Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans – only 1 Penny – Just pay $8 P&H – USA Sales – Nov 22 & 23, 2016 Only

Family Roots Publishing has found that we have several cases of these books in stock, and want to blow them out. We’re making them just 1 cent Tuesday and Wednesday, November 29 and 30, 2016. Buyers need just pay the $8 p&h.

Following is a review:

In his History of New Hampshire, historian Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole attempts to answer the question, “What makes a man prominent?” In his words:

“Whoever has helped notably in the great march of human progress deserves credit therefor in the popular estimation. Abilities, character and achievement make men prominent. Learning and money may be helpful, but they are not enough; without character they may the sooner sink one into oblivion.”

This seems to me as good as any definition. By whatever scale of prominence men have chosen to use, historians has provided us with tales, biographies, and accounts of men deemed important in their own right. Histories are written of events from those that changed the world to the deeds of men known only in their own communities. Either way, research can help uncover these men and their deeds. Family historians should take note that many of these histories contain vital genealogical data about not only individuals of prominence, but also their families, their acquaintances, and those with whom they interact, fixing these individual in time and place.

Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans, by William S. Speer, is a prime example of a selective history of men in Tennessee. By whatever right the Honorable William Speer though these men important, he has immortalized their names through the written word. First published in 1888, Speer selected 259 men from 19th century Tennessee for his historical record. “It is this kind of unique first-hand biographical information that makes Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans unequaled in the canon of Tennessee genealogical literature. Not only did compiler William S. Speer have the unparalleled opportunity to interview a number of the featured Tennesseans himself, he also was able to garner–and include in this book–thousands and thousands of names of their family members, friends, and colleagues.” Republished in 2008, this type of book is a treasure to both those interested in Tennessean history as well as to genealogists.

As would be hoped, these sketches include many details about the lives of these men and their families. Speer offers, often extraordinary, insight into the personal, professional, and sometimes even physical characteristics that made each of these men a success. A complete list of names, or even surnames, would be too lengthy to list here. However, below is a list of surnames of those men highlighted in this book.

 

Pick up a copy of Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans from Family Roots Publishing; Regular Price: $45. Just 1 penny November 22 and 23 – Just pay the $8 P&H.

 

Surnames featured in the book:

  • Anderson
  • Arrington
  • Atkins
  • Atlee
  • Baptist
  • Barrett
  • Bartlett
  • Bate
  • Baxter
  • Bearden
  • Bibb
  • Black
  • Blankenship
  • Boynton
  • Bradford
  • Briggs
  • Brockway
  • Brown
  • Buchanan
  • Buist
  • Burney
  • Burns
  • Burrus
  • Butler
  • Callender
  • Campbell
  • Chester
  • Childress
  • Clapp
  • Clift
  • Coldwell
  • Cole
  • Conner
  • Cooper
  • Cowan
  • Craft
  • Cullom
  • Dake
  • Dashiell
  • Deaderick
  • DeWitt
  • Dibrell
  • Dickens
  • Dodd
  • East
  • Elder
  • Elliott
  • Erskine
  • Estes
  • Evans
  • Eve
  • Ewing
  • Fain
  • Fentress
  • Ferriss
  • Fleming
  • Folsom
  • Foote
  • Foster
  • Frayser
  • Freeman
  • Frierson
  • Frizzell
  • Fulkerson
  • Gantt
  • Gaines
  • Gallaway
  • Gardenhire
  • Gaut
  • Gibson
  • Glass
  • Godwin
  • Golliday
  • Goodbar
  • Grant
  • Graves
  • Green
  • Greer
  • Hadden
  • Hall
  • Haller
  • Harding
  • Hardwick
  • Harrell
  • Harris
  • Harrison
  • Haynes
  • Heiskell
  • Henderson
  • Henning
  • Hill
  • Holman
  • Holmes
  • Houk
  • House
  • Howell
  • Hughes
  • Humes
  • Ingersoll
  • Jackson
  • Jones
  • Jordan
  • Keating
  • Kennedy
  • Key
  • Killebrew
  • King
  • Kyle
  • Larkin
  • Latta
  • Lea
  • Ledgerwood
  • Lidsley
  • Lipscomb
  • Livingston
  • Looney
  • Long
  • McAdoo
  • McBride
  • McConnell
  • McDowell
  • McFarland
  • McFerrin
  • McGuire
  • McMurray
  • McNeal
  • McTyeire
  • McWhirter
  • Maddin
  • Marchbanks
  • Marks
  • Martin
  • Mathes
  • Maruy
  • Meek
  • Menees
  • Mitchell
  • Morgan
  • Moore
  • Mumford
  • Muse
  • Neal
  • Neely
  • Neilson
  • Nelson
  • Netherland
  • Nichol
  • Nichols
  • Nicholson
  • Overton
  • Paine
  • Palmer
  • Patterson
  • Pettibone
  • Phillips
  • Pitman
  • Plunket
  • Porter
  • Quarles
  • Rambaut
  • Randolph
  • Reid
  • Richardson
  • Roberts
  • Robison
  • Rodgers
  • Rose
  • Safford
  • Sanford
  • Saunders
  • Scobey
  • Sears
  • Senter
  • Shearer
  • Sheppard
  • Shields
  • Simonton
  • Smith
  • Smitheal
  • Smithson
  • Staley
  • Stark
  • Stephens
  • Stewart
  • Stockell
  • Stokes
  • Tarver
  • Taylor
  • Temple
  • Thompson
  • Thomas
  • Thornburgh
  • Thornton
  • Thurman
  • Tinnon
  • Trewhitt
  • Trousdale
  • Turley
  • Turney
  • Ussery
  • Vance
  • Van Deman
  • Van Dyke
  • Vertrees
  • Wade
  • Ward
  • Warder
  • Watson
  • White
  • Whitthorne
  • Wilder
  • Williamson
  • Wilson
  • Wood
  • Woods
  • Wright
  • Young

Over 40,000 Digital #Genealogy Books Searchable & Downloadable for Free at GenGophers.com

Most genealogists know that FamilySearch has lots of genealogy/local history books online and downloadable through their website. FamilySearch offers a search of the books, allowing the user to search for a name and locate a book or books with that name in it. However, the search is limited, in that you can’t go directly to any particular page with your ancestor’s name on it. Other websites have similar issues. Now my good friend, Dallan Quass, has a new site where genealogy books can be searched for a particular name and place, with the search results coming back as a snippet, with direct access to the book upon clicking on the snippet link.

This is really cool. Better yet – it’s entirely FREE. To fund the site, Dallan has come across a survey company whose surveys pop up on the screen. The user answers a few easy questions by clicking, taking just seconds to complete. They then have access to the data for a day. This is one of the most innovative methods of funding that I’ve seen. Dallan only gets pennies when the surveys are completed, but pennies can easily add up to dollars, making this wonderful resource available to everyone – not just folks that can afford another subscription.

Note that 40,000 genealogy-relevant books are currently being searched – with thousands more to come. The books being searched are currently from FamilySearch, Allen County Public Library, Mid-Continent Public Library and several others. To see what I might find, I did a search for Henry Canfield of Michigan. That’s my great-grandfather, whom I’ve researched extensively. I got seven hits – not all for Henry, but for names like H. Canfield, etc. The second hit was from a book titled “Official Army register of the volunteer force of the United States Army for the years 1861, ’62, ’63, ’64, ’65, vol. 5.” I’ve never seen this book before now. According to the site, the original is located at Mid-Continent Public Library. And this book has information about my great-grandfather in it! Note that the advanced search technology allows searches for people, as well as the names, dates, places, and relatives associated with them, not just words.

GenealogyGophers-HenryCanfieldHit-585pw

Options include downloading a PDF of the book, or reading the page in full-screen mode.

The website just launched and is in beta. Over the coming months Dallan will be continue to improve the search algorithms and add another 60,000 genealogy-relevant books.

Following is the Genealogy Gophers Press Release:

A new website enables genealogists for the first time to have free, easy, and precise searching of family history books

SALT LAKE CITY – Researching family histories online is an activity that has begun to come of age. Thousands of family history books and magazines are available to be searched directly from multiple websites. But searching through these websites and combing through the jumble of information they return can be a frustrating, costly, and fruitless process. The newly launched family history website, GenGophers.com, solves these problems by providing precise and free access to the industry’s most effective online search tools and a growing library of more than 40,000 downloadable family and personal histories, local histories, and genealogy newsletters.

Many searchable book websites, like Google Books and archive.org, make it difficult to restrict their searches to genealogy-related books. The result is that online searches for names, dates, and places return lists of thousands of potential books completely unrelated to genealogy.

GenGophers.com is the only website that – completely for free – returns genealogy book results only. Results include the publication name and a snippet from the page showing the highlighted search terms:

GenealogyGophers-illustration-250pw

The pages and publications returned in a search are then downloadable for free by users. “In addition to focusing our searches only on genealogy books, our search engine also employs a completely different approach than those used by other book-searching websites”, said Dallan Quass, founder of GenGophers.com. “While other websites can only search for specific words contained in books, our engine uses artificial intelligence to first identify and index all people mentioned in a publication and then allows specific searches for names, dates, and places associated with them. This approach significantly increases the chance of discovering extended family connections, stories about the lives of ancestors, and bringing family histories to life.”

GenGophers.com is financially supported by ads and Google Consumer Surveys, which asks users a few market research questions once per day to view the free books.

Genealogy Gophers has the most easily searched and retrieved family history books on the Web. Search tools based on artificial intelligence algorithms significantly increase the chances of finding relevant search term matches compared to typical word search engines. Relevant pages and books can be downloaded for free from the GenGophers.com website.

Check out Genealogy Gophers. I was impressed (especially since I found a book I hadn’t seen before!), and plan to use the site a lot.

NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

ngs06Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later issued as special publications. The latest version of the series contains revised guides, plus additional states not included in the previous releases. NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri was written by Pamela Boyer Porter and Ann Carter Fleming.

“Missouri was the land of the Osage and their rival tribes. The jumping-off place for Lewis and Clark’s expedition of discovery. The early home to French trappers, mountain men, and Spanish garrisons and churches. In the wake of the American Revolution, it was the siren call for frontiersmen and land-hungry farmers out of British America. By teh mid-1800s, it was the gateway to the West for thousands of migrants headed for the gold mines of California, for the unspoiled new lands of Oregon, and for the trade riches offered by the Santa Fe Trail. Hundreds of thousands passed through or stayed a while, leaving traces for descendants who seek their records. This guide is intended to familiarize researchers with the state’s original and published resources, as well as the repositories that preserve this material.”

In the following words of the authors, the real purpose of this book is uncovered:

“People of every hue, creed, occupation, and origin left their tracks on Missouri’s hills, plains, and prairies. Their footprints are found throughout the state’s archives, libraries, and government offices. To study Missouri families, however, one must know the history of the state; and one must understand its records and their access”

This guide, as are all the state series guides, provides the researcher with the understanding of available resources and how to access these repositories.

Both authors are native Missourians with strong backgrounds in research, writing, and lecturing. Both are certified Genealogists and Certified Genealogical Lecturers. Pam has served on the boards of both the Federation of Genealogical Societies and the Missouri State Genealogical Association. Ann is a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and is the course coordinator at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, and has served on many other boards in the past.

 

Table of Contents

History and Settlement

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Missouri State Archives
  • State Historical Society of Missouri
  • Western Historical Manuscript Collection
  • National Archives and Records Administration
    • National Archives–Central Plains Region
    • National Civilian Personnel Record Center
    • National Military Personnel Record Center
  • Missouri Historical Society
  • Other Libraries
  • Other Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Censuses
    • Federal Censuses
    • State Censuses
    • Miscellaneous Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • County-Level Courts
    • District and State-Level Courts
    • Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Records
    • African Americans
    • Native Americans
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Grants
    • U.S. Land Distribution
    • State-Level Land Records
    • County-Level Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Militia and National Guard Service
    • War of 1812
    • Indian War
    • Mormon War
    • Iowa or Honey War
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Civil War (Postwar Activities)
    • Spanish-American War
    • World War I
    • Other Military Actions
    • Military Records: Benefits
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
    • Miscellaneous “Vital Records”
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Missouri
  • Conclusion

 

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri are available from Family Roots Publishing.

A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia – on sale for 50% Off Thru Friday

Family Roots Publishing just acquired a quantity of the beautiful book, A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. The book 894 page hard-cover is technically out-of-print, but the truth is that FRPC has the last of them. FRPC is offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is good until midnight EST (Not MST) Friday, Nov. 22, 2013.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.

Following is a book review of this terrific volume.

gpc6175Some 10,000 names is reason enough for any genealogist to find some interest in A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia, by John W. Wayland. First published in 1927, this book reaches back to the earliest exploration of the area in 1670, to the first permanent settlers around 1728, through the establishment of the county in 1772, and up to the year 1926.

Page upon page the history of the Shenandoah Valley and County is revealed, along with the people who lived its history. From prominent figures to the names of children and families, this book provided genealogical data by the droves. Within these pages you will find lists of names, property owner, short biographies, head of families and civic leaders.

This history also provides great details on landmarks and buildings, both those gone forever and imaginably plenty that are still standing. Take the Solomon’s Church, located “about four miles southwest of Pine Church, near Forestville…This is also an old establishment and was for many years held in common by the Reformed and the Lutherans.” Such seemingly small details are just what genealogists often need to help track down names and missing records, cemeteries, and other vital pieces of the genealogy puzzle.

The book has been reprinted a few times, but is provided as a copy of the original. It is impossible to describe the wealth of detail found in nearly 800 pages of history, but I can say great value comes from the over 100  page index listing over 10,000 entries, most of which are names, listed by surname.

 

Outline of Contents

List of Maps and Illustrations
Table of Dates (1,000 Items of Interest Arranged in Chronological Order)

  1. By Way of Introduction
  2. The Fairfax Line
  3. Explorations and Early Settlements
  4. Indians and Indian Raids
  5. Angels Unawares
  6. A County With Two Names
  7. Among the Early Records
  8. Towns and Villages of Shenandoah County
  9. The Forest and the Fort
  10. Famous Landmarks
  11. The Outbreak of the Revolution
  12. The Conquest of the Northwest
  13. Heads of Families in 1785
  14. Iron-Making and Iron-Masters
  15. The War of 1812
  16. The Long Gray Trail
  17. First Citizens of 1833
  18. The Forties and the Fifties
  19. The Early Years of the Civil War
  20. The Later Years of the Civil War
  21. Since 1865
  22. The Memorable Years of 1870 and 1876
  23. Echoes of The World War
  24. Old Churches and New
  25. Old Shenandoah Homesteads
  26. Schools and Schoolmasters
  27. Literary Activities and Associations
  28. Some Notable Incidents
  29. Distinguished Sons and Daughters
  30. A Pageant of the Golden West
  31. Pack-Saddles and Hame-Bells
  32. Fairy Palaces
  33. Genealogical Scrap-Bag
  34. Appendix
  35. Historical bits and Pieces
  36. Shenandoah County Since 1927
  37. Table of Dates (Continued)
  38. Index

A copy of A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia await the curious and avid historian and genealogist alike. FRPC is offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off of the orginal MSRP. The offer is good until midnight EST (Not MST) Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. Following is a book review of this terrific volume.

Purchase this beautiful volume at the FRPC website.

NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

ngs06“Missouri was the land of the Osage and their rival tribes. The jumping-off place for Lewis and Clark’s expedition of discovery. The early home to French trappers, mountain men, and Spanish garrisons and churches. In the wake of the American Revolution, it was the siren call for frontiersmen and land-hungry farmers out of British America. By teh mid-1800s, it was the gateway to the West for thousands of migrants headed for the gold mines of California, for the unspoiled new lands of Oregon, and for the trade riches offered by the Santa Fe Trail. Hundreds of thousands passed through or stayed a while, leaving traces for descendants who seek their records. This guide is intended to familiarize researchers with the state’s original and published resources, as well as the repositories that preserve this material.”

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later issued as special publications. The latest version of the series contains revised guides, plus additional states not included in the previous releases. NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri was written by Pamela Boyer Porter and Ann Carter Fleming.

In the following words of the authors, the real purpose of this book is uncovered:

“People of every hue, creed, occupation, and origin left their tracks on Missouri’s hills, plains, and prairies. Their footprints are found throughout the state’s archives, libraries, and government offices. To study Missouri families, however, one must know the history of the state; and one must understand its records and their access”

This guide, as are all the state series guides, provides the researcher with the understanding of available resources and how to access these repositories.

Both authors are native Missourians with strong backgrounds in research, writing, and lecturing. Both are certified Genealogists and Certified Genealogical Lecturers. Pam has served on the boards of both the Federation of Genealogical Societies and the Missouri State Genealogical Association. Ann is a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and is the course coordinator at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, and has served on many other boards in the past.

 

Table of Contents

History and Settlement

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Missouri State Archives
  • State Historical Society of Missouri
  • Western Historical Manuscript Collection
  • National Archives and Records Administration
    • National Archives–Central Plains Region
    • National Civilian Personnel Record Center
    • National Military Personnel Record Center
  • Missouri Historical Society
  • Other Libraries
  • Other Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Censuses
    • Federal Censuses
    • State Censuses
    • Miscellaneous Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • County-Level Courts
    • District and State-Level Courts
    • Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Records
    • African Americans
    • Native Americans
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Grants
    • U.S. Land Distribution
    • State-Level Land Records
    • County-Level Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Militia and National Guard Service
    • War of 1812
    • Indian War
    • Mormon War
    • Iowa or Honey War
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Civil War (Postwar Activities)
    • Spanish-American War
    • World War I
    • Other Military Actions
    • Military Records: Benefits
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
    • Miscellaneous “Vital Records”
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Missouri
  • Conclusion

 

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.79.

NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

ngs06“Missouri was the land of the Osage and their rival tribes. The jumping-off place for Lewis and Clark’s expedition of discovery. The early home to French trappers, mountain men, and Spanish garrisons and churches. In the wake of the American Revolution, it was the siren call for frontiersmen and land-hungry farmers out of British America. By teh mid-1800s, it was the gateway to the West for thousands of migrants headed for the gold mines of California, for the unspoiled new lands of Oregon, and for the trade riches offered by the Santa Fe Trail. Hundreds of thousands passed through or stayed a while, leaving traces for descendants who seek their records. This guide is intended to familiarize researchers with the state’s original and published resources, as well as the repositories that preserve this material.”

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later issued as special publications. The latest version of the series contains revised guides, plus additional states not included in the previous releases. NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri was written by Pamela Boyer Porter and Ann Carter Fleming.

In the following words of the authors, the real purpose of this book is uncovered:

“People of every hue, creed, occupation, and origin left their tracks on Missouri’s hills, plains, and prairies. Their footprints are found throughout the state’s archives, libraries, and government offices. To study Missouri families, however, one must know the history of the state; and one must understand its records and their access”

This guide, as are all the state series guides, provides the researcher with the understanding of available resources and how to access these repositories.

Both authors are native Missourians with strong backgrounds in research, writing, and lecturing. Both are certified Genealogists and Certified Genealogical Lecturers. Pam has served on the boards of both the Federation of Genealogical Societies and the Missouri State Genealogical Association. Ann is a trustee of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and is the course coordinator at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, and has served on many other boards in the past.

 

Table of Contents

History and Settlement

Archives, Libraries, and Societies

  • Missouri State Archives
  • State Historical Society of Missouri
  • Western Historical Manuscript Collection
  • National Archives and Records Administration
    • National Archives–Central Plains Region
    • National Civilian Personnel Record Center
    • National Military Personnel Record Center
  • Missouri Historical Society
  • Other Libraries
  • Other Societies

Major Resources

  • Aids to Research
  • Atlases, Gazetteers, and Maps
  • Biographical Guides
  • Cemetery Records
  • Censuses and Census Substitutes
    • Colonial Censuses
    • Federal Censuses
    • State Censuses
    • Miscellaneous Censuses
  • City and County Directories
  • City-Level Research
  • Court Records
    • County-Level Courts
    • District and State-Level Courts
    • Federal Courts
  • Ethnic Records
    • African Americans
    • Native Americans
  • Land Records
    • Colonial Grants
    • U.S. Land Distribution
    • State-Level Land Records
    • County-Level Land Records
  • Military Records
    • Militia and National Guard Service
    • War of 1812
    • Indian War
    • Mormon War
    • Iowa or Honey War
    • Mexican War
    • Civil War
    • Civil War (Postwar Activities)
    • Spanish-American War
    • World War I
    • Other Military Actions
    • Military Records: Benefits
  • Naturalization Records
  • Newspapers
  • Religious Records
  • State Records
  • Tax Records
  • Vital Records
    • Adoption Records
    • Birth and Death Records
    • Marriage and Divorce Records
    • Miscellaneous “Vital Records”
  • Voter Registration
  • Women of Missouri
  • Conclusion

 

These guides are an excellent resource for state by state research. Available guides, including NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri are available from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $15.79.

Discovering the History of Your House…and Your Neighborhood

Home may be where your heart is at, but what do you really know about the house you live in? Old or new, Betsy J. Green believes your house and property have a unique history. Her book, Discovering the History of Your House…and Your Neighborhood, was written to help uncover your home’s history and “show you how easy it is to create a cherished legacy.” Listed here are just some of the topics covered in this book:

  • Beginning your search
  • Finding and contacting former owners of your house
  • Discovering the architect who designed your house
  • Finding the original plans for your house
  • Re-creating long-lost woodwork, porches, even historic landscaping
  • Locating building permits for your house
  • Finding the original price of your house
  • Researching subdivisions and neighborhoods
  • Finding deeds for your house and land
  • Getting information from a deed
  • Finding old photos of your house and neighborhood
  • Using old maps to learn about your neighborhood
  • Discovering your house on a postcard
  • Using vintage architectural magazines
  • Writing up your house history
  • Includes a state-by-state guide to resources

By looking at the list above and the contents listed below I would estimate that Betsy has left nothing out, except maybe the kitchen sink. Then again, the sink probably counts as one of the “visual clues” covered in the second chapter. About the only thing this book does not explicitly state is that all the great information found here won’t just lead you to the history of your own home, but can also be use to uncover the history of any home any one of your ancestors every lived in. This may even include homes no longer standing.

 

Get Discovering the History of Your House…and Your Neighborhood from Family Roots Publishing; Price: $14.65

 

Contents

Where to Start?

  • Introduction
  • House Research in Your Area
  • Getting Started
  • Even Your Subdivision Has a History
    • Story: How I Got Started
  • Supply List for Beginners
    • Story: Only Believe Half of What You Hear
  • “You’re Not Using a Pen, Are You?”
    • Story: “Follow That House History Writer”
  • Surf the Internet
  • Go to Class
    • Story: House Histories Sometimes Mirror Local History
  • Follow the Paper Trail and the People Trail
    • Story: Reach Out and Touch Someone
  • Take a Genealogist to Lunch
    • Story: Don’t Believe Everything You Hear About Your House
  • Historical Information is Here and There

Looking at Visual Clues

  • “What Style is My House?”
    • Story: Houses Are Not Always What They Seem
  • Where Are the Plans for My House?
  • Look for Old House Plan Books
  • Finding Hidden Treasures in Photo Files
  • Your House could Be on a Postcard
  • Finding Your House on Fire
  • Insurance Maps
    • Story: Sanborn Maps and Spies
  • Bird’s-Eye Views Are Not Just for the Birds
  • Never Pass Up and Old Map
    • Story: Finding the Truth on Old Maps
  • Don’t Overlook Vintage Aerial Maps
  • How Was My House Decorated When it was Built?
  • Using Vintage Architectural Magazines

Searching for Physical Clues

  • If Your Wall Could Talk
    • Story: Does Your Home Have a Secret Room?
  • Do You Have a Sears Catalog House?
    • Story: The Mystery of the Name on the Window
  • Did Your Home Come from Another Catalog Company?
    • Story: The Porch Swing That Was Meant to Be
  • Have You Tried a Metal Detector in Your Yard?
    • Story: Front Doors in the Basement
  • Digging Up the past in Old Privy Holes
    • Story: A House-Raising Story
  • Was Your House Ever Moved?
    • Story: House Moving Stories
  • Uncovering the Original Colors of Your Home
    • Story: You Never Know What You’ll Find in an Old Basement
  • My Home’s Not Historic, But I Want to Fix It Up Right

Using Your Address to Find Information

  • Who Was the Architect for My Home?
  • Locating Building Permits for Your House
    • Story: Don’t Let FOI Forms Scare You
  • Utility Records Can Provide Clues
  • Finding the Original Price of Your Home
  • Contact Local Insurance Companies
  • Thank the Tax Man!
    • Story: Tax Records Can Be Misleading
  • Ask for Street and House Files
    • Story: Just Because It’s Written Down, Doesn’t Mean It’s True
  • Is Your Home in a Subdivision?
  • Is Your Home Listed on an Architectural Survey?
  • Old Address vs. New Address

What Families Owned Your House?

  • House History Equals Homeowners’ History
    • Story: Klondike or Bust!
  • Where and How to Find Deeds for Your House
    • Story: A Deed Does Not Equal a House
  • “Chaining the Title”
  • What Your Won’t Find on a Deed
  • Understanding types of deeds
    • Story: Signed With an X
  • Squeezing Information from a Deed
    • Story: Does “Pfingste” Sound Like “Kingston” to You?
  • Using eh Document Information Forms
    • Story: Name Misspelling Can Drive You Knutz
  • Deciphering Old-Style Script
    • Story: No Saloons or Asylums, Please
  • Your Home May Have Been Rented

Investigating Owners to Learn Even More

  • Let Your Fingers Do the Walking
  • Census Records Yield Fascinating Details
  • Ask Churches About People Records
  • Listening to Oral Histories
  • Look at Any Lists of Peole That YOur Find
  • Going Once, Going Twice, Sold!
  • Go to Court
  • God Bless the Mormon Family History Centers
  • Ask About Donor Files
  • Look for Homeowners in Local History Books
  • Search for Vintage Who’s Who Books
  • Don’t Overlook Old Newspapers
  • Social Directories Tell You Who Was Who
  • Newspapers Contain Interesting tidbits
    • Story: Seasick Researchers
  • Farmer’s Directories Left Nothing Out
  • Contacting Former Owners of Your Home
  • Sample Letter to the Former Owner of Your Home
  • Sample Questionnaire for the Former Owner of Your Home
    • Story: Ghostly Faces at the Windows

Clues from Beyond the Graves

  • Death Indexes Lead to Obituaries
    • Story: A Ghost Named Julia
  • Cemetery Indexes Help You Find Obits
  • Funeral Homes Can Be Helpful
  • Obituaries are Marvelous!
    • Story: Obituary Information Solves Puzzle
  • Where There’s a Will, There’s Information
    • Story: A Wealth of Information in Wills

Curious About the History of Your Land?

  • Going Back to the Beginning of History
  • Who Owned Your Land Before Your Home Appeared?
  • Understanding How Land Was Surveyed
  • Land Management Trivia
  • “N 18.5 Degrees East 13 Chains, East 8 Chains…”
  • Untangling Land Measurements
  • Landownership Maps Contain Landowners’ Names
  • Agricultural Censuses Yield Farm Information

Making Your Own History

  • Put Your Research Finds in Order
  • Save Your Research and Memorabilia
  • Start Your Own Photo Archive
  • Give Something Back to Your Local Historical Society

Other Sources of Information

  • State Historic Preservation Offices
  • Regional Depository Libraries
  • State Libraries
  • Vital Records Office
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography

Index

 

 

 

“State’s archives offer look into role of women in Tennessee history”

This article comes from knownews.com:

Midway through Women’s History Month is prime time to learn more about the impact of Tennessee women on the course of history.

The Tennessee State Library and Archives, near the state Capitol, has the resources to help. But you don’t have to drive to Nashville to access all of them, thanks to TSLA’s extensive online offerings.

Did you know Tennessee cast the decisive vote to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote? Find suffrage highlights in TSLA’s online exhibit, “Remember the Ladies: Women Struggle for an Equal Voice,” at http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/exhibits/suffrage, in addition to the Carrie Chapman Catt pro-suffrage collection, and Josephine A. Pearson’s anti-suffrage papers. Pearson lobbied vigorously against the 19th Amendment.

Online, TSLA houses a host of letters, diaries and other writings by and about women that shed light on their roles in different periods of history.

Click here to read the full article.

Warning Out in New England 1656-1817

Americans have come to expect certain freedoms and civil rights. One right is it to live just about anywhere one can afford to without undo legal prejudice. Sure, there may still exist racial, religious, or other such biases, but legally this cannot stop people from moving city to city or neighborhood to neighborhood. Looking back through history such freedoms were not always there. The Constitution and the subsequent Bill of Rights and other amendments provided for many added freedoms never before experienced in the world. However, not all the freedoms one expect were immediately available. During the colonial years, and even into the nineteenth century, people did not always have the right to move into a community or town without express permission. Likewise, people, individuals and families, were often sent from their homes by their own neighbors and community. Often these were good people. The excising of people from their homes was called “warning out.” Warning Out in New England 1656-1817 describes this old English law and its application in early American society.

The author’s great-grandfather “a good soldier, a devout Christian, and a peaceable citizen,” was a victim of this law. This law, when “properly implied,” gave a town the legal right to “exclude from inhabitancy persons for (whom) they did not desire to become responsible.” In researching the law and what happened to his great-grandfather, the author discovered this law was exercised frequently. In accordance with the law, residents couldn’t sell their homes and property to strangers with out town permission. Even family members were often denied permission to live within a town due to a lack of community approval.

This book reviews the law in detail, including its application. Some never left when “warned out.” Some paid taxes, owned property, and even held office without ever gaining actual rights of inhabitancy. Delve into this unusual law that may have affected the lives of many of your own ancestors.

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction

  • Example of Warning Out
  • Inhabitancy
  • Land Titles in New England

Chapter 2. Admission of Inhabitants

  • Grants of Land by Towns
  • Restraint of Alienation of Lands
  • Proceedings in Boston and Other Massachusetts and Plymouth Towns

Chapter 3. Massachusetts Colony and State Laws

  • Plymouth Colony Laws
  • Further Illustrations of Town Action as to Inhabitancy, Alienation of Land, Warning Out, etc.

Chapter 4. Inhabitancy and Warning Out in Connecticut

  • Early Colony and State Laws
  • Illustrations of Action of Towns, etc.

Chapter 5. New Hampshire Colony and State Laws

  • Action of Towns as to Inhabitancy, Warning Out, Relief of the Poor, etc.

Chapter 6. Rhode Island Colony and State Laws as to Inhabitancy Relief of the Poor, Town Settlement, etc.

  • Maine and Vermont State Laws as to Warning Out, Inhabitancy, Settlement, Relief of the Poor, etc.

Chapter 7 The Length of Time Warning Out was practiced

  • Effect of Warning Out, How Avoided
  • Value of Warning Out Records
  • Summary as to Reason for Warning Out, etc.

Chronology

Index

 

Warning Out in New England 1656-1817 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBB0730.

History of Louisianna: From Its First Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time

If I were to summarize what I remember learning about American History in public school, it would go something like this:

  • In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue
  • Then the Pilgrims came to Plymouth Rock
  • People came from Europe, mostly English, to practice free religion and other things.
  • The 13 colonies didn’t like the taxes and the the British ruled them so they dumped the Tea into the Boston Harbor and then went to war for freedom
  • The 13 colonies became the first states
  • People moved to territories which became states
  • The U.S. bought Louisiana and other land from France in the Louisiana purchase and Alaska from the Russians

Granted, I have filled in a few blanks since grade and high school. But, like most U.S. Citizens, I don’t know near enough about early settlers in North America outside the 13 colonies. I have only the vaguest sense of proper Canadian history or the history of the southern states like Florida and the areas encompassed in the Louisiana Purchase. Fortunately, there are those out there willing to help fill in my educational gaps without having to return to school. History of Louisiana: From Its First Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time, by E. Bunner, is just such a gap filler.

The book starts out with early explorers, most French in this case, and the connection between Louisiana, the Mississippi River, and Canada. Filled within the pages are details of land transfers between countries. The presence of both Spain and France in the Gulf Coast region and the treaties and wars alike with the Native population. The historical involvement of France and Spain in the Revolutionary War is covered, including the position of French citizens in Louisiana who “rejoiced at the opportunity thus presented of avenging the injuries of the last war.”

Other areas covered include Penal laws, slavery laws or the “Black Code,” laws upon husbands and wives; plus, involvement in the War of 1812 and other settlers to the area. It must be noted, that though the title of the book states “to the Present Time,” the present time at the printing of this book was 1842. This book was reprinted in 2008. Despite, or perhaps because of, the date or original printing, this book provides a great historical reference to state of Louisiana and the surrounding areas.

Did you know that Hurricane Katrina was not the first storm to nearly wipe out the city of New Orleans? Quoting from the book:

“1723 – This year the colony suffered greatly from a dreadful hurricane, which lasted from the 11th to the 16th of September, nearly destroying New-Orleans just as it was beginning to assume the appearance of a town.”

History of Louisiana reads like a story, making it easier to follow than many modern history books. So, if you are like myself, and lack a proper education into parts of the modern U.S. but were not part of the 13 colonies, here is a chance to learn more about a very important segment of American’s past.

 

Contents

Chapter I Discovery of Canada

Chapter II Discovery of the Mississippi

Chapter III Settlement of Florida

Chapter IV Expedition of Joliet and Marquette—Hennein—La Salle

Chapter V Expedition of Iberville—Mississippi Company—Foundation of New-Orleans by Bienville

Chapter VI Indian Tribes

Chapter VII War of the Natchez

Chapter VIII Surrender of the Charter of the Mississippi Company—War of the Chickasaws—Interior affairs

Chapter IX Difference between France and England—General Washington—Nova Scotia—Fort Duquesne—Loss of Canada—Suppression of the Order of Jesuits

Chapter X Louisiana ceded to Spain

Chapter XI Conduct of O’Reilly—Villere—Acts of the Spanish Government

Chapter XII Galvez—War with England—Mira—St. Domnigo

Chapter XIII Carondelet—Fortification of New Orleans—Sugar Manufactory—French Emigrants—Treaty between the United States and Spain—Gayoso de Lemos

Chapter XIV Transfer of Louisiana to the United States

Chapter XV Territorial Government of Louisiana—Laws

Chapter XVI Spain–Conspiracy of Burr—General Wilkinson—Refugees from Cuba—Taking of Baton Rouge—Louisiana made a State—Constitution—Steamboats

Chapter XVII War with England—Battle of New Orleans

Chapter XVIII Prosperity of Louisianan—Bank of Louisianan—Laws—Florida—Mouth of the Mississippi—Lafayette—General Jackson elected President—National Bank—Cholera

Chapter XIX Tariff—Speculation—Lotteries—Banks—Madame Lalaurie—New Orleans Divided—Stoppage of Specie Payments

Chapter XX Project of Albert Hoa—Appropriations—Great Flood—Improvements in Louisiana—State of Society—Conclusion

 

Order History of Louisiana: From Its First Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time [1842] from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBB2275, Price: $27.93.

The Expansion of New England

For 2012, the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) has republished The Expansion of New England: The Spread of New England Settlement and Institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865. Lois Mathews wrote and originally published this history in 1909. Many of today’s historians and genealogists have overlooked this valuable history. However, NEHGS recognized the value is this volume, and so have made it available again.

In this manuscript, Mathews seeks to explain where and why people migrated, first to early coastal settlements, then throughout the region as families moved inland and northward during the colonial period. The author continues this historical examination of migration through the 1850s and people moved up and down the Hudson River, and then on into central and western New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and the northern counties of Indiana and Illinois.

Mathews examines reasons behind migration movements, including, socio-economics, religion, and war. She also evaluates the relationships between Native Americans and settlers. Even the formation of new states is reviewed.

Ralph Crandall, Executive Director Emeritus for NEHGS provided the foreword for this most recent publishing. In it, he outlines the value of this book to genealogists. He suggest that first, taking the larger migration patterns into consideration can help genealogists potentially reverse trace a families origin in the American colonies. Second, Crandall notes that Mathews thoroughly examined the printed literature available in her day; namely, town histories and other works that covered specific migrations. These smaller migrations were usually small clusters of families. These groups and the sources are cited through the book. Genealogist can identify specific works for further reference and reading.

Of course, just knowing a bit of history, and understanding the driving forces of the day, can help researchers make deductions about their own ancestors and their likely movements throughout New England and beyond.

 

Contents

Chapter I Introduction

Chapter II The Beginning of an American Frontier

Chapter III The Influence of Indian Warfare Upon the Frontier

Chapter IV Forty Years of Strife withing the Wilderness

Chapter V The Frontier in War and in Peace, 1754-1781

Chapter VI The Beginning of the Great Migrations form New England Toward the West, 1781-1812

Chapter VII The Planting of a Second New England, 1787-1865

Chapter VIII The Joining of Two Frontiers: Indiana and Illinois, 1809-1865

Chapter IX The New Englanders as State Builders: Michigan and Wisconsin, 1820-1860

Chapter X Two Centuries and a Half of New England Pioneering, 1620-1865

 

Find The Expansion of New England: The Spread of New England Settlement and Institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865 at Family Roots Publishing; Price: $17.59.

Genealogical Notes, First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts

Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts is a reprint of a volume originally published in 1856. The book represents the compiled notes of an early American Genealogist, Nathaniel Goodwin. This collection is a effectively a descendants report, with extensive notes by Goodwin, on forty seventeenth-century families from Connecticut and Massachusetts. Many of these lists extend five to six generations.

This book provides organized information on the family heritage of hundreds of individuals. It would be nearly impossible to estimate the thousands, or tens of thousands or more, descendants living today. Even when written in 1833, Goodwin did not intend this book as a complete genealogy of certain families, but rather as “genealogical notes to assist others in tracing out their family histories.”

Goodwin’s notes fills in gaps and names along with other tidbits. Take this short example given for one David Hollister, born November 21, 1681:

“Settled in Glastenbury. Mr. David Hollister, died December 27, 1753, in the 76th year of his age. His widow, Mrs. charity Hollister, died January 12, 1786, in the 89th year of her age. Children,—Six, named in his will”

Besides the obvious value of naming a wife, along with marriage and death date, is the positive indication that there was a will and that it names his children. Something the researcher can look for, knowing it at least existed at that time. Most notes offer similar extended family information beyond the names and birth years of direct descendents for each family.

 

Contents

Memoir of Nathaniel Goodwin

Genealogy of the Goodwin Family

Adam Blakeman of Stratford, CT

Leonard Chester of Wethersfield, CT

Daniel Clark of Windsor, CT

John Dwight of Dedham, MA

William Edwards of Hartford, CT

William Goodrich of Wethersfield, CT

John Goodrich of Wethersfield, CT

William Gurley of Northampton, MA

John Hollister of Wethersfield, CT

John Hopkins of Hartford, CT

John Ingersoll of Hartford, CT and of Northampton, MA

Lewis Jones of Watertown, MA

William Judson of Concord, MA and of Stratford and New Haven, CT

John Kent of Suffield, CT

Richard Mather of Dorchester, MA

Michael Metcalf of Dedham, MA

Joseph Mygatt of Hartford, CT

John Nott of Westhersfield, CT

John Porter of Windsor, CT

Robert Sedgwick of Charlestown, MA

Rev. Henry Smith of Wethersfield, CT

Jared Spencer of Cambridge and Lynn, MA and of Haddam, CT

Thomas Spencer of Harford, CT

Rev. Samuel Stone, Harford, CT

Samuel Storrs of Mansfield, CT

Samuel Terry of Springfield, MA and of Enfield, CT

Stephen Terry of Windsor, CT

Matthias Treat of Wethersfield, CT

Richard Treat of Westhersfield, CT

Andre Ward of Wethersfield, Stamford, and Fairfield, CT

Governor John Webster of Harford, CT and Hadley, MA

Governor Thomas Welles of Harford, CT

Nicholas Worthington of Hatfield, MA

Appendix

John Case of Windsor and Simsbury, CT

Edwards Family

Goodrich Family

William Spencer of Cambridge, MA and Hartford, CT

Family of Richard Treat

William Whiting of Hartford, CT

John Lord of Hartford, CT

Errata

Index

 

Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts is available from Family Roots Publishers, Price: $24.45.

Mormon Gold

Few people are aware it was the job foreman and half-a-dozen Mormons who first discovered gold at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California. Even fewer are aware of the overall presence and contribution Mormons made during the gold rush years. The Mormon people had been in Salt Lake for less than a year when Gold was discover. A year later the rush to riches was on. People flooded California from around the world in an effort to lay claim to part of California’s rich Gold deposits. Mormon Gold: Mormons in the California Gold Rush Contributing to the Development of California and the Monetary Solvency of Early Utah examines the Mormon people and their participation in the famous Gold Rush of 1849 and the subsequent mining years.

The early years for Mormons in Salt Lake and its surrounding settlements were economically difficult for many. Those who came with Brigham Young, and those who continued to arrive over the next few years, came across the plains with few possessions. Many were destitute and were doing their best just to survive those early years. The temptation to seek wealth and prosperity in the gold rich hills of California was strong. Sensing this pull, and knowing most would not find the wealth they dreamed of, along with understanding the need to keep the new communities in Utah as strong as possible if the Mormons were to survive, Brigham Young ordered the saints to stay, to work, and to follow God’s will. Meanwhile, he also knew that California Gold could be a boon to the struggling economy in Salt Lake. Thus, he selected men to go and seek prosperous enterprises in California, to build businesses and seek opportunities to gain advantage from the flood of gold seekers. Some were to also mine gold and gather tithes and return what they could to Utah. Mormon Gold provides the facts and details about these Mormon participants and their reasons for going to California.

Mormon Gold tries to “identify individuals involved in the gold rush and piece together their lives and interactions. It is extensively illustrated with portraits, landscapes, and maps.” The book is filled with background stories and details. Inset into the chapters are independent, brief, biographies of individuals found within the story. Likewise, added details, historical facts, and explanations are provided in similar manner for key locations, settlements, and interest items. One inset shows and describes the gold mining process using a sluice with a riddle plate. Brief bios are presented for more famous individuals, like John A. Sutter (not a mormon but obviously a major player in the Gold Rush thanks to the discovery of Gold at his mill), Brigham Young, and Orrin Porter Rockwell. Some of the less historically famous individuals, whose presence are noted within the Gold Rush story,  are given individual space with their own brief bios, such as Francis Martin Pomeroy (my own third-great grandfather).

Here are some of the other California Mormon highlights found in the book:

  • “They came, some just before and some just after California became a Territory (1846)
  • They doubled the population of Yerba Buena and helped turn that placid, ‘ends of the earth’ hamlet into a bustling San Francisco
  • They were involved in some of the first gold discoveries (Coloma and Mormon Island)
  • They opened important trails across the Sierra and the Southwest
  • Some brought their families, built homes, and pioneered commercial farming in California
  • Many sent their gold back to help establish a currency for the infant Mormon settlement in the Salt Lake Valley, which without that help might have floundered.”

The first edition of Mormon Gold was published in 1984. At the time, researchers praised the author for “having left no stone unturned in recounting all there is to know about Mormons and the gold rush.” That may have been true at the time. However, in the over twenty-five years since then, much research has been added to the collective knowledge on the subject. Thus, the authors felt the book needed a major update. This second edition make uses of dozens of resources not available at the printing of the first edition. Some of the additional materials include extensive biographies on major participants and leaders among the Mormons in California; plus, annotated diaries, including, the diary of George Q. Cannon, an apostle in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, during his California years.

 

Contents

Maps and Illustrations

Preface

Introduction

1. The Stage is Set

2. Gold at Coloma

3. Mormon Island: The First California Gold Rush

4. The Mormon-Carson Pass Emigrant Trail

5. A Message of Gold to Brigham Young

6. The Mormon ’48ers

7. Mormon Valley Currency

8. Mormon Guides to the Gold Mines

9. Amasa M. Lyman and the Mormon Apostolic Gold Mission

10. The Pueblo Saints

11. The Rhoades Mormon gold TRain

12. Apostle Charles C. Rich and the Gold Missionaries

13. The Gentile Pomeroy Wagon Train

14. The Huffaker Company

15. The Salt Lake Trading Company

16. The Joint Apostolic Gold Mission

17. From God to the Word

18. The Last Trains West

19. Home to Zion

20. A Maverick Mormon Argonaut

21. Mormon Station and the Carson Valley Saints

22. The San Bernardino Saints and Gold

23. Proselyting the Gold Fields

24. Missionaries and the Final Exodus

25. Mormon Argonauts: Some Reflections

Appendix A: The Mormon Argonaut Communities

Appendix B: Mormon Argonauts in the Census Records

Appendix C: Mormon Gold Time Line

Appendix D: Historical Background for the Mormon Gold Story

Bibliography

Map and Illustration Credits

Subject Index

Personal Name Index

About the Authors

 

Avid historians, gold rush aficionados, and Mormons alike will all appreciate the detailed history this book provides. Rich in details, colorful characters, and a sense of truth helps bring light California’s gold rush and its Mormon participants.

Mormon Gold: Mormons in the California Gold Rush Contributing to the Development of California and the Monetary Solvency of Early Utah is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: GMP1, Price: $39.96.

 

Writing the Family Narrative

Eventually, most genealogist come to realize that years of collected data, records, diaries, pictures, heirlooms, and more cannot endlessly pile up in boxes and still serve living or future generations. Organizing and sharing volumes of data in a practical and digestible manner becomes a problem. The solution for many is the publishing of a family history book. However, putting a book together can seem like an overwhelming task. With help, some of the fear around writing and compiling a book can be alleviated. The most common type of family history book is a narrative. Writing a Family Narrative was created to help genealogist bring their experience and research together with the necessary help to produce that family history book. Learn from author, Lawrence P. Goudrup, “how to compose a controlled and focused rendition of your family’s story.”

This book was written specifically for the genealogist and those hoping to write about themselves or their own family’s history. Though not spelled out in the table of contents or on the cover, here is what the reader can expect to learn from reading this book:

  • Planning: writing a family narrative requires careful preparation to avoid being tedious or unappealing
  • Scope: avoid beginner pitfalls like trying to tell the complete story, when focus on specific issues, people, or periods is better
  • Focus: commitment to the specific theme and selecting only those facts from one’s genealogical data that contribute to the narrative in a positive way
  • Evaluation: deciding what is truth and what it not, and what truth to include in order to properly tell the story
  • Avoiding Fiction: avoiding tendency to “put words in their mouths;” avoid adding opinions, ideas, or details to embellish a story but lack truth
  • Immersion: put at least the same effort into organizing facts and into the writing process that went into the original research. “Leave no leaf unturned,” “leave no lead unfollowed.”

Writing a Family Narrative helps the reader examine aspects of family information to determine relevancy and the relevant details necessary to construct a story without undue embellishments. For example, sections include “How did the family earn its money and how did it spend it?” and “What did the family consider important or valuable?” The book also focuses on important writing techniques such as characterization, plot conflict, and point of view.

Each section provides clear instructions and is filled with examples. The book is easy to read and the examples help take the reader step-by-step through the literary process.

 

Contents

Preface

Chapter One What is Family History?

Chapter Two Using Genealogical and Local History Records to Write the Historical Exposition

Chapter Three Writing the Narrative

Chapter Four Point of View

Chapter Five Some Finishing Touches

 

Writing a Family Narrative is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: TP274, Price: $12.69.

 

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840

“County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively know as “road orders.” The Virginia Transportation Research Council’s published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. Much of this information is found nowhere else in early records, making these publications invaluable not only to historical and cultural resources research, but also to other disciplines, including social history, preservation planning, environmental science, and genealogy.”

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is the result of a larger study into the history of road construction and development in the various counties of Virginia. This book represents what was to be the introduction to a larger work on the county of Albemarle. With the input of other, the author realized the value of this brief history to all interested in the early development of roads across the state. This historical sketch is intended to provide insight to the development of all Virginian roads, up to the time of heavy railroad development in the nineteenth century, while also providing understanding of the various forces which shaped transportation policy at the colonial, and following, state level.

A map book I review a few months ago, An Atlas of Appalachian Trails to the Ohio River, by Carrie Eldridge, shows the location of little known trails as well as the major routes which passed through Virginia during the early expansion years. Along these routes grew towns and communities. Only four major routes crossed the Appalachians from the eastern seaboard to the Ohio River. But, the area spread out along minor routes and eventually many of the major and minor routes became state and interstate highways. A Brief History of Roads in Virginia provides additional insight to this development; including, the legislation and thinking that was behind continued improvements and development.

Establishing and maintaining public roads was important business. Choosing between roads and canals, selecting overseers to keep roads in repair, and managing budgets was of great importance to everyone. The history of road development is probably far more important to the country’s overall history than most give it credit for. This brief look into this small subsection of American history opens windows of thought and perspective into the lives of early Americans.

 

Contents

Preface

The Colonial Period 1607-1776

Groping for a Solution 1783-1816

The Board of Public Works 1816-1827

The Board of Public Works: The Golden Years 1827-1840

Selected Bibliography

 

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBV3674, Price: $16.17.