Mary, Queen of Scots, Cleared of Murdering Her Husband – Over 400 Years Later

The following teaser is from the September 25, 2105 edition of DailyMail.com:

Mary Queen of Scots, depicted here around 1565.
Mary Queen of Scots, depicted here around 1565.

Mary, Queen of Scots has been cleared of any involvement in the notorious murder of her husband, more than four centuries after the unsolved crime took place.

The rebel queen, who plotted against Elizabeth I, has long been suspected of bringing about the death of Lord Darnley, her royal consort who himself had royal blood.

Their marriage had been under serious strain since they wed in 1565, and just two years later he and his squire were found dead in an orchard in Kirk o’Field, Edinburgh.

Not long before the bodies were discovered, an explosion had rocked Lord Darnley’s home, throwing even more confusion over the deaths, which are believed to have been carried out by suffocation.

However, a panel assembled by the Royal Society of Edinburgh was convened this week and has begun considering the crime with modern investigative methods – and has concluded that Mary’s hands are clean.

Read the full article.

The Queen Mother’s Brother Was a Genuine WWI Hero

The following teaser is from the September 27, 2015 edition of DailyMail.com.

Fergus Bowes-Lyon, son of the 14th Earl of Strathmore, elder brother to the Queen Mother.
Fergus Bowes-Lyon, son of the 14th Earl of Strathmore, elder brother to the Queen Mother.

The Prince of Wales stood in solemn silence yesterday as he took part in a centenary memorial service in Dundee to honour the British troops who lost their lives at the ill-fated Battle of Loos. And among the 20,000 soldiers who died during the largest First World War battle on the Western Front, there was one brave soldier in particular whose heroic sacrifice the Royal Family will never forget.

Fergus Bowes-Lyon, son of the 14th Earl of Strathmore, elder brother to the Queen Mother and the uncle Queen Elizabeth II never met, died 100 years ago today after leading his men into the face of the enemy. Yet for the best part of a century the Royals have not known his final resting place, or the full details of how he led an assault on the most heavily defended part of the German lines, had a leg blown off and was repeatedly hit by machine-gun bullets, before dying an hour later as his sergeant tried desperately to keep him alive until medical assistance arrived.

Such was the chaos and carnage of the battle that the precise details of the death of the Queen Mother’s beloved brother ‘Fergie’ have remained a mystery – until now. But after years of trawling his family’s archives and discovering long-lost letters, the true heroism of the Queen’s uncle has been unearthed by Fergus’s grandson James Voicey-Cecil.

It is an astonishing story that, without his search, would have been lost to history.

Read the full article.

Maryland Mechanic Discovers He is Heir to the Throne of the Isle of Man

The following teaser is from an article posted in the August 6, 2015 dailymail.co.uk:

David_Drew_Howe_and_his_wife_Pam_and_Daughter-250pw

A blue-collar American is getting the royal treatment after a search for his family ancestry online revealed that he is the heir to the throne of the British Isle of Man.

In the new TLC reality series Suddenly Royal, David Drew Howe, 45, an auto-repair specialist from Maryland, embarks on the adventure of a lifetime, taking his wife Pam and their 12-year-old daughter Grace 3,000 away to learn what it really means to look and act like royalty.

And while David’s noble lineage, which he claims makes him a cousin of Queen Elizabeth II, may have scored his family invites to the Prince William’s royal wedding to Kate Middleton, it proves to be far more difficult to earn the respect and acceptance of locals, who are less than thrilled that an American is taking the throne.

His journey has been documented for the TLC reality series Suddenly Royal which premiers September 9 at 10pm.

Read the full article.

Medieval Welsh Ancestors

Medieval-Welsh-Ancestors-Cover-300pw

Those who have found their noble and royal lines in Weis’ Ancestral Roots of 60 Colonists may have noticed that the Welsh lines are given short shrift. Carl Boyer’s Medieval Welsh Ancestors of Certain Americans is a unique work, resulting from years of research and three trips to Wales with work in the National Library at Aberystwyth, which develops the Welsh lines as far as they can be traced, and includes thousands more ancestors.

The author, Carl Boyer 3rd, has been a friend for many years. I will personally vouch for the quality and accuracy of his work. The man is a very adept genealogist, with many years of experience in researching medieval ancestors.

The volume should be of interest to everyone with noble and royal English ancestry, for it picks up where Weis and other scholars treating English lines gave up. As an example, Joan, daughter of King John of England, married Llywelyn ab Iorwerth the Great, Prince of North Wales. Books on English medieval ancestry stop with the name, usually spelled poorly as copied from some English source, and perhaps one or two lines of data. Boyer’s book includes a page and a half of biographical material and data on each of his twelve children, of whom five were children of Joan. Llywelyn is a descendant of Merfyn Frych, who is said to have been slain in a battle with the King of Mercia about 840, and was father of Rhodri Mawr, King of Wales, who died in the 870s.

Many English families are closely related to the Welsh: de Burgh, Herbert, Lingen, Owen, Puleston, Stanley, le Strange and Turberville, among the many dozens found in the index. An index of Welsh Patronyms makes it easy to find the Welsh entries. I haven’t transcribed that index in this review. I attempted to, but soon gave up as all the fertches and abs and aps were making me crazy! The volume also includes a Personal Names Index, which is actually a surname index with given names included. These names are for those with English-style surnames, not patronymics. See the list copied from the index of Personal Names (without the given names) below.

At the end of this review, I have included a listing made up of the names of those whose descendent genealogies are found in this volume.

Boyer made three trips to Wales while researching this volume because of the difficulty of finding sources in the United States, and did much of his work in the National Library at Aberystwyth.

Order Medieval Welsh Ancestors of Certain Americans, A Comprehensive Genealogy With Biographical and Historical Background as Well as Critical Commentary; by Carl Boyer, 3rd; 2004; Hardback; 6×9.25; 431 pp.

Names included in the Index of Personal Names, Excepting Patronyms

  • Of Abergavenny
  • Abrahall
  • ÆLFGAR,
  • ÆLFGIFU
  • Alcock
  • De Aldford
  • ÆLFGAR,
  • ÆLFGIFU
  • Alcock
  • De Aldford
  • Alfred the Great, King of England
  • Appleton
  • Arnold
  • Arthur, King
  • De Arundel
  • Athelstan
  • Audbrey
  • De Audley
  • Austin
  • Baldwin
  • De Bamville
  • Banastre
  • Barret
  • Barry
  • Baskerville
  • Bassen
  • Basset
  • Beauchamp
  • Beufort
  • Bebb
  • De Bechie
  • Becket
  • Beinon
  • Beisyn
  • De Belesmo
  • Le Belward
  • Berkeley
  • Berkerolles
  • De Berney
  • De Besford
  • Besyn
  • Bewprey
  • Blaene[y]
  • Blout
  • Continue reading “Medieval Welsh Ancestors”

Monaco’s Princess Charlene Presented with a Certificate of Irish Heritage

The following teaser is from an article written by Pól Ó Conghaile and posted in the July 30, 2014 edition of independent.ie.

Monaco – Princess Charlene was presented with a Certificate of Irish Heritage by HE Rory Montgomery, Irish Ambassador to France.
Monaco – Princess Charlene was presented with a Certificate of Irish Heritage by HE Rory Montgomery, Irish Ambassador to France.

New research has traced Princess Charlene of Monaco’s ancestors back to the 1520s and a prominent Dublin family called the Fagans.

The research, carried out by genealogy researchers Eneclann for Tourism Ireland, shows that Princess Charlene descends from one of the most successful gentlemen-merchant families in Dublin in the 16th and 17th centuries.

The Fagans made a number of enduring contributions to the development of Dublin.

In 1592, Richard and Christopher Fagan, the Princess’s great (x12) grandfathers, were key figures in the foundation of Trinity College; and in the 1660s, Christopher Fagan, the Princess’s great (x9) grandfather, sold the manor of Phoenix to the Duke of Ormond to create a royal deer park – which we know today as the Phoenix Park.

Read the full article.

Royal Families: Americans Of Royal And Noble Ancestry – Vol. III – Now On Sale for 55% Off Thru Aug 3, 2014

gpc6163

As this week’s FRPC Exceptional Bargain Offer, Marston Watson’s popular Royal Families: Americans Of Royal And Noble Ancestry. Volume Three, Samuel Appleton And His Wife Judith Everard And Five Generations Of Their Descendants is being offered at 55% off. Thousands of Americans with royal ancestry are descended from Samuel Appleton, and his wife Judith Everard. Check out the Pedigree Charts and the book’s surname index below.

Purchase the book at 55% off for just $27 (plus $5.50 p&h) thru Sunday, August 3, 2014.

Following is a review written by Andy Pomeroy this last spring.

I am not sure why it is, but it seems like American genealogists are obsessed with the notion of having royal ancestry. The truth is, a significant number of us are a descendant of royal blood; however, proving so will bring you little more than bragging rights, which you will share with millions of other people. First, whether of a legitimate relationship, or the other type, given enough generations any royal will have millions of descendants. Second, even if you proved a connection, there is no crown, no throne, no glory waiting for you. What does that leave us? Bragging rights, and maybe a few more generations filled in on our pedigree. To be honest, that may be a reward in itself, regardless of the royal nature of that extended pedigree. Yet, we are still captivated by the possibility of our royal ancestry. In full disclosure, I too must admit I think it would be cool to be royal lineage. Just don’t ask me to explain why.

So what does this commentary have to do with anything? Well, because there is a book, Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. There is actually an entire series of books; however, for today, we will look at Volume Three. Within this book, you will find the five generations of descendants of Samuel Appleton and his wife Judith Everard, who were descended of William the Conqueror and of Louis IV. Together they came to the American colonies in the 1630s. There are over three thousand descendants in just five generations. The 3,000 would easily measure into the millions today, giving those of European descent a significant chance of tying our own ancestry into this family line.

You may be wondering just how this all works. Let me try and explain further. Samuel Appleton married Judith Everard in the early 1600s. Each was a descendant of royal ancestry. Here are their royal lineage lines:

Samuel Appleton

Mary Issac

Margery Whetehill

Sir Richard Whetehill of Calais

Margaret Worsley

Rose Revor

Angharad Puleston

Lowri ferch Gruffyd Fychan

Guffyd Fychan ap Gruffydd

Elizabeth Lestrange

John Lestrange V

Joan de Somery

Nichole d’Aubigny

Mabel of Chester

Hugh de Kevelioc

Maud of Gloucester

Robert de Caen

Henry I Beauclerc of England, King of England

William I, the Conqueror

In the book, spouses are also listed. One interesting fact is the spouse listed on this line for Henry I is simply “unknown mistress.” Here is Judith’s line:

Judith Everard

John Everard

Thomas Everard

Henry Everard

Mary Cornish

John Cornish

John Cornish

Iodena Hunt

Margaret Pecche

Sir Simon Pecche

Gilbert Pecche

Gilbert Pecche

Hamon Pecche

Alice Fitz Walter

Walter Fitz Robert

Matilda de Saint Liz

Matilda

Judith

Lambert

Matilda de Louvain

Gerberga

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine

Louis IV “the Simple,” King of the Franks

Somewhere in my genealogy I have a similar list, created by one of my ancestors, also tying me to Henry I. Looks like I could have a few hundred thousand more cousins by way of Samuel and Judith.

Based on these lists, Samuel and Judith can trace their royal ancestry back to at least one king each. Thus, any descendant would also link to these two kings. While there may be other royals along other lines, this book only details these two lines. Still, the book outlines five generations of individuals, descendants, from Samuel and Judith. If you can find a family connection to any of the three plus names inscribed in this book, then you too can claim your own bragging rights to royal ancestry.

To put it another way, “The purpose of the book is to provide a genealogical history with documented sources (using vital records primarily) for the descendants of Samuel and Judith (Everard) Appleton. Where possible, the identity of the parents of each known spouse is also provided, along with relevant biographical, genealogical, and historical details.”

If your lineage connects to this family, then who might some of your more famous cousins be? “Americans linked to Samuel and Judith Appleton will find near or distant cousins among such distinguished individuals as President Franklin Pierce, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, Jr. Other descendants include “signer” William Whipple, Jr., Mrs. John Singleton Copley, James Russell Lowell, Francis Parkman, Jr., Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Jr., and poet Robert Frost.”

So in the end, why get the book? One, you may discover your own connection to royalty. Second, and in my opinion the more important reason, if you can connect your lineage to anyone in this book then you just opened up a huge addition to your family pedigree.

 

Table of Contents

Foreword by Gary Boyd Roberts

Introduction

About the Author

Appleton Pedigree Chart

Appleton Descendancy Chart

Everard Pedigree Chart

Everard Descendancy Chart

Generation One

Generation Two

Generation Three

Generation Four

Generation Five

Generation Six

Bibliography

Person Index

Lineage Society Index

 

You may just uncover your own Royal connection, with Royal Families: American of Royal and Noble Ancestry, Volume Three; Available from Family Roots Publishing at 55% off thru Sunday, August 3, 214.

Following is a listing of over 1200 surnames found in the book:

  • Abbot
  • Abbott
  • Ackerly
  • Ackley
  • Adams
  • Albree
  • Alden
  • Aldrich
  • Allen
  • Allin
  • Allyn
  • Ames
  • Andrews
  • Angier
  • Annable
  • Anson
  • Appleton
  • Archer
  • Armstrong
  • Arnold
  • Assalbie
  • Athearn
  • Atherton
  • Atlee
  • Atwater
  • Atwood
  • Auger
  • Austin
  • Averill
  • Ayer
  • Babb
  • Bacon
  • Badger
  • Bailey
  • Baker
  • Balch
  • Ball
  • Ballard
  • Barberie
  • Barker
  • Barlow
  • Barnard
  • Barnes
  • Barnum
  • Barrett
  • Bartlett
  • Barton
  • Bass
  • Batchelder
  • Bates
  • Batt
  • Battie
  • Bayley
  • Beal
  • Beaman
  • Beanes
  • Beck
  • Becket
  • Belcher
  • Belden
  • Belknap
  • Bell
  • Benedict
  • Bennett
  • Benning
  • Bent
  • Benton
  • Berry
  • Betts
  • Bickford
  • Bidwell
  • Bigelow
  • Biggs
  • Bill
  • Billings
  • Biscon
  • Bishop
  • Bixby
  • Blake
  • Blanchard
  • Blaney
  • Blaw
  • Blood
  • Blowers
  • Bloyd
  • Blydenburgh
  • Boardman
  • Bodfish
  • Bodwell
  • Bond
  • Booth
  • Bourne
  • Boutelle
  • Bowditch
  • Bowdoin
  • Bowen
  • Bowers
  • Bowker
  • Boyden
  • Boynton
  • Brackett
  • Bradbury
  • Bradford
  • Bradley
  • Bradshaw
  • Bradstreet
  • Branch
  • Brandon
  • Bray
  • Breck
  • Breed
  • Brewster
  • Briard
  • Bridges
  • Brigham
  • Brimmer
  • Brinsmade
  • Brock
  • Brocklebank
  • Bromfield
  • Bronsdon
  • Brookins
  • Brooks
  • Brown
  • Browne
  • Brush
  • Buck
  • Buckingham
  • Buckminster
  • Continue reading “Royal Families: Americans Of Royal And Noble Ancestry – Vol. III – Now On Sale for 55% Off Thru Aug 3, 2014”

Salt Lake Christmas Tour…………………. Week’s Peek

When hubby and I were last in Maui, we went to the Whalers’ Village Shopping Center just to visit the Whaling Museum there. It was fabulous! We learned much about this topic and were fascinated even though I don’t think either of us have whaling ancestors.

In this museum I found many original papers framed and shown along the walls. Many were the “papers” that the captain carried to prove and show his mission. I scribbled down notes from this one to share with you:

Whaleman’s Shipping Papers:  From a framed document in the Whalers Museum in the Whalers Village Shopping Center in Ka’anapali,Maui:

“It is agreed between the owner, master, seaman and mariners of the Bark Cape Horn Pigeon of New Bedford, Mass, now bound from the port of New Bedford, Mass, on a whaling voyage not exceeding 4 years in duration….”

Then followed eleven points/articles to which they agreed; many were pertaining to conduct and payroll.

Signed: 1 Sep 1884, Edward F. Potter, Managing owner/master…signed first, then 31 others

On a note dated 28 Oct 1885 and attached to the bottom corner of the page, signed by the Consulate General of the U.S. in Honolulu….verifying some business and proving that they were there.

The men had signed and indicated their nationality. They were from Germany, U.S., Sweden, Wales, Cape Verde Islands, Mexico, West Indies, Prussia and Norway. A most international crew and I had assumed they’d all be from New England.

A seaman could expect to pocket $54.17 at the end of his 4-year commitment; the captain received $380.00. And when a seaman signed his shipping papers, “he crossed the dotted line from personal freedom to unconditional obedience…..”

It took three days to butcher, cut up, try out and cask the oil from one whale….. three days of blood, slippery decks, oil and stench…… three days of hell. And the ship and crew did this day after day for months and years. Amazing to me that the little ship could store so much oil. Amazing to me that men wanted to do this.

These “whaler’s papers” caught my eye because of the Edward F. Potter, Captain, listed. Since this is my maiden name, I had to look for him. Did look for him in the 1880 and 1900 census for New Bedford; negative. He’s not my ancestor so I stopped there.

Do you have ancestors who were whalers from New England? Do you have any letters or accounts from them? Have you ever read Moby Dick?  Or see the movie with Patrick Stewart from Star Trek as the demented captain? 

Donna, aka Mother Hen, until next peek.

Royal Families: Americans Of Royal And Noble Ancestry. Volume Three

gpc6163I am not sure why it is, but it seems like American genealogist are obsessed with the notion of having royal ancestry. The truth is, a significant number of us are descendant or royal blood; however, proving so will bring you little more than bragging rights, which you will share with millions of other people. First, whether of a legitimate relationship, or the other type, given enough generations any royal will have millions of descendants. Second, even if you proved a connection, there is no crown, no throne, no glory waiting for you. What does that leave us? Bragging rights, and maybe a few more generations filled in on our pedigree. To be honest, that may be a reward in itself, regardless of the royal nature of that extended pedigree. Yet, we are still captivated by the possibility or our royal ancestry. In full disclosure, I too must admit I think it would be cool to be royal lineage. Just don’t ask me to explain why.

So what does this commentary have to do with anything? Well, because there is a book, Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry. There is actually an entire series of books; however, for today, we will look at Volume Three. Within this book, you will find the five generations of descendant of Samuel Appleton and his wife Judith Everard, who were descended of William the Conqueror and of Louis IV. Together they came to the American colonies in the 1630s. There are over three thousand descendents in just fiver generations. The 3,000 would easily measure into the millions today, giving those of European descent a significant chance of tying our own ancestry into this family line.

You may be wondering just how this all works. Let me try and explain further. Samuel Appleton married Judith Everard in the early 1600s. Each was a descendant of royal ancestry. Here are their royal lineage lines:

Samuel Appleton

Mary Issac

Margery Whetehill

Sir Richard Whetehill of Calais

Margaret Worsley

Rose Revor

Angharad Puleston

Lowri ferch Gruffyd Fychan

Guffyd Fychan ap Gruffydd

Elizabeth Lestrange

John Lestrange V

Joan de Somery

Nichole d’Aubigny

Mabel of Chester

Hugh de Kevelioc

Maud of Gloucester

Robert de Caen

Henry I Beauclerc of England, King of England

William I, the Conqueror

In the book, spouses are also listed. One interesting fact is the spouse listed on this line for Henry I is simply “unknown mistress.” Here is Judith’s line:

Judith Everard

John Everard

Thomas Everard

Henry Everard

Mary Cornish

John Cornish

John Cornish

Iodena Hunt

Margaret Pecche

Sir Simon Pecche

Gilbert Pecche

Gilbert Pecche

Hamon Pecche

Alice Fitz Walter

Walter Fitz Robert

Matilda de Saint Liz

Matilda

Judith

Lambert

Matilda de Louvain

Gerberga

Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine

Louis IV “the Simple,” King of the Franks

Somewhere in my genealogy I have a similar list, created by one of my ancestors, also tying me to Henry I. Looks like I could have a few hundred thousand more cousins by way of Samuel and Judith.

Based on these lists, Samuel and Judith can trace their royal ancestry back to at least one king each. Thus, any descendant would also link to these two kings. While there may be other royals along other lines, this book only details these two lines. Still, the book outlines five generations of individuals, descendents, from Samuel and Judith. If you can find a family connection to any of the three plus names inscribed in this book, then you too can claim your own bragging rights to royal ancestry.

To put all another way, “The purpose of the book is to provide a genealogical history with documented sources (using vital records primarily) for the descendants of Samuel and Judith (Everard) Appleton. Where possible, the identity of the parents of each known spouse is also provided, along with relevant biographical, genealogical, and historical details.”

If your lineage connects to this family, then who might some of your more famous cousins be? “Americans linked to Samuel and Judith Appleton will find near or distant cousins among such distinguished individuals as President Franklin Pierce, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, Jr. Other descendants include “signer” William Whipple, Jr., Mrs. John Singleton Copley, James Russell Lowell, Francis Parkman, Jr., Phillips Brooks, Josiah Quincy, Jr., and poet Robert Frost.”

So in the end, why get the book? One, you may discover your own connection to royalty. Second, and in my opinion the more important reason, if you can connect your lineage to anyone in this book then you just opened up a huge addition to your family pedigree.

 

Table of Contents

Foreword by Gary Boyd Roberts

Introduction

About the Author

Appleton Pedigree Chart

Appleton Descendancy Chart

Everard Pedigree Chart

Everard Descendancy Chart

Generation One

Generation Two

Generation Three

Generation Four

Generation Five

Generation Six

Bibliography

Person Index

Lineage Society Index

 

You may just uncover your own Royal connection, with Royal Families: American of Royal and Noble Ancestry, Volume Three; Available from Family Roots Publishing.

Richard III to Have His Genome Mapped

The following teaser is from an article by Kate Kelland, posted February 12, 2014 at iol.co.za:

The front of Richard III's skull is seen in this photograph provided by the University of Leicester.
The front of Richard III’s skull is seen in this photograph provided by the University of Leicester.

London – A year after they revealed a twisted skeleton found under a car park as the mortal remains of King Richard III, scientists in Britain plan to grind samples of his ancient bones and use them to map his genome.

The project, which may alter perceptions of the last king of England to die in battle more than 500 years ago, aims to learn about Richard’s ancestry and health, and provide a genetic archive for historians, researchers and the public.

In one of the most significant archaeological finds of recent English history, the skeleton – with a cleaved skull and curved spine – was dug up from under a car park in the English city of Leicester and unveiled last year as that of the king slain as he fought to keep his crown at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.

His death ended the Plantagenet dynasty and ushered in the Tudors under Henry VII.

Read the full article.

The First Family Voted Favorite Family; Kardashians, Not So Much

The following is from Astrid Galván for findmypast.com:
Obama-Family-250pw

Survey also finds which families in history people most want to be related to

LOS ANGELES (Sept. 9, 2013) – Whether it was the Brady Bunch or the Adams Family, we’ve all wondered what it would be like to join another clan. Findmypast.com was curious too, so it launched a survey to find which famous families Americans most want to be related to – and which ones they’d run away from.

We don’t know if Sasha and Malia want more cousins, but that’s irrelevant to 41 percent of responders, who picked the Obamas as the celebrity family they would most like to be related to. The Bush family came in second place with 23 percent of the vote, which was not enough to win this election. Interestingly enough, both the Obama and Bush family are related to one another, President Barack Obama and George W. Bush share a common ancestor from Massachusetts in the 1600s, Samuel Hinckley. Though distantly related, both families likely have many thousands of cousins across the United States (which could make for a family reunion the size of Texas).

Other famous families that people want to share ancestors with:
• The royal Windsors, with 21 percent of the vote (also ancient cousins of Bush and Obama)
• The Jolie-Pitts, with 8 percent of the vote (also ancient cousins of Bush and Obama).
• The Affleck-Garners/The Coppolas, both coming in with 3 percent of the vote. Affleck is also a distant cousin of Bush and Obama

But who do Americans least want to know closely? That would be Kim, Khloé and Kourtney, also known as the Kardashian clan. Sixty-one percent of voters picked the E! reality stars as the family they’d least like to be related to.

Asked which famous family in history they’d most like to be related to, voters forwent the wealthy Rockefellers and Astors and chose the Kennedys. Apparently all those untimely deaths and extra-marital controversies kept this line of American royalty in good standing.

The other choices were:
• The Astors, with 22 percent of the vote
• The Plantagenets, with 22 percent of the vote
• The Rockefellers, with 19 percent of the vote
• The Medicis, with 11 percent of the vote
• The Rothschilds, with 5 percent of vote.

Those who are curious if they have connections to any of these families can visit the Get Started section on findmypast.com.
Findmypast.com’s expertise at digitizing historical records and uniting communities provides the tools to help people connect with their past, present and future.

To learn more about findmypast.com or to get started on your own family history search:
• Like findmypast on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/findmypastus
• Follow findmypast on Twitter at https://twitter.com/findmypastus
• Follow findmypast on Pinterest at http://pinterest.com/findmypastus/

About findmypast.com
Findmypast.com, owned by brightsolid, provides the most complete and relevant records in online family history and genealogy research. Findmypast members worldwide share our passion, and rely on our expertise to help them discover the roots to their family tree. Our accurate search tools and data featuring unique and core U.S., English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, Australian and New Zealand records dating back as far as the 7th century, help both professional and budding genealogists find their past. Findmypast.com works closely with the genealogy community, including local libraries, archives, societies, and other organizations from around the world, to preserve, digitize and provide access to historical records and genealogical publications. To learn more, visit www.findmypast.com, the findmypast.com blog, Facebook or Twitter.

About brightsolid
Findmypast.com is owned by brightsolid online publishing, a British-owned world leader in online genealogy, with over 45 years’ experience in family history and a record of online innovation in the field of family history nearly two decades long. With nearly 18 million registered users across its family of online genealogy brands, brightsolid hosts over a billion genealogical records from across the globe. The company reported a 75 percent growth in turnover and a 47 percent growth in gross profits in its most recent published accounts and was voted Best Genealogy Organization in the Online Gene Awards.

Methodology
The celebrity family history survey was conducted by findmpast.com with submissions from 441 findmypast.com users aged 18-65 from 39 states. The average age was 29.

Royal Prince to Inspire an Extra 1400 Georges

The following is from Ancestry.com:

  • The popularity of a royal baby’s first name increases by an average of 32 percent the year after the baby is born
  • Historically, Prince Andrew (born in 1960) has had the biggest impact on baby names

Provo, UT (24 July, 2013)Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, predicted today that George will be the fourth most popular baby name in the United Kingdom in 2014, with 1,400 more Georges to be born then in 2013. The birth of a royal baby typically increases the popularity of that name by almost a third (32 percent) the year following the birth. This equates to an average of 1,400 babies born in the UK in the year following a royal birth that are given the same royal name.[i]

With 4,340 George’s born each year in the UK, this trend predicts a total of 5,740 being born in 2014 – pushing it from 12th position to the fourth most popular baby name for a boy.

The royal naming pattern was uncovered through historical analysis of yearly birth indexes available on Ancestry.com, which detail every baby born in England and Wales from 1837 to 2005. The number of babies with the same name as a royal baby in the year of the royal’s birth was compared with the number in the following year. Every royal from King Edward VII (born in 1841) to Princess Eugenie (born in 1990) was included in the study.

“The royals are always trendsetters for the population, and Prince William and Princess Kate have been no exception,” said Michelle Ercanbrack, a Family Historian at Ancestry.com. “If history is any indication, we fully expect George to jump in popularity amongst UK baby names.”

The research from Ancestry.com uncovered these specific impacts of previous royal births:

Prince Andrew’s birth was found to have the biggest impact on expecting parents, with the number of ‘Andrews’ born in 1961 increasing by more than 5,500 compared to the year of his birth (1960).

In terms of percentages, the birth of Zara Phillips saw the biggest rise in popularity. The number of ‘Zaras’ increased by 92 percent the year after her birth.

Other royals who had a significant impact on baby names include Princess Anne (increasing the popularity of ‘Anne’ by 36 percent and 1,507 total babies), Princess Margaret (21 percent, 3,760 babies), Peter Phillips (31 percent, 2,607 babies), Prince William (23 percent, 2,581 babies) and King George VI (3 percent, 1,431 babies).

Prince Harry, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie- the youngest of the royals- had only a small impact on the actual number of babies given their names. To the contrary, by percentage their births expanded the popularity of their names by 55 percent, 37 percent and 69 percent respectively.

On average, the male royal babies were found to have a bigger impact in volume (resulting in an average of 1,664 instances of the name the following year, as opposed to 1,010 for girls), yet female royal babies had the largest impact by percentage, increasing the popularity of their names by 43 percent, compared to 24 percent for boys. An explanation for this difference could be that female royals have typically had more unusual names such as Eugenie or Zara that were not previously popular.

In fact, the only royal born in the past 170 years whose name actually decreased in popularity after his birth was King George V, with the number of ‘Georges’ born in 1866 falling by more than 7,000 compared to the year before. A likely explanation for this disruption in the naming trend could be the impact of London’s cholera pandemic[ii] on the population, as many people perished during this period.

Derived from the Greek name Georgious, which means farmer, George has been a British staple name for centuries and is the third most common name for English monarchs (6 times) since 1066 after Henry (8 times) and Edward (8 times).

Table 1- The impact a royal birth has on the popularity of that name:

Royal Baby Names

About Ancestry.com
Ancestry.com is the world’s largest online family history resource with approximately 2.7 million paying subscribers across all its websites. More than 11 billion records have been added to the Ancestry.com sites and users have created more than 50 million family trees containing more than 5 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site www.ancestry.com, the company operates several Ancestry international websites along with a suite of online family history brands including Archives.com, Fold3.com and Newspapers.com, all designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

Findmypast.com Discovers the Royal Baby will be Related to Other Celebrity Kids

FindMyPast.Com
The following is from FindMyPast.com:

New prince or princess shares ancestry with Beyoncé, Brangelina and Hilary Duff offspring

LOS ANGELES (July 8, 2013) – As the world waits with bated breath for the birth of the heir to the British throne, findmypast.com, an international leader in online family history, has uncovered His or Her Royal Highness’ celebrity cousins.

Prince William and Kate Middleton may expect petitions for palace play dates from the following celebrity royalty whose children are related to the Royal Baby:

11th cousins: Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck’s three children Violet Anne, Seraphina Rose Elizabeth and Samuel Garner Affleck. With lines connecting through Affleck and the Royal Baby’s grandmother, Princess Diana, this is the closest celebrity/royal relationship reported by findmypast.com.

22nd cousin: Uma Thurman and Arpad Busson’s daughter, Rosalind Arusha Arkadina Altalune Florence Thurman-Busson.

20th cousins twice removed: Maggie Gyllenhaal and Peter Sarsgaard’s two daughters, Ramona and Gloria Ray Sarsgaard.

19th cousin once removed: Hilary Duff and Mike Comrie’s son Luca Cruz Comrie. Duff used to top the list of celebrities most closely related to the Queen as her 18th cousin. The Queen and Duff can both trace their ancestry to King Edward III.

23rd cousin twice removed: Beyoncé Knowles and Jay-Z’s daughter Blue Ivy Carter. Blue Ivy’s relation to the Queen comes through French royal heritage.

27th cousins: Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s biological brood, including daughter Shiloh Nouvel Jolie-Pitt. Shiloh is related to the royal family through both parents, although Pitt has more royal ties than Jolie.

26th cousins thrice removed: Celine Dion and Rene Angelil’s three kids, Rene-Charles, Eddy and Nelson Angelil.

“While not surprising, the closest connection unearthed among Hollywood’s babies comes from a connection to the late Princess Diana, the royal baby’s grandmother,” said D. Joshua Taylor, findmypast.com’s lead genealogist. “Diana’s ancestry includes a number of early New England families, which means a large number of Americans will find a closer kinship with the heir to the throne than to the current Queen. Therefore, you don’t have to be a celebrity to trace your ancestry to the royal family. Millions of Americans are related to royalty and their family tree is just waiting to be discovered.”

The people most likely to be related to the royal family can trace their ancestry to England or New England, particularly Massachusetts and Connecticut. Although some Southerners will also find their lineage leads to the monarchy.

Findmypast.com’s expertise at digitizing historical records and uniting communities provides the tools to help people connect with their past.

To learn more about findmypast.com or to get started on your own family history search:

About findmypast.com
Findmypast.com, owned by brightsolid, provides the most complete and relevant records in online family history and genealogy research. Findmypast members worldwide share our passion, and rely on our expertise to help them discover the roots to their family tree. Our accurate search tools and data featuring unique and core U.S., English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, Australian and New Zealand records dating back as far as the 7th century, help both professional and budding genealogists find their past. Findmypast.com works closely with the genealogy community, including local libraries, archives, societies, and other organizations from around the world, to preserve, digitize and provide access to historical records and genealogical publications. To learn more, visit www.findmypast.com, the findmypast.com blog, Facebook or Twitter.

About brightsolid
Findmypast.com is owned by brightsolid online publishing, a British-owned world leader in online genealogy, with over 45 years’ experience in family history and a record of online innovation in the field of family history nearly two decades long. With nearly 18 million registered users across its family of online genealogy brands, brightsolid hosts more than a billion genealogical records from across the globe.

Methodology
Using published research from a variety of sources, including the work of Gary Boyd Roberts (http://www.notablekin.org) and Leo van de Pas (http://www.genealogics.org) considered by many to be the leading authorities on royal descents, findmypast.com analyzed the ancestry of each celebrity through a computer genealogy database program.

Findmypast.com also looked at the full known ancestry of Queen Elizabeth II to identify where her Majesty’s lineage intersected with each celebrity. From there, the team examined connections into the ancestry of Catherine Middleton and Diana, Princess of Wales. Finally a computer program was used to calculate their relationship.

As genealogical research can be unpredictable, the known descents of each celebrity are still subject to further research and discovery.

Prince William Has Indian Ancestry

The following excerpt is from the June 13, 2013 edition of MailOnline.
Prince-William

DNA testing has revealed that Prince William will become the first British monarch of Indian ancestry.

A clear genetic line has been drawn between the Duke of Cambridge and a half-Indian woman, potentially marking him as the first King whose bloodline is descended from the country.

Analysis of saliva samples on relatives of Prince William revealed the link between the second in line to the throne and a distant relative from his mother’s family.

The revelation will prompt calls for the 30-year-old prince to make his maiden visit to India, following in the footsteps of his parents who travelled there in 1992.

The genetic link with India is believed to originate from Williams’s great-great-great-great-great grandmother Eliza Kewark.

Read the full article.

Bones of the Last English Monarch to Die in Battle have been Found and Verified

DNA testing has proven that bones found under a car park belong to Richard III, the last English Monarch to die in battle. This story can be read in full at The Telegraph:

Richard III: tests on skeleton could ‘rewrite history books’, says lead scientist

Richard III: The King in the Car Park on Channel 4 tells the story of the discovery of a remarkable skeleton beneath a Leicester car park. Florence Waters talks to the scientist who must prove whether it is the 15th-century king.

Tomorrow could be a landmark moment in British history. If the skeleton of a man found with an arrowhead embedded in his curving spine – dug from beneath a Leicester council car park in September last year and now lying in the city’s university lab – is identified as that of King Richard III, the implications will be enormous.

“If it is Richard III we would know an awful lot about his death and burial,” says Professor Lin Foxhall, head of Leicester University’s archaeology department, which has led the dig. “We would have hard, hard evidence to compare against the various historical accounts.”

The scientific team has been on lock-down in case the results of the investigation are leaked before the official announcement, but Foxhall hinted that the department was “very excited”. She’s optimistic that there are sufficient pieces of the puzzle in order for them to reach a “meaningful conclusion”.

All of this will be detailed in a film-length Channel 4 television documentary in which a host of scholars and scientists have been invited to present their case. As one of the most notorious historic villains, both in British chronicles and Shakespeare’s plays, conflicting ideas about Richard III have kept debate surrounding his life – and his death – alive.

He was the king, according to one chronicler, who emerged from the womb two years late “with teeth and hair to his shoulders”. But not all that was written about him is so easy to dismiss. If enough clues conspire, the results could “rewrite the history books”, says Foxhall.

Click here to read the full article.

Has Richard III’s Body Been Found?

The following teaser is from the September 12, 2012 edtiion of The Telegraph:

‘Strong evidence’ Richard III’s body has been found – with a curved spine
Archaeologists searching under a city centre car park for the lost grave of King Richard III have discovered human remains. Here are the latest developments as scientists unveil their “stunning” findings.

Read the full article – and watch video.