Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Second Edition – Now Shipping & 15% Off Thru March 21

Following eight years of sales, Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists has been updated and revised in a new Second Edition. Written by William Dollarhide, and initially published in 2009, this book has consistently been a best seller for Family Roots Publishing. This new edition was much needed and after months of work, Bill got the book revised and it’s now available.

This new Second Edition contains many updates. Since the first edition in 2009, over 200 of the 265 Internet addresses alone within the volume changed! Virtually every state section of the book had to be updated and revised. Another major change of many pages within the book dealt with the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), which is now found exclusively at FindMyPast.org.

To celebrate the launch of the new book, Family Roots Publishing is discounting it 15% and making it available as not only a printed volume, but as a PDF eBook besides. This sale runs thru Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Click here to purchase the Printed Book. Just $29.71 (plus $5.50 p&h) – Reg. $34.95 (plus $5.50 p&h).

Click here to purchase the PDF eBook, with an immediate download. Just $20.36 – Reg. $23.95.

Most genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. This new volume by William Dollarhide identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories are identified within this book:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories
  • The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

Online Resources

Libraries & Archives

Order this new volume by clicking on the illustration or the link below.
Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists – Second Edition; by William Dollarhide; 2017; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp; ISBN#: 9781933194455; Item # FR0113

Donna Moughty’s Irish Research Series of Quick Reference Guides

Lisa Louise Cooke just released a new series of two Irish Research Quick Guides. They were written by Donna M. Moughty, and edited by Lisa. While only four pages each, these guides are loaded with information everyone with Irish ancestry can use.

FRPC is offering these new guides at 10% off through March 21.

Following is a description of each:

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series
Without the right preparation, researching in Ireland can be frustrating! Before you jump the pond, start your research at home to determine a place in Ireland, as well as details to help differentiate your person from someone of the same name. This research guide will walk you through the process of identifying records in the US to set you up for success in your Irish research.

Each Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish research preparation and template
  • Creating a research plan
  • Strategic steps to answer your research questions
  • Sample research plan outline
  • Irish immigration history
  • Irish jurisdictions
  • Next steps for Irish records research

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU25

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series
Civil Registration for all of Ireland began in 1864, with Protestant marriages dating back to 1845. Even if your ancestors left before that date, they likely had relatives that remained in Ireland. Prior to Civil Registration, the only records of births (baptisms), marriages or deaths (burials) are in church records. This Reference Guide will explain how to use the new online Civil Registration records as well as how to identify the surviving church records for your ancestors in Ireland.

Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish Civil Registrations history
  • Irish families, names, and variations
  • Strategies for locating Irish Civil Registrations
  • Northern Ireland research
  • Irish church records
  • Online and traditional resources for research

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU26

About the Author
Donna Moughty is a professional genealogist and a former Regional Manager for Apple Computers. She has been conducting family research for over 20 years. She teaches classes for beginners and lectures on a variety of subjects including Internet, Irish research, and computer topics. In addition, she provides consultations, research assistance, and training. She is a member of Association of Professional Genealogists and the Genealogical Speakers Guild.

Bockstruck’s New Settlements & Migrations book, bundled with his Names volume – 15% Off through March 14

Family Roots Publishing has put together a bundle of two recently published Lloyd Bockstruck books – one dealing with Settlements and Migration in America & the other the closely related subject of Names. We’ve discounted the bundle by 15%, making it just $30.52 (Reg. $35.90) The following books are included:

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book at their respective pages, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page to order the bundle.

Following are reviews of each of the books:
GPC has just released a new guide from Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck. This softbound book is titled American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians.

The book provides a synopsis of the original patterns of settlement and migration for the United States. Mr. Bockstruck discusses each of the 50 states, however, his emphasis is on the states and territories that were established between the colonial period and the middle of the nineteenth century. For each state the author examines pioneers’ places of origin, reasons for settlement, specific places of settlement in America, names of pioneering families, migrations within and between states, and more. Equally important, throughout the volume he names the key sources for further research.

The study of migration is inextricably intertwined with family history. By combining a knowledge of history and geography, therefore, the family historian can extend the family pedigree across the country. Every detail represents a potential clue to an elusive ancestor, from the name of a shipping line, port of embarkation, and clusters of fellow passengers, to the nature of soil available to the colonist, church membership, and status of roadways.

Some members of the family may not have ventured away from the ancestral home. Others went westward but did not continue as far as some of their kinfolk. They may have generated the records further inland that would enable the family historian to bridge an ancestral geographical gap. Finding earlier places of residence could enable one to determine the place of nativity of an ancestor. Following such paths could enable one to locate relatives who remained in the East or dropped off earlier along the migration route, thereby identifying the immigrant or colonist who founded the family in the New World and perhaps the ancestral home in the Old World as well.

The study of migration/immigration follows several principles. Firstly, one must understand the local history of one’s ancestral homes. For example, as late as 1950, the state possessing greatest percentage of residents of British descent was Utah. Why? Utah was settled by Mormons, and this relatively new religious group was mostly composed of New England Puritan stock. Moreover, that church’s first missionary efforts abroad were in conducted in the British Isles, and those converts joined them in Utah.

Secondly, migrations are also tied to similar climatic belts. Colonists and immigrants often sought out lands that were capable of growing the crops with which they were familiar, as in the case of Scandinavian settlement in Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Thirdly, migration rests upon forces that draw immigrants to a new home. It may also apply to those forces that drove them away from their home. In some instances both aspects may apply. For instance, more than 150,000 natives of Virginia were living in the states of the Old Northwest Territory in 1850—an area accessible to them and possessing terrain and soils with which they were familiar.

Still other factors impinging on migration and settlement include available modes of transportation, religious preference or ethnicity, economic factors such as famines and floods, and foreign wars, revolutions, and other aspects of statecraft. Bockstruck contrasts colonial migrations, for example, with those following American Independence. During the colonial period, individuals and groups moved from the southern colonies to the northern colonies, and vice versa. Until the 1750s, colonists utilized sailing ships as the primary mode of transportation between colonies. They did not move from the East to the West until after the French and Indian War, when the Braddock and Forbes roads were built to enable the military forces to go into the interior to challenge the French in the Ohio River Valley. Such roads were necessary to move heavy military equipment, such as canons, and materiel to the war front.

American Settlements and Migrations is arranged by region and thereunder by state. Each chapter outlines not only the events, persons, and forces that contributed to a state’s settlement but also offers untold clues to the reader’s own ancestors. Might an 18th-century South Carolina forebear have been part of the British expulsion of the French from Nova Scotia? Was your Welsh ancestor part of the Pennsylvania migration to work in the Knoxville, Tennessee mining industry? Your Irish Famine-era ancestor was living in Boston in 1860, but is the gap in his genealogy attributable to the fact that he might have entered North America through the Canadian Port of St. John, Newfoundland. These are just some of hundreds of possibilities Mr. Bockstruck gets you to consider. His new primer may be just the clue finder you have been looking for.

In my review of the volume, I found that virtually hundreds of resources are found within the text – all with full titles, and authors. This makes it easy for the genealogist to find the item with the publishers, or a nearby library genealogy collection. By the way, you can find books in libraries near you within seconds by typing the title into the search engine at http://www.worldcat.org/. Find the book, and click on it. Enter your location zip code (under Find a Copy in a Library). Bingo!

The only issue I have with the volume is that the font is a bit small for my old and tired eyes. But reading the volume in bright lighting made my reading pleasurable – and I learned many things that I didn’t know previously.

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

The following is from the Table of Contents – the abbreviations are mine:

  • Chapter One: American Settlements and Migrations in America
  • Chapter Two. New England – MA, CT, RI, Providence Plantations, VT, ME
  • Chapter Three. West Indies
  • Chapter Four. The Middle Colonies – NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD
  • Chapter Five. The Southern Colonies – VA, WV, NC, SC, GA
  • Chapter Six. The Impact of the Revolutionary War
  • Chapter Seven. Post Revolutionary War Settlements – FL, KY, TN
  • Chapter Eight. The Old Northwest – OH, IN, IL, MI, WI, MN
  • Chapter Nine. The Old Southwest – AL, MI, LA
  • Chapter Ten. The Trans-Mississippi West – IA, MO, AR
  • Chapter Eleven. The West – TX, KS, NE, OK, UT, NM. AZ, NV, CO, ND, SD, WY, ID
  • Chapter Twelve. The Pacific Coast – OR, WA, CA
  • Chapter Thirteen. Alaska, Hawaii and Canadian Settlements – AL, HI, QC, NS, ON

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.
_________________________

cf8006Two hundred years ago no parent would have named a child for a favorite movie star. There were no movies. However, naming a child for an historical figure, like George after George Washington, was not uncommon. Other naming practice common in the past would seldom be considered today. However, understanding such practices may help a genealogists better identify their ancestors. For example, using an uxornecronym. An uxornecronym is a name given to the first daughter born into a marriage were the name honors a previous wife. Such practices would be less common in a society were divorce is the primary reason for having previous marriages, but not so in a time when death, especially in child birth, would have left an empty place in a home to be filled by a second marriage. Genealogists looking to better understand and trace their ancestors by their names may benefit greatly from The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogists, a new book by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck.

What is Onomatology? Where etymology is the study of the origin and history of words, onomatology is the same for names. Bockstruck explains, “onomatology is the study of names. It involves both forenames, commonly called first, second, or middle names, and family names or surnames. It also includes nicknames and  place names which in the United States are often named for individuals.” He also makes the important distinction, “the study of onomatology is one based on records over centuries and requires an awareness of a multitude of changes in names.” This book provides, at least, the basics of onomatology for genealogists.

The Name IS the Game is broken into five chapters. The first acts as introduction. The second and third chapters examine given names and surnames, respectively. These chapters represent the bulk of the book and cover all types of naming practices over centuries of Europe and the United States. The last two chapters cover toponyms, place names, and provide a selected bibliography for further reference.

I have provided, below, and expanded table of contents. The list should demonstrate just how much this book covers, especially regarding surnames.

Table of Contents  (expanded)

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Forenames

  • Ethnic Clues in Forenames
  • Forename or a Title
  • The Maiden Name of a Mother as a Forename
  • Forename Clues
  • Diminutives
  • Diminutive Abbreviations
  • Forename Equivalents
  • Multiple Forenames
  • Uxornecronyms
  • Ambisexual Forenames
  • Postponing the Bestowing of Forenames
  • Repetition of Forenames
  • Forename Clues
  • Hagiographic Forenames
  • Naming Patterns
  • Optical Mis-recognition
  • Forenames from Historical Figures
  • Initials
  • Renaming of a Living Child

Chapter 3 Surnames

  • Maiden Names
  • Spelling Fixation
  • Surname Confusion
  • Misinterpretation of Letters of Surnames
  • The Un-aspirated Initial Letter of Surnames
  • Pronunciations
  • The Terminal “G”
  • Nee, Alias, and Genannt
  • Adoption of a Step-parent’s Surname
  • Military Influence on Surnames
  • From English to Another Language
  • From One European Language to Another
  • The Dit Name
  • Dialects and Minorities
  • Dutch Surnames
  • Abbreviations of Surnames
  • The Crossed Tail of the Letter P
  • The Long “S”
  • The Female Title of Mrs.
  • Idem  Sonans
  • Translation into English
  • Surname Shortening
  • The Letters “R” and “L”
  • “Ou” and “Wh”
  • Gender and Surnames
  • Ethnic Clues
  • Statutory Changes
  • District and County Court Changes of Names
  • Multiple Independent Appearances
  • Spanish
  • African-American
  • Jewish
  • American Indian Surnames

Chapter 4 Toponyms

Chapter 5 Selected Bibliography of Legal Changes of Names

 
Copies of The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogist are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Purchase the bundle for $30.52 (plus $8 p&h) (Reg. $35.90) by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books? Click on the book links above to purchase individual books at 10% off dealing the sale period.

Eastern European Historical Repositories – on sale for 10% off thru November 10 , 2016

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Just $17.55 with the discount. Click on this link to order.

We just got in a new stock of the new Eastern European Historical Repositories by Dr. Charles Dickson. I’m always looking for new resources, especially as deals with Europe – and this book fills a void.

America has often been described as a melting pot nation. While such an adjective contains some truth it does not capture the total flavor of its multiethnic experience. While many national groups have blended into the American fabric, they have also, to varying degrees, maintained a sense of individual ethic identity.

This work represents an attempt to organize a list of the many resources that are available to serious students of Eastern European history in their ongoing search for family histories. The listings in this book cover the following ethnic groups: Albanians, Armenians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Estonians, Greeks, Hungarians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, Slovenians, and Ukrainians.

Under each ethnic group a common format has been followed which includes an introduction to immigration patterns, followed by separate page listings describing the holdings of primary genealogical societies, museums, and educational institutions associated with that group.

Next there are listings of other ethnic related societies which have some family histories followed by a listing of the regional public libraries located in areas where each particular group has settled in significant numbers. As the reader uses this handbook as a research tool in discovering group and family histories, hopefully he or she will be reminded that the American multiethnic experience may be singularly unique in human history.

The following is from the Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • The Author
  • Table of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  • Albanians
  • Armenians
  • Bulgarians
  • Croatians
  • Czechs (including Bohemians & Moravians)
  • Estonians
  • Greeks (including Cypriots)
  • Hungarians (Including Magyars)
  • Latvians
  • Lithuanians
  • Poles (Including Pomeranians & Silesians)
  • Romanians (Including Moldavians)
  • Russians (Including Byelorussians)
  • Serbians (Including Bosnians & Macedonians)
  • Slovaks (Including Carpatho-Rusyns)
  • Slovenians
  • Ukrainians (Including Ruthenians)
  • General Bibliography

Click on the link to order Eastern European Historical Repositories; by Dr. Charles Dickson; 140 pp., paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2014; ISBN: 0788455826; Item # HBD5582. On sale for 10% off through Nov 10, 2016.

Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers – 15% Off thru Thursday, Nov 3, 2016

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We have a good stock of the recently published Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers in stock. We’re now shipping them on a daily basis. We decided to run a promo on the soft cover edition this week, and are discounting the price by 15% for our readers. This is an Internet Only sale. No phone or mail-order sales at this price. Click on the links to order.

Written in English by Kevan Hansen, the Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers was written to help family historians locate their Luxembourg ancestors. It is available in both soft cover and hard-back editions. Note – the soft cover edition is the one we’ve discounted for the sale.

The Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers does the following:

  • Identifies the major online resources for Luxembourg genealogical research.
  • Identifies each canton, its communes, and populated areas with the names in French, German and Luxembourgish.
  • Visually identifies Catholic church parishes within each canton.
  • Provides an overview of Luxembourg genealogical records.
  • Identifies neighboring parishes, just in case your ancestor may have gone to an alternate parish.
  • Aids in conduction area searches, particularly across district and canton borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for your family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Every canton is mapped to show where each commune lies.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources
  • Identifies important gazetteers and online dictionaries available to researchers

The following contents are found in this volume.

  • Historical Background of Luxembourg
  • Luxembourg Genealogical Resources
  • Catholic Parishes
  • How to Use This Book
  • Census Records
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • Emigration
  • Archives and Repositories
  • Secondary Collections
  • Genealogical Societies
  • Language
  • Gazetteers
  • Luxembourg Overview Map
    • District Diekirch
    • Canton Clervaux
    • Canton Diekirch
    • Canton Rendange
    • Canton Vianden
    • Canton Wiltz
    • District Grevenmacher
    • Canton Echternach
    • Canton Grevenmacher
    • Canton Remich
    • District Luxembourg
    • Canton Capellen
    • Canton Esch-sur-Alzette
    • Canton Luxembourg
    • Canton Mersch
  • Town Index of Luxembourg
  • The maps in this volume are divided along the administrative boundaries of Luxembourg. Each of the three districts: Diekirch, Grevenmacher, and Luxembourg, are further divided into a total of twelve cantons. Each canton map is then followed by the description of the communes (municipalities) within its boundaries.

    The descriptions of the communes include the names of the population centers (villages, hamlets, mils, etc.). The names of these localities are shown with their French, German, and Luxembourgish names. To the right of the location name is a number in parentheses which is reflected in the accompanying mini map showing its approximate location within the commune borders.

    The surviving church records are shown along with the span of years available for them. The beginning and ending dates are representative of the earliest and latest record. In some instances one type of vital record may be more complete than another. Digital images of the records may be searched at FamilySearch.org. They are also available at Archives Nationales de Luxembourg.

    Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers, by Kevan Hansen, 180 pp; Soft Cover; 2016; ISBN: 9781628590791; Item # FR0660. To order, click on the link or the illustration.

    Following is the list of places found within this volume:

    • Aassel
    • Aasselbur
    • Aasselscheierhaff
    • Abweiler
    • Ahn
    • Aischen
    • Äischen
    • Äischer
    • Allënster
    • Allerborn
    • Allerbur
    • Alrodeschhaff
    • Alscheid
    • Alschënt
    • Altlinster
    • Altrier
    • Altrodeschhof
    • Altwies
    • Altwis
    • Alzeng
    • Alzingen
    • Amber
    • an der Buerg
    • an der Zowaasch
    • Angelduerf
    • Angelsberg
    • Angelsbierg
    • Ansebuerg
    • Ansembourg
    • Ansemburg
    • Antoniushaff
    • Antoniushof
    • Arsdorf
    • Arsdorfermühle
    • Arsdorf‑Moulin
    • Aspelt
    • Assel
    • Asselborn
    • Asselscheuerhof
    • Atert
    • Attert
    • Baaschtenduerf
    • Baastenduerf
    • Bad‑Mondorf
    • Bäerdref
    • Bäereldeng
    • Banzelt
    • Bärel
    • Bartreng
    • Bartringen
    • Basbellain
    • Bascharage
    • Baschelt
    • Baschleiden
    • Bastendorf
    • Bauschelt
    • Bauschleiden
    • Bavigne
    • Beaufort
    • Bech
    • Bech‑Kleinmacher
    • Bech‑Maacher
    • Continue readingMap Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers – 15% Off thru Thursday, Nov 3, 2016″

    New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians

    The following news release is from NYGBS:

    New-York-City-Municipal-Archive_198pw

    The publication unlocks key resources for anyone tracing New York City’s vast history to leverage the hundreds of key collections housed at the Municipal Archives.

    NEW YORK, NY — The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) is pleased to announce the release of New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians.

    The 245-page guide will make research at this vital facility far more approachable and will introduce researchers to many previously-unknown record collections housed there.

    As one of the world’s largest repositories of city records, the holdings of the New York City Municipal Archives offer untold resources for those tracing the history of New Yok City and its families. But until now, it has remained difficult for anyone but the most experienced researcher to navigate more than the basics of this essential archive. This new guide, created with the assistance of the New York City Municipal Archives, will make it possible for genealogists, family historians or anyone researching New York City’s vast history to leverage the hundreds of key collections found there.

    The guide has already been the recipient of significant praise from the genealogical and archival community, including David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, who stated, “What a gift to genealogists, researchers, and the just plain curious! For the first time a treasure trove of New York City history going back to the Dutch Colonial Era is described to facilitate easy access.”

    The publication, which has been in progress for more than two years, is authored by genealogist Aaron Goodwin of New York City. Harry Macy, Jr., FASG, FGBS, is its consulting editor. Support for the publication was provided by Furthermore, a program of the J.M. Kaplan fund and former NYG&B trustee, M. David Sherrill.

    Pauline Toole, Commissioner, New York City Department of Records and Information Services noted, “We look forward to welcoming family historians at the Municipal Archives as they explore all the wonderful collections highlighted in the new guide.  This comprehensive resource will be especially useful for our patrons who want to go beyond the basics as they document their New York City roots.”

    D. Joshua Taylor, NYG&B President remarked, “The guide provides a look at key records and largely unknown collections that will unlock information and solve mysteries relating to millions of those who at one time called New York City their home.”

    Last year the NYG&B released the monumental New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer which has quickly become a best-selling “must-have” resource for those tracing New York genealogy and family history. The New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians is the latest in the organization’s series of research guides, with further topics planned in the future.

    The New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians is available in print for $40 at NewYorkFamilyHistory.org (members of the NYG&B receive a $10 discount and can also purchase an exclusive digital version alongside a paperback copy).

    About the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B)
    Since 1869 the NYG&B has been bringing families closer to their New York State history by preserving and sharing information related to family history and genealogy. As the largest genealogical society in New York, the NYG&B’s website, NewYorkFamilyHistory.org, includes digital collections, articles, research aids, and other essential tools for those researching New York State. The NYG&B has thousands of members across the globe and publishes The NYG&B Record each quarter, a scholarly journal devoted to New York genealogy and biography, as well as the award-winning New York Researcher, which provides the latest news and updates for those tracing their New York ancestors. In 2015 the NYG&B published the award-winning New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, offering more than 800 pages of detailed resources related to New York. Each day the NYG&B engages with the dynamic, fast-growing, rapidly changing field of family history through accurate, thorough research and the highest standards of scholarship.

    New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians, by Aaron Goodwin , Harry Macy Jr., Consulting Editor, August 2016. Softcover, 7 x 10, 245 pages.
    Shipping and handling for U.S. locations $5 per book; for international orders, call 212-755-8532. State and local sales tax applies to non-exempt purchases by New York State residents and purchases shipped to a New York address.

    German Immigrants in American Church Records – the Series

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    I am excited to be able to announce that Family Roots Publishing just signed contracts to continue the publication of what was Picton Press’s German Immigrants in American Church Records series of books.

    Under the direction of Lewis Rohrbach, these volumes have been printed at the rate of just under 2 per year since 2005. They are amazing books, listing the names, relationships and German homeland birthplaces of thousands upon thousands of German settlers in the Midwest United States. Under the direction and editorship of my friend, Roger Minert, these records have been meticulously extracted by students at BYU, then formatted and indexed to make for some of the finest German birthplace aids in existence today.

    For those who may not know, Mr. Rohrbach was one of the premier genealogists and genealogy publishers in the country, specializing in Swiss research – but also known for his quality publications – both in content as well as appearance. Lewis passed away last January, and Picton Press closed it’s doors. Read his obituary at Dick Eastman’s blog. Seventeen volumes of the series were shipped to customers. I personally know of 74 libraries that have nearly the entire series. The manuscript for Volume 18 was sent to Picton just prior to Lewis’s death and was never shipped, although I suspect it may have been printed. I understand that Lewis’s widow plans to donate his inventory to various libraries, and I am in hopes that those 74 libraries (plus others I am sure) will get Volume 18 during that process. Because of contractual and copyright issues, neither Roger, nor Family Roots Publishing has access to any of volumes one through eighteen at this time – other than ten copies of Volume 5, one copy of Volume 4, and one copy of Volume 8.

    German Immigrants in American Church Records – Volume 19: Missouri (Excluding St. Louis County) will ship in September 2016. We will be posting it at the Family Roots Publishing website in the near future. If you or your library wish to be placed on a standing order for the volumes as they come out, email me at Lmeitzler@gmail.com and I’ll forward you a standing order form to get the book at a substantial discount.

    Note that Family Roots Publishing is very interested in maintaining the superior quality of this hard-bound series, and like Mr. Rohrbach, will ensure that all volumes will be hardbound and printed on 60# acid-free paper for long-lasting shelf life.

    German Census Records 1816-1916 – A Groundbreaking New Genealogy Resource

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    I need to first make a sincere apology. For years I have been telling people that there were very few German censuses taken – with a small number of exceptions. I didn’t know what I was talking about. I guess I could make the excuse that I didn’t know what I didn’t know, but I learned years ago that excuses aren’t worth anything. Actually, many German censuses were taken, some as early as the 1700s, but with most starting in 1816. And yes – many are accessible to researchers today.

    After wondering for several years why American researchers know very little about German census records, my good friend, Dr. Roger Minert, found an opportunity to live in Europe for six months to investigate them. He was sure that many existed, but he could find very little information about them. While in Europe, he learned that even German researchers know very little about their census records! How could such a potentially important resource be lost to obscurity? In a new book, researchers can now learn where and when German census records were compiled, as well as why and how. The author also describes state by state the content of the census records and explains how surviving census documents can be located. This is groundbreaking information, of enormous value to anyone researching their German roots.

    Would you like additional information about your family in old country? The information found in the parish registers is key to your research, but there’s often even more family information to be found in the German census records.

    German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource is available and now shipping.

    Note – this book is also available in a hardbound edition. Click on this link to be directed to that page at the FPRC website.

    The following Table of Contents is found in the volume:

    • Acknowledgements
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 1: A History of Census Records in the German States
    • Chapter 2: The Census of 1867: The Great Transition
    • Chapter 3: Census Records during the German Empire 1871-1918
    • Chapter 4: Census Records in the German States from 1816 to 1864
    • Chapter 5: Anhalt
    • Chapter 6: Baden
    • Chapter 7: Bayern [Bavaria]
    • Chapter 8: Brandenburg
    • Chapter 9: Braunschweig [Brunswick]
    • Chapter 10: Bremen (Hansestadt Bremen)
    • Chapter 11: Elsaß-Lothringen {Alsace-Lorraine]
    • Chapter 12: Hamburg (Hansestadt Hamburg)
    • Chapter 13: Hannover [Hanover]
    • Chapter 14: Hessen [Hesse]
    • Chapter 15: Hessen-Nassau [Hesse-Nassau]
    • Chapter 16: Hohenzollern
    • Chapter 17: Lippe
    • Chapter 18: Lübeck (Hansestadt Lübeck) [Luebeck]
    • Chapter 19: Mecklenburg-Schwerin
    • Chapter 20: Mecklenburg-Strelitz
    • Chapter 21: Oldenburg
    • Chapter 22: Ostpreußen [East Prussia]
    • Chapter 23: Pommern [Pomerania]
    • Chapter 24: Posen
    • Chapter 25: Reuß älterer Linie [Reuss Elder Line]
    • Chapter 26: Reuß jüngere Linie [Reuss Younger Line]
    • Chapter 27: Rheinprovinz [Rhineland Province]
    • Chapter 28: Sachsen-Altenburg [Saxe-Altenburg]
    • Chapter 29: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
    • Chapter 30: Königreich Sachsen [Kingdom of Saxony]
    • Chapter 31: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
    • Chapter 32: Provinz Sachsen [Province of Saxony]
    • Chapter 33: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach [Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach]
    • Chapter 34: Schaumburg-Lippe
    • Chapter 35: Schlesian [Silesia]
    • Chapter 36: Schleswig-Holstein
    • Chapter 37: Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
    • Chapter 38: Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
    • Chapter 39: Waldeck
    • Chapter 40: Westfalen [Westphalia]
    • Chapter 41: Westpreußen [West Prussia]
    • Chapter 42: Württemberg [Wuerttemberg]
    • Chapter 43: German Census Records from 1816-1916: What Do We Know Now?
    • Chapter 44: Conclusions
    • Appendix A: Writing to Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
    • Appendix B: Conducting Census Research in Archives in Germany, France and Poland
    • Appendix C: Interesting Documents Relating to German Census Campaigns
    • Appendix D: The States of Germany in 1871
    • Bibliography
    • Index

    German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource; by Roger P Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2016; 260 pp; 8.5×11; Softbound; ISBN: 9781628590777; Item #: FR0650

    Masonic Research – A Quick Guide by Pat Gordon – 10% off thru Sept. 1

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    Our ancestors were social beings, just like we are today. Using information found in this much-needed Masonic Research guide will soon have you on the right track to discovering your Masonic ancestors. And chances are you have some, since Masonry is one of the oldest, most popular and influential organizations in the U.S., Canada and Europe with just about every town having a Masonic Lodge. Pat Gordon’s Masonic Research guide explains how to find Masonic records, including a comprehensive listing of Grand Lodges and Prince Hall Grand Lodges by state.

    I’ve personally had great success using Masonic records. In fact, I actually broke a brick-wall problem with them once. If you haven’t used them, I certainly recommend that you start now. This 4-page laminated Genealogy Quick Tips guide was published in 2013, but FRPC just began stocking them. To introduce the item, we’re offering it at 10% off thru Sept. 1. Sale price: $8.06, Reg. $8.95.

    Contents Include:

    • Background
    • Lodges
    • Becoming a Mason
    • Degrees
    • Offices
    • Affiliated Organizations
    • Genealogical Information
    • Finding Records
    • Researching
    • Pitfalls
    • Terms
    • Grand Lodges by State
    • Prince Hall Grand Lodges by State

    Quick Sheet: Masonic Research by Pat Gordon; 4 pp; Laminated; 8.5×11; Published: 2013; Item # BT01. Sale Price: $8.06; Reg. $8.95.

    Click on the above link to order.

    Evidence Explained, Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3rd Edition – 15% Off Sale Extended Thru June 16

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    It’s now been eight years since the first edition of Evidence Explained, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, was published. The book proved to be the definitive guide to citation and analysis. This guide left nothing to chance. As time went on, a second edition was required. And now the Bible of genealogical citation has come out in a much-anticipated new third edition.

    Advances in genealogy and history research, changes at major repositories and online information providers, and the ever-evolving electronic world have generated new citation and analysis challenges for researchers. While countless websites now suggest ways to identify their offerings, few of those address the analytical needs of a researcher concerned with the nature and provenance of web material, whose numerous incarnations and transformations often affect the reliability of their content.

    As with the previous two editions of Evidence Explained, the third edition explains citation principles for both traditional and nontraditional sources; includes 1,000 citation models for virtually every source type; and shows readers where to go to find their sources and how to describe and evaluate them. It contains many new citation models, updates to websites, and descriptions and evaluations of numerous contemporary materials not included in earlier editions.

    Highlights of the new Evidence Explained, Third Edition include:

    • QuickStart Guide
    • Expanded “3×3” Evidence Analysis Process Model
    • Expanded coverage for genetic citations
    • Expanded coverage of layered citations
    • Latest Concepts in evidence analysis
    • Coverage of latest media and delivery systems
    • Expanded glossary
    • Handling of cached materials at Wayback Machine and elsewhere
    • Privacy standards for genetic research
    • Updates in National Archives citations after changes at NARA and TNG
    • Updates for major online providers after acquisitions and mergers
    • When to cite DOIs vs. URLs
    • When to cite Stable URLs vs. paths and keywords
    • Your 4 Basic Rules for Citing websites
    • And many other issues raised by users of past editions of Evidence Explained

    This volume is 892 pages in length, indexed and in hardcover. It was just published in May of 2015. ISBN 978-08063-2017-5. Item #: GPC3878D. Normally selling for $59.95 plus p&h, FRPC is marketing it online for 15% off, making it just $50.96, through June 16, 2015. Click here to order.

    Maine Names Lists 1623-2012 – Now Shipping

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    The brand new Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook! The Name List book is 103 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

    See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 – with FR0248 FREE as a PDF download eBook; by William Dollarhide; 103 pp., paper; 8.5×11; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781628590302; Item # FR0247

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Washington. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Contents

    • Preface
    • Map: USGS Map Of Maine.
    • Map: English, French, Dutch, and Swedish Colonies, 1584-1626
    • Map: 1790 (as part of Massachusetts)
    • Map: Grants to the Plymouth and Virginia Companies
    • Maine Name Lists
    • Maine Historical Timeline, 1524-1863
    • Accounts of the First Europeans to Visit the Present Maine
    • Things to Know about Maine’s Censuses and Substitutes
    • Online Databases at the Maine State Archives
    • Genealogy Resources at the Maine State Archives & Maine State Library
    • Online Genealogy Research at the Maine Historical Society
    • Bibliography of Maine Name Lists, 1623-2012
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors – On Sale for 10 to 15% Off Thru May 11, 2015

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    Moorshead Magazines recently brought us Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors. At 82 pages, this journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

    Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

    “For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

    Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

    Contents

    10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

    Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

    Using Maps & Gazetteers

    Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

    Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

    Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

    Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

    Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

    Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

    JRI-Poland Expands Access

    Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

    Online Hungarian Research

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

    Researching the Hungarian Census

    Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

    Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

    Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

    Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

    Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

    Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

    Researching Your Russian Ancestors

    Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

    Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

    Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

    Copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Reg. Price: $9.95 – on sale for 10% off at just $8.96 – or 15% off as part of the 2-book Eastern European research bundle.

    Louisiana Names Lists – Published & Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 – Sale Extended Thru March 19

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    Louisiana Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook. The Name List book is 99 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

    Sale for 25% off Extended Through Midnight EST Thursday, March 19, 2015

    See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

    To celebrate the publication of both this Louisiana book, as well as a Kentucky volume, Family Roots Publishing extended their promotion and has discounted ALL the Name Lists books by 25% through Midnight EDT Thursday March 19, 2015 – that includes the pdf eBooks as well as the printed volumes. The printed volumes are $14.21 (reg. 18.95), and the PDF eBook alone is $9.38 (reg. $12.50).

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Contents

      Contents

      • Preface
      • Map: Indian Cessions – Louisiana.
      • Map: 1810 Louisiana Parishes & Current Counties
      • Map: 18110 West Florida Annexation
      • Louisiana Name Lists
      • Louisiana Historical Timeline, 1673-1865
      • Online Databases at the Louisiana State Archives
      • Louisiana State Vital Records Registry
      • Louisiana Historical Center
      • New Orleans Public Library’s Louisiana Div. & City Archives
      • Searchable Online Databases, New Orleans Public Library Website
      • Online Genealogy Guides at the Louisiana Division
      • Bibliography of Louisiana Name Lists, 1679-2001
    • U.S. Maps
      • 1763 British North America
      • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
      • 1790 United States
      • 1800 United States
      • 1810 United States
      • 1820 United States
      • 1830 United States
      • 1840 United States
      • 1850 United States
      • 1860 United States
      • 1870-1880 United States
      • 1890-1940 United States
      • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
    • National Name Lists
      • Getting Started
      • National Look-up Sites Online
      • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Kentucky Name Lists – Published & Online Censuses & Substitutes 1773-2000 – Sale Extended Thru March 19

    Kentucky-Name-Lists-Cover-200pw

    Kentucky Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1773-2000 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook. The Name List book is 95 pages in length and loaded with information.

    Now on extended Sale for 25% off Through Midnight EST Thursday, March 19, 2015

    See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

    To celebrate the publication of both this Kentucky book, as well as a Louisiana volume, Family Roots Publishing has discounted ALL the Name Lists books by 25% through Midnight EDT Thursday, March 19, 2015 – that includes the pdf eBooks as well as the printed volumes. The printed volumes are $14.21 (reg. 18.95), and the PDF eBook alone is $9.38 (reg. $12.50).

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Contents

    • Preface
    • Map: Indian Cessions – Tennessee & Kentucky.
    • Map: 1790 Kentucky (as part of Virginia)
    • Kentucky Name Lists
    • Kentucky Historical Timeline, 1541-1998
    • Research, Collections & Links at the Kentucky Historical Society
    • Kentucky Dept. of Library & Archives
    • Guides to Kentucky Manuscripts and Records
    • Bibliography of Kentucky Name Lists, 1773-2000
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Kindred Voices – on pre-pub sale with FREE Immediate PDF ebook download

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    My friend, Geoff Rasmussen, just wrote a new book entitled Kindred Voices. Geoff is probably best known for his work with Legacy, hosting their weekly webinars. However, he’s a great writer, having written a number of books including the popular Digital Imaging Essentials. We are taking pre-publication orders for the full-color soft-cover book, with a substantial discount and a FREE IMMEDIATE PDF download of the eBook of the same if ordered by February 27, 2015!

    PLEASE NOTE that the paperback book SHIPS in March – probably toward the end of the month. The order confirmation will say toexpect it to be shipped within 72 hours, but that’s a line added by the computer dealing with daily sales of in-stock books. Ignore it, and expect it in late March.

    In Kindred Voices – Listening For Our Ancestors, Geoff takes on the not-uncontroversial topic of how our ancestors themselves may be helping us make genealogical discoveries. This is a topic previousy dealt with by Hank Jones in his Psychic Roots, and More Psychic Roots volumes. Ann Bradshaw later wrote True Miracles with Genealogy: Help from Beyond the Veil, and True Miracles with Genealogy: Volume Two. Geoff’s new volume is fascinating. He sent me a PDF review copy a few days ago, and although super-busy, I sat down and read the entire book cover to cover – something I seldom do.

    Most genealogists will tell you that every now and then, seemingly unexplainable things happen. Call it what you will. A miracle? psychic phenomena, or serendipity? Seemingly unexplainable things happen. In Kindred Voices, Geoff lays out a case to show that genealogists often receive research help from their long-deceased ancestors themselves. Many fascinating examples, taken from his own life experiences, are given. Did you ever wonder why those of the Mormon faith do genealogy? Geoff gives the best explanation for it that I’ve ever read.

    Another good friend, Megan Smolenyak, put it this way, “If you didn’t believe it before now, Geoff Rasmussen will convince you that our ancestors want to be found as much as we want to find them. Whether you’re new to genealogy or struggling with a brick wall in your research, Kindred Voices will inspire you in your quest to reach out to those who came before us. C’mon, they’re waiting for you!”

    The following is from Legacy’s website:

    Genealogists hear dead people…

    […pause for dramatic effect…]

    The voices of our ancestors awake when our search for them begins. Most often we feel their voices – in our minds and in our hearts – as research ideas, promptings, and intuitions on where to find them. Yet sometimes, as our hearts turn toward theirs, their heaven-sent communications can be heard with our earthly ears. These voices – those of our ancestors – are the evidence of their hearts having turned towards ours.

    The serendipitous encounters with genealogical voices that Geoff Rasmussen tells in Kindred Voices are true stories. Readers will be stirred by the reality of our ancestors’ interventions in our search for them. You will be inspired to either begin your search or to receive the hope you need to continue your quest. Our ancestors speak to us; are we listening?

    Click Here to view the Table of Contents and the preface (9 pages)

    Kindred Voices: Listening For Our Ancestors; 100pp; March 2015; Perfect-bound Paperback; 6×9; Full-color; ISBN: 978-0-9864094-0-0; Item #: JR03. $14.95; on sale for just $12.95 plus a FREE immediate PDF download.

    Kindred Voices: Listening For Our Ancestors is also available alone as a PDF eBook.