Dollarhide Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides AL-KS 80% Off! – NEW AL & KY-WY Guides 25% Off! With FREE Downloads!

FRPC ran a sale on these books last June, and we’re again running a deep-discount sale for Christmas 2017 – bumping up the discount on the new volumes published since 2015 to 25% – with the older 2013 and 2014 discounted at 80% during the sale.

Bill Dollarhide started a series of what he called “Name List” guides in the Summer of 2013. He wrote steadily on them until sometime in 2015, when life caught up with him, and he had to put the project aside. Well, he went back at it in 2017, and completed new guides for all the rest of the states, alphabetically Minnesota through Wyoming. He also wrote a full book on the U.S. Territories. Finally, Bill went back and updated an earlier volume – choosing Indiana – to test whether enough changes had taken place to make it worthwhile to do Second Editions. Bill found that a number of URL addresses had changed, which he expected, and he found additional data that expanded the volume by another 10 pages. Since that time, Bill also produced a Second Edition for Alabama.

Bill has also released 37 NEW volumes from 2015 through 2017 – Alabama and Minnesota through Wyoming, plus U.S. Territories and Indiana Second Edition.

To celebrate the Christmas season, we’re pricing all of the 2015 to 2017 print volumes at 25% off, making them $14.21. They cover Kentucky through Wyoming, as well as an Alabama volume, an Indiana volume, and one on the U.S. Territories. As before, we’re throwing in a FREE instantly downloadable PDF eBook version with any paperback book being purchased. See my Super-Saver shipping note below.

To clear out the earlier printed books (Alabama through Kansas), those written in 2013 and 2014, FRPC has discounted the price 80%! That makes them only $3.79 each! We will most likely do Second Editions for those volumes sometime in the 2018.

To make this offer even more attractive, we’re offering Super-Saver (USA Only) USPS shipping on all 53 printed books. That’s $4.50 for the first book, and only 50 cents for each thereafter.

With the completion of this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists, censuses, and census substitutes are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & Substitute Name Lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only do these this volumes give a detailed bibliography of Censuses and Substitute Names Lists available for each state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co. Click on the appropriate links to purchase.

Heritage Travel: Tips, Tricks & Strategies – 20% Off Thru Dec 25

A short time ago, Lisa A. Alzo and Christine Woodcock wrote a new booklet for Moorshead Magazines entitled: Tracing Your Ancestors – Heritage Travel: Tips, Tricks & Strategies. After reading a PDF review copy, I purchased 10 cases of them to offer to my readers. All genealogists travel at one point or another – some of us more than others. This guide will assist anyone who wishes to plan a trip. Whether doing a genealogy road trip stateside or a trip abroad to your ancestral homeland, this booklet will help you in planning the perfect journey. Written by two experienced genealogy professionals, writers, and travelers, you’re sure to get ideas and tips that you hadn’t even thought about before.

The following is from the Table of Contents, and will give you a pretty good idea of what to expect from the book:

  • Ten Things to know Before You Go: Lisa offer ten suggestions to make the most of your ancestral journey.
  • Awesome Apps for Travelers!: Lisa gives an overview of 17 useful heritage travel tools and apps.
  • Preparing For a Genealogy Trip: Christine says being prepared is the key to a successful journey.
  • Preparation Checklist: Christine recommends a comprehensive list of to-dos to consider before you depart on your journey
  • Preparation Checklist: Christine Woodcock Says being prepared is the key to a successful journey.
  • Speaking Your Ancestor’s Language: Lisa A. Alzo offer tips for conquering colloquialisms and communicating with cousins during a heritage trip.
  • Build An Itinerary in Trello!: Lisa A. Alzo discusses how Trello can help you organize your genealogy and writing projects.
  • Journal Your Journey: Christine Woodcock recommends keeping a journal of your genealogical travel experiences.
  • Meeting Family – Making Memories: Lisa A. Alzo share how to find and make the most of chance encounters with newly found relatives.
  • Immersion Genealogy: Lisa A. Alzo share her thoughts on a more complete way to explore your ancestry.
  • Social History Museums: Christine Woodcock shows how to put your ancestors’ lives into perspective.
  • Expert Guidance: Lisa A. Alzo offers tips on how to hire a tour guide for your trip.
  • Food, Family and Folklore: Lisa A. Alzo shares tips for planning a dream trip to your ancestral homeland.
  • Visiting Cemeteries: Christine Woodcock offers guidance on how to prepare for a visit to your ancestor’s gravesite.
  • After the Tour: Christine Woodcock shares tips on what to do with all that information you collect while on your trip to your ancestral homeland.

Order Tracing Your Ancestors – Heritage Travel: Tips, Tricks & Strategies; by Lisa A. Alzo and Christine Woodcock by clicking on the link. Printed 2017; 66 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; ISBN: 978-1-926510-07-1; Item #: MM027; Reg. $9.95 – on sale for $7.96 (+ $4.50 p&h) through December 25.

3 “Organizing Your Genealogy” Aids – Bundled & Discounted 40% For the Holidays

Family Roots Publishing has again bundled 3 newly published organizing your genealogy aids and discounted the set a full 40%. Reg. $27.85, it’s just $16.71 (plus $5.50 p&H). This bundle has been one of the most successful we’ve ever sold. Click on this link to order. Note that two of the items currently include FREE PDF eBook downloads. There was some confusion when we ran a similar sale in May, as some folks expected THREE items… to download.

This bundle is made up of three new items, all of which will help genealogists get organized. They are:

Read the descriptions of the three items below. Click on their individual links to order just that item at 10% off. Click on the Bundle Links – or the illustration – to order the bundle at 30% off.

Organizing Your Genealogical Documents – a Genealogists’ Insta-Guide, by Leland K Meitzler; May 4 2017, 4 pp; Laminated; 3-hole punched; ISBN 978-1-933194-90-5; Item #: FR0194

I’ve been lecturing on organizing your genealogical documents electronically for the last decade. It’s one of my most requested topics. We all have piles of paper – some organized, and a lot that’s not. I have nothing against paper filing systems. In fact, William Dollarhide got my files in order, with his “Dollarhide Systems” organizing methods, back in the day when computers weren’t even discussed. But now we have more electronic documents coming our way than paper. Thus the need to organize electronically.

This Insta-Guide is made to help genealogist’s make the transition from paper documents to electronic. Get rid of the 3-drawer filing cabinet, and those boxes full of paper. And include the all-electronic paperwork that you pull off the internet every evening.

This guide covers the following topics:

  • The Introduction
  • What You Will Need Besides Your Computer
  • Digitize Those Papers!
  • A Note About Files and Folders
  • Electronically File as You Would in a 3-Drawer Filing Cabinet
  • Electronic Filing – Setting up Hierarchical Folders
  • What Goes in the Master file?
  • Inside each Surname Folder, set up Country Folders and Family Folders
  • Labeling a Family Folder
  • The Contents Sheet
  • A Note and a Warning About Files
  • Access the Master Folder From More Than One Computer and/or Program
  • Sharing Documents (files)
  • Link to Your Files From Within Your Genealogy Program
  • What About Photos?
  • Electronic Document Storage Systems
  • Back Up Your Files
  • Dispose of Your Paper Clutter
  • Take Your Family Documents on the Road
  • References

This Insta-Guide currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen.

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Organize Your Genealogy Research: Tips, Tricks & Strategies – a Tracing Your Ancestors publication by Lisa A. Alzo & Denise May Levenick; printed in 2017; 66 pages; ISBN 978-1-926510-05-7; Item #MM023.

Lisa A. Alzo & Denise May Levenick have written a new booklet for Moorshead Publishing titled Organize Your Genealogy Research: Tips, Tricks & Strategies. The booklet is part of the Tracing Your Ancestors series. I wrote Tracing Your Germanic Ancestors for the series, so I do know something about them.

It is made up of 19 chapters – all dealing with an aspect of genealogy organization. Starting with an article on getting rid of the useless clutter – and knowing what is of archival value to an article dealing with organizing your genealogy research through the use of online internet resources.

Denise Levenick is an expert in the area of organizing and archiving paperwork and well as physical heirlooms. Several of the articles detail how to go about archiving all these items we have stored in our home offices, and well as our attics, living rooms, and closets. One chapter deals with how to deal with all those photos we all seem to collect. Do you have issues with archival terminology? She includes a chapter dealing with just that. Everything from Acid, acidic to Polyvinyl chloride. Lists of archival suppliers, as well as resources (with detailed contact information) are included.

I’ve been a fan of Lisa Alzo’s instruction for a number of years. She includes a number of chapters dealing specifically with organizing your research using storyboarding, apps, Trello, and Evernote.

Genealogists can get a lot of good tips and instruction from this 66 page publication. It’s well worth it’s low price, and then some.

The following is from the Table of Contents:

  • Taming Your Inner Packrat Purge your inner packrat and cut the clutter!
  • Storyboarding Your Family’s History Helpful techniques to overcome writer’s block
  • Tips From the Pros Lisa A. Alzo and Denis May Levenick share their tips for staying organized
  • Setting Up a Home Archive How to be a better keeper of your family’s artifacts
  • Archival Product Resources A look at the terminology and other resources relating to preservation
  • Archiving Family Keepsakes Top tips on how to become “The Family Curator”
  • S.M.A.R.T. Goals Learn how this popular goal-setting method can help you organize your genealogy
  • Creating Research Log & Plan Planning your research strategy and logging your work are crucial to your success
  • Organizing Heirlooms A look at storage options for your treasured family items
  • Web Resources for Organizing A look at websites for helping you organize your genealogy
  • Organizing Online Life Five ways to avoid online overload
  • Finding Clues in the Archives Carefully examine every aspect of your family collection for a possible unexpected connection
  • Organizing Photos A look at the prints, negative and film left by your ancestors
  • Timesaving Apps & Tools Lisa A. Alzo shares her favorite scanning and organizing apps
  • 20 Tips for Organizing Paper Files Denise May Levenick looks at ways to organize sooner, rather than later
  • Organizing Digital Files Five steps to help you organize your hard drive and avoid the digital clutter
  • Trello Lisa A. Alzo discusses how Trello can organize your genealogy and writing projects
  • Evernote Use Evernote to organize your genealogy and more!
  • Choosing Scanners Denise May Levenick looks at what you need to consider when choosing the right digitizing equipment

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Organizing Your Genealogy: No More Piles of Paper! – A Genealogists’ Insta-Guide; by William Dollarhide; 2017; 8.5×11; 4 pp; folded; laminated; ISBN: 978-1-62859-128-6; Item #: FR0425

It could be said that William Dollarhide is the father of genealogical organization. During the 1970s, Bill developed an organizational method that became known as Dollarhide Systems. Thousands of genealogists still use the method. Mr. Dollarhide has now compiled an Insta-Guide titled: Organizing Your Genealogy: No More Piles of Paper!, condensing what can take up a book and more, into 4 pages. Armed with the Insta-Guide, any genealogist can get their paperwork organized – and stay that way.

The following is an overview of the Contents:

  • Piles of Paper
  • Pile 1 – The Compiled Sheets
  • Pile 2 – The Research Aids
  • Pile 3 – The Notes and Documents
  • Separate the Notes and Documents
  • The First Problem – Families vs Surnames
  • The Second Problem – Extra People
  • 1. Ancestors
  • 2. Collaterals
  • 3. Suspicious
  • Solving the Paper Collecting Problem
  • Four Rules for Saving Notes and Documents
  • Convert the Notes and Documents Pile into Organized Surname Books
  • Genealogical Evidence
  • Preparing a List for a Family Group Sheet
  • Further Reading

This Insta-Guide currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook.

Family Roots Publishing has bundled the three new organizing your genealogy aids and discounted it 40%. Reg. $27.85, it’s just $16.71 (plus $5.50 p&H).Click on this link to order.

The German Research Companion, 3rd Edition – 25% Off + a FREE New Book Thru Oct 31

The The German Research Companion third edition of Shirley Riemer’s classic The German Research Companion. is on sale until October 31 at 25% off – making it just $21 (plus $5.50 p&h). AND – put the word “Heritage” in the “Order Notes” box (NOT the OFFER CODE) at Checkout, and we’ll throw in a totally FREE copy of the new Heritage Travel, Tips, Tricks & Strategies booklet (valued at $9.95). It won’t be listed on your Order Confirmation, but you’ll get it. Again, click on the link – or the illustration – to order.

The book has always been one of the best places to look for sources of German research information. The page count is 706 pages, making it the huge value, and a go-to book for those of us researching our German ancestors. When compiling the volume, Shirley enlisted the help of two other well-known Germanic genealogists, Roger Minert, and Jennifer Anderson, who spent hundreds of hours in adding additional material, editing, and layout of the book, making a good volume even better.

The German Research Companion is often referred to as “the Bible of German family history.” It provides a wide range of helpful information on virtually hundreds of topics related to German research, most indexed for easy reference. It is published in a handy 5.5 x 8.5 inch format, making it an ideal book to accompany the German family historian on research trips to libraries, archives, seminars, and even the “old country.”

Although not intended as a “how to do German research” volume, genealogists will find it the most complete book on German research produced. Concentrating on German research sources, it is in fact the only book in print that deals with the wide range of material needed by those who are searching their German lines. Written in English, the genealogist needs no knowledge of the German language to use the volume. Any German words and phrases found in The German Research Companion are either translated or clarified in English.

The German Research Companion contains useful details on hundreds of German genealogical topics. The following is directly from the Table of Contents:

Section 1: German land, past and present

  • Germany’s political and jurisdictional organization
  • The three empires
  • Populations, capitals, and geography
  • The courts and the constitution
  • The rulers, the flag and the colonies
  • The major turning points and markers of German history

Section 2: The Tools, Contacts, and Resources

  • Resources for utilizing the Family History Library and its branches
  • Uses of the Family History Library Catalog for German Research
  • Credentialed researchers, societies, home-area sources
  • The search for the German immigrant’s place of origin
  • Communicating with Germany
  • Sending euro abroad
  • Village photographs and conference audiotapes
  • Choosing between Du and Sie
  • German organizations and institutes
  • Frequently used resources

Section 3: Emigration and Immigration

  • Immigration laws in the United States
  • Emigration laws in Germany
  • Naturalization records
  • The immigration process and Ellis Island
  • The Statue of Liberty
  • Immigration laws
  • Passport applications
  • German immigrant aid societies
  • Pennsylvania societies, archives, and libraries
  • Basic resources for researching Germans from Russia
  • Basic resources for researching the Danube Swabians
  • Basic resources for researching the Wends (Sorbs)
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Pennsylvania
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Alsace-Lorraine
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in the Austro-Hungarian Empire
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Sudetenland
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Bukovina
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Canada
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Czechoslovakia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Galatia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Liechtenstein
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Lithuania
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Netherlands
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Poland
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Silesia
  • Basic resources for researching Germans in Switzerland

Section 4: United States Resources

  • U.S. Cemeteries and burial records
  • National Archives and Records Administration
  • Social Security history and research
  • U.S. Railroad and Retirement Board
  • U.S. vital records
  • The WPA
  • The U.S. Census
  • Land and property records
  • The Homestead Act
  • U.S. Libraries and publishers
  • American military records
  • Germans who fought in the American Civil War
  • Hessian soldier research
  • The Turnverein in America
  • Fraternal organizations

Section 5: Language and Vocabularies

  • History and characteristics of the German alphabet and language
  • German dialectics and high, middle, and low German
  • The old German script
  • Abbreviations in German and Latin
  • German genealogy vocabulary
  • Occupations, trades and titles in German and Latin
  • Medical terms, illnesses, and causes of death, in German
  • German family relationships vocabulary
  • Christenings, marriages, and deaths vocabularies
  • Latin genealogy vocabulary
  • Roman numerals
  • Latin vocabularies for calendar dates, tombstone expressions, and old cities of Europe
  • French genealogy vocabulary
  • Fraktur
  • Yiddish

Section 6: German Resources

  • German church and civil registration records
  • Church inventories
  • Citizen books
  • The German privacy law
  • City registers
  • German cemeteries
  • Abbreviations keys to Meyers Orts- und Verkehrslexikon & Müllers grosses deutsches Ortsbuvh
  • Reverse alphabetical place name indexes
  • Maps
  • German phonetics
  • Indexes of German surnames
  • Periodicals
  • Place names
  • Researchers
  • Queries in German publications
  • Village lineage books
  • Postal code directories
  • The Ahnenpass
  • Telephone directories
  • Dictionaries

Section 7: Archives

  • German archive terminologies
  • German federal and state archives
  • County archives
  • Ecclesiastical archives and organizations
  • Central office for genealogy in Leipzig
  • The Berlin Document Center
  • The “Gauck” files
  • Specialized archives
  • Recommendations for working in a German archive
  • Genealogy related organizations in Germany
  • Historical societies in Germany

Section 8: Life in Our Ancestor’s Times

  • Names and naming patterns
  • Patronymic names
  • Given names of Germanic and foreign origin
  • “Name days”
  • Old measurements
  • Monetary units
  • Records of guilds and tradesmen
  • Calendars through the ages
  • The perpetual calendar
  • Feast days
  • Holidays and observances
  • History and customs of Christmas
  • The church in modern Germany
  • Religions: Protestant, Catholic, Jewish and pietist, with resources
  • German Universities and academic degrees
  • Heraldry
  • German nobility
  • Military church-books, cemeteries, archives & records
  • German expellees following World War II
  • German prisoners of war in Americas

Section 9: Newspapers, Libraries, Museums and other Information

  • City directories and manuscript collections
  • German and German-American newspapers
  • Special interest publications
  • Emigration records in newspapers
  • Sister City arrangements
  • German museums, libraries, and publishers
  • American universities in Germany
  • U.S. Embassy offices in Germany
  • Academic and cultural organizations
  • Cooking measurements and ingredients
  • Folk dress (Trachten)
  • Greetings in German
  • Formalities of letter-writing
  • Telephone cards

The Appendix

  • The appendix includes maps, tables, charts, and pictures that help to illustrate Germanic research.

In Conclusion
Simply said, if you’re an English-speaking person doing German research, you will profit by a copy of this Third Edition of The German Research Companion. The volume is immediately available by purchase from Family Roots Publishing Company, the primary sponsor of GenealogyBlog.com. The cost is usually just $28.00, less the FRPC discount – this week being 25%! A real deal…

The German Research Companion, Third Edition, by Shirley J. Riemer, Roger P. Minert & Jennifer A. Anderson. 706 pp; softbound; ISBN 0-9656761-6-1; Item #M0025.

Four New Research in the States Guides From the NGS

Four new guides in the National Genealogical Society Research in the States Series are now available. They are for the following states:

And they are 10% off through August 18. Click on the links to order.

Following are descriptions of the four new titles:

Research in Mississippi – NGS Research in the States Series; By Lori Thornton, MLS; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 44 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-25-9; Item # NGS30

The National Genealogical Society’s Research in the States series, of which this book is one, had it’s start in the NGS Quarterly with the publication of “Master Plan for North Carolina Research” in 1987. The Quarterly continued to publish state guides and NGS later issued many of them as special publications. This series includes both revised editions of earlier guides and many new states. Additional states are planned and Family Roots Publishing plans to distribute them as they are printed.

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the Mississippi volume:

RESEARCH IN FLORIDA

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

  • French Province (1699-1763)
  • British West Florida (1763-1779)
  • Spanish Dominion (1779-1798)
  • Mississippi Territory (1798-1817)
  • The State of Mississippi (1817-Present)
  • Jurisdictional Changes
  • Economy

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • Major Repositories
  • Other Repositories

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers and Maps
  • Bible Records
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business and Organization / Fraternal Records
  • Cemetery Records / Cemetery Surveys
  • Census Records – Colonial, Territorial, State, Federal Population, Other Federal Censuses
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records
  • Directories: City and Suburban
  • Ethnic Records – AfricanAmerican; American Indian, Chinese
  • Genealogical and Historical Periodicals
  • Institutional Records
  • Internal Improvements
  • Land Records
  • Military Records – Civil War, Spanish American / Philippine Insurrection, World War I, World War II, Soldiers’ Homes
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Railroads
  • Religious Records – Assemblies of God, Baptist, Catholic, Church of God, Churches of Christ, Christian Churches, Disciples of Christ, Jewish, Methodist, Presbyterian
  • School Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption, Birth and Death, Marriage, Divorce
  • Women
  • Conclusion

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Research in North Carolina – NGS Research in the States Series – Second Edition; By Jeffrey L. Haines, C.G; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 44 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-27-3; Item # NGS29

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the North Carolina volume:

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • State Archives of North Carolina
  • State Library of North Carolina’s Government and Heritage Library
  • University of North Carolina
  • University of North Carolina Collections – North Carolina Collection
  • University of North Carolina Collections – Southern Historical Collection
  • Duke University
  • East Carolina University
  • Other Repositories
  • North Carolina Genealogical Society
  • Other Societies

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Business Records
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes – Federal Censuses
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes – State Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • County-Level Research
  • Court Records – County Courts
  • Court Records – Higher Courts
  • Court Records – Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Research – African American
  • Ethnic Research – American Indian
  • Ethnic Research – Cherokee
  • Ethnic Research – Lumbee
  • Ethnic Research – Other Tribes
  • Land Records – Colonial Land Grants
  • Land Records – County-Level Records
  • Military Records – Colonial Wars
  • Military Records – American Revolution
  • Military Records Cherokee Wars, War of 1812, and Mexican War
  • Military Records – Civil War
  • Military Records – Post Civil War and Reconstruction Records
  • Military Records – Spanish-American War
  • Military Records – World Wars
  • Naturalization and Immigration Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • Religious Records
  • State-Level Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption Records
  • Vital Records – Birth and Death Records
  • Vital Records – Marriage Records
  • Vital Records – Divorce Records
  • Voter Rolls
  • Women of North Carolina
  • Conclusion

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Research in Tennessee – NGS Research in the States Series – Second Edition; By Charles A. Sherrill; Edited by Barbara Vines Little; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 40 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-26-6; Item # NGS28

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of Research in Tennessee – Second Edition volume:

HISTORY AND SETTLEMENT

  • Jurisdiction Changes

ARCHIVES, LIBRARIES, AND SOCIETIES

  • Tennessee State Library and Archives
  • Tennessee Genealogical Society
  • Tennessee Historical Society
  • Other Facilities

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Sources
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses & Census Their Substitutes
  • Church Records
  • County–Level Records
  • County–Level Records – Loose Papers
  • Court Records
  • Court Records
  • County Courts
  • Superior Courts
  • Court System, 1809-1934
  • Chancery Courts
  • Circuit Courts
  • Supreme Court
  • Federal Court
  • Directories: City & Suburban
  • Ethnic Records – Growth & Dispersal
  • Ethnic Records – Ethnic Origins
  • Ethnic Records – African Americans
  • Ethnic Records – Melungeons
  • Ethnic Records American Indians
  • Ethnic Records – Cherokee Resources
  • Ethnic Resources – Chickasaw Resources
  • Ethnic Records – General Information
  • Land Records
  • Land Records – North Carolina Grants
  • Land Records – Tennessee Grants
  • Land Records – Accessing the Grant Records
  • Land Records – County-Level Land Records
  • Military and Pension Records
  • Military Records – Colonial Era
  • Military Records – Revolutionary War
  • Military Records – Indian Campaigns, 1784-1811
  • Military Records – State Militia Activity, 1796-1903
  • Military Records – War of 1812
  • Military Records – Old Indian Wars
  • Military Records – Mexican War
  • Military Records – Civil War
  • Military Records – Spanish American War
  • Military Records – World Wars
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Probate Records
  • State Records
  • State Records – Legislative Records
  • State Records – Governors’ Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records – Adoption Records
  • Vital Records – Birth and Death Records
  • Vital Records – Marriage and Divorce Records
  • Women
  • Conclusion

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Research in American Indians of Oklahoma – NGS Research in the States Series; By Kathy Huber; The Series is edited by Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FUGA, FVGS; Published 2017 by the National Genealogical Society, Arlington, VA; 40 pp; Soft Cover, Saddle Stapled; 8.5×11 in.; ISBN: 978-1-935815-28-0; Item # NGS31

The following is found on the Table of Contents pages of the American Indians of Oklahoma volume:

AMERICAN INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA

EARLY HISTORY AND REMOVAL

ARCHIVES AND LIBRARIES

  • Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS)
  • National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
  • National Archives of Fort Worth
  • Western Histories Collection, University of Oklahoma Libraries
  • Helmrich Center for American Research
  • Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC)

MAJOR RESOURCES

  • Aids to Research
  • Allotment Records
  • Atlases, Gazetteers and Maps
  • Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)
  • Census Records
  • Citizenship Records
  • Newspapers
  • Oral Histories
  • Personal Papers and Manuscripts
  • Removal Papers
  • School Records
  • Conclusion

Order any of the above books at 10% off through August 18, 2017 by clicking on their respective links.

NGS Research in the States Guides for the following areas are currently available from FRPC:

Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors – NEW – 15% Off – Only $8.46 Thru April 15

Just in time of the NGS conference in Raleigh, Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors was just released by Moorshead Magazines. Written by Christine Woodcock, this 66 page booklet gives researchers the latest information on finding their Scots ancestry.

You’ll find the following Scots-related topics in this great research guide:

  • Genealogy BASICS!
  • Researching Criminal Ancestors
  • Researching in Libraries & Archives
  • Plan a Research Trip to Your Ancestral Homeland!
  • Breaking Through Brick Walls
  • Researching the Clearances
  • Records of the Hudson’s Bay Company
  • Create a Genealogy Toolbox!

Family Roots Publishing purchased a quantity of this great research aid, and is making them available at 15% off through April 15, 2017. That’s just $8.46 per copy (plus $4.50 USA P&H – just 50 cents if it’s an additional item when ordering!) Click here to order.

Following is a complete list of chapters you will find in this special edition publication:

  • Finding Your Scottish Ancestors: The Basics Getting Started, and how to properly cite your sources
  • What’s In a Name? Understanding naming patterns may seem daunting, but we offer some tips to make it easier
  • What’s In Your Scottish Genealogy Toolbox? Be prepared with a good set of research tools
  • Who’s Your Daddy? Researching the illegitimate birth of an ancestor
  • Breaking Through Brick Walls; Reviewing documents can reveal hidden gems and help you find those elusive ancestors
  • Genealogy Treasures in Scottish Libraries; There’s a vast array of resources to discover in Scottish libraries
  • Researching In Archives; Archives hold vast amounts of material to assist you in understanding your ancestors’ lives
  • Maps, Marvelous Maps; Join the crowd in helping to preserve the names of Scottish towns
  • The Scottish Clearances; Massive changes in farming practices eventually forces many to leave Scotland for the colonies
  • Researching Occupations; The work of your ancestors is an important part of researching their lives
  • Researching Criminal Ancestors; If your ancestors came before the courts, there are a wealth of records for you to explore
  • Researching Mental Health Records in Scotland; There are a variety of records available for researching an ancestor who was institutionalized
  • Military Men, Covenanters and Jacobites; Pre-1800s colonial arrivals may have been part of the military, or sent as exiles for their perceived crimes
  • Scotland’s Connection to the Hudson’s Bay Company; From the early 18th century, men from Orkney were recruited for the Hudson’s Bay Company
  • Planning a Research Trip to Your Ancestral Homeland; Walk where your ancestors walked, and experience a real connection to your family’s history

Order you copy by clicking on the following link:
Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors – a Tracing Your Ancestors publication by Christine Woodcock: from the Publishers of “Your Genealogy Today, Internet Genealogy & History Magazine – Moorshead Magazines; printed in 2017; 66 pages; ISBN 978-1-926510-06-4; Item #MM025.

Update on Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers – Now Shipping Canton Bern & Zürich Volumes – Soft & Hard

This is an update to let everyone know that we now have both the soft and hardbound versions of the first three volumes of Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers now shipping. This project actually started last May, so, we’ve been at it for a year now.

The Community Indexes for Canton Bern (in two volumes), Canton Zürich, Canton Fribourg, and Canton Aargau are included in the description of each book – and can be found at their respective pages at the Family Roots Publishing website. Click on their respective links above to find your communities within those Cantons.

The Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers series is an out-growth of the very popular Map Guide to German Parish Registers project, which is still in process, but nearing completion. Over the years, we’ve been asked by numerous parties to extend the project to cover other German-speaking European countries. We did that with the publication of Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers in 2016. There are 26 current cantons in Switzerland. Many of them are small, so we plan to publish guides to multiple cantons in a number of the books. For this reason, we expect the entire series to be under 20 volumes.

Unlike American genealogical research, where the place to search is usually a civil registration (city, county, and state), European research is usually related to an ecclesiastical jurisdiction. In 18th and 19th century Switzerland, one must search the parish registers for births, christenings, marriages, deaths and burials. The historic boundaries for the Swiss cantons and amtsbezirke are quite well defined, and this volume lays them out in map form. Listings are given for both Catholic and Protestant parishes, along with what records are available and where to access them. Contact information, and the municipalities covered by each parish is found, making your Swiss research much easier to accomplish.

Each of the Map Guide to Swiss Parish Registers does the following:

  • Includes an index of all the communities found within the Canton.
  • Identifies the major online resources for Swiss genealogical research.
  • Identifies each canton with amtsbezirke (districts), and the municipalities, bauerten (farming coalitions), and subsidiary locations.
  • Visually identifies church parishes within each amtsbezirk (district).
  • Provides an overview of Swiss genealogical records.
  • Identifies neighboring parishes, just in case your ancestor may have gone to an alternate parish.
  • Aids in conducting area searches, particularly across district and canton borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for your family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources.
  • Identifies important gazetteers and online dictionaries available to researchers.
  • To see the full list (both hard and soft bound) of the first five volumes, click here.

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance – New and On Sale for 10% Off

Michael A. Ports – author of the groundbreaking series Georgia Free Persons of Color as well as numerous volumes of transcribed records from Baldwin, Elbert, and especially Jefferson County, Georgia – has applied his expertise in Georgia genealogy research to a “Genealogy at a Glance” guide. Like the other publications in the series, Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research is a four-page laminated folder that gives you all the useful information you’ll need to begin and proceed successfully with your research.

Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

Ports begins with a discussion of Georgia’s settlement background, beginning in 1732 when King George II granted a charter for the new colony – named in his honor – to James Oglethorpe and twenty other proprietors. County formation began in 1777 with the creation of Burke, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Richmond, and Wilkes counties, and ended in 1924 with the creation of Peach County. Many of the records most useful to genealogists are located at the county level. Therefore a general rule of thumb, Ports states, is to begin your research at the Georgia Archives, which houses original and microfilm copies of most county records, and he details the most critical of these records – marriage and divorce, birth and death, probate, and land lottery records.

Ports also gives an overview of two significant supplementary sources – land grant records and tax records – and identifies the major repositories and online resources with useful information for your Georgia family research. Along the way you’ll find research tips and references to key publications, making Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research the most helpful four pages you’ll ever read on Georgia genealogy.

The following is an annotated Table of Contents of my creation:

  • Quick Facts – A timeline from 1732 through 1870 dealing with ten important Georgia events.
  • Settlement Background – A history of Georgia from 1732 through 1805, important to Georgia researchers – includes two important further references.
  • Record Sources – An introduction, and two items for further reference – followed by sections on Marriage and Divorce Records; Birth and Death Records; Probate Records, and Land Lottery Records – includes several important internet links and eight further references, all to important lottery-related books.
  • Supplemental Sources – Includes sections on Land Grant Records (with an internet link), as well as Tax Records with one book listed as an important further reference.
  • Major Repositories – a listing of five repositories, with full addresses and contact information.
  • Online Resources – a listing of seven websites invaluable for those with Georgia ancestry.

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance; by Michael A. Ports; 2017; 4 pp; laminated; ISBN: 978-0-8063-2039-7; Item #: GPC4668

As noted above, Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Second Edition

Following eight years of sales, Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists has been updated and revised in a new Second Edition. Written by William Dollarhide, and initially published in 2009, this book has consistently been a best seller for Family Roots Publishing. This new edition was much needed and after months of work, Bill got the book revised and it’s now available.

This new Second Edition contains many updates. Since the first edition in 2009, over 200 of the 265 Internet addresses alone within the volume changed! Virtually every state section of the book had to be updated and revised. Another major change of many pages within the book dealt with the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), which is now found exclusively at FindMyPast.org.

Click here to purchase the Printed Book.

Click here to purchase the PDF eBook, with an immediate download.

Most genealogical records during the decade of the Civil War are related to the soldiers and regiments of the Union and Confederate military. However, there are numerous records relating to the entire population as well. This new volume by William Dollarhide identifies the places to look and documents to be found for ancestors during the decade, 1861-1869, as well as post-war veterans. The book is laid out first by nation-wide name lists and then by state listings in alphabetical order.

The following broad categories are identified within this book:

National Resources:

  • Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
  • The American Civil War Research Database
  • Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
  • General and Organizational Indexes to Pension Files, 1861-1934
  • 1883 List of U.S. Pensioners on the Roll
  • 1890 Federal Census of Union Veterans
  • Roll of Honor & Veteran Burials
  • 1865-1867 Confederate Amnesty Papers
  • Consolidated Lists of Confederate Soldiers & United Confederate Veterans Association
  • Index to Compiled Service Records

Statewide Resources:

  • Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • Index to Compiled Service Records (by state)
  • 1861-1869 State Censuses
  • 1861-1869 Statewide Name Lists
  • 1862-1869 Internal Revenue Assessment Lists
  • Statewide Militia Lists
  • Confederate Pension Applications
  • Pensioner Name Lists and censuses of Confederate Veterans
  • Indexes to Statewide Records
  • Lists of Veteran Burials; State Adjutant General Reports & state-sponsored histories
  • The Best Civil War Resource Centers for Local & County Research

Online Resources

Libraries & Archives

Order this new volume by clicking on the illustration or the link below.
Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era – Online and Published Military or Civilian Name Lists, 1861-1869 & Post-Civil War Veteran Lists – Second Edition; by William Dollarhide; 2017; Soft Cover, Perfect Bound; 8.5×11; 203 pp; ISBN#: 9781933194455; Item # FR0113

Donna Moughty’s Irish Research Series of Quick Reference Guides

Lisa Louise Cooke just released a new series of two Irish Research Quick Guides. They were written by Donna M. Moughty, and edited by Lisa. While only four pages each, these guides are loaded with information everyone with Irish ancestry can use.

FRPC is offering these new guides at 10% off through March 21.

Following is a description of each:

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series
Without the right preparation, researching in Ireland can be frustrating! Before you jump the pond, start your research at home to determine a place in Ireland, as well as details to help differentiate your person from someone of the same name. This research guide will walk you through the process of identifying records in the US to set you up for success in your Irish research.

Each Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish research preparation and template
  • Creating a research plan
  • Strategic steps to answer your research questions
  • Sample research plan outline
  • Irish immigration history
  • Irish jurisdictions
  • Next steps for Irish records research

Preparing for Success in Irish Records Research: Guide #1 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU25

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series
Civil Registration for all of Ireland began in 1864, with Protestant marriages dating back to 1845. Even if your ancestors left before that date, they likely had relatives that remained in Ireland. Prior to Civil Registration, the only records of births (baptisms), marriages or deaths (burials) are in church records. This Reference Guide will explain how to use the new online Civil Registration records as well as how to identify the surviving church records for your ancestors in Ireland.

Quick reference guide includes:

  • Irish Civil Registrations history
  • Irish families, names, and variations
  • Strategies for locating Irish Civil Registrations
  • Northern Ireland research
  • Irish church records
  • Online and traditional resources for research

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records: Guide #2 in the Irish Research Series; 2017, 1st Edition; 8.5×11; 4 pp; Binding: 10 mil, tear resistant, water resistant synthetic; folded; Full Color; Item #LU26

About the Author
Donna Moughty is a professional genealogist and a former Regional Manager for Apple Computers. She has been conducting family research for over 20 years. She teaches classes for beginners and lectures on a variety of subjects including Internet, Irish research, and computer topics. In addition, she provides consultations, research assistance, and training. She is a member of Association of Professional Genealogists and the Genealogical Speakers Guild.

Bockstruck’s New Settlements & Migrations book, bundled with his Names volume – 10% Off

Family Roots Publishing has put together a bundle of two recently published Lloyd Bockstruck books – one dealing with Settlements and Migration in America & the other the closely related subject of Names. We’ve discounted the bundle by 10%. The following books are included:

Click on the links to view full descriptions of either book at their respective pages, or to purchase just the one item. Return to this page to order the bundle.

Following are reviews of each of the books:
GPC has just released a new guide from Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck. This softbound book is titled American Settlements and Migrations: A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians.

The book provides a synopsis of the original patterns of settlement and migration for the United States. Mr. Bockstruck discusses each of the 50 states, however, his emphasis is on the states and territories that were established between the colonial period and the middle of the nineteenth century. For each state the author examines pioneers’ places of origin, reasons for settlement, specific places of settlement in America, names of pioneering families, migrations within and between states, and more. Equally important, throughout the volume he names the key sources for further research.

The study of migration is inextricably intertwined with family history. By combining a knowledge of history and geography, therefore, the family historian can extend the family pedigree across the country. Every detail represents a potential clue to an elusive ancestor, from the name of a shipping line, port of embarkation, and clusters of fellow passengers, to the nature of soil available to the colonist, church membership, and status of roadways.

Some members of the family may not have ventured away from the ancestral home. Others went westward but did not continue as far as some of their kinfolk. They may have generated the records further inland that would enable the family historian to bridge an ancestral geographical gap. Finding earlier places of residence could enable one to determine the place of nativity of an ancestor. Following such paths could enable one to locate relatives who remained in the East or dropped off earlier along the migration route, thereby identifying the immigrant or colonist who founded the family in the New World and perhaps the ancestral home in the Old World as well.

The study of migration/immigration follows several principles. Firstly, one must understand the local history of one’s ancestral homes. For example, as late as 1950, the state possessing greatest percentage of residents of British descent was Utah. Why? Utah was settled by Mormons, and this relatively new religious group was mostly composed of New England Puritan stock. Moreover, that church’s first missionary efforts abroad were in conducted in the British Isles, and those converts joined them in Utah.

Secondly, migrations are also tied to similar climatic belts. Colonists and immigrants often sought out lands that were capable of growing the crops with which they were familiar, as in the case of Scandinavian settlement in Minnesota and the Dakotas.

Thirdly, migration rests upon forces that draw immigrants to a new home. It may also apply to those forces that drove them away from their home. In some instances both aspects may apply. For instance, more than 150,000 natives of Virginia were living in the states of the Old Northwest Territory in 1850—an area accessible to them and possessing terrain and soils with which they were familiar.

Still other factors impinging on migration and settlement include available modes of transportation, religious preference or ethnicity, economic factors such as famines and floods, and foreign wars, revolutions, and other aspects of statecraft. Bockstruck contrasts colonial migrations, for example, with those following American Independence. During the colonial period, individuals and groups moved from the southern colonies to the northern colonies, and vice versa. Until the 1750s, colonists utilized sailing ships as the primary mode of transportation between colonies. They did not move from the East to the West until after the French and Indian War, when the Braddock and Forbes roads were built to enable the military forces to go into the interior to challenge the French in the Ohio River Valley. Such roads were necessary to move heavy military equipment, such as canons, and materiel to the war front.

American Settlements and Migrations is arranged by region and thereunder by state. Each chapter outlines not only the events, persons, and forces that contributed to a state’s settlement but also offers untold clues to the reader’s own ancestors. Might an 18th-century South Carolina forebear have been part of the British expulsion of the French from Nova Scotia? Was your Welsh ancestor part of the Pennsylvania migration to work in the Knoxville, Tennessee mining industry? Your Irish Famine-era ancestor was living in Boston in 1860, but is the gap in his genealogy attributable to the fact that he might have entered North America through the Canadian Port of St. John, Newfoundland. These are just some of hundreds of possibilities Mr. Bockstruck gets you to consider. His new primer may be just the clue finder you have been looking for.

In my review of the volume, I found that virtually hundreds of resources are found within the text – all with full titles, and authors. This makes it easy for the genealogist to find the item with the publishers, or a nearby library genealogy collection. By the way, you can find books in libraries near you within seconds by typing the title into the search engine at http://www.worldcat.org/. Find the book, and click on it. Enter your location zip code (under Find a Copy in a Library). Bingo!

The only issue I have with the volume is that the font is a bit small for my old and tired eyes. But reading the volume in bright lighting made my reading pleasurable – and I learned many things that I didn’t know previously.

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

The following is from the Table of Contents – the abbreviations are mine:

  • Chapter One: American Settlements and Migrations in America
  • Chapter Two. New England – MA, CT, RI, Providence Plantations, VT, ME
  • Chapter Three. West Indies
  • Chapter Four. The Middle Colonies – NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD
  • Chapter Five. The Southern Colonies – VA, WV, NC, SC, GA
  • Chapter Six. The Impact of the Revolutionary War
  • Chapter Seven. Post Revolutionary War Settlements – FL, KY, TN
  • Chapter Eight. The Old Northwest – OH, IN, IL, MI, WI, MN
  • Chapter Nine. The Old Southwest – AL, MI, LA
  • Chapter Ten. The Trans-Mississippi West – IA, MO, AR
  • Chapter Eleven. The West – TX, KS, NE, OK, UT, NM. AZ, NV, CO, ND, SD, WY, ID
  • Chapter Twelve. The Pacific Coast – OR, WA, CA
  • Chapter Thirteen. Alaska, Hawaii and Canadian Settlements – AL, HI, QC, NS, ON

Order your volume by clicking on the link:

American Settlements and Migrations; A Primer for Genealogists and Family Historians; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck; 2017; 108 pp; 6×9; paperback; ISBN: 9780806358314; Item #:CF8125D

Purchase the bundle by clicking here or on the illustration.
_________________________

cf8006Two hundred years ago no parent would have named a child for a favorite movie star. There were no movies. However, naming a child for an historical figure, like George after George Washington, was not uncommon. Other naming practice common in the past would seldom be considered today. However, understanding such practices may help a genealogists better identify their ancestors. For example, using an uxornecronym. An uxornecronym is a name given to the first daughter born into a marriage were the name honors a previous wife. Such practices would be less common in a society were divorce is the primary reason for having previous marriages, but not so in a time when death, especially in child birth, would have left an empty place in a home to be filled by a second marriage. Genealogists looking to better understand and trace their ancestors by their names may benefit greatly from The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogists, a new book by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck.

What is Onomatology? Where etymology is the study of the origin and history of words, onomatology is the same for names. Bockstruck explains, “onomatology is the study of names. It involves both forenames, commonly called first, second, or middle names, and family names or surnames. It also includes nicknames and  place names which in the United States are often named for individuals.” He also makes the important distinction, “the study of onomatology is one based on records over centuries and requires an awareness of a multitude of changes in names.” This book provides, at least, the basics of onomatology for genealogists.

The Name IS the Game is broken into five chapters. The first acts as introduction. The second and third chapters examine given names and surnames, respectively. These chapters represent the bulk of the book and cover all types of naming practices over centuries of Europe and the United States. The last two chapters cover toponyms, place names, and provide a selected bibliography for further reference.

I have provided, below, and expanded table of contents. The list should demonstrate just how much this book covers, especially regarding surnames.

Table of Contents  (expanded)

Chapter 1 Introduction

Chapter 2 Forenames

  • Ethnic Clues in Forenames
  • Forename or a Title
  • The Maiden Name of a Mother as a Forename
  • Forename Clues
  • Diminutives
  • Diminutive Abbreviations
  • Forename Equivalents
  • Multiple Forenames
  • Uxornecronyms
  • Ambisexual Forenames
  • Postponing the Bestowing of Forenames
  • Repetition of Forenames
  • Forename Clues
  • Hagiographic Forenames
  • Naming Patterns
  • Optical Mis-recognition
  • Forenames from Historical Figures
  • Initials
  • Renaming of a Living Child

Chapter 3 Surnames

  • Maiden Names
  • Spelling Fixation
  • Surname Confusion
  • Misinterpretation of Letters of Surnames
  • The Un-aspirated Initial Letter of Surnames
  • Pronunciations
  • The Terminal “G”
  • Nee, Alias, and Genannt
  • Adoption of a Step-parent’s Surname
  • Military Influence on Surnames
  • From English to Another Language
  • From One European Language to Another
  • The Dit Name
  • Dialects and Minorities
  • Dutch Surnames
  • Abbreviations of Surnames
  • The Crossed Tail of the Letter P
  • The Long “S”
  • The Female Title of Mrs.
  • Idem  Sonans
  • Translation into English
  • Surname Shortening
  • The Letters “R” and “L”
  • “Ou” and “Wh”
  • Gender and Surnames
  • Ethnic Clues
  • Statutory Changes
  • District and County Court Changes of Names
  • Multiple Independent Appearances
  • Spanish
  • African-American
  • Jewish
  • American Indian Surnames

Chapter 4 Toponyms

Chapter 5 Selected Bibliography of Legal Changes of Names

 
Copies of The Name IS the Game: Onomatology and the Genealogist are available from Family Roots Publishing.

Purchase the bundle by clicking here or on the illustration. Need just one of the books?

Eastern European Historical Repositories – on sale for 10% off thru November 10 , 2016

EasternEuropeanHistoricalRepostories-250

Just $17.55 with the discount. Click on this link to order.

We just got in a new stock of the new Eastern European Historical Repositories by Dr. Charles Dickson. I’m always looking for new resources, especially as deals with Europe – and this book fills a void.

America has often been described as a melting pot nation. While such an adjective contains some truth it does not capture the total flavor of its multiethnic experience. While many national groups have blended into the American fabric, they have also, to varying degrees, maintained a sense of individual ethic identity.

This work represents an attempt to organize a list of the many resources that are available to serious students of Eastern European history in their ongoing search for family histories. The listings in this book cover the following ethnic groups: Albanians, Armenians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Estonians, Greeks, Hungarians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, Slovenians, and Ukrainians.

Under each ethnic group a common format has been followed which includes an introduction to immigration patterns, followed by separate page listings describing the holdings of primary genealogical societies, museums, and educational institutions associated with that group.

Next there are listings of other ethnic related societies which have some family histories followed by a listing of the regional public libraries located in areas where each particular group has settled in significant numbers. As the reader uses this handbook as a research tool in discovering group and family histories, hopefully he or she will be reminded that the American multiethnic experience may be singularly unique in human history.

The following is from the Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • The Author
  • Table of Illustrations
  • Introduction
  • Albanians
  • Armenians
  • Bulgarians
  • Croatians
  • Czechs (including Bohemians & Moravians)
  • Estonians
  • Greeks (including Cypriots)
  • Hungarians (Including Magyars)
  • Latvians
  • Lithuanians
  • Poles (Including Pomeranians & Silesians)
  • Romanians (Including Moldavians)
  • Russians (Including Byelorussians)
  • Serbians (Including Bosnians & Macedonians)
  • Slovaks (Including Carpatho-Rusyns)
  • Slovenians
  • Ukrainians (Including Ruthenians)
  • General Bibliography

Click on the link to order Eastern European Historical Repositories; by Dr. Charles Dickson; 140 pp., paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2014; ISBN: 0788455826; Item # HBD5582. On sale for 10% off through Nov 10, 2016.

Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers – 15% Off thru Thursday, Nov 3, 2016

Luxembourg-Soft-Cover_300pw

We have a good stock of the recently published Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers in stock. We’re now shipping them on a daily basis. We decided to run a promo on the soft cover edition this week, and are discounting the price by 15% for our readers. This is an Internet Only sale. No phone or mail-order sales at this price. Click on the links to order.

Written in English by Kevan Hansen, the Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers was written to help family historians locate their Luxembourg ancestors. It is available in both soft cover and hard-back editions. Note – the soft cover edition is the one we’ve discounted for the sale.

The Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers does the following:

  • Identifies the major online resources for Luxembourg genealogical research.
  • Identifies each canton, its communes, and populated areas with the names in French, German and Luxembourgish.
  • Visually identifies Catholic church parishes within each canton.
  • Provides an overview of Luxembourg genealogical records.
  • Identifies neighboring parishes, just in case your ancestor may have gone to an alternate parish.
  • Aids in conduction area searches, particularly across district and canton borders.
  • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for your family.
  • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
  • Every canton is mapped to show where each commune lies.
  • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources
  • Identifies important gazetteers and online dictionaries available to researchers

The following contents are found in this volume.

  • Historical Background of Luxembourg
  • Luxembourg Genealogical Resources
  • Catholic Parishes
  • How to Use This Book
  • Census Records
  • Church Records
  • Civil Registration
  • Emigration
  • Archives and Repositories
  • Secondary Collections
  • Genealogical Societies
  • Language
  • Gazetteers
  • Luxembourg Overview Map
    • District Diekirch
    • Canton Clervaux
    • Canton Diekirch
    • Canton Rendange
    • Canton Vianden
    • Canton Wiltz
    • District Grevenmacher
    • Canton Echternach
    • Canton Grevenmacher
    • Canton Remich
    • District Luxembourg
    • Canton Capellen
    • Canton Esch-sur-Alzette
    • Canton Luxembourg
    • Canton Mersch
  • Town Index of Luxembourg
  • The maps in this volume are divided along the administrative boundaries of Luxembourg. Each of the three districts: Diekirch, Grevenmacher, and Luxembourg, are further divided into a total of twelve cantons. Each canton map is then followed by the description of the communes (municipalities) within its boundaries.

    The descriptions of the communes include the names of the population centers (villages, hamlets, mils, etc.). The names of these localities are shown with their French, German, and Luxembourgish names. To the right of the location name is a number in parentheses which is reflected in the accompanying mini map showing its approximate location within the commune borders.

    The surviving church records are shown along with the span of years available for them. The beginning and ending dates are representative of the earliest and latest record. In some instances one type of vital record may be more complete than another. Digital images of the records may be searched at FamilySearch.org. They are also available at Archives Nationales de Luxembourg.

    Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers, by Kevan Hansen, 180 pp; Soft Cover; 2016; ISBN: 9781628590791; Item # FR0660. To order, click on the link or the illustration.

    Following is the list of places found within this volume:

    • Aassel
    • Aasselbur
    • Aasselscheierhaff
    • Abweiler
    • Ahn
    • Aischen
    • Äischen
    • Äischer
    • Allënster
    • Allerborn
    • Allerbur
    • Alrodeschhaff
    • Alscheid
    • Alschënt
    • Altlinster
    • Altrier
    • Altrodeschhof
    • Altwies
    • Altwis
    • Alzeng
    • Alzingen
    • Amber
    • an der Buerg
    • an der Zowaasch
    • Angelduerf
    • Angelsberg
    • Angelsbierg
    • Ansebuerg
    • Ansembourg
    • Ansemburg
    • Antoniushaff
    • Antoniushof
    • Arsdorf
    • Arsdorfermühle
    • Arsdorf‑Moulin
    • Aspelt
    • Assel
    • Asselborn
    • Asselscheuerhof
    • Atert
    • Attert
    • Baaschtenduerf
    • Baastenduerf
    • Bad‑Mondorf
    • Bäerdref
    • Bäereldeng
    • Banzelt
    • Bärel
    • Bartreng
    • Bartringen
    • Basbellain
    • Bascharage
    • Baschelt
    • Baschleiden
    • Bastendorf
    • Bauschelt
    • Bauschleiden
    • Bavigne
    • Beaufort
    • Bech
    • Bech‑Kleinmacher
    • Bech‑Maacher
    • Continue Reading Map Guide to Luxembourg Parish Registers – 15% Off thru Thursday, Nov 3, 2016″

    New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians

    The following news release is from NYGBS:

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    The publication unlocks key resources for anyone tracing New York City’s vast history to leverage the hundreds of key collections housed at the Municipal Archives.

    NEW YORK, NY — The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) is pleased to announce the release of New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians.

    The 245-page guide will make research at this vital facility far more approachable and will introduce researchers to many previously-unknown record collections housed there.

    As one of the world’s largest repositories of city records, the holdings of the New York City Municipal Archives offer untold resources for those tracing the history of New Yok City and its families. But until now, it has remained difficult for anyone but the most experienced researcher to navigate more than the basics of this essential archive. This new guide, created with the assistance of the New York City Municipal Archives, will make it possible for genealogists, family historians or anyone researching New York City’s vast history to leverage the hundreds of key collections found there.

    The guide has already been the recipient of significant praise from the genealogical and archival community, including David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, who stated, “What a gift to genealogists, researchers, and the just plain curious! For the first time a treasure trove of New York City history going back to the Dutch Colonial Era is described to facilitate easy access.”

    The publication, which has been in progress for more than two years, is authored by genealogist Aaron Goodwin of New York City. Harry Macy, Jr., FASG, FGBS, is its consulting editor. Support for the publication was provided by Furthermore, a program of the J.M. Kaplan fund and former NYG&B trustee, M. David Sherrill.

    Pauline Toole, Commissioner, New York City Department of Records and Information Services noted, “We look forward to welcoming family historians at the Municipal Archives as they explore all the wonderful collections highlighted in the new guide.  This comprehensive resource will be especially useful for our patrons who want to go beyond the basics as they document their New York City roots.”

    D. Joshua Taylor, NYG&B President remarked, “The guide provides a look at key records and largely unknown collections that will unlock information and solve mysteries relating to millions of those who at one time called New York City their home.”

    Last year the NYG&B released the monumental New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer which has quickly become a best-selling “must-have” resource for those tracing New York genealogy and family history. The New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians is the latest in the organization’s series of research guides, with further topics planned in the future.

    The New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians is available in print for $40 at NewYorkFamilyHistory.org (members of the NYG&B receive a $10 discount and can also purchase an exclusive digital version alongside a paperback copy).

    About the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B)
    Since 1869 the NYG&B has been bringing families closer to their New York State history by preserving and sharing information related to family history and genealogy. As the largest genealogical society in New York, the NYG&B’s website, NewYorkFamilyHistory.org, includes digital collections, articles, research aids, and other essential tools for those researching New York State. The NYG&B has thousands of members across the globe and publishes The NYG&B Record each quarter, a scholarly journal devoted to New York genealogy and biography, as well as the award-winning New York Researcher, which provides the latest news and updates for those tracing their New York ancestors. In 2015 the NYG&B published the award-winning New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, offering more than 800 pages of detailed resources related to New York. Each day the NYG&B engages with the dynamic, fast-growing, rapidly changing field of family history through accurate, thorough research and the highest standards of scholarship.

    New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians, by Aaron Goodwin , Harry Macy Jr., Consulting Editor, August 2016. Softcover, 7 x 10, 245 pages.
    Shipping and handling for U.S. locations $5 per book; for international orders, call 212-755-8532. State and local sales tax applies to non-exempt purchases by New York State residents and purchases shipped to a New York address.

    German Immigrants in American Church Records – the Series

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    I am excited to be able to announce that Family Roots Publishing just signed contracts to continue the publication of what was Picton Press’s German Immigrants in American Church Records series of books.

    Under the direction of Lewis Rohrbach, these volumes have been printed at the rate of just under 2 per year since 2005. They are amazing books, listing the names, relationships and German homeland birthplaces of thousands upon thousands of German settlers in the Midwest United States. Under the direction and editorship of my friend, Roger Minert, these records have been meticulously extracted by students at BYU, then formatted and indexed to make for some of the finest German birthplace aids in existence today.

    For those who may not know, Mr. Rohrbach was one of the premier genealogists and genealogy publishers in the country, specializing in Swiss research – but also known for his quality publications – both in content as well as appearance. Lewis passed away last January, and Picton Press closed it’s doors. Read his obituary at Dick Eastman’s blog. Seventeen volumes of the series were shipped to customers. I personally know of 74 libraries that have nearly the entire series. The manuscript for Volume 18 was sent to Picton just prior to Lewis’s death and was never shipped, although I suspect it may have been printed. I understand that Lewis’s widow plans to donate his inventory to various libraries, and I am in hopes that those 74 libraries (plus others I am sure) will get Volume 18 during that process. Because of contractual and copyright issues, neither Roger, nor Family Roots Publishing has access to any of volumes one through eighteen at this time – other than ten copies of Volume 5, one copy of Volume 4, and one copy of Volume 8.

    German Immigrants in American Church Records – Volume 19: Missouri (Excluding St. Louis County) will ship in September 2016. We will be posting it at the Family Roots Publishing website in the near future. If you or your library wish to be placed on a standing order for the volumes as they come out, email me at Lmeitzler@gmail.com and I’ll forward you a standing order form to get the book at a substantial discount.

    Note that Family Roots Publishing is very interested in maintaining the superior quality of this hard-bound series, and like Mr. Rohrbach, will ensure that all volumes will be hardbound and printed on 60# acid-free paper for long-lasting shelf life.