From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes – Now on Sale for 55% Off thru Feb. 9, 2016

Food makes up, and takes up, a considerable portion of our human existence. A large portion of our time goes to earning an income, from which a significant portion goes to food. Hours can be spent each day preparing the daily meals. Major significance is given to the customs, habits, and manners surrounding food. Food can tell us about who we are, where we live, and in what time period we exist. The same is true for those who have gone on before us.  Food, often overlooked, should be a significant part of ones genealogical research. Learning about our food heritage and even those secret family recipes is made easier using From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes, by Gena Philibert-Ortega.

The book looks like a blast-from-the-past, hardbound, family recipe book. However, inside this creative little book one can find historical recipes, food traditions and clues to one’s family food past. Here are just a few things covered in this book:

  • “Methods for gathering family recipes
  • Interview questions to help loved ones record their food memories
  • Places to search for historical recipes
  • An explanation of how immigrants influenced the American diet
  • A look at how technology changed the way people eat
  • A glossary of historical cooking terms
  • Actual recipes from late nineteenth–and early twentieth-century cookbooks”

The author suggests you are now thinking,”What does food have to do with genealogy?” Her response, “For me, the real question is why doesn’t everyone include food traditions in their family history? I grew up in Southern California. Mexican dishes from tamales to burritos and tacos to quesadillas have always been a common factor in my life. But, I remember when finding a taco stand in other states was nearly impossible. I remember hearing of family friends who moved back east and could only find tortillas in a can. Now, it seems Mexican dishes are nearly a mainstay of the average American home. This book walks the reader through understanding and preserving one’s own food heritage as well as researching and evaluating one’s ancestral dietary connections.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

PART A: DISCOVER YOUR FAMILY’S FOOD HERITAGE

Chapter 1 Food Heritage

Genealogy is more than names and dates. Studying social history will help you better understand how your ancestors lived.

Chapter 2 They Brought Their Food With Them

Immigrants brought recipes, raw ingredients, and even seeds from their homelands. How did these food traditions meld into our ancestors’ diet?

Chapter 3 Oysters, Peacocks, and Green Jell-O

Food traditions vary by region, state, county, city, and even neighborhood. This chapter explores the impact of climate, ethnic and religious groups, and industry on our food.

Chapter 4 Food Throughout Time

The foods your ancestors ate were often influenced or dictated by technology, location, and social and political events such as economic depression and war.

Chapter 5 Cookbooks and Menus

This chapter explores the evolution of cookbooks since the eighteenth century and explores menus from nineteenth-century restaurants.

Chapter 6 How to Find your  Ancestor’s Recipes

The best place to find family recipes is in your own home. You can also interview relatives and research local cookbooks to learn more about your ancestors’ diets.

PART 2: A LOOK BACK AT HISTORICAL RECIPES

Chapter 7 Decipher Old Cooking Terms

Having trouble understanding an old recipe? This chapter includes a vintage glossary of cooking terms, measuring charts, and cooking times.

Chapter 8 The Arts of Dining and Cleaning

Cookbooks are more than just recipes. Read vintage advice on menu planning, table setting and decorating, and proper cleaning techniques.

Chapter 9 Historical Recipes

This chapter contains recipes from both community cookbooks and cooking school cookbooks and from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

PART 3: RECIPE JOURNAL

Record you own family recipes in this journal section

Bibliography and Resources

Index

 

Delve into your own culinary heritage in From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes, available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GPO01, NOW ON SALE FOR 55% OFF! Just $12.60; Reg. Price: $27.99.

NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland

“and then on the 3 of March came into Chesapeake bay, at the mouth of the Patomecke, this baye is the most delightfull water I ever saw, between two seet lande, with a channel, 4:5:6:7: and 8 fathoms deepe, some 10 leagues broad, at time of yeare full of fish, yet it doth yeild to Patomecke, which we have made St. Gregories; this is teh sweetest and greatest river have seene, so that the Thames is but a little finder to it, there are noe marshes or swampes about it, but solid firme ground.” — Father Andrew White, S.J.

ngs04This Issue: NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland; written by Patricia O’Brien Shawker.

“The Chesapeake Bay described by Father White dominates Maryland… At the time of Maryland’s founding, it was increadibly rich in fish and shellfish, a magnet attracting the Europeans…

“Knowledge of the history of Maryland and the nature of the record keeping is essential when conducting genealogical research. As one of the original thirteen colonies, Maryland had 140 years of colonial history and has one of the most complete collections of colonial records.”

Each guide in this series offers a bit of history behind each type of record or resource as well as names and descriptions for specific archives.  For example, under the heading Women of Maryland, you will find the following:

“The Maryland State Archives has three online research aids for women. One is the Women Legislators of Maryland, another is the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame, and the third is Maryland Women Citizen; Women’s History at the Maryland State Archives. All three of these have biographical and genealogical information about women in Maryland. There are more than one hundred items useful for researching women in the Archives’ special collections including the records of women’s clubs in Maryland (minutes and reports) and the records of the Young Women’s Christian Association (directories, minutes, and reports). Other useful records are city directories (which usually list them as a widow), wills, marriage, divorce, church, land, and military pension records. The Maryland Room at the Hornbake Library of the University of Maryland has a resource guide for women, which includes the Female Writer’s of Maryland, Biographies of Women from Maryland, and Maryland Women’s History.”

In the guide, each section is handled in like manner. Plenty of specific information on what records are available and where to find them.

About the Series

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. Eventually those guides became outdated and out of print. The current set of guides represents a refresh of those publications, updated and improved for today’s traditional and digital research resources.

About the Authors

Patricia O’Brien Shawker is a professional genealogist and lecturer. She served as the Director of the National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) and has served as the treasurer for the National Genealogical Society.

More About the State Guides (from the Introduction)

“Readers should be aware that every effort has been made to include current web addresses throughout the publication and all were verified immediately prior to release…”

“Two research facilities used by many genealogists are the Family History Library (FHL) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Most genealogists are familiar with the abbreviations used for these two facilities and they are used in these publications. Otherwise the use of abbreviations and acronyms is kept to a minimum.”

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Enoch Pratt Free Library
  • Maryland Genealogical Society
  • Maryland Historical Society
  • Maryland State Archives
  • Maryland State Law Library
  • National Archives — College Park
  • Other Facilities
  • Other Libraries and Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Archives of Maryland
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Directories
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Census
    • Federal Census
  • City and County Directories
  • County Records
  • Court Records
    • Colonial
    • Post-Colonial
    • After 1851
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Germans American
    • Irish American
    • Jewish American
    • Native American
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Land Grants
    • State Land Grants
    • Subsequent Land Records Transactions – County and Baltimore City Land Records
  • Military Records and Benefits
    • Colonial Wars
    • American Revolution
    • War of 1812
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Spanish American War
    • World War I
    • World War II
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
    • Colonial Tax Records
    • Later Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Maryland
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Maryland, are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

NGS Research in the States: North Carolina

ngs08“From the Native American tribes who first lived on the land to the English settlers form Virginia who followed; from the enslaved African Americans to those who came to the area on overland routes, the people of North Carolina have produced a wealth of records to tell their stories. Genealogists who want to trace Tar Heels will find an abundance of records if they take the time to study the history, geography, and record-keeping practices of the state.”

Before European settlers came to North Carolina, by way of Virginia, at least 35 different Native American tribes had inhabited the area of the state at one point or anthers. The first attempt to settle the area by Europeans failed in 1580, and took until the 1650s before any successful settlement was founded. North Carolina had a difficult and varied history through the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. The state saw many battles during the Revolutionary War and much of the state was in chaos. Fewer battles were fought within the state during the Civil War, but the war took no less toll on its people. After the wars, however, the state saw prosperity, becoming a leader in furniture, textiles, and tobacco.

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: North Carolina was written by Jeffrey L. Haines.

Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on North Carolina begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. Learn more about your North Carolina ancestors with help from this guide.

About the Author

“Jeffrey L. Haines is a professional genealogists who specializes in the study of the families of the Carolinas and the British West Indies…Mr. Haines currently serves as the editor of the North Carlina Genealogical Society Journal. He has written articles for many publications, including the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, the Board for Certification of Genealogists’ OnBoard, and the Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly.” He has lectured locally and nationally, and has served in several key positions in multiple genealogical organizations.

Table of Contents

History and Settlements

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • North Carolina State Archives
  • North Carolina State Library
  • University of North Carolina Collections
    • North Carolina Collection
    • Southern Historical Collection
  • Duke University
  • East Carolina University
  • Other Repositories
  • North Carolina Genealogical Society
    • Other Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Federal Census
    • State Census
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • County Courts
    • Higher Courts
    • Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Records
    • African Americans
    • Native Americans
    • Cherokee
    • Lumbee
    • Other Groups
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Land Grants
    • County-Level Records
  • Military Records
    • Colonial War
    • American Revolution
    • Cherokee Wars, War of 1812, and Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Post Civil War and Reconstruction
    • Spanish American War
    • World Wars
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Religious Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage Records
    • Divorce Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women Of North Carolina
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: North Carolina are available from Family Roots Publishing.

 

Other guides in series reviewed to date (in alphabetical order):

 

NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia

ngs13“Research in Virginia is a never-ending search for new sources, new names, and new family connections. Discovering the role of one’s family in the long panorama of Virginia’s past is a challenge to genealogists–often frustrating, frequently rewarding. Researchers will confront many successes if they give careful attention to the records and to their historical and legal context.”

Virginia was the first and largest English colony in North America. As such, many American can trace their ancestral roots to Virginia. More than 400 years have passed since the first settlement, time for records to be moved, found, lost, destroyed, preserved, and treated in every manner possible. The centuries make puzzles out of written histories and records. Guides like NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia help researchers uncover clues to help find their ancestors with an historical perspective.

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia was written by Eric G. Grundset.

Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on Virginia begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. A separate useful section, Jurisdictional Changes, covers border changes over the years. All the other standard information can be found, court, probate, land, religious, tax records, etc.

“Not everyone can descend from Pocahontas, from a Lee, or from a Byrd, but then, those individuals and families were not the only ones who built Virginia and created her history…While one may lament the great record losses of the past, one can also focus on the rich surviving documentary heritage of the Commonwealth and work to bring new information to light. Research on Virginia families is a challenge, but a challenge that rarely loses its appeal and excitement for anyone seeking an understanding of their ancestor’s lives in the Old Dominion.”

About the Author

Eric G. Grundset is a native Virginian, born in Prince George County. An early interest in Virginia’s history led to a degree in history from James Madison University and a MLS from Catholic University. He has worked for over 35 years in genealogical libraries. Grundset is a past president of the Virginia Genealogical Society and previously served as vice president of the NGS.

Table of Contents

Research in Virginia

  • History and Settlement
  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • The Library of Virginia (LVA)
    • Published Guides, Online Finding Aides, Catalogs and Other Records
    • Microfilm Collection
    • Original Records of Counties and Cities
    • Work Progress Administration Records
  • Virginia Historical Society (VHS)
  • Virginia Department of Historic Resources (VDHR)
  • Other Virginia Libraries
  • Libraries Outside Virginia with Major Virginia Holdings
  • State and Local Genealogical and Historical Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Genealogical and Historical Periodicals
  • Atlases and Maps
    • County and City Highway Maps and Topographic Maps
    • Historical Maps
  • Gazettes
  • Biographical Sources, Personal Papers, and Manuscripts
  • Bible Records
  • Business and Organizational Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Early Censuses and Substitutes
    • Federal Population Schedules
  • Colonial and State Government Records
  • County and City Records
    • County Formation and Local Records
    • Independent Cities
  • Court Records
  • Directories
  • Ethnic Records
    • Native Americans in Virginia
    • European Virginians
    • African American Virginians
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Period
    • Local Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Colonial Period
    • American Revolution
    • Military Records, 1783-1812, and the War of 1812
    • Military Records, 1815-1860
    • Civil War, 1861-1865
    • Wars of the Late Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate  and Will Records
  • Religious Records
  • Tax and Financial Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1853-1869 Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1896-1912 Records
    • Birth and Death Records, 1912-1939, 1939 to Present
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Women in Virginia
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Virginia are available from Family Roots Publishing.

NGS Research in the States Series: Oklahoma

ngs24“Gunshots rang out in the territorial capital at Guthrie on Saturday, 16 November 1907, as word was received by telegrapho that President Theodore Roosevelt had signed the proclamation creating Oklahoma as the forty-sixth state. Oklahoma, a Choctaw word meaning red (Okla) people (homma) was chosen as the name for the state joining Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory. Abundant in land and natural resources, the story of Oklahoma is the story of her land. Whether it was the native peoples who first settled this wide open prairie or the white men who came from far and wide to stake their claim in the first ever land run, Oklahoma’s records tell their stories. Unlike the early Spanish explorers who found no gold in Oklahoma, genealogist will discover a gold mine of records in the Sooner state.”

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: Oklahoma was written by Kathy Huber, and is summarized here:

Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on Oklahoma begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. Archeologically evidence shows early game-hunting sites and settled villages, with evidence of early hunting tools and early agricultural practices. The land became part of the United State with the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, but statehood did not come until 1906, making it the forty-sixth state.

The guide outlines and describes the expected resources available for research, from libraries and archives, to courthouses and vital records. According to the author’s conclusion, “to fully understand Oklahoma’s story, however, family researchers should focus on the story of Oklahoma’s land.” You can get a start on that research through this guide. See the Table of Contents below for a complete list of information found in the book.

About the Author

Kathy Huber manages the Genealogy Center of the Tulsa (Oklahoma) City County Library, where she has worked for over 20 years. She is a member of the Oklahoma Library Association, the Texas Library Association, the Texas Genealogical Society, DAR, and others. Huber has taught classes and given presentations at the library and at several local and national events and societies, including NGS and FGS.

Table of Contents

Early History and Settlement

  • Exploration
  • Jurisdictional Changes

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS)
  • Oklahoma Department of Libraries (ODL)
  • Western History Collections, University of Oklahoma Libraries
  • National Archives at Fort Worth
  • Other Libraries
    • Bartelsville Public Library
    • Jennie L. McCutcheon Research Room, Lawton Public Library
    • Muskogee Public Library
    • Genealogy Center, Tulsa City County Library
  • Other Societies
    • Oklahoma Genealogical Society (OGS)
    • Southwest Oklahoma Genealogical Society (SWOGS)
    • Tulsa Genealogical Society (TGS)

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Sources, Personal Papers, and Manuscripts
  • Bible Records
  • Business and Organizational Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Territorial Census
    • Federal Population Schedules
    • Special Censuses
  • City Directories
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • Pre-Statehood Records
    • County-Records
    • State-Records
    • Federal Records
    • State Legislative Records
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • American Indians
  • Land Records
    • Oklahoma Territory
    • Indian Territory
    • County-Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Civil War
    • Confederate Records
    • Union Records
    • Battle of Washita
    • Oklahoma National Guard
    • Spanish-American War
    • Twentieth-Century Wars
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Religious Records
  • School Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage Records
    • Divorce Records
  • Women of Oklahoma
  • Conclusion

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Oklahoma are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Elements of Genealogical Analysis

ne36The accuracy, thus the validity, of any family tree is only as good as the records and sources by which each ancestor on the tree is identified. Many genealogy enthusiasts have used their professional experience to establish methodologies for resolving genealogical conundrums. Elements of Genealogical Analysis, by Robert Charles Anderson, is a recently published book that provides a unique perspective on how to solve genealogical problems.

Anderson has a diverse background in areas such as radio electronics and bio-chemistry. Over the years he developed a methodology to his genealogical research based on his unique perspective taken from his professional life. He learned to put together clues from radio signals to create a pictures of complete radio networks. As a bio chemist he learned that from examining the way enzymes break down protein structures he could see how different enzymes produced different collections of protein fragments. “By studying these fragments, and the ways in which they overlapped, one was able to reconstruct the full sequence of the protein.” These skills led him to think of genealogical research in terms of collecting fragmentary data, comparing bits of information, and eventually creating a complete picture. Eventually these skills and ideas led to a complete system of solving genealogical problems.

Elements of Genealogical Analysis is the manual to Anderson’s ideas and method, as he explains “the purpose of this book is to elaborate a systematic methodology for doing genealogy. Specifically, this book will look at how to solve a genealogical problem.” This book establishes a methodology, a series of steps, one can use to resolve the main issue the author puts before us when he states, “each genealogical problem really comes down to one basic question: does a given record or piece of evidence refer to the person I am researching?”

The answer, as put forth by Anderson, and detailed in a comprehensive methodology can be outlined, or “formulated,” as two “compact, fundamental rules:

First Fundamental Rule: All statements must be based only on accurately reported, carefully documented, and exhaustively analyzed records.

Second Fundamental Rule: You must have a sound, explicit reason for saying that any two individual records refer to the same person.”

The application of these two rules is outlined in the book in two parts. First, are the analytic tools one needs to apply to their research. Second, is the series of  seps used to go from question to answer.

Part One looks at the tools needed for source analysis, record analysis, and linkage analysis. Part Two, breaks problem solving into five steps: problem selection, problem analysis, data collection, synthesis, and problem resolution. Each of the three tools and five steps are given their own chapter spread over 168 pages.

Improve upon your own research skills by applying the techniques taught by Robert Anderson in Elements of Genealogical Analysis, available from Family Roots Publishing.

Robert Anderson was the Winner of the National Genealogical Society’s 2015 award for Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Source for this book,  Elements of Genealogical Analysis.

About the Author:

“Robert Charles Anderson is the director of the Great Migration Study Project at NEHGS. He was educated as a bio-chemist and served in the United States Army in electronics intelligence. In 1972 he discovered his early New England ancestry and thereafter devoted his time and energies to genealogical research. In 1983 he received a master’s degree in colonial American history from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and he was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists in 1978. Anderson was coeditor of ‘The American Genealogist’ from 1993 to 2012, and he has been an editorial consultant to ‘The New England Historical and Genealogical Register’ since 1989.”

 

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Overview

Part One: Analytic Tools

Chapter One – Source Analysis

Chapter Two – Records Analysis

Chapter Three – Linkage Analysis

Part Two: Problem-Solving Sequence

Chapter Four: Problem Selection

Chapter Five: Problem Analysis

Chapter Six: Data Collection

Chapter Seven: Synthesis

Chapter Eight: Problem Resolution

Appendixes

Appendix A – Glossary

Appendix B – The Three Paradigms

Appendix C – GENTECH Genealogical Data Model

Appendix D – Forgery

Notes

Indexes

Subjects

Names

Places

Order Elements of Genealogical Analysis from Family Roots Publishing

NGS Research in the States Series: California

ngs20I doubt anyone would question the fact that California is a unique state. Third largest in territory, largest in population, known around the world, for good or bad, for entertainment, earthquakes, technology, agriculture, and much more. California offers some of the most unique natural features from the redwoods to Yosemite; from Mt. Whitney to Death Valley; and even the ability to surfing in the morning and snow ski away the afternoon. Yet, the people of California bring even more diversity than the state’s resources. The state is a true melting pot of cultural, ethnic, economic, and political diversity.

The NGS Research in the States Series: Californiaby Sheila Benedict, provides the insight needed to research the diversity that is California, its people, and their histories. This guide shows it’s difference from other guides by including sections like the 1906 San Francisco quake and the Movie Industry. Not typical to sections found in similar guides. Of course, the “normal” sections are included as well; such as, information on vital records collections, newspapers, census records, etc. California is big enough that it takes 7 pages, out of this 48 page guide, just to list the major genealogical/historical societies and major library collections (by county).

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state.

About the author:

Sheila Benedict is a dedicated, self-employed, genealogists with an education and background in history, writing, and forensic genealogy. She spent 10 years as the administrator of Old Mission Santa Inés, and continues today as a part-time archivist. Benedict is also a life member and former board member of the National Genealogical Society, of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the Society of California Archivists, and other similarly important societies and organizations dedicated to genealogy and historical research and preservation.

 

Table of Contents

History and Settlement

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • California State Archives
  • California State Library
  • California Historical Society
  • National Archives (NARA) Regional Centers
  • National Archives at Riverside
    • National Archives at San Francisco
    • Bureau of Indian Affairs
  • California State Genealogical Alliance

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
    • Online Archive of California
    • Calisphere, California Digital Library
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Sources
  • Cattle Brands
  • Cemetery Records
  • Census Records
    • 1890 Census Substitute
  • City and County Records
    • California County Record Offices
  • Courts and Court Records
    • Superior Courts
    • Appeals Courts
    • Federal Courts
  • Directories
  • Ethnic Records
    • Chinese
    • Japanese
    • Native Americans
    • Spanish/Mexican
    • Other Ethnicities
  • Land Records / Land Grants
    • Spanish and Mexican Land Grants
    • Federal Land Grants
  • Military Records
  • Mining
  • Mission System
  • Movie Industry
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Railroads
  • Religious Records
    • Baptist
    • Catholic
    • Episcopal
    • Jewish
    • Lutheran
    • Methodist
    • Presbyterian
    • Quakers
  • 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
  • Tax Records
    • Personal Property Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Birth Records
    • Death Records
    • Marriage Records
    • Divorce Records
    • Adoptions
    • Name Changes
    • California State Clerk-Recorder
  • Women
  • Genealogical and Historical Societies/Museums
  • County by County Listing of Genealogical/Historical Societies & Major Library Collections
  • Other Societies and Research Repositories

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: California are available from Family Roots Publishing.

NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska

ngs23“Early native inhabitants roamed the tall-grass prairie, establishing camp villages along the clear streams and leaving behind anthropologic traces of their homes. The wide Platte River carried the early fur traders and foreign explorers, and the nineteenth-century pioneer wagon trains traveled along its grassy banks.

Agriculture has led Nebraska’s economy since the state’s beginning. Ranching is dominant in the sandy-prairie central and western regions, while farming has thrived in the eastern third of the state. In the larger towns and cities manufacturing has become the second-leading economic activity. Tourism, which showcases the state’s natural river scenic byways, historic sites, parks, and outdoor trails, has also become an important economic activity. Nebraska’s rural community societies and museums, county courthouses, historical sites, and library districts welcome the visitor with records still largely intact and accessible.”

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later re-issued as special publications designed to support genealogical research in each state. NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska was written by Roberta King, and is summarized here:

Like other NGS Research in the States guides, this volume on Nebraska begins with a short, historical summary of the state and its inhabitants. Understanding the largely rural nature of the state, the reader comes to understand the value of rural research skills needed in finding ancestral data within the state.

The guide outlines and describes the expected resources available for research, from libraries and archives, to courthouses and vital records. There is also a list of biographical sources and information on Ethnic records. Ethnic information not only includes several Indian tribes, as would be expected, but also major European ethnic groups found in the state, including, Czech, German, Irish, and Jewish information. See the Table of Contents below for a complete list of information found in the book.

About the Author

Roberta ‘Bobbi’ King is a native Nebraskan (3rd generation), with extensive experience in researching rural and small town courthouse records. She has authored many articles on homestead research and continues to teach and write on rural research from her current home in Colorado.

Table of Contents

History and Settlement

Geography and Early History

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Nebraska State Historical Society Library and Archives (NSHS)
  • National Archives at Kansas City, Missouri
  • Nebraska State Genealogical Society
  • American Historical Society of Germans from Russia
  • Other Libraries
  • Museums and Historical Societies
  • Other Societies and Museums

Major Resources

  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Sources
  • Brands
  • Cemeteries
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Territorial Census
    • Federal Census
    • State Census
    • City Census
  • City and County Directories
  • County Research
  • Court Records
  • Judicial System
  • Ethnic Records
    • African American
    • Czech
    • German
    • Irish
    • Jewish
    • Native Americans
  • Land Records
    • Preemption Records
    • Homestead Records
    • Late Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Military Forts in Nebraska
    • Civil War
    • Spanish-American War
    • World War I
    • World War II
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Religious Records
    • Baptists
    • Catholic (Roman)
    • Congregational
    • Lutheran
    • Mennonite
    • Methodist
    • Presbyterian
  • School Records
  • Vital Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage Records
    • Divorce Records
  • Women of Nebraska
  • Conclusion

 

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Nebraska are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Got Proof Of That? Genealogical & Historical Proof Bundle – 15% Off Through Wed., Sept. 9, 2015

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Family Roots Publishing has bundled 3 of our best sellers – all items that deal with proving your case. We all have times when we can’t find direct proof of an ancestor’s relationship – or when we have multiple evidential documents that conflict with each other. So what do we do? All three of these guides deal with the issue. All three are published by different publishers, but FRPC has brought them all under one roof, and made them available as a “Proof Bundle.”

The three items are as follows. Click on the individual links to read reviews of each item or to purchase that item alone at 10% off. The item will open in a new tab. Click on this browser tab to return to this page and order as a bundle at 15% off (plus a $3 postage savings) by clicking here or on the illustration.

Mastering Genealogical Proof, by Thomas W Jones

Genealogical Proof Standard, Building a Solid Case, by Christine Rose

QuickSheet – Your Stripped-Bare Guide to Historical “Proof,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills

Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’ – On Sale for 10% Off

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Elizabeth Shown Mills is an expert researcher and family historian. Her works include top selling books on proving and citing sources: Evidence!: Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian and Evidence Explained, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace. Mills has also written a number of Quicksheets covering research methodologies designed to improve the accuracy and success of the overall research process.

Elizabeth has authored a 2 page laminated guide called Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’. According to Mills, proof is a conclusion we reach from a body of evidence. No single source can serve as proof. No one piece of information can provide it. No one bit of evidence can stand alone.

This guide is available for 10% Off, making it just $6.26 through Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. Click here to order.

In a clean and clear format, Mills provides a most basic, yet useful, overview to evaluating historical resources to find the Proof. Here is what you will find in the guide:

Side 1

A precise definition and explanation of ‘proof,’ followed by a brief explanation on ‘Evaluating the Source,’ ‘Evaluating the Information,’ and ‘Evaluating and Processing the Evidence.’ In three-short, bulletized columns, you learn the basics to identifying useful sources and their reliability.

Side 2

A clear and simple chart, a ‘Process Map,’ outlining historical research from the source through evidence and down to ‘Proof.’

Trust me, when you read the guide this will all make sense!

Get your copy of Elizabeth Shown Mills’ new guide, Quicksheet: Your Stripped-Bare Guide to HISTORICAL ‘PROOF’, from Family Roots Publishing

Genealogical Proof Standard: Building A Solid Case – Fourth Edition

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In this blog, we have previously reviewed books and examined the topic of evidence as it relates to proving or supporting facts found in ones research. For example, two different sources indicate different marriage dates for an ancestor. How does the research identify which source is more accurate. Sometimes this involves an examination of the sources themselves. In other words, an evaluation of the evidence. In terms of the legal system, attorneys build cases on a principle called preponderance of evidence. Family historians build their own cases around evidence as well. The standard for building genealogical cases is referred to as the Genealogical Proof Standard. This is really less complicated than it sounds. Fortunately, Christine Rose has written the perfect primer on the subject, called Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case. The Fourth Edition of this must-have genealogy guide was published in 2014.

This new fourth edition is being offered at 10% off through Wednesday, September 9, 2015 making it just $8.96; Reg. $9.95.

The first chapter jumps right in and explains exactly what the Genealogical Proof Standard actually is; including, the process and how to apply it. The book also covers when and why the standard should be used by researchers. Ultimately, the main point of the book is to help family historians use a structured and tested method for evaluating the veracity of records and information. The book is short, only five brief chapters. Yet, the measure of its worth is in the return one sees in applying these concepts to their own genealogical research.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: What is the Genealogical Proof Standard?

  • Applying the Standard
  • GPS: The Process
  • How Research is Evaluated
  • Criteria to Consider
  • Original, Derivative, and Authored Sources
  • Distance in time
  • Primary, Secondary, and Indeterminable Information
  • Importance of identifying the informant
  • Primary information generally carries more weight than secondary or indeterminate information
  • Secondary information
  • Direct, Indirect, and Negative Evidence
  • Categorizing the evidence
  • Weighing the Assembled Evidence

Chapter 2: Building a Solid Case

  • When to Use GPS
    • Situation 1
    • Situation 2
  • The Important “Who”
  • Additionally, Consider the “Why”
    • Situation 3
  • Cautions Emphasized
    • Items of Contradicting evidence
    • What to do when opposing evidence is not refuted?
    • Chart: Building a Solid Case with the GPS, the Process
    • To Reach a Conclusion in Problem Cases

Chapter 3: Evaluation the Records

  • Census Records
  • Tombstones
    • Multiple sources don’t match
  • Military Records
  • Death Records
  • Marriage Records
  • Birth Records
  • The Internet
    • Family data on the Internet
    • Published family histories
  • Getting Hung Up
    • Not all questions or problems are solved

Chapter 4: Case Studies

  • Analyzing the Criteria
  • John Smith [Hypothetical Case]
  • Bennet Rose [Actual Case]
  • Analysis of Evidence
    • Conclusion
  • Continued Testing
  • Summation

Chapter 5: Writing it Up

  • Proof Summary, Proof Argument and Proof Statement
    • Proof Summaries
    • Proof Summary: List-Style and Narrative-Style
    • Proof Arguments
    • The Narrative
    • Proof Statements
    • Purpose of Written Summaries/Conclusions

    Epilogue: Final Words

    Suggested Sources

    Index

    Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: CR0001, FRPC Sale Price $8.96 – through Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015; Reg Price: $9.95.

Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors, 2nd Edition – On Sale for 15% off thru Sept. 1

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Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors has been out of stock in the FRPC warehouse for some time. We just got a new stock in and FRPC is making it available for 15% off through Sept. 1, 2015.

The entire Irish county research series of “Tracing Your Ancestors” and “Finding Your Ancestors” was created to help researchers both at home [Ireland] and abroad trace their family tree on a county by county basis. Essentially, each book in the series provides a listing of record and document resources within the given county. Each county has its own rich history, with a variety of key settlers, like the Normans, the Vikings, and other groups establishing the first communities and towns. With so many Irish descendents living outside the country, having a county by county resource could prove the very thing needed for finding one’s family in Ireland.

Mayo county sits on the northwest coast and is the second largest county in Ireland. The entire county’s population is around 124,000, down over 215,000 since 1841. Its heritage is a mixture of native Gaelic, Norman, and immigrant Gaelic from Northern Ireland; plus, the normal mixture, if in small numbers, of other ethnic groups from other places.

According to the author, “Mayo, like many other western Irish counties does not have a rich store of records. Therefore it is important that the full range of sources available are used effectively. These sources vary widely in their genealogical content…” This book lists available records of genealogical interest, with details about each source, their location, and reference.

Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Chapter 1. Introduction

Chapter 2. How to Use This Book

Chapter 3. Administrative Divisions

Chapter 4. Civil Registration

Chapter 5. Census and Census Substitutes

Chapter 6. Church Records

Chapter 7. Wills, Administration and Marriage Licenses

Chapter 8. Land Records

Chapter 9. Commercial and Social Directions

Chapter 10. Newspapers

Chapter 11. Gravestone Inscriptions

Chapter 12. Surnames, Family Names and Histories

Chapter 13. Mayo in 1789

Chapter 14. Further Reading

Chapter 15. Library, Archives and Society Addresses

Index

 
Order Tracing Your Mayo Ancestors from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: FLP017; Sale Price: $16.96 – Reg. $18.95.

Professional Genealogy – Back in Print and 17% Off Sale Extended Thru September 1

gpc3844Imaging going to a genealogy seminar and having nothing but great classes taught by some of the very best professional genealogists in the county. That is what you get in Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians.

Edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG; this book was primarily compiled to help those who are, or wish to become, a professional genealogist. However, insight to the developing skills of a professional genealogists will help any family historian and genealogist, as well as those in other professions who support genealogical studies. Every genealogist, from beginner to advance, is constantly learning. “…that is, education. It is our foundation in genealogy. As we gain experience, it deepens and strengthens our grasp of concepts and techniques. Indeed, rapidly changing technology and increasing competition make continuing education imperative. Whatever form it takes—formal instruction or independent study—ongoing education is basic to our effective conduct of professional genealogical research.”

This “Bible” of the professional genealogist has just come back into print, and FRPC made a deal with the publisher to offer the book for 17% off – now through Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Regularly $59.95, it’s just $49.76!

For those who simply want to learn what the professionals know and become better researchers then there is plenty to learn within these pages. Learn about:

  • developing and maintaining a personal library
  • problem analysis and improved research skills
  • evidence analysis
  • writing skills, proofreading, and family histories
  • even learn how to become a presenter

Professional genealogists and those hoping to develop a career in genealogy will also learn important skills in areas including:

  • career management
  • building and marketing a genealogy business
  • writing reports and lineage papers
  • preparing books for press
  • becoming a professional presenter or teacher
  • ethics
  • accreditation

There is so much to learn and this book doesn’t hold back. Over 600 pages await to help any genealogist become a better researcher. Much of what is taught is common sense, and some provides truly practical use, like avoiding legal and ethical problems.

 

Contents

Figures

Appendixes

Acknowledgments

Chapter Authors

Foreword

Preface

Professional Preparation
1. Defining Professionalism, by Donn Devine,J.D., CG, CGI
2. Educational Preparation, by Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
3. Certification and Accreditation, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG; Paul F. Smart, AG; Jimmy B. Parker, AG; and Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
4. The Essential Library, by Joy Reisinger, CG

Ethics and Legalities
5. Ethical Standards, by Neil D. Thompson, LL.B., Ph.D., CG, FASG
6. Executing Contracts, by Patricia Gilliam Hastings, J.D.
7. Copyright and Fair Use, by Val D. Greenwood, J.D., AG

Career Management
8. Alternative Careers, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
9. Structuring A Business, by Melinda Shackleford Kashuba, Ph.D.
10. Setting Realistic Fees, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
11. Marketing Strategies, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
12. Business Record Keeping, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
13. Time Management, by Patricia Law Hatcher, CG, FASG

Professional Research Skills
14. Problem Analyses and Research Plans, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
15. Research Procedures, by Linda Woodward Geiger, CGRS, CGL
16. Transcripts and Abstracts, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL
17. Evidence Analysis, by Donn Devine, J.D., CG, CGI

Writing and Compiling
18. Research Reports, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
19. Genealogy Columns, by Regina Hines Ellison, CGRS
20. Proof Arguments and Case Studies, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
21. Book and Media Reviews, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
22. Record Compilations, by Bettie Cummings Cook, CG
23. Family Histories, by Christine Rose, CG, CGL, FASG
24. Lineage Papers, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL and Elisabeth Whitman Schmidt, CLS

Editing and Publishing
25. Editing Periodicals, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
26. Proofreading and Indexing, by Birdie Monk Holsclaw
27. Preparing Books for Press, by Joan Ferris Curran, CG

Educational Services
28. Classroom Teaching, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
29. Lecturing, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG

This 654-page reference book includes an appendix for Abbreviations and Acronyms as well as a section covering “Codes, Guidelines, and Standards: United States and International.” The book also has an extensive index.

Professional Genealogy is a landmark–the field’s most significant publication since 1960, when the American Society of Genealogists introduced Genealogical Research: Methods and Sources. In a sense, though, its title belies its greatest value: it offers priceless guidance to the many amateur family historians who want to ensure that their work is of high quality and enduring value.” – Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, President, Board for Certification of Genealogists

Become the best genealogist you can, click on the link and purchase Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians from Family Roots Publishing; Sale Price: $49.76; Regular $59.95.

Getting Started in #Genealogy Bundle – On Sale for 65% Off

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As this week’s FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer, Family Roots Publishing is offering 3 popular genealogy books as a bundle for 65% off – or individually at 25% off. The bundle is heavy, and can’t be shipped outside of the United States & Canada.

To Purchase the bundle for just $19.20 (plus $8 p&h), Click Here.

The books are:

Give a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History (5th Edition)

Portrait of My Family – My Family Heritage

Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition

Again, Sorry – we do not ship this bundle outside of the United States. Any orders placed for outside-the-USA & Canada shipping for this item will be reversed. It’s just too heavy to ship economically out of the North America.

Following are reviews of each of the three items:

Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy – Record & Preserve Your Family’s History

Gift of Genealogy

In 2013, Jeffrey A. Bockman, published a major update to his popular book, Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History. Now in its fifth edition, this fantastic primer covers all the basics needed for the novice to get started with family history research. Sometimes genealogists forget an important part of family history research, leaving their own story behind. Bockman created this book to guide and inspire anyone with an inkling of interest into their own past, to help search it out and leave both it and their own stories behind for future genealogists.

In this book Bockman covers all the basics, for example:

  • Forms to record the basic facts
  • Saving  documents future researchers will need
  • Identifying people in photographs
  • Preservation
  • Finding and telling family stories
  • Conducting your own research

This fifth edition is a major revision, adding over five additional years of experience and new resources. New for the fifth edition:

  • More family stories and photographs
  • Newer sources
  • More online resources
  • A new section on searching techniques
  • Comments about genealogy travel with examples
  • Mini case study (to give hope to those who have a relative that disappeared)

The book is organized for easy reading with plenty of examples to help the beginner get started. If you know someone looking to get started with family history or  hoping to help someone develop and interest in their families stories, then this book would help them in the process.

Not only is this book one of the best primers available, it is priced affordably. Family Roots Publishing has Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, (normally $8.95) on sale for only $6.71 (25% off) through February 9 – or purchase it as part of the 65% off Getting Started bundle available through the same date.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

  • About the author
  • Introduction

Family Facts

  • Identify family members and key events
  • Recording information on standardized forms
    • Family Group Sheet
    • Ancestor Chart

Home Sources

  • Supporting documents that help to provide the necessary proof
  • List of what to use, keep, and preserve
  • Important home sources
  • Bockman family home sources

Photographs

  • Help turn names and dates into real people
  • Identify the people, the time, and the place

Preservation

  • Saving items for future generations
  • Paper & document preservation
  • Photo preservation

Family Stories

  • Can only be told by someone who was a part of it
  • Timeline of events
  • Bockman family history

Organizing It All

  • Assembling all of the information

Family History Research

  • How to start researching your family
    • Vital records
    • Wills & probate records
    • Cemetery records
    • Newspapers/obituaries
    • Census records
    • Other records
    • Immigrants
    • Didn’t find it in the index
    • Genealogy travel
    • Case Study: Finding Alvar a not so great dane

Our Family

  • Title page
  • Guidelines for filling in your forms
    • Three family group sheets
    • One ancestor charts
    • Two timeline pages
    • Notes page

    Purchase Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record; Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, (normally $8.95) on sale for only $6.71 (25% off) through February 9 – or purchase it as part of the 65% off Getting Started bundle available through the same date.
    ———-

    Portrait-of-My-Family-200pw

    Portrait of My Family, My Family Heritage

    A great gift or keepsake album to record the genealogy and family history.

    This attractive hardback work contains some 136 pages, illustrated in color, pertaining to virtually every relationship, object, and activity of family life. Each page is dedicated to a separate topic, such as “The Family of My Father” or “Special Memories,” and leaves ample space thereunder for entering names, birthplaces, ages, and other appropriate information.

    Looking for an easy and fun way to preserve the memories in the closest branches of your family’s history? Or, looking for a great way to get others in your family involved in the work? Portrait of My Family is a great solution. The book also makes a great gift, and here is why.

    Portrait of My Family – My Family Heritage is a hardback, fill-in the blank, beautiful family history memory book. This 8.5″ x 11″ hardback book, if properly cared for, will last generations. Filled with pages beautifully printed to add a sense of style to each form. This book is a journal, a memory book, and a family history reference all in one.

    Page by page, the owner will enjoy creating this long-lasting memory by hand, recording basic genealogical information along with the memories of family treasures and special family events. Forms and charts are designed for ease of use and for easy reading. There are places for both genealogical data as well as family personal and family stories. Records of family heirlooms and collections will help future generations identify important family treasures. The contents listed below show all the exciting topics and sheets this book offers for creating a new family heirloom.

    The book also comes with an inserted sheet offering “helpful suggestion for filling in your book.” This included tips on preparing and adding photographs and making the most of your entries.

    As a gift now for others, or as a gift you leave behind, is available from Family Roots Publishing.

    • Table of Contents
    • From Generation to Generation
    • How to Use This book
    • My Genealogy
    • My Parent’s Courtship
    • My Parent’s Marriage
    • Father’s Family
    • Mother’s Family
    • My Foreign-Born Ancestors
    • The Lands of Our Ancestors
    • My Family Tree – fold-out Ancestral Chart
    • My Family
    • The Family of My Father
    • The Family of My Mother
    • The Family of My Paternal GrandFather
    • The Family of My Paternal Grandmother
    • The Family of My Maternal Grandfather
    • The Family of My Maternal Grandmother
    • The Families of My Paternal Great-Grandparents
    • The Families of My Maternal Great-Grandparents
    • Family Weddings
    • Other Religious Ceremonies in Our Family
    • My Family’s Religious Affiliations
    • Where I Have Worshipped
    • Special Memories
    • My Family’s Homes
    • The Schools I Have Attended
    • The Organizations I Have Joined
    • Professions, Occupations, Crafts and Trades
    • My Family’s Military Service Record
    • My Best Friends
    • The Pets in My Family
    • The Automobiles – Our Mechanical Companion
    • Special Things
    • My Prized Family Possessions
    • Sports I Enjoy
    • My Family’s Hobbies
    • Memorable Vacations
    • Family Gatherings
    • Cherished Traditions
    • The Most Outstanding Events in My Family’s History
    • Trials & Disasters My Family Has Faced
    • The Oral History of My Family
    • My Family’s Medical History
    • Vital Statistics
    • Photographs
    • Genealogical Research
    • National Archives [International]
    • Addresses
    • Autographs

    Portrait of My Family, My Family Heritage; by F. Michael Carroll; Copyright 1978; Hardcover; 136 pp.; 8.5×11; Item# GPC8451; Reg. $10.95; Purchase at 25% off ($8.21) through midnight MST Monday, February 9, 2015 – or as a 65% off bundle through the same date.

    ———-

    Directory of Family Associations – 4th Edition

    gpc426About a year ago, Family Roots Publishing made a special purchase of several hundred copies of the 4th Edition of the Directory of Family Associations. The book was written by Elizabeth Petty Bentley and Deborah Ann Carl in 2001, and is the latest family association directory available. No further editions are planned at this time. Most genealogical research within the United States and much of Europe can easily be done for the last 200 years, if not much more. Figuring an average generation as 25 years, that’s eight generations of ancestors – or 510 different and unique surnames in the family tree! If you are working on that many surnames or even a small portion of that (as many of us are), information on family associations is invaluable to our research.

    There are many uses for a directory of family associations, but undoubtedly the best use for it is for genealogical research – for making contact with family members, sharing information about family history, developing common ground between people of the same surname, arranging reunions, discovering who’s out there and where you connect on the family tree, and finding out where you can go with your own research. And there are a host of other uses – kin searching and heir searching, for example, determining family migration patterns, even marketing your own genealogical research. The possibilities are endless.

    Based largely on data received in response to questionnaires sent to family associations, reunion committees, and one-name societies, the 4th edition of the Directory of Family Associations gives you access to a range of possibilities, offering information on approximately 6,000 family associations across the United States.

    The book starts with a section on Multi-family Resources, then launches into the bulk of the book listing the 6000 associations. It literally runs from Aaldericnk through Zyrkle.

    This book is an immensely useful A-Z directory of family associations giving addresses, phone numbers, contact persons, and publications (if any). The book is 12 years old, so undoubtedly some of the contact info will be bad. However, having the data that tells of an association that did exist can also be useful. So whether you’re just starting your genealogical research or already waist deep in your investigations, planning a family reunion or hoping to attend one, or simply curious about your family or your surname, the course you choose from now on may be partially governed by this indispensable directory.

    Note that the reviews on the various editions of this book have been outstanding. Library Journal listed the 1991 edition as a “Best Reference Book of 1991.”

    Get your copy of the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition at 25% off through February 9, 2015 or as part of a 65% off bundle through the same date.

    ———-

    To Purchase the bundle at 65% off – just $19.20 (plus $8 p&h), Click Here.

    Sale ends midnight MST Monday, February 9, 2015.

In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe — 50% OFF

What genealogical records are available?

Where are the records located?

How can each records repository be accessed and used?

gpc395Searching for specific records for your ancestors is work enough. There is no need to first spending significant time finding record repositories to begin with; especially, when there are guides available to point the researcher in the right direction. This includes guides like, In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe This book has been around a while, but it’s still loaded with valuable information on researching ancestors in Europe.

When it comes to European records, this book lists it all. What repositories are available. The types and nature of the records held in each. Where these repositories are held. You also get a little bit of history and key information in understanding and using the available records. This book is one of the few guides that provides the depth of details to prepare the researcher for searching each records set.

Inside this book you will find the archival resources of each country from the national to the local level; the location of church records and census returns; the systems of civil registration of births, marriages, and deaths; and how to find and use such records as certificates of domicile, orphan lists, emigration registers, guild records, internal passports, confirmation records, and even vaccination lists.

The third edition of this book added as many URLs (addresses) to as many associative websites as possible. However, the information in this book is by and large unchanged from its first edition, and invaluable compared to the contact information, like websites. The history and location of records is virtually unchanged and of the greatest worth. Besides, any websites or contact information changed since this book was last printed is easily obtained by searching online. By knowing, what is available, what each repository hold, with its history, any researcher can get online and search for online copies of documents or get current contact information for those repositories not yet indexed or copied online.

Never underestimate the value of a book like In Search of Your European Roots. The information is invaluable to researchers looking to find their European ancestors. Equally important, few books every try to cover the whole of a continent in the way this book has covered Europe. See below for a complete list of countries included in this book.

Get a copy of In Search of Your European Roots: A Complete Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors in Every Country in Europe from Family Roots Publishing currently on On Sale for 50% Off through January 15, 2015.

Countries included in this book:

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Austria
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia
  • Bularia
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • The Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Herzegovina
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macedonia
  • Malta
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • San Marino
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Ukraine
  • Yugoslavia