to make the 1940 U.S. Census searchable for free online. 1940 U.S. Census Community Project partners Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, ProQuest.com and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) were ecstatic with the response to the challenge and had nothing but praise for those who participated.

“Apparently we set the goal too low,” said Mike Judson, volunteer development manager for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “We continue to be amazed by the number of compassionate volunteers donating their time so others can trace their family history. Their enthusiasm for indexing historic genealogical records to make them searchable online is astounding and incredibly gratifying.”

Indexing volunteers perform an invaluable service for anyone looking to identify branches of their family tree. Working online, volunteers view images of historic records and index the names, dates and places to make each individual searchable online. To ensure accuracy, two volunteers index each record and a third volunteer, known as an arbitrator, reviews any discrepancies and makes a final decision about the information that gets published.

Since the April 2 release of Census images by NARA, more than 140,000 volunteers have contributed to the cause. The project, totaling 132 million names of people living in the U.S. in 1940, is more than 84 percent complete and as a result, the records for 30 U.S. states are currently available online and freely searchable. For more information, visit https://the1940census.com.

More Volunteers Needed
Anyone above the age of 13 can volunteer to index historic records online. Indexers and arbitrators can work at their own pace, giving as much or as little time as they choose. Projects are available in a variety of languages and in a variety of skill levels. Most “batches” of indexing work can be accomplished in 45 minutes or less, which makes online indexing a popular community service option. The 1940 U.S. Census project is currently still available for any who want to try their hand at indexing census records.

About the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project
The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a web-based, national service project with the goal of creating as soon as possible a free, high quality online index linked to the complete set of census images. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at 1940census.archives.gov, Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com and by ProQuest through public and academic libraries. All of these organizations are respective website sponsors of the community project. Archives.com, findmypast.com, and ProQuest will make substantial financial contributions to make the 1940 U.S. census online name index possible and will work with the nonprofit organization FamilySearch to bring additional new historic records collections online—making even more highly valued family history resources available to the entire genealogical community.

Major Changes in the 1940 Census Indexed States!

Both Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.com have made major progress this week in posting of Indexes to the 1940 Census. The following info includes indexes that are currently being posted the night of Thursday, June 28-Friday June 29, 2012.

Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com – As of tonight (Thursday-Friday June 28-29) the following sites can be searched by name at Ancestry.com:

  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Maine
  • Nevada
  • and New York

NEW! Ancestry is the only site that has the District of Columbia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee indexes available. The 1940 New York images and Index are available free of charge to New York State residents. The 1940 census records will remain searchable for freethrough 2013 at Ancestry.com/1940. Indexes to the following states are posting the night of Thursday, June 28 at Ancestry.com:

  • Colorado – NEW
  • Ohio – NEW
  • Pennsylvania – NEW
  • Tennessee – NEW
  • Vermont – NEW
  • Virginia – NEW

These states will join the collection with the above four other searchable states and Washington D.C. (ME, NV, DE, NY). These ten states (and D.C.) make up more than 39 million records of the 132 million total records to be completed later this year. These records remain searchable for free through 2013 at Ancestry.com/1940.

The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project

The free, searchable database from the coalition of:

Those organizations cooperating in the Census Community Project have the following censuses indexed as of June 28, 2012. I’ve linked these to FamilySearch.org, but you can also find them at Archives.com, and findmypast.com.

Note that as of today, Minnesota, and Rhode Island are 100% indexed, while New York and Missouri are 99% indexed, and Arkansas is 95% indexed by the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project, but the indexes are posted yet.

MyHeritage.com – WorldVitalRecords.com

MyHeritage.com and WorldVitalRecords.com have part of Rhode Island and the state of New York indexed.

The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project has Indexed and Posted the 1940 Census for Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia & New Hampshire

The most exciting news from the National Genealogical Society Conference in Cincinnati is that volunteers have now indexed over 30% of the 1940 U.S. Federal Census of 3.8 million records in just 37 days. Six states have now gone through the finalizing process (which takes about a week) with Oregon and Virginia going online on Wednesday. As of this moment Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire are now fully indexed and posted online at Archives.com, FindMyPast.com, National Archives, ProQuest, and FamilySearch.org.

Lucky for me… I just happened to have all kinds of family living in Oregon, Colorado, and Virginia in 1940. This is all very exciting for me. Thanks to over 100,000 volunteers, my family history is expanding rapidly.

I did not know specifically where my father lived in Oregon in 1940 until today. With my grandson, Nicholas, in one arm I stopped by the FamilySearch.org booth at the NGS Conference and did a quick check of the index for the 1940 Oregon census. I found him instantly. I’d known that he lived in the same home with his sister and niece. However, I didn’t know or I’d forgotten that my twice-widowed grandmother, Nellie, also lived with them. One tiny tidbit that I found fascinating was that Dad (Theodore Meitzler) was farming, and rented their home for $5 a month. He married my mother to following January 1 (1941).

The following News Release gives more details:

SALT LAKE CITY, May 09, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project announced today the availability of a free, searchable index of 1940 U.S. census records for six U.S. states, including Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire. Records for these states are now searchable by name, location and family relations thanks to the efforts of more than 100,000 volunteers nationwide.

“For the past month, Community Project partners have worked to establish the first free, searchable database of 1940 U.S. census records made possible entirely through the hard work of volunteers,” said Josh Taylor, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “We’re proud to bring easily searchable 1940 U.S. census records for Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire online for people to learn about their ancestors and life and times in these states more than 72 years ago.”

Since April 2, Community Project volunteers have indexed more than 45 million records and this number continues to grow quickly as more than 10,000 volunteers sign up each week. Those interested in lending a hand can learn more and sign up to be an official 1940 U.S. census volunteer indexer at the 1940 census website (the1940census.com). The project will release searchable records for individual states on an ongoing basis with an aim to make the entire 1940 U.S. census searchable by the end of 2012.

The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a joint initiative between the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, ProQuest and other leading genealogy organizations. Thanks to advancements in technology and to volunteers nationwide, Project partners and volunteers can lend a voice to countless untold stories of their ancestors living, working and persevering as the “Greatest Generation.”

“When you index U.S. census records, what you’re essentially doing is stepping back in time and walking in the shoes of the enumerator some 72 years prior,” said Megan Smolenyak, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “The indexing experience is much like walking down a street, ringing doorbells and learning about a specific neighborhood in 1940. Only now, volunteers can explore these fascinating records from the comfort of our own homes.”

To learn more about the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project and to track real-time progress of volunteer indexing efforts, visit the1940census.com.

About the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project (the1940census.com)
The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a web-based, national service project with the goal of creating as soon as possible a free, high quality online index linked to the complete set of census images. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at 1940census.archives.gov, Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com and by ProQuest.com through public libraries. All of these organizations are respective website sponsors of the community project. Archives.com, findmypast.com, and ProQuest will make substantial financial contributions to make the 1940 U.S. census online name index possible and will work with the nonprofit organization FamilySearch to bring additional new historic records collections online–making even more highly valued family history resources available to the entire genealogical community.

John Grenham’s Irish Column

Any American doing Irish research will recognize the name John Grenham. In doing a Google search this evening I ran onto an excellent column written by this renowned genealogist for the IrishTimes.com. I was attracted to an article in which Mr. Grenham complains just a bit, but not too strenuously, about Ancestry.com’s “web records” searches. Clicking on his archives for January through May of 2012, I ran onto quite a lot of excellent material dealing with Irish research. It’s worth spending some time with…

Following is a teaser from John’s “The Fruits of Others’ Labour” column:

Ancestry.com, based in Provo, Utah, is by far the biggest commercial online genealogy company, with 1.8 million subscribers and a turnover in 2011 of $400 million. Over the past decade they have expanded steadily by buying up smaller rivals – last week the U.S.-only archives.com cost them a mere $100 million. Ancestry is steadily becoming the default option for most researchers, the Microsoft of online research

One irritating little fly in Ancestry’s ointment over the years has been the lack of a significant collection of Irish records. In the past twelve months they’ve been going about removing the fly, in ways that have raised eyebrows and blood pressure here in Ireland. The digitising of the National Library’s microfilms of the registers of the Catholic diocese of Meath without asking either the Library or the diocese is only the most conspicuous example.

Read the full column.

Ancestry.com to Acquire Archives.com

The following news release is from Matthew Deighton at Ancestry.com. The acquisition doesn’t surprise me in the least, as Archives.com’s strategic partnerships have got to be worth a lot all by themselves. With access to Ancestry.com’s capital, Archives.com is sure to prosper.

“Simple and Affordable” Fast-growing Start-up Adds Complementary Offering to Ancestry.com

PROVO, Utah, April 25, 2012Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) announced today it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Archives.com, a family history website, for approximately $100 million in cash and assumed liabilities.

This transaction will enable Ancestry.com to add a differentiated service targeted to a complementary segment of the growing family history category. In addition, Ancestry.com will welcome a team of talented engineers, digital marketers, and family history innovators into the Ancestry.com fold and also gain access to a proprietary technology platform that has supported Archives.com’s rapid growth.

Archives.com is owned and operated by Inflection LLC, a Silicon Valley-based technology company. Since Archives.com’s launch in January 2010, the site has rapidly grown to more than 380,000 paying subscribers who pay approximately $39.95 a year. Archives.com offers access to over 2.1 billion historical records, including birth records, obituaries, immigration and passenger lists, historical newspapers, and U.S. and U.K. Censuses.

“Archives.com has built a fantastic and fast-growing business that we think is highly complementary to Ancestry.com’s online family history offering,” said Tim Sullivan, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry.com. “We love their focus on making family history simple and affordable, and we are excited to help the talented Archives.com team continue to grow alongside Ancestry.com, Fold3.com, and Family Tree Maker.”

“Family history remains a dynamic and growing online category,” added Sullivan. “Archives.com’s focus is consistent with our mission to help everyone discover, preserve and share their family history, which will help continue our efforts in delivering amazing discoveries to an even broader audience.”

Over the past two years, Archives.com has partnered with multiple well-known family history organizations that have helped build out Archives.com robust collection of family history records. Most recently, Archives.com partnered with the U.S. National Archives to provide free digital access to the recently released 1940 U.S. Federal Census.

“We are proud of the experience we’ve built with Archives.com and believe strongly in its future potential,” said Matthew Monahan, CEO and Co-Founder of Inflection. “Combining with Ancestry.com positions Archives.com to best capitalize on that potential, pairing complementary visions of the marketplace and the opportunity. We’ve long admired Ancestry.com’s content and technology and the innovations that the Ancestry.com team continues to bring to market. We’re excited to see how this transaction expands the reach of family history to an even larger audience.”

Upon completion of the transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions, including expiration of the HSR waiting period, Ancestry.com will continue to operate Archives.com separately retaining its brand and website. Multiple Inflection employees, including key product and engineering executives are expected to join the Ancestry.com team.

About Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world’s largest online family history resource, with more than 1.8 million paying subscribers. More than 9 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 34 million family trees containing approximately 4 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site, Ancestry.com offers several localized Web sites designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

About Archives.com
Archives.com is a leading family history website that makes discovering family history simple and affordable. The company has assembled more than 2.1 billion historical records all in a single location. Archives also partners with other leading family history websites to provide a comprehensive resource for researching your family history. Archives.com is free to try for seven days, allowing anyone to explore the benefits of membership without risk or obligation. For more information and to start discovering your family history, please visit http://www.archives.com/.

Archives.com Partners with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America to Publish Millions of Church Records

The following news release was received from Julie Hill at Archives.com

First Time a Comprehensive Historical Database of Lutheran Congregants Will Be Available Online

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., April 17, 2012Archives.com, a website that makes family history research simple and affordable, is pleased to announce its partnership with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) to digitize and index 1,000 reels of microfilm containing millions of baptism, confirmation, marriage, and funeral records. Archives.com will make these records available online for the first time as part of its ongoing effort to expand its collection of over 2.1 billion historical records.

With the help of digitization and indexing partners, Archives.com will create digital indexes of these records. The documents cover Lutheran congregations throughout the U.S., and will be accompanied by images of the original parish register ledger books. Dating from 1793–1940, these new collections will help users uncover valuable information about their ancestors that isn’t available anywhere else online.

Joel Thoreson, Archivist for Management and Reference Services at the Evangelical Lutheran Church Archives notes, “We’re very excited to work with Archives.com in digitizing and indexing these records. Researchers have long sought the ability to do easy searches for individuals across multiple congregations. Currently, without knowing the exact congregation at which ancestors worshipped, finding those individuals is a slow and painstaking process.”

Archives.com estimates that digital indexes and images resulting from the 1,000 microfilm reels will be available online later this year. Nearly all of the records were handwritten in Norwegian, German, Danish, and Slovakian, in addition to English, making this an especially unique and valuable record set.

Archives.com Senior Director of Product Joe Godfrey said, “Church records are rich with genealogical information, and we’re excited to be partnering with the ELCA to make their impressive collection available online for the first time. Access to these records will allow our users with ties to the Lutheran church to discover more about their ancestors than ever before.”

Archives.com makes over 2.1 billion records available to its users, including a comprehensive U.S. census collection and is continually adding new content. Please visit the Collections page to learn about the records available on Archives.com, and to receive regular updates about the website please visit the Archives.com blog.

About Archives.com
Archives.com is a leading family history website that makes discovering family history simple and affordable. The company has assembled more than 2.1 billion historical records all in a single location, and makes them available at a price that’s up to 80 percent less than the leading competitor. Archives also partners with other leading family history websites to provide a comprehensive resource for researching your family history. Archives.com is free to try for seven days, allowing anyone to explore the benefits of membership without risk or obligation. For more information and to start discovering your family history, please visit http://www.archives.com/.

About the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Archives
The Archives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America preserves and maintains the records of predecessor church bodies, inter-Lutheran organizations, as well as records of leaders, congregations, and synods of the church. Located outside of Chicago, the ELCA Archives hold genealogically rich collections of oral histories, microfilm, photographs, as well as other archival materials and exhibits. To learn more please visit http://www.elca.org/archives.

Archives.com & the U.S. National Archives Make the 1940 Census Free to Search

I received the following news release from my friend, Julie Hill, at Archives.com:

Family history research is now easier than ever! Archives.com partnered with the U.S. National Archives to bring the 1940 census online today for the first time. Archives.com has built the website http://1940census.archives.gov allowing anyone to view and share 1940 census records for free!

This is the only website where the entire collection of 1940 census images will be available April 2nd. The pages of the census will provide a never-before-seen look into the lives of Americans, at this watershed moment in our history.

As the website that makes family history simple and affordable, Archives.com has built a unique set of tools to make finding your family in the census as simple as possible. Though the 1940 census is not yet searchable by-name, you can explore census maps, descriptions, and other finding-tools to help you locate your family.

To make the records even easier to search, Archives.com has partnered with the U.S. National Archives, FamilySearch, and findmypast, to sponsor the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. We invite you to join this national service effort to create a free, by-name index for the 1940 census!

Once complete, you will be able to search the 1940 census by-name for free at Archives.com. Learn more at www.archives.com/1940census.

Don’t wait to discover your family’s history in the 1940 census!

– Today, start your 1940 census search on 1940census.archives.gov

– For real-time updates about the 1940 census check out @1940censusnews

– To volunteer with the U.S. Census Community Project go to the1940census.com

** Make sure to share your 1940 census discoveries with us. Post census images to www.facebook.com/archivescom and be eligible to win prizes all this week!

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces to Publish the 1940 US Census

The following news release was received from Paul Nauta, with FamilySearch.

SALT LAKE CITY—Three leading genealogy organizations, Archives.com, FamilySearch International, and findmypast.com, announced today they are joining forces to launch the 1940 US Census Community Project. The ambitious project aims to engage online volunteers to quickly publish a searchable, high quality name index to the 1940 US Census after it is released in April 2012 by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States (NARA). The highly anticipated 1940 US Census is expected to be the most popular US record collection released to date. Its completion will allow anyone to search the record collection by name for free online. Learn more about this exciting initiative or how to volunteer at www.the1940census.com.

The 1940 US Census Community Project is also receiving additional support from leading societal organizations like the Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Genealogical Society, and Ohio Genealogical Society.

The population of the US in 1940 was approximately 130 million. NARA’s census images will not have a searchable index. The goal of the 1940 US Census Community Project is to create a high quality index online linked to the complete set of census images as soon as possible. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, and findmypast.com, the sponsors of the community project. This new collection will open access to family history research like never before for this period in the US.

“The 1940 Census is attractive to both new and experienced researchers because most people in the US can remember a relative that was living in 1940. It will do more to connect living memory with historical records and families than any other collection previously made available,” said David Rencher, Chief Genealogical Officer for FamilySearch.

The collaborative project will also pool the collective resources, know-how, and marketing reach of Archives.com, FamilySearch, and findmypast.com to engage and coordinate the volunteer workforce needed to deliver the ambitious project. Additionally, Archives.com and findmypast.com will make substantial financial contributions to make the 1940 US Census online name index possible and work with nonprofit FamilySearch to bring additional new records collections online—making even more highly valued family history resources available to the entire genealogical community.

Archives.com launched in 2009 with a focus on making family history research simple and affordable. Archives.com was recently awarded the opportunity to host the 1940 census for the National Archives as part of a separate project. Its involvement with the collaborative 1940 US Census project reiterates its commitment to the genealogy community and leadership in the space.

“As a forward thinking company, we understand the critical importance the 1940 Census will have on US family history research. We are proud to be a primary sponsor of this community initiative, giving us another opportunity to take a leading role in the genealogy industry. We’d like to encourage and thank volunteers in advance for their essential contribution to this project,” said Matthew Monahan, CEO of Archives.com’s parent company, Inflection.

FamilySearch has developed an impressive global online community of volunteers over the past 5 years to help create free indexes to millions of the world’s historic records. The scope and size of the 1940 US Census Community Project will require tens of thousands of additional volunteers.

findmypast.com is one of a series of leading family history websites owned by the online publisher, brightsolid, which hosts over a billion records across its genealogy brands. The company, which has been at the cutting edge of online family history since 2002, has a wealth of genealogy experience, including the recently digitized historic newspaper archive for the British Library (britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk), which is set to digitize up to 40 million pages over the next 10 years.

“By supporting this ground-breaking initiative, we hope to capture the imagination of the public to bring millions of people together to create this remarkable document of, and tribute to, the Greatest Generation. At brightsolid we are committed to making family history accessible for all and believe access to these records will transform the family history market in the US,” said Chris van der Kuyl, CEO of findmypast.com’s parent company, brightsolid.