German Census Records 1816-1916 – A Groundbreaking New Genealogy Resource

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I need to first make a sincere apology. For years I have been telling people that there were very few German censuses taken – with a small number of exceptions. I didn’t know what I was talking about. I guess I could make the excuse that I didn’t know what I didn’t know, but I learned years ago that excuses aren’t worth anything. Actually, many German censuses were taken, some as early as the 1700s, but with most starting in 1816. And yes – many are accessible to researchers today.

After wondering for several years why American researchers know very little about German census records, my good friend, Dr. Roger Minert, found an opportunity to live in Europe for six months to investigate them. He was sure that many existed, but he could find very little information about them. While in Europe, he learned that even German researchers know very little about their census records! How could such a potentially important resource be lost to obscurity? In a new book, researchers can now learn where and when German census records were compiled, as well as why and how. The author also describes state by state the content of the census records and explains how surviving census documents can be located. This is groundbreaking information, of enormous value to anyone researching their German roots.

Would you like additional information about your family in old country? The information found in the parish registers is key to your research, but there’s often even more family information to be found in the German census records.

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource is available and now shipping.

Note – this book is also available in a hardbound edition. Click on this link to be directed to that page at the FPRC website.

The following Table of Contents is found in the volume:

  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: A History of Census Records in the German States
  • Chapter 2: The Census of 1867: The Great Transition
  • Chapter 3: Census Records during the German Empire 1871-1918
  • Chapter 4: Census Records in the German States from 1816 to 1864
  • Chapter 5: Anhalt
  • Chapter 6: Baden
  • Chapter 7: Bayern [Bavaria]
  • Chapter 8: Brandenburg
  • Chapter 9: Braunschweig [Brunswick]
  • Chapter 10: Bremen (Hansestadt Bremen)
  • Chapter 11: Elsaß-Lothringen {Alsace-Lorraine]
  • Chapter 12: Hamburg (Hansestadt Hamburg)
  • Chapter 13: Hannover [Hanover]
  • Chapter 14: Hessen [Hesse]
  • Chapter 15: Hessen-Nassau [Hesse-Nassau]
  • Chapter 16: Hohenzollern
  • Chapter 17: Lippe
  • Chapter 18: Lübeck (Hansestadt Lübeck) [Luebeck]
  • Chapter 19: Mecklenburg-Schwerin
  • Chapter 20: Mecklenburg-Strelitz
  • Chapter 21: Oldenburg
  • Chapter 22: Ostpreußen [East Prussia]
  • Chapter 23: Pommern [Pomerania]
  • Chapter 24: Posen
  • Chapter 25: Reuß älterer Linie [Reuss Elder Line]
  • Chapter 26: Reuß jüngere Linie [Reuss Younger Line]
  • Chapter 27: Rheinprovinz [Rhineland Province]
  • Chapter 28: Sachsen-Altenburg [Saxe-Altenburg]
  • Chapter 29: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 30: Königreich Sachsen [Kingdom of Saxony]
  • Chapter 31: Sachsen-Meiningen [Saxe-Meiningen]
  • Chapter 32: Provinz Sachsen [Province of Saxony]
  • Chapter 33: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach [Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach]
  • Chapter 34: Schaumburg-Lippe
  • Chapter 35: Schlesian [Silesia]
  • Chapter 36: Schleswig-Holstein
  • Chapter 37: Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
  • Chapter 38: Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
  • Chapter 39: Waldeck
  • Chapter 40: Westfalen [Westphalia]
  • Chapter 41: Westpreußen [West Prussia]
  • Chapter 42: Württemberg [Wuerttemberg]
  • Chapter 43: German Census Records from 1816-1916: What Do We Know Now?
  • Chapter 44: Conclusions
  • Appendix A: Writing to Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
  • Appendix B: Conducting Census Research in Archives in Germany, France and Poland
  • Appendix C: Interesting Documents Relating to German Census Campaigns
  • Appendix D: The States of Germany in 1871
  • Bibliography
  • Index

German Census Records, 1816-1916: The When, Where, and How of a Valuable Genealogical Resource; by Roger P Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2016; 260 pp; 8.5×11; Softbound; ISBN: 9781628590777; Item #: FR0650

Masonic Research – A Quick Guide by Pat Gordon – 10% off thru Sept. 1

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Our ancestors were social beings, just like we are today. Using information found in this much-needed Masonic Research guide will soon have you on the right track to discovering your Masonic ancestors. And chances are you have some, since Masonry is one of the oldest, most popular and influential organizations in the U.S., Canada and Europe with just about every town having a Masonic Lodge. Pat Gordon’s Masonic Research guide explains how to find Masonic records, including a comprehensive listing of Grand Lodges and Prince Hall Grand Lodges by state.

I’ve personally had great success using Masonic records. In fact, I actually broke a brick-wall problem with them once. If you haven’t used them, I certainly recommend that you start now. This 4-page laminated Genealogy Quick Tips guide was published in 2013, but FRPC just began stocking them. To introduce the item, we’re offering it at 10% off thru Sept. 1. Sale price: $8.06, Reg. $8.95.

Contents Include:

  • Background
  • Lodges
  • Becoming a Mason
  • Degrees
  • Offices
  • Affiliated Organizations
  • Genealogical Information
  • Finding Records
  • Researching
  • Pitfalls
  • Terms
  • Grand Lodges by State
  • Prince Hall Grand Lodges by State

Quick Sheet: Masonic Research by Pat Gordon; 4 pp; Laminated; 8.5×11; Published: 2013; Item # BT01. Sale Price: $8.06; Reg. $8.95.

Click on the above link to order.

Evidence Explained, Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, 3rd Edition – 15% Off Sale Extended Thru June 16

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It’s now been eight years since the first edition of Evidence Explained, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, was published. The book proved to be the definitive guide to citation and analysis. This guide left nothing to chance. As time went on, a second edition was required. And now the Bible of genealogical citation has come out in a much-anticipated new third edition.

Advances in genealogy and history research, changes at major repositories and online information providers, and the ever-evolving electronic world have generated new citation and analysis challenges for researchers. While countless websites now suggest ways to identify their offerings, few of those address the analytical needs of a researcher concerned with the nature and provenance of web material, whose numerous incarnations and transformations often affect the reliability of their content.

As with the previous two editions of Evidence Explained, the third edition explains citation principles for both traditional and nontraditional sources; includes 1,000 citation models for virtually every source type; and shows readers where to go to find their sources and how to describe and evaluate them. It contains many new citation models, updates to websites, and descriptions and evaluations of numerous contemporary materials not included in earlier editions.

Highlights of the new Evidence Explained, Third Edition include:

  • QuickStart Guide
  • Expanded “3×3” Evidence Analysis Process Model
  • Expanded coverage for genetic citations
  • Expanded coverage of layered citations
  • Latest Concepts in evidence analysis
  • Coverage of latest media and delivery systems
  • Expanded glossary
  • Handling of cached materials at Wayback Machine and elsewhere
  • Privacy standards for genetic research
  • Updates in National Archives citations after changes at NARA and TNG
  • Updates for major online providers after acquisitions and mergers
  • When to cite DOIs vs. URLs
  • When to cite Stable URLs vs. paths and keywords
  • Your 4 Basic Rules for Citing websites
  • And many other issues raised by users of past editions of Evidence Explained

This volume is 892 pages in length, indexed and in hardcover. It was just published in May of 2015. ISBN 978-08063-2017-5. Item #: GPC3878D. Normally selling for $59.95 plus p&h, FRPC is marketing it online for 15% off, making it just $50.96, through June 16, 2015. Click here to order.

Maine Names Lists 1623-2012 – Now Shipping

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The brand new Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook! The Name List book is 103 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

Maine Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1623-2012 – with FR0248 FREE as a PDF download eBook; by William Dollarhide; 103 pp., paper; 8.5×11; Published: 2015; ISBN: 9781628590302; Item # FR0247

All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the full-color pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Washington. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

Contents

  • Preface
  • Map: USGS Map Of Maine.
  • Map: English, French, Dutch, and Swedish Colonies, 1584-1626
  • Map: 1790 (as part of Massachusetts)
  • Map: Grants to the Plymouth and Virginia Companies
  • Maine Name Lists
  • Maine Historical Timeline, 1524-1863
  • Accounts of the First Europeans to Visit the Present Maine
  • Things to Know about Maine’s Censuses and Substitutes
  • Online Databases at the Maine State Archives
  • Genealogy Resources at the Maine State Archives & Maine State Library
  • Online Genealogy Research at the Maine Historical Society
  • Bibliography of Maine Name Lists, 1623-2012
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Eastern European Historical Repositories – on sale for 10 to 15% off thru June 16, 2015

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    I recently obtained copies of the new Eastern European Historical Repositories by Dr. Charles Dickson. I’m always looking for new resources, especially as deals with Europe – and this book fills a void.

    America has often been described as a melting pot nation. While such an adjective contains some truth it does not capture the total flavor of its multiethnic experience. While many national groups have blended into the American fabric, they have also, to varying degrees, maintained a sense of individual ethic identity.

    This work represents an attempt to organize a list of the many resources that are available to serious students of Eastern European history in their ongoing search for family histories. The listings in this book cover the following ethnic groups: Albanians, Armenians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Estonians, Greeks, Hungarians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, Slovenians, and Ukrainians.

    Under each ethnic group a common format has been followed which includes an introduction to immigration patterns, followed by separate page listings describing the holdings of primary genealogical societies, museums, and educational institutions associated with that group.

    Next there are listings of other ethnic related societies which have some family histories followed by a listing of the regional public libraries located in areas where each particular group has settled in significant numbers. As the reader uses this handbook as a research tool in discovering group and family histories, hopefully he or she will be reminded that the American multiethnic experience may be singularly unique in human history.

    The following is from the Table of Contents

    • Preface
    • The Author
    • Table of Illustrations
    • Introduction
    • Albanians
    • Armenians
    • Bulgarians
    • Croatians
    • Czechs (including Bohemians & Moravians)
    • Estonians
    • Greeks (including Cypriots)
    • Hungarians (Including Magyars)
    • Latvians
    • Lithuanians
    • Poles (Including Pomeranians & Silesians)
    • Romanians (Including Moldavians)
    • Russians (Including Byelorussians)
    • Serbians (Including Bosnians & Macedonians)
    • Slovaks (Including Carpatho-Rusyns)
    • Slovenians
    • Ukrainians (Including Ruthenians)
    • General Bibliography

    Click on the link to order Eastern European Historical Repositories; by Dr. Charles Dickson; 140 pp., paper; 5.5×8.5; Published: 2014; ISBN: 0788455826; Item # HBD5582. On sale for 10% off through June 16, 2015 – or Now 15% off in the Eastern European bundle of 2 books. Sale ends at midnight June 8, 2015.

    Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors – On Sale for 10 to 15% Off Thru May 11, 2015

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    Moorshead Magazines recently brought us Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors. At 82 pages, this journal offers 15 articles written by a collection of professional researchers and genealogists.

    Publisher and editor, Edward Zapletal, does an excellent job in describing the difficulties of Eastern Europeans research:

    “For many of us ion the genealogy world who are researching ancestors from countries in Eastern Europe, it’s a know fact that research in the region can, at times, be very difficult. We often start out searching for an ancestor in one place, but end up locating them in a completely different places the reasons are numerous, but several centuries of wars, famines, disease, floods, and fires, to name a few, contributed to migration and emigration, and to the destruction of many valuable records. Still, many records survived, including parish books, censuses, and gazetteers. For those who emigrated to distant lands, many records were created along the way at various ports of departure and arrival. Those, and many other documents that were carefully stored, are now being digitized, indexed and made available to eager family historians all over the world. The Internet has made searching much easier, but it’s not always the answer. Only a relatively small portion of all records have been digitized. Writing to, or visiting, local archives, records offices, churches, etc. still may be the only way to find that elusive Eastern European ancestor. Be patient. Be vigilant. Enjoy!”

    Answers to many of your research questions can be found in this collection of professional articles. Just look at the contents list below to get an idea of all that is covered here.

    Contents

    10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Eastern European Research!

    Lisa A. Alzo shows you the steps to track down your Eastern European roots

    Using Maps & Gazetteers

    Dave Obee show us how to use maps and gazetteers to locate where your ancestors lived

    Online Resources for Researching Eastern European Ancestors

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews some of the best websites for learning about your East European ancestors

    Meet Your Matches: Helpful Tools from MyHeritage.com

    Lisa a. Alzo discusses how to use some great tools from MyHeritage.com t o research East European ancestors

    Top 10 Websites for Finding Your Polish Ancestors!

    Donna J. Pointkouski looks at ten websites to help you locate your Polish ancestors

    JRI-Poland Expands Access

    Lisa A. Alzo reports on a new agreement between The Polish State Archives and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland

    Online Hungarian Research

    Lisa A. Alzo reviews the latest online resources for Hungary (With special thanks to Beth Long)

    Researching the Hungarian Census

    Smiljka Kitanovic explains the resources available for researching your Hungarian ancestors

    Start Researching Your Czech Ancestors

    Scott Phillips outlines the sources you’ll need to start on a successful journey to find your Czech ancestors

    Five Great Sites fro Researching Your Slovak Ancestors!

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the key websites you need to know to research your Slovak ancestors

    Researching Your Ukrainian Ancestors

    Matthew Bielawa discusses taking the first “steppes” to finding your Ukrainian ancestors

    Researching Your Russian Ancestors

    Rick Norberg explores five websites that will be helpful for researching your Russian ancestors

    Benefits of Joining an Ethnic Genealogical Society

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses the role of ethnic genealogical societies in family history research

    Five Simple Ways to Share Old Favorites

    Lisa A. Alzo discusses five ways you can share Eastern European recipes and traditions online

    Copies of Tracing Your Eastern European Ancestors can be purchased from Family Roots Publishing; Reg. Price: $9.95 – on sale for 10% off at just $8.96 – or 15% off as part of the 2-book Eastern European research bundle.

    Louisiana Names Lists – Published & Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 – Sale Extended Thru March 19

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    Louisiana Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1679-2001 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook. The Name List book is 99 pages in length and as with his earlier volumes, it’s loaded with information.

    Sale for 25% off Extended Through Midnight EST Thursday, March 19, 2015

    See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

    To celebrate the publication of both this Louisiana book, as well as a Kentucky volume, Family Roots Publishing extended their promotion and has discounted ALL the Name Lists books by 25% through Midnight EDT Thursday March 19, 2015 – that includes the pdf eBooks as well as the printed volumes. The printed volumes are $14.21 (reg. 18.95), and the PDF eBook alone is $9.38 (reg. $12.50).

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Contents

      Contents

      • Preface
      • Map: Indian Cessions – Louisiana.
      • Map: 1810 Louisiana Parishes & Current Counties
      • Map: 18110 West Florida Annexation
      • Louisiana Name Lists
      • Louisiana Historical Timeline, 1673-1865
      • Online Databases at the Louisiana State Archives
      • Louisiana State Vital Records Registry
      • Louisiana Historical Center
      • New Orleans Public Library’s Louisiana Div. & City Archives
      • Searchable Online Databases, New Orleans Public Library Website
      • Online Genealogy Guides at the Louisiana Division
      • Bibliography of Louisiana Name Lists, 1679-2001
    • U.S. Maps
      • 1763 British North America
      • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
      • 1790 United States
      • 1800 United States
      • 1810 United States
      • 1820 United States
      • 1830 United States
      • 1840 United States
      • 1850 United States
      • 1860 United States
      • 1870-1880 United States
      • 1890-1940 United States
      • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
    • National Name Lists
      • Getting Started
      • National Look-up Sites Online
      • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Kentucky Name Lists – Published & Online Censuses & Substitutes 1773-2000 – Sale Extended Thru March 19

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    Kentucky Name Lists – Published and Online Censuses & Substitutes 1773-2000 is now in print and shipping with a FREE immediate PDF download eBook. The Name List book is 95 pages in length and loaded with information.

    Now on extended Sale for 25% off Through Midnight EST Thursday, March 19, 2015

    See Dollarhide’s article, “What are Name Lists?

    To celebrate the publication of both this Kentucky book, as well as a Louisiana volume, Family Roots Publishing has discounted ALL the Name Lists books by 25% through Midnight EDT Thursday, March 19, 2015 – that includes the pdf eBooks as well as the printed volumes. The printed volumes are $14.21 (reg. 18.95), and the PDF eBook alone is $9.38 (reg. $12.50).

    All Dollarhide state Name List books currently come with a FREE download of the pdf eBook. Upon placing your order, you will be able to download the FREE PDF eBook directly from the FRPC screen. You will also be sent an email from where you can click on the link and download the item. You can only download the PDF eBook once, so if you make your order from a computer other than your own, you might want to wait until you get to your computer and do the actual download from the email. Your book itself will be mailed by USPS media mail, and can be expected to arrive within 7 to 10 days within the United States.

    After downloading the FREE full-color eBook, click on “File” in the Adobe Acrobat menu bar at the top of the screen, then click on “Save As,” and save to a location on your hard drive or other storage device.

    William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, a book of 393 census year maps, and one of the bestselling titles ever published in the field of genealogy. Mr. Dollarhide currently lives in Utah. He has written numerous guidebooks related to genealogical research.

    With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

    Name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

    Not only does this volume give a detailed bibliography of Name Lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

    I recommend it to any genealogist, beginner or advanced, that had ancestors in the state. – Leland K. Meitzler, Editor – GenealogyBlog.com, Publisher – Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC

    This book is also available in a PDF eBook format only.

    Contents

    • Preface
    • Map: Indian Cessions – Tennessee & Kentucky.
    • Map: 1790 Kentucky (as part of Virginia)
    • Kentucky Name Lists
    • Kentucky Historical Timeline, 1541-1998
    • Research, Collections & Links at the Kentucky Historical Society
    • Kentucky Dept. of Library & Archives
    • Guides to Kentucky Manuscripts and Records
    • Bibliography of Kentucky Name Lists, 1773-2000
  • U.S. Maps
    • 1763 British North America
    • 1784-1802 Western Land Cessions
    • 1790 United States
    • 1800 United States
    • 1810 United States
    • 1820 United States
    • 1830 United States
    • 1840 United States
    • 1850 United States
    • 1860 United States
    • 1870-1880 United States
    • 1890-1940 United States
    • 50 States, AL to WY / Year a State / Order Admitted to the U.S.
  • National Name Lists
    • Getting Started
    • National Look-up Sites Online
    • Bibliography of National Lists, 1600s – Present

    The following Name List Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

    Kindred Voices – on pre-pub sale with FREE Immediate PDF ebook download

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    My friend, Geoff Rasmussen, just wrote a new book entitled Kindred Voices. Geoff is probably best known for his work with Legacy, hosting their weekly webinars. However, he’s a great writer, having written a number of books including the popular Digital Imaging Essentials. We are taking pre-publication orders for the full-color soft-cover book, with a substantial discount and a FREE IMMEDIATE PDF download of the eBook of the same if ordered by February 27, 2015!

    PLEASE NOTE that the paperback book SHIPS in March – probably toward the end of the month. The order confirmation will say toexpect it to be shipped within 72 hours, but that’s a line added by the computer dealing with daily sales of in-stock books. Ignore it, and expect it in late March.

    In Kindred Voices – Listening For Our Ancestors, Geoff takes on the not-uncontroversial topic of how our ancestors themselves may be helping us make genealogical discoveries. This is a topic previousy dealt with by Hank Jones in his Psychic Roots, and More Psychic Roots volumes. Ann Bradshaw later wrote True Miracles with Genealogy: Help from Beyond the Veil, and True Miracles with Genealogy: Volume Two. Geoff’s new volume is fascinating. He sent me a PDF review copy a few days ago, and although super-busy, I sat down and read the entire book cover to cover – something I seldom do.

    Most genealogists will tell you that every now and then, seemingly unexplainable things happen. Call it what you will. A miracle? psychic phenomena, or serendipity? Seemingly unexplainable things happen. In Kindred Voices, Geoff lays out a case to show that genealogists often receive research help from their long-deceased ancestors themselves. Many fascinating examples, taken from his own life experiences, are given. Did you ever wonder why those of the Mormon faith do genealogy? Geoff gives the best explanation for it that I’ve ever read.

    Another good friend, Megan Smolenyak, put it this way, “If you didn’t believe it before now, Geoff Rasmussen will convince you that our ancestors want to be found as much as we want to find them. Whether you’re new to genealogy or struggling with a brick wall in your research, Kindred Voices will inspire you in your quest to reach out to those who came before us. C’mon, they’re waiting for you!”

    The following is from Legacy’s website:

    Genealogists hear dead people…

    […pause for dramatic effect…]

    The voices of our ancestors awake when our search for them begins. Most often we feel their voices – in our minds and in our hearts – as research ideas, promptings, and intuitions on where to find them. Yet sometimes, as our hearts turn toward theirs, their heaven-sent communications can be heard with our earthly ears. These voices – those of our ancestors – are the evidence of their hearts having turned towards ours.

    The serendipitous encounters with genealogical voices that Geoff Rasmussen tells in Kindred Voices are true stories. Readers will be stirred by the reality of our ancestors’ interventions in our search for them. You will be inspired to either begin your search or to receive the hope you need to continue your quest. Our ancestors speak to us; are we listening?

    Click Here to view the Table of Contents and the preface (9 pages)

    Kindred Voices: Listening For Our Ancestors; 100pp; March 2015; Perfect-bound Paperback; 6×9; Full-color; ISBN: 978-0-9864094-0-0; Item #: JR03. $14.95; on sale for just $12.95 plus a FREE immediate PDF download.

    Kindred Voices: Listening For Our Ancestors is also available alone as a PDF eBook.

    Getting Started in #Genealogy Bundle – On Sale for 65% Off

    Getting-Started-Bundle-350pw

    As this week’s FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer, Family Roots Publishing is offering 3 popular genealogy books as a bundle for 65% off – or individually at 25% off. The bundle is heavy, and can’t be shipped outside of the United States & Canada.

    To Purchase the bundle for just $19.20 (plus $8 p&h), Click Here.

    The books are:

    Give a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History (5th Edition)

    Portrait of My Family – My Family Heritage

    Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition

    Again, Sorry – we do not ship this bundle outside of the United States. Any orders placed for outside-the-USA & Canada shipping for this item will be reversed. It’s just too heavy to ship economically out of the North America.

    Following are reviews of each of the three items:

    Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy – Record & Preserve Your Family’s History

    Gift of Genealogy

    In 2013, Jeffrey A. Bockman, published a major update to his popular book, Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History. Now in its fifth edition, this fantastic primer covers all the basics needed for the novice to get started with family history research. Sometimes genealogists forget an important part of family history research, leaving their own story behind. Bockman created this book to guide and inspire anyone with an inkling of interest into their own past, to help search it out and leave both it and their own stories behind for future genealogists.

    In this book Bockman covers all the basics, for example:

    • Forms to record the basic facts
    • Saving  documents future researchers will need
    • Identifying people in photographs
    • Preservation
    • Finding and telling family stories
    • Conducting your own research

    This fifth edition is a major revision, adding over five additional years of experience and new resources. New for the fifth edition:

    • More family stories and photographs
    • Newer sources
    • More online resources
    • A new section on searching techniques
    • Comments about genealogy travel with examples
    • Mini case study (to give hope to those who have a relative that disappeared)

    The book is organized for easy reading with plenty of examples to help the beginner get started. If you know someone looking to get started with family history or  hoping to help someone develop and interest in their families stories, then this book would help them in the process.

    Not only is this book one of the best primers available, it is priced affordably. Family Roots Publishing has Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record & Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, (normally $8.95) on sale for only $6.71 (25% off) through February 9 – or purchase it as part of the 65% off Getting Started bundle available through the same date.

     

    Table of Contents

    Introduction

    • About the author
    • Introduction

    Family Facts

    • Identify family members and key events
    • Recording information on standardized forms
      • Family Group Sheet
      • Ancestor Chart

    Home Sources

    • Supporting documents that help to provide the necessary proof
    • List of what to use, keep, and preserve
    • Important home sources
    • Bockman family home sources

    Photographs

    • Help turn names and dates into real people
    • Identify the people, the time, and the place

    Preservation

    • Saving items for future generations
    • Paper & document preservation
    • Photo preservation

    Family Stories

    • Can only be told by someone who was a part of it
    • Timeline of events
    • Bockman family history

    Organizing It All

    • Assembling all of the information

    Family History Research

    • How to start researching your family
      • Vital records
      • Wills & probate records
      • Cemetery records
      • Newspapers/obituaries
      • Census records
      • Other records
      • Immigrants
      • Didn’t find it in the index
      • Genealogy travel
      • Case Study: Finding Alvar a not so great dane

    Our Family

    • Title page
    • Guidelines for filling in your forms
      • Three family group sheets
      • One ancestor charts
      • Two timeline pages
      • Notes page

      Purchase Give Your Family a Gift That Money Can’t Buy: Record; Preserve Your Family’s History, 5th Edition, (normally $8.95) on sale for only $6.71 (25% off) through February 9 – or purchase it as part of the 65% off Getting Started bundle available through the same date.
      ———-

      Portrait-of-My-Family-200pw

      Portrait of My Family, My Family Heritage

      A great gift or keepsake album to record the genealogy and family history.

      This attractive hardback work contains some 136 pages, illustrated in color, pertaining to virtually every relationship, object, and activity of family life. Each page is dedicated to a separate topic, such as “The Family of My Father” or “Special Memories,” and leaves ample space thereunder for entering names, birthplaces, ages, and other appropriate information.

      Looking for an easy and fun way to preserve the memories in the closest branches of your family’s history? Or, looking for a great way to get others in your family involved in the work? Portrait of My Family is a great solution. The book also makes a great gift, and here is why.

      Portrait of My Family – My Family Heritage is a hardback, fill-in the blank, beautiful family history memory book. This 8.5″ x 11″ hardback book, if properly cared for, will last generations. Filled with pages beautifully printed to add a sense of style to each form. This book is a journal, a memory book, and a family history reference all in one.

      Page by page, the owner will enjoy creating this long-lasting memory by hand, recording basic genealogical information along with the memories of family treasures and special family events. Forms and charts are designed for ease of use and for easy reading. There are places for both genealogical data as well as family personal and family stories. Records of family heirlooms and collections will help future generations identify important family treasures. The contents listed below show all the exciting topics and sheets this book offers for creating a new family heirloom.

      The book also comes with an inserted sheet offering “helpful suggestion for filling in your book.” This included tips on preparing and adding photographs and making the most of your entries.

      As a gift now for others, or as a gift you leave behind, is available from Family Roots Publishing.

      • Table of Contents
      • From Generation to Generation
      • How to Use This book
      • My Genealogy
      • My Parent’s Courtship
      • My Parent’s Marriage
      • Father’s Family
      • Mother’s Family
      • My Foreign-Born Ancestors
      • The Lands of Our Ancestors
      • My Family Tree – fold-out Ancestral Chart
      • My Family
      • The Family of My Father
      • The Family of My Mother
      • The Family of My Paternal GrandFather
      • The Family of My Paternal Grandmother
      • The Family of My Maternal Grandfather
      • The Family of My Maternal Grandmother
      • The Families of My Paternal Great-Grandparents
      • The Families of My Maternal Great-Grandparents
      • Family Weddings
      • Other Religious Ceremonies in Our Family
      • My Family’s Religious Affiliations
      • Where I Have Worshipped
      • Special Memories
      • My Family’s Homes
      • The Schools I Have Attended
      • The Organizations I Have Joined
      • Professions, Occupations, Crafts and Trades
      • My Family’s Military Service Record
      • My Best Friends
      • The Pets in My Family
      • The Automobiles – Our Mechanical Companion
      • Special Things
      • My Prized Family Possessions
      • Sports I Enjoy
      • My Family’s Hobbies
      • Memorable Vacations
      • Family Gatherings
      • Cherished Traditions
      • The Most Outstanding Events in My Family’s History
      • Trials & Disasters My Family Has Faced
      • The Oral History of My Family
      • My Family’s Medical History
      • Vital Statistics
      • Photographs
      • Genealogical Research
      • National Archives [International]
      • Addresses
      • Autographs

      Portrait of My Family, My Family Heritage; by F. Michael Carroll; Copyright 1978; Hardcover; 136 pp.; 8.5×11; Item# GPC8451; Reg. $10.95; Purchase at 25% off ($8.21) through midnight MST Monday, February 9, 2015 – or as a 65% off bundle through the same date.

      ———-

      Directory of Family Associations – 4th Edition

      gpc426About a year ago, Family Roots Publishing made a special purchase of several hundred copies of the 4th Edition of the Directory of Family Associations. The book was written by Elizabeth Petty Bentley and Deborah Ann Carl in 2001, and is the latest family association directory available. No further editions are planned at this time. Most genealogical research within the United States and much of Europe can easily be done for the last 200 years, if not much more. Figuring an average generation as 25 years, that’s eight generations of ancestors – or 510 different and unique surnames in the family tree! If you are working on that many surnames or even a small portion of that (as many of us are), information on family associations is invaluable to our research.

      There are many uses for a directory of family associations, but undoubtedly the best use for it is for genealogical research – for making contact with family members, sharing information about family history, developing common ground between people of the same surname, arranging reunions, discovering who’s out there and where you connect on the family tree, and finding out where you can go with your own research. And there are a host of other uses – kin searching and heir searching, for example, determining family migration patterns, even marketing your own genealogical research. The possibilities are endless.

      Based largely on data received in response to questionnaires sent to family associations, reunion committees, and one-name societies, the 4th edition of the Directory of Family Associations gives you access to a range of possibilities, offering information on approximately 6,000 family associations across the United States.

      The book starts with a section on Multi-family Resources, then launches into the bulk of the book listing the 6000 associations. It literally runs from Aaldericnk through Zyrkle.

      This book is an immensely useful A-Z directory of family associations giving addresses, phone numbers, contact persons, and publications (if any). The book is 12 years old, so undoubtedly some of the contact info will be bad. However, having the data that tells of an association that did exist can also be useful. So whether you’re just starting your genealogical research or already waist deep in your investigations, planning a family reunion or hoping to attend one, or simply curious about your family or your surname, the course you choose from now on may be partially governed by this indispensable directory.

      Note that the reviews on the various editions of this book have been outstanding. Library Journal listed the 1991 edition as a “Best Reference Book of 1991.”

      Get your copy of the Directory of Family Associations, 4th Edition at 25% off through February 9, 2015 or as part of a 65% off bundle through the same date.

      ———-

      To Purchase the bundle at 65% off – just $19.20 (plus $8 p&h), Click Here.

      Sale ends midnight MST Monday, February 9, 2015.

    Oregon Burial Site Guide – Available for only the P&H Charge! #Genealogy

    Oregon-Burial-Site-Guide

    I received the following note from my friend, Jan Healy. If you have Oregon research, this is a really good deal! This book is beautifully done, and they are basically giving them away. You’ll never beat the price.

    Press release – Oregon Burial Site Guide: We are losing our warehouse space the end of July. So the boss said to offer the Oregon Burial Site Guide, Compiled by Dean Byrd, Stanley Clarke, & Janice M. Healy free. We will send a hard back copy to everyone for the cost of shipping and handling. Prepaid $20 post marked not later than 1 July 2015. Those of you with Nonprofit status please add your tax ID number. Any questions contact me. This book sold for $125 each.

    This book is about where the cemeteries of Oregon are located. Not lists of who is buried in them. Those are only listed for the small sites on private property with 12 or less burials.

    The book is 8.5″ X 11″ X 2″ 1,200 plus pages and weighs in at about 8 lbs in the shipping carton. Fully alphabetical by county and site, each county is indexed, Black and White photo’s for a general idea of what monuments are in each county, with a state wide index in the back. This is a must for those researching Oregon using death certificates. We tried to pick up all the also known as names to the sites. There are about 2500 burial sites in the 36 counties of Oregon. This material is updated and corrected, not like the material from the old ODOT book that has been put up on the web. So no this is not on the web.

    Make checks out to:

    Stoney Way LLC
    PO Box 5414
    Aloha, OR 97006-0414

    The Georgia Frontier; Three Volume Set — 15% OFF

    cf9873The Georgia Frontier; Three Volume Set, by Jeannette Holland Austin

    Volume I: Colonial Families to the Revolutionary War

    Volume II: Revolutionary War Families to the Mid-1880

    Volume III: Descendents of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina Families

    Following General James Oglethorpe’s initial settling of Europeans from England, Scotland, and the Palatine to the Georgia Colony and the dissolution of the Georgia trustees’ charter, the British Crown offered substantial land grants to entice other colonists to settle and work the Georgia countryside.

    As early as 1752, colonists from New England, Virginia, and the Carolinas poured into Georgia, bringing with them their families, servants, and sometimes entire religious communities. By 1775, these “frontier” settlements had established extensive coastal cotton and rice plantations. After the Revolution, Patriot veterans established homesteads by taking up land grants for their war services. During the early 1800s, Georgia employed a series of land lotteries to attract even more settlers. Once the federal government had “removed” Georgia’s Cherokee and Creek populations during the late 1820s, the stage was set for a climactic state lottery of middle and western Georgia lands in 1832.

    Set against the history of Georgia’s advancing frontier, this unprecedented three-volume work, the outgrowth of one genealogist’s professional lifetime of tracing Georgia family histories, sets forth the genealogies of 591 families, referencing tens of thousands of Georgia settlers. The families are divided into three convenient groupings: (1) those who settled prior to 1775, (2) families who first entered Georgia between the Revolution and before the Civil War, and (3) families that migrated to Georgia from Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina during various periods.

    It is impossible to praise this new compendium of family histories too highly. Mrs. Austin’s work is destined to be regarded as a landmark in Georgia genealogy. Scan the surnames of the main families covered, below, to learn if your Georgia ancestors are those who pioneered the Georgia frontier.

     

    The Georgia Frontier; Three Volume Set, by Jeannette Holland Austin is now available from Family Roots Publishing for 15% OFF for a Limited Time.

     

    Surnames listed in each of the volumes:

    Volume I:
    Adams, Adkerson/Adkinson/Atkinson, Akens/Akins, Alfriend, Allen, Allison, Anderson, Andrew/Andrews, Armor/Armour, Arnett, Arnsdorff, Askin/Askins, Atwell, Austin, Aycock, Ayres, Bacon, Baillie, Baker, Baldwin, Ball, Banks, Barnard, Barnett, Barron, Battle, Baxley, Bazemore, Bechtle, Beddingfield, Bedell, Berkner, Berry, Biddenback, Bignon (du bignon), Billingslea, Bird, Blackstone, Blount, Blow, Blue, Bohannon, Bohrman, Bolzius, Bond, Bostick/Bostwick, Bowen, Bowling, Boykin, Braddy, Bradley, Bradshaw, Bradwell, Brandner, Branham, Brannon, Brantley, Braswell, Breedlove, Brewer, Brincefield, Broach, Browning, Bryan, Bryant, Buckner, Bulloch, Buntz, Burford, Burgholder (Bourghalter), Burnley, Butler, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Candler, Carlton, Carr, Carter, Cassells, Castleberry, Castlin, Chaffin, Chapman, Chappell, Chattin, Cheney, Childs, Choate, Clarke, Clay, Clements, Cleaveland/Cleveland, Cleveland, Clower, Cocke, Cofer, Cole, Collier, Collins, Comer, Congleton, Conner, Cook, Cooper, Corneck, Cornwell, Cotton, Cowan, Cox, Crenshaw, Cross, Crutchfield, Cuthbert, Damour, Darden, Darsey, Davis, Dawson, Delegal, Delk, Dent, Dewberry, Dickson, Dozier, Drawhorn, Dregors, Driggers, Driver, Dukes, Dumas, Dunn, Durden, Durham, Dwight, Dyson, Early, Earnest, Easterling, Edge, Edwards, Elliott, Ellis, Emerson, English, Epps, Etheridge, Evans, Fambrough, Feagin, Feaster, Few, Finney, Fisher, Fletcher, Flewellen, Fraser, Freeman, Fryer, Fullilove, Futch, Gafford, Gardner, Gates, Gay, Gee, Germain, Germany, Gibbons, Gibbs, Gibson, Gilbert, Gilder, Gilmer, Giovanoli, Glascock, Gober, Godfrey, Goggans, Golden/Golding, Goldwire, Goodall, Goodman, Goodwin, Gordon, Graham, Gray, Greer, Grier, Griminger, Gronau, Guerry, Gunter, Gwinnett, Habersham, Hall, Hammond, Hancock, Hansford, Hanson, Hardeman/Harman, Harmon, Harper, Harrell, Harris, Harrison, Hart, Hatcher, Hatchett, Hawkins, Haygood, Healy, Helfenstein, Henderson, Hendricks, Hendry, Henry, Herron, Hickman, Hicks, Hiers, Hill, Hillhouse, Hines, Hird, Hodges, Hodges, Hogan, Holcombe, Holland, Hollis, Holt, Hood, Hooper, Horne, Horton, Houstoun, Howard, Howard, Huckaby, Hudson, Huffstetler, Hughes, Huguley, Humphrey, Hutchings, Hutchings, Ingram, Irby, Irwin, Jackson, James, Jarrard, Jay, Jemison, Jewett, Johnson, Johnson, Johnston, Jones, Jordan, Justice, Kelly, Kennedy, Kennon, Kibbee, Kieffer, Kilgo/Kilgore, Kimbrough, King, Knighton, Lamar, Lane, Lanham, Lanier, Lasseter, Lastinger, Lavender, Layfield, Lee, Lester, Lester, LeSueur, Letson, Lewis, Lightner, Loggins, Long, Love, Lowe, Loyd, Mabry, MacBean, Macintosh, Mackay, Madison, Mallard, Malone, Mann, Marbury, Marshall, Martin, Mason, Massey, Maxey, Maxwell, May, McCall, McClendon, McCord, McCormick, McCorquodale, McCoy, McDonald, McGinty, McKee, McKey, McLean, McMichael, McRight, Means, Melson, Mercer, Merriman, Merritt, Messer, Middlebrooks, Milledge, Miller, Mills, Minis, Mitchell, Money/Mooney, Montgomery, Moon, Moore, Morel, Morgan, Morris, Morton, Moss, Mullins, Murphy, Napier, Naylor, Nesmith, Norman, Norris, Odingsell, Oglethorpe, Oliver, Orr, Ortman, Osgood, Overton, Owen, Oxford, Padgett, Parker, Parr, Paterson, Paulk, Payne, Peacock, Pearson, Peek, Peeler, Pendley, Penrose, Perdue, Perkins, Perry, Perryman, Phifer, Phillips, Pike, Pitts, Polhill, Pope, Potts, Prather, Prince, Proctor, Pye, Quarterman, Radford, Rae, Rahn, Ramsey, Ray, Redding, Reeves, Reid, Remshart, Rich, Richardson, Roberts, Robinson, Rogers, Roquemore, Rountree, Rouvier, Rumble, Russell, Sappington, Satterwhite, Scarborough, Schaeffer, Schweighofer, Scott, Searcy, Seckinger, Shannon, Shattles, Shepherd, Sheppard, Shiflet, Shirey, Shockley, Sikes/Sykes, Simmons, Singleton, Sisk, Skinner, Slaughter, Slocumb, Smith, Smylie, Stallings, Stallsworth, Standley, Starr, Stewart, Stocks, Strickland, Stripling, Struthers, Stubbs, Sumner, Surrency, Tankersley, Taylor, Tekell/Teakell, Tennille, Thomas, Thornton, Todd, Tomlin, Treadway, Trotman, Upton, Ussery, Valentine, Vanderplank, Vanzant, Veazey, Vernon, Wade, Waldhauer, Warnell, Warren, Watkins, Watson, Way, Welch, Wells, Wereat, Wheelis/Wheeless/Wheelus, Whitefield, Wilcher, Wilder, Williams, Williamson, Wilson, Wimberly, Winn, Wright, Young, Zant, Zellner, Zettler, Ziegler, Zipperer, Zitterauer, Zorn, and Zouberbuhler.

    Volume II:
    Aaron, Adams, Albritton, Aldredge, Alexander, Alston, Anglin, Ansley, Ash/Ashe, Atkinson, Avera, Avery/Avary, Baldree, Baldwin, Bankston, Barfield, Barksdale, Barnett, Barnwell, Bartlett, Battle, Bell, Berry, Biddy, Bingham, Blackstock, Blackwell, Blair, Blandford, Bond, Bonnell, Bonner, Borders, Bostick, Bowen, Braselton, Brooks, Brunson, Bullock, Burgess, Burney, Butler, Butner, Buttrill, Caldwell, Campbell, Candler, Cannon, Carithers, Carlton, Carmichael, Carnes, Caruth, Castlin, Causey, Cauthern, Chalker, Chamlee, Childs, Cline, Cloud, Clower, Cochran, Coggins, Colbert, Collins, Comer, Conner, Cooper, Cordle, Crawford, Creel, Creighton, Crisson, Crosson, Crowley, Cunningham, Curls, Day, Deason, Denson, Dobbs, Dooly, Dover, Dowdy, Drawhorn/Draughton, Dyer, Easley, Eberhart, Evans, Eve, Fitzpatrick, Fleming, Flewellen, Fountain, Franklin, Freeman, Garrard, Gilmer, Gober, Golden, Goodson, Goss, Greer, Guess, Gunnells, Guthrie, Guyton, Hammock, Hargis, Hargrove, Harris, Harrison, Haygood, Haynes, Heard, Heath/Heeth, Henderson, Hicks, Hill, Hilley, Hodge, Holt, Hooper, Hopkins, House, Howard, Howell, Hubert, Huff, Human, Hume, Humphrey/Humphries, Hurt, Inman, Irby, Irwin, Jeffers, Jolley, Jones, Keaton, Kemp, Kendrick, Key, Kirk, Kiser, Kitchens, Knox, Kontz, Lamkin, Ledbetter, Lee, Lemon, Lester, Lewis, Liddell, Lindley, Little, Lockett, Lockhart, Long, Lord, Lovelace, Lowry, Lyon, Mangum, Matthews, Mayes, McCall, McCardle, McClure, McCurdy, McGuire, McRee, Meeks, Merritt, Miller, Millican, Moone, Moore, Morris, Moseley, Mullins, Mundy, Neal, Nephew, Newsom, Nicholson, Nunnalee, Ogletree, Oliver, Orr, Parker, Parris, Peace, Pentecost, Perdue, Perkins, Peters, Phinizy, Powell, Power, Preston, Pullen, Quillian, Ragsdale, Raiford, Redding, Redman, Renfroe, Rollestone, Rouse, Rucker, Rumph, Russell, Rutherford, Ryals, Satterfield, Sanford, Scroggins, Selman, Sewell, Shackleford, Shankle, Shannon, Sheffield, Sheftall, Sheppard, Simmons, Sims, Siniard, Smith, Stansel, Stapler, Steed, Steele, Stephens, Stephenson, Stevens, Stokes, Stovall, Strickland, Strong, Stroud, Stubbs, Summerhill, Swift, Swinney, Talley, Tatom, Taylor, Tibbitts, Tidwell, Todd, Tomlin, Townsend, Trammell, Trotman, Trout, Tucker, Tuggle, Turk, Turner, Upton, Varnedoe, Veal, Vickers, Wadsworth, Wakefield, Waldrep/Waldrop/Waldroup, Waldrop, Walker, Wall, Waller, Walraven, Walton, Watkins, Watts, Wellbourne, Whatley, Wheeless, Whelchel, Whisenhunt, White, Whitehead, Whitehurst, Wigley, Wilburn, Wilkins, Wills, Wilson, Wimberly, Wimpy, Wisener, Wommack, Woolfolk, Wootten, Worley, Wortham, Wyche, Wylie, York, Zellers, and Zuber.

    Volume III:
    Ables, Adair, Austin, Baxter, Beckham, Bell, Bird, Bittick, Bivins, Bone, Bradley, Brent, Brooks, Brown, Bulloch, Calloway, Camp, Carlton, Carnes, Carter, Chambless/Chambliss, Cheatham, Clements, Cliatt, Cobbs, Coles, Collins, Conger, Cook, Craton/Crayton, Danielly, Davis, Dean, Delk, Dent, Dixon, Drew, Durham, Edmondson, Edwards, Elsberry, Ethridge, Evans, Fambrough, Finch, Foote, Forsyth, Franklin, Gamel/Gammell, Gann, Gideon, Greene, Gruber, Hagan/Hagin, Hamilton, Hargett/Hugett, Harris, Hill, Hitchcock, Hogan, Holland, Howard, Howell, Huckaby, Johns, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Kalcher, Keaten, Kilpatrick (Patrick), Lane, Lee, Leverett, Littleton, Matthews, McGarity, McGee, McKenney/McKinney, Mercer, Miles, Monfort/Montford/Munford, Moody, Moon, Noland, O’Neal, Parker, Parris, Perkins, Ponder, Power, Pye, Ragsdale, Roberts, Roguemore, Sailors, Salter, Sanders, Singleton, Skedsvold, Smith, Sorrells, Sparks, Spiers/Spears, Spinks, Starling, Stegall, Sullivan, Tapley, Tolbert, Wade, Waldron, Williams, Williamson, Wilson, Woodall, York, Young, and Youngblood.

     

    An Index to the New UDC CSA Ancestor Album

    DOC Book

    A few days ago, I received a few copies (now gone) of the United Daughters of the Confederacy CSA Ancestor Album, 2nd Edition. I got them from the publisher, Pelican Publishing Company, and they tell me that the book was printed in short run specifically for pre-orders of the book taken by the United Daughters of the Confederacy prior to their annual 2014 convention, where they distributed the volume. This book is a absolute delight! Patty immediately started searching for our Southern ancestors in the volume, and when she realized that this big hard-cover book was actually one book following another, she decided it needed an index produced for it. You can check out her surname index below. Note that the index is only to the Confederate Ancestor about whom the biography is written. All kinds of other family members, family history and genealogy is included, but for this index, she didn’t attempt to cover them all. There are 1526 surnames listed within the two books in the hard-cover volume (all listed below). The first volume in this book made up the First Edition – with the Second Edition having the second volume added. Volume 1 makes up the first 176 pages, with the additional biographies running from page 178 to 432.

    Born out of the Daughters of the Confederacy in Missouri and the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Confederate Soldiers Home in Tennessee, the United Daughters of the Confederacy® (UDC) aims to preserve the history of the South, to support veterans who served in the War between the States, and to strengthen the bonds of friendship between its members. Membership is open to women descendent from those who fought in the War between the States or those who served honorably for the cause.

    Since 1890, chapters have formed throughout the country, from Texas to Alabama and Ohio to North Carolina. From aiding Red Cross Efforts in World War II to offering assistance to veterans and their families, the UDC understands the importance of community and patriotism. In addition to the physical preservation of memorial sites and graves, the UDC maintains its historical, patriotic, benevolent, memorial, and educational objectives by speaking in schools, writing papers, publishing historical documents, and providing scholarships to exceptional young people.

    Adding new and updated information to the long-out-of-print volume, the national organization has compiled an exhaustive number of notable ancestral records. This collection of biographies and photos is an impressive memorial to Confederate veterans. Whether you are a Southern history enthusiast, a son or daughter of the Confederacy, or a genealogy buff, you will discover a wealth of information in this volume about the lineal heritage, personal lives, and military efforts of the men who served in the War between the States.

    About the Editors
    Jamesene E. “Jamie” Likins serves as president general of the United Daughters of the Confederacy®. She attended the University of Florida and lives in Palm Coast, Florida.

    With a background in the publishing and marketing industries, Lynda Moreau serves as general chairman of ways and means for the UDC. A Southerner through and through, she is an active member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy® and several other lineage organizations. Moreau is the editor of The Confederate Cookbook: Family Favorites from the Sons of Confederate Veterans and Sweetly Southern: Delicious Desserts from the Sons of Confederate Veterans, both published by Pelican. She lives in Metairie, Louisiana, with her husband and two children.

    SURNAME — PAGE

    • AARON 178
    • ABBOTT 8,178
    • ABEL 8
    • ABELS 8,9
    • ABERCROMBIE 178
    • ABERNATHY 9
    • ABLES 9
    • ADAIR 178
    • ADAMS 9,178
    • ADAMSON 178,179
    • ADERHOLT 179
    • ADKINS 179
    • AGEE 179
    • AGERTON 179
    • AGNEW 10,180
    • AILLS 10
    • ALBEA 180
    • ALBRITTON 10
    • ALDRIDGE 10,180
    • ALEXANDER 180
    • ALLEN 10,181
    • ALLEY 181,182
    • ALLGOOD 182
    • ALMAND 182
    • Continue reading “An Index to the New UDC CSA Ancestor Album”

    Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Province of Pomerania I – RB Köslin – Now Shipping in Soft Cover

    Pomerania-I-350pw

    Over the last several days, FRPC has shipped the soft cover edition of Map Guide to German Parish Registers, Kingdom of Prussia – Province of Pomerania I – Regierungsbezirk Köslin to all our accounts that have standing orders. We are now releasing it to the public. The hardback library edition will be shipping soon, but we are are still awaiting delivery from the bindery.

    Published by Family Roots Publishing Company, Volume 49 of the German Map Guide series was published in November of 2014. This volume includes a total of 3,284 places – mostly towns, found in the Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Pomerania, Regierungsbezirk Köslin. The book also includes a master index to Volumes 49 through 50, which covers all of Pomerania. Written in English by Kevan Hansen, the volume was principally written to help family historians resolve where their family may have gone to church – and left vital records behind that may be seen today. This is the forty-ninth of a series covering all of Germany. The series is still in production. In many cases, even the smallest places are listed in this series – some with as little population as one person! These places are as of about 1870. If the place existed prior to that date, it will most likely be listed. If the place was named after that date, the chances drop.

    Each volumes of the series does the following:

    • Identifies the parish where an ancestor worshipped based on where they lived.
    • Gives the FHL microfilm number for the family’s parish records.
    • Identifies nearly every city, town, and place that included residents.
    • Visually identifies church parishes for Lutherans & Catholics in each district.
    • Identifies adjoining parishes in case an ancestor attended an alternate parish.
    • Aids in area searches, particularly across district or regional borders.
    • Provides visual identification of search areas in which to look for a family.
    • Helps in determining proximity of one area to another.
    • Aids in determining reasonable distances of travel from one area to another.
    • Identifies population centers in each parish.
    • Identifies archives, repositories, and other resources.
    • Aids in identification of the location of minority religions.
    • Click here to order Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Pomerania I, Regierungsbezirk Köslin, with full index of included towns, by Kevan Hansen, 230 pp; German Map Guide Volume 49; Soft Cover; ISBN-13: 978-1-62859-022-7; Item #: FR0097; $34.60

      Pomerania-Atlantic-Bridge-30pw
      Those doing research on Pommern ancestors might also be interested in Pomerania Atlantic Bridge to Germany. FRPC is making it available for 10% off through December 24, 2014 (just $24.26). It’s a great companion volume to set next to FPRC’s new Pomerania German Map Guides.

      The following places are found in this volume.

    • Aalbeck
    • Aalkaten
    • Aba
    • Abbau  Hölle
    • Abbau  Luggewiese
    • Abbau  Lupowske
    • Abbau  Retzin
    • Abbau  Schimmerwitz
    • Abbau  Schwerinsthal-Buchhorst
    • Abbau  Ziegelei
    • Abdeckerei
    • Abtshagen
    • Achteklitz
    • Ackerhof
    • Adlig  Bauerhufen
    • Adlig  Bornhagen
    • Adlig  Bütow
    • Adlig  Damerkow
    • Adlig  Draheim
    • Adlig  Freest
    • Adlig  Gross  Tuchen
    • Adlig  Heinrichsdorf
    • Adlig  Klein  Möllen
    • Adlig  Kublitz
    • Adlig  Mellin
    • Adlig  Rose
    • Adlig  Sassenburg
    • Adlig  Suckow
    • Adlig  Wusseken
    • Adlig  Zamborst
    • Adolfshof
    • Adolphsruh
    • Agathonshof
    • Albertinenbruch
    • Albertinenhof
    • Albertswalde
    • Alexanderhof
    • Alt  Banzin
    • Alt  Bärbaum
    • Alt  Belz
    • Alt  Bewersdorf
    • Alt  Bork
    • Alt  Buckow
    • Alt  Damerow
    • Alt  Draheim
    • Alte  Dampfmühle
    • Altemühle
    • Alte  Mühle
    • Altenhagen
    • Altenwalde
    • Alter  Bahnhof
    • Alter  Krug
    • Alter  Sandkrug
    • Alte  Schäferei
    • Alte  Schneidemühle
    • Altes  Forsthaus
    • Alte  Walkmühle
    • Alte  Ziegelei
    • Alt  Fliesshof
    • Alt  Friedrichswalde
    • Alt  Griebnitz
    • Alt  Gutzmerow
    • Althammer
    • Althof
    • Althütte
    • Alt  Hütten
    • Alt  Järshagen
    • Alt  Jassonka
    • Alt  Johannishof
    • Alt  Jugelow
    • Alt  Kleehof
    • Alt  Kolziglow
    • Alt  Koprieben
    • Alt  Körtnitz
    • Alt  Krakow
    • Alt  Kuddezow
    • Alt  Kugelwitz
    • Alt  Liepenfier
    • Alt  Lissow
    • Alt  Lükfitz
    • Alt  Marrin
    • Altmühl
    • Altmühl  bei  Grünewald
    • Altmühl  bei  Pielburg
    • Altmühle
    • Alt  Paalow
    • Alt  Priebkow
    • Alt  Quetzin
    • Alt  Ristow
    • Alt  Ritzerow
    • Alt Sanskow
    • Altschäferei
    • Alt  Schidlitz
    • Alt  Schlage
    • Alt  Schlawe
    • Alt  Springe
    • Altstadt
    • Alt  Strand
    • Alt  Stüdnitz
    • Alt  Tramm
    • Alt  Valm
    • Alt  Vargow
    • Alt  Warschow
    • Alt  Werder
    • Alt  Wilhelmshof
    • Alt  Wuhrow
    • Alt  Wustrow
    • Alt  Zowen
    • Alwinenhof
    • Amalienhof
    • Ameisenkrug
    • Amerika
    • Am  Jamunder  See
    • Am  Kantzenberg
    • Am  Moor
    • Am  Ostseestrande
    • Amt  Bauerhufen
    • Amt  Bornhagen
    • Amt  Klein  Möllen
    • Amt  Neuenhagen
    • Amt  Todenhagen
    • Ankerholz
    • Ankrow
    • Annaberg
    • Annaburg
    • Annenhof
    • Antonienettenhof
    • Antonienhof
    • Antonshof
    • Antonswalde
    • Arnhausen
    • Arnsberg
    • Arnshagen
    • Aschenkaten
    • Auenfelde
    • Auf  dem  Auger
    • Auf  den  Bergen
    • Augenweide
    • Augustenfelde
    • Augustenhof
    • Augustenthal
    • Augustfelde
    • Augusthof
    • Augusthöhe
    • Augustin
    • Augustthal
    • Augustwald
    • Augustwalde
    • Aulage
    • Ausbau  an  der Rummelsburger Chaussee
    • Ausbau  Brandmoor
    • Ausbau  Brückenkrug
    • Ausbau  Buschkowi
    • Ausbau  Gipp
    • Ausbau  Pinnow
    • Ausbau  Popiel
    • Aussicht
    • Babidoll
    • Babilonken
    • Babin
    • Babylon
    • Bachkaten
    • Bäck
    • Badelhörne
    • Bahlberg
    • Bahnhof  Alt  Körnitz
    • Bahnhof  Arnshagen
    • Bahnhof  Balster  Süd
    • Continue reading “Map Guide to German Parish Registers – Province of Pomerania I – RB Köslin – Now Shipping in Soft Cover”

    Polish Roots is Now in a New Second Edition! 15% Off Sale Extended Through October 20

    Polish-Roots-2nd-Edition-300pw

    Rosemary Chorzempa’s Polish Roots has been the leading guidebook for Polish genealogical research for over 20 years. During that time, there have been numerous advances in Polish genealogy research. As all of my reader’s know, the Internet has made the task of locating Polish ancestors much easier, as more information and images are made available online. In addition, there has been a marked rise in interest in genealogy in Poland itself, resulting in many more Polish genealogical societies and the amount of helpful information disseminated by them. The second edition of Polish Roots addresses these exciting developments, with a new Introduction, four brand-new chapters, one completely rewritten chapter, several new maps and charts, and numerous updates scattered throughout the original text.

    Family Roots Publishing is now making this new book available for 15% off as an Exceptional Bargain Offer through midnight PDT Monday, October 20, 2014. Click here to Purchase.

    Polish genealogy is almost completely defined by geography and history. Situated in the center of Europe, Poland has been foster mother to people of many different nationalities, especially Russians, Austrians, Germans, Ukrainians, and Lithuanians—people belonging to the nation states that exercised dominion over it. It has also been host over the centuries to Balkan and Carpathian Slavs, Jews, Prussians, Balts, Gypsies, and even Scots, so the Polish genealogical landscape is actually a mosaic. To explore it properly is to cross the overlapping boundaries of language, religion, geography, and history. The second edition of this pioneering work on Polish family history provides the American researcher with the most up-to-date tools to succeed in genealogical research in each of these areas.

    The following is from the Table of Contents:

    Acknowledgements
    Introduction

    Chapter One: Valuable Records
    The Trunk in the Attic
    Ciocia Kasia
    Church Records
    Cemetery and Gravestone Records
    Funeral Home Records
    Obituaries
    Church Anniversary Books
    Fraternal Societies
    Vital Records
    U.S. Federal Census Records
    U.S. Naturalization Records
    Alien Registration Records
    World War I Draft Registration Records
    World War I Polish-American Military Records
    Other Military Records
    City Directories
    Other Civil Records
    Ships’ Passenger Lists’
    Your Ancestor’s Ship
    U.S. Passport Office
    Russian Consular Records
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Two: Polish Genealogical Research in America
    Research Libraries With Polish Materials in the U.S. and Canada
    Family History Library and Family History Centers
    Locality Index
    International Genealogical Index
    Computers
    Ancestral File
    Patron Microfilming Program
    Polish Museum of American Archives and Library
    Allen County Public Library
    National Archives and Records Administration
    Regional Archives of the National Archives
    University of Illinois Library
    National Archives of Canada
    University of Pittsburgh Slavic Department
    Polonica Americana Research Center
    Immigration History Research Center
    University of Wisconsin Library and Archives

    Sources For Regional Research
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Connecticut and the Connecticut River Valley
    Detroit, Michigan
    Wisconsin
    New England and the Mid-Atlantic States
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    South Bend, Indiana
    Toledo, Ohio
    Cleveland, Ohio

    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Three: Polish Genealogical Societies of America
    Polish Genealogical Society of America
    Polish Genealogical Society of California
    Polish Genealogical Society of Connecticut and the Northeast, Inc.
    Polish Genealogical Society of Greater Cleveland
    Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts
    Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan
    Polish Genealogical Society of Minnesota
    Polish Genealogical Society of New York State
    Polish Genealogical Society of Texas
    Toledo Polish Genealogical Society
    East European Genealogical Society
    JewishGen
    Lithuanian Global Genealogical Society
    Balzekas Museum of Lithuanian Culture

    PART TWO: RESEARCH IN POLAND
    Life in Poland
    History of Poland
    Social Classes in Poland
    Magnates (Magnacy)
    Nobility (Szachtha)
    Peasants (Chlopy)
    Burghers
    Intelligentsia
    Loose People
    Polish Heraldry
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Five: Other Ethic Groups in Poland
    Germans
    Jews
    Caraïtes
    Scots
    Dutch
    Irish
    Armenians
    Russians
    Bohemians
    Tatars
    Tziganes
    English
    Italians
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Six: Geographic and Ethnic Areas of Poland
    Greater Poland
    Little Poland
    Mazuria
    Mazovia
    Kurpie
    Warmia
    Kuyavia
    Silesia
    Pomerania
    Kashubia
    Western Pomerania
    Podhale
    Lusatia
    Podlasie
    Prussia
    Livonia
    Courland
    Lithuania
    Smole´nsk
    Byelorussia
    Polesie
    Ruthania and Ukraine
    Zaporozhye
    Halich Ruthenia
    Volhynia
    Podolia
    Moldavia
    Bukovina
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Seven: Maps and Gazetteers
    Locating Your Ancestor’s Village or Town
    Village Names
    Land Measurements
    Map Symbols
    Map Coordinates
    Boundaries
    Maps of Poland
    Additional Reading and Maps
    Gazetteers (Geographical Dictionaries)

    Chapter Eight: Research Using Records from Poland
    The Big Three
    Research Services in Poland
    Strategy for Researching Polish Records
    Missing Records
    Resources at the LDS Family History Library
    Additional Reading

    Chapter Nine: Church Records
    Religions in Poland
    Roman Catholic Church
    Roman Catholic Church Registers
    Birth/Baptismal Registers
    Marriage Registers
    Death/Funeral Registers
    Availability of Catholic Church Records
    Roman Catholic Church Archives
    Additional Reading

    Greek Catholic Church & Availability of Records
    Russian Orthodox Church & Availability of Records
    Evangelical (Lutheran) Church & Availability of Records
    Mennonite Church & Availability of Records
    Reformed (Protestant) Church & Availability of Records
    The Hebrew Religion & Availability of Jewish Records
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Ten:Civil Records
    Russian Occupied Territory & Availability of Russian Civil Records
    Prussian/German-occupied Territory & Availability of Prussian/German Civil Records
    Austrian Occupied Territory & Availability of Austrian Civil Records

    Archives in Poland
    National Archives
    State Provincial Archives/Regional Archives
    Local Record Offices

    Records of Departure
    Polish Military Records
    Polish Military Records for Russian-occupied Territory
    Polish Military Records for Prussian-occupied Territory
    Polish Military Records for Austrian-occupied Territory
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Eleven: Surnames
    Polish Surnames
    Place Names
    Patronymics and Matronymics
    Occupational Names
    Physical Appearance, Personality, and Nicknames
    More About Polish Surnames
    Lithuanian Surnames
    Livonian Surnames
    Estonian Surnames
    Byelorussian Surnames
    Russian Surnames
    Ukrainian (Ruthenian) Surnames
    Slovak and Carpatho-Ukrainian Surnames
    Serbian and Croatian Surnames
    Czech Surnames
    Armenian Surnames
    Western Slavonic Surnames
    Germanic Surnames
    Dutch Surnames
    Jewish Surnames
    Surname Research in Poland
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Twelve: Christian or First Names
    Feast Days of the Saints
    Polish Customs in Names Children
    Common Polish Names
    Ukrainian Customs in Naming Children
    Ukrainian Calendar Names
    German Customs in Naming Children
    Jewish Customs in Naming Children
    Sources and Additional Reading

    Chapter Thirteen: Breaking the Language Barrier
    A Timetable
    The Polish Language
    Language and Regional Differences
    The Polish Alphabet
    Pronunciation of Common Letter Combinations
    Cases in the Polish Language
    Nominal Surnames
    Adjectival Surnames
    Numbers and Dates
    Polish Terms Found in Vital Records

    The Latin Language
    Proper Names
    Numbers and Months
    Latin Terms Found in Vital Records

    The German Language
    Proper Names
    German Terms Found in Vital Records

    The Russian Language
    Russian Alphabet
    Genealogical Research in Russia
    Additional Reading

    Chapter Fourteen: Writing Letters to Poland
    Polish Genealogical Letter-Writing Guide

    Chapter Fifteen: Additional Reading
    Additional Reading – Polish Genealogical Research
    Additional Reading – Maps, Gazetteers, and Surnames
    Additional Reading – Languages

    PART THREE: ONLINE POLISH ROOTS

    Chapter Sixteen: Online Polish Genealogical Research
    FamilySearch Online and Family History Centers

    Subscription Websites
    Ancestry.com
    Fold3.com
    World Vital Records

    Government Records
    National Archives
    Civil Records
    U.S. Census Records
    U.S. Naturalization Records

    Ships’ Passenger Lists
    Passengers From German Areas
    Passengers From Russian Areas
    Emigration Museum in Poland

    Military Records
    U.S. Military Draft Registration Cards
    World War I Polish-American Military Records
    Polish-Americans in the U.S. Civil War

    Other Records
    Polish Roman Catholic Union of America
    Cemetery and Gravestone Records
    Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps
    Plat Maps
    PolandGenWeb
    Polish Food and Culture
    Family Health History

    Research Libraries with Polish Materials in America
    Polish Museum of America Library and Archives
    The Genealogy Center / Allen County Public Library
    Polonica Americana Research Institute

    Regional Research
    Detroit, Michigan
    Toledo, Ohio
    Silesian Texans
    Historical Societies

    Chapter Seventeen: Online Research Using Records from Poland
    General Websites
    Internet Polish Genealogical Source
    Discovering Roots in Poland
    Poznan Project

    Genealogical Societies in Poland
    BASIA
    Geneteka
    PTG Pomordkie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne

    Government Archives
    Naczelnej Dyrekeji Archiwow Panstwowych
    Office of Chief Archivist of Lithuania

    Diocesan and Parish Records
    LUBGENS
    Luteranie
    Parafie Ziemi Dobrzynskiej
    Przodkowie
    Radom Diocese Civil Records

    Maps and Gazetteers
    Wikimedia Atlas of Poland
    Wikipedia
    Archiwum Map Wojskowego Instytutu Georapficznego
    Mapa Szukaca
    Kartenmeister
    Slownik
    JewsihGen Gazetteer
    Opaka
    Moikrewni

    Visiting Poland – Personal Tours and Virtual Tours

    Breaking the Language Barrier
    Rudy’s List of Archaic Medical Terms
    Navigating Polish Websites

    Chapter Eighteen: Polish Genealogy Research in the Digital Age
    Genealogy Software
    How to Use a Digital Camera to Photograph Microfilm
    Scanner Apps

    There is also a List of Illustrations (many church registers and such), as well as a List of Maps found in the original Table of Contents for the Book. I have not attempted to include this in the above list from the Table of Contents.

    An enthusiastic genealogist for close to 50 years, Rosemary Chorzempa has traced some branches of her Polish family back to the early 1700s. She was awarded the Polish Genealogical Society of America’s Wigilia Medal in 1999 for her contributions to the Polish Genealogical Society of America and Polish genealogy. In 2012 she was made an honorary lifetime member of the Toledo Polish Genealogical Society. Her books My Family Tree Workbook and Design Your Own Coat-of-Arms have been continuously in print since 1982 and 1987.

    Polish Roots, Second Edition; by Rosemary A. Chorzempa; Published 2014; 298 pp; Soft Cover; 6×9; ISBN: 9780806320045; Item # GPC981; Available at the Family Roots Publishing website at 15% off, making it only $21.21, now through midnight PDT Monday, October 20.