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Archive for the ‘Local History’ Category

NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later issued as special publications. The latest version of the series contains revised guides, plus additional states not included in the previous releases. NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri was written […]

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A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia – on sale for 50% Off Thru Friday

Family Roots Publishing just acquired a quantity of the beautiful book, A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. The book 894 page hard-cover is technically out-of-print, but the truth is that FRPC has the last of them. FRPC is offering this volume as this week’s Exceptional Bargain at just $37.50 (plus $5.50 p&h). That’s 50% off […]

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NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

“Missouri was the land of the Osage and their rival tribes. The jumping-off place for Lewis and Clark’s expedition of discovery. The early home to French trappers, mountain men, and Spanish garrisons and churches. In the wake of the American Revolution, it was the siren call for frontiersmen and land-hungry farmers out of British America. […]

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NGS Research in the States Series: Missouri

“Missouri was the land of the Osage and their rival tribes. The jumping-off place for Lewis and Clark’s expedition of discovery. The early home to French trappers, mountain men, and Spanish garrisons and churches. In the wake of the American Revolution, it was the siren call for frontiersmen and land-hungry farmers out of British America. […]

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Discovering the History of Your House…and Your Neighborhood

Home may be where your heart is at, but what do you really know about the house you live in? Old or new, Betsy J. Green believes your house and property have a unique history. Her book, Discovering the History of Your House…and Your Neighborhood, was written to help uncover your home’s history and “show […]

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“State’s archives offer look into role of women in Tennessee history”

This article comes from knownews.com: Midway through Women’s History Month is prime time to learn more about the impact of Tennessee women on the course of history. The Tennessee State Library and Archives, near the state Capitol, has the resources to help. But you don’t have to drive to Nashville to access all of them, […]

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Warning Out in New England 1656-1817

Americans have come to expect certain freedoms and civil rights. One right is it to live just about anywhere one can afford to without undo legal prejudice. Sure, there may still exist racial, religious, or other such biases, but legally this cannot stop people from moving city to city or neighborhood to neighborhood. Looking back through […]

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History of Louisianna: From Its First Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time

If I were to summarize what I remember learning about American History in public school, it would go something like this: In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue Then the Pilgrims came to Plymouth Rock People came from Europe, mostly English, to practice free religion and other things. The 13 colonies didn’t like the taxes […]

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The Expansion of New England

For 2012, the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) has republished The Expansion of New England: The Spread of New England Settlement and Institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865. Lois Mathews wrote and originally published this history in 1909. Many of today’s historians and genealogists have overlooked this valuable history. However, NEHGS recognized the value […]

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Sketches of Prominent Tennesseans

In his History of New Hampshire, historian Everett Schermerhorn Stackpole attempts to answer the question, “What makes a man prominent?” In his words: “Whoever has helped notably in the great march of human progress deserves credit therefor in the popular estimation. Abilities, character and achievement make men prominent. Learning and money may be helpful, but […]

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Genealogical Notes, First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts

Genealogical Notes or Contributions to the Family History of Some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts is a reprint of a volume originally published in 1856. The book represents the compiled notes of an early American Genealogist, Nathaniel Goodwin. This collection is a effectively a descendants report, with extensive notes by Goodwin, on […]

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Mormon Gold

Few people are aware it was the job foreman and half-a-dozen Mormons who first discovered gold at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California. Even fewer are aware of the overall presence and contribution Mormons made during the gold rush years. The Mormon people had been in Salt Lake for less than a year when Gold was […]

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Writing the Family Narrative

Eventually, most genealogist come to realize that years of collected data, records, diaries, pictures, heirlooms, and more cannot endlessly pile up in boxes and still serve living or future generations. Organizing and sharing volumes of data in a practical and digestible manner becomes a problem. The solution for many is the publishing of a family […]

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A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840

“County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively know as “road orders.” The Virginia Transportation Research Council’s published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. […]

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History of Louisianna: From Its First Discovery and Settlement to the Present Time [1842]

If I were to summarize what I remember learning about American History in public school, it would go something like this: In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue Then the Pilgrims came to Plymouth Rock People came from Europe, mostly English, to practice free religion and other things. The 13 colonies didn’t like the taxes […]

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