New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases were added at The Original Record this week:
The Original Record
1442-1449 – Workers building the Trinity Aisle of Thame church, Oxfordshire
The building accounts of Thame church give details of the expenditure entailed in the building of the Trinity Aisle or north transept from 1442 onwards, listing payments to individual workmen, carting and cutting stone, bringing sand and timber.

1644-1645 – Astrologer’s Clients
William Lilly, an astrologer, kept practice books listing his clients, their questions and the figures or horoscopes that he cast. Their questions relate to stolen property, probable success in any undertaking, ships at sea, health, long-life, love, marriage, pregnancy, &c. The books came into the possession of Elias Ashmole, who bequeathed them to Oxford University. This calendar was prepared by William Henry Black and printed in 1845. He lists the clients by folio number, remarking ‘the names are often omitted, and usually written invertedly, or disguised in some other manner’. Where a date of birth is specified in the practice book, it is given in the calendar. Practice Book I is for consultations from 30 March 1644 to 4 June 1645.

1748 – Subscribers to the Devon & Exeter Hospital
List of the governors and other subscribers and contributors to the Devon and Exeter Hospital for Sick and Lame Poor, before the Bishop of Exeter and the other governors. Those subscribing £5 or more per annum were standing members of the committee, by virtue of their subscriptions; those subscribing £2 or more a year were thereby governors; those marked with a star were in 1748 the present members of the elective part of the committee. There were also fourteen governors by virtue of their past benefactions, ranging from £20 to £123 8s.

1798-1800 – Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks’ articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master’s trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice’s name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield: in 1770 a change was made to describe many of the collectors according to their county rather than their town, but no change was made to the rule that they might stamp indentures from all the surrounding area, so these labels are deceptive. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. There are returns from Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Brecknockshire, Bristol, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cardiganshire, Cheshire, Chester, Cornwall, Cumberland, Denbighshire, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Durham, East Essex, East Kent, Essex, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, Monmouthshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Norwich, Nottingham, Oxfordshire, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire, each of which has been indexed separately. IR 1/69

1818 – Yorkshire Tenants of William Long Wellesley
The election for a member of parliament to represent Wiltshire drew various accusations against one of the candidates, William Long Wellesley, which in turn elicited this testimonial from his Yorkshire tenantry, signed at York 20 April 1818: ‘We do not affirm that those unforeseen evils, or the unprecedented distress, which has been of late so universally felt by the great body of agriculturists throughout the kingdom, has been altogether unfelt by us; but we do affirm, that this burthern has been rendered comparatively light by your well-timed and liberal interference.’

1827 – Retired East-India Company Officers
The official list of retired military officers of the Hon. East-India Company gives name (surname and christian name or initials); rank; establishment; and date of retirement – corrected to 1 September 1827.

1845 – Prisoners in County Durham
A total of £2272 11d was disbursed by the County Treasurer of Durham from 31 December 1844 to 25 August 1845 to attorneys conducting prosecutions in the county sessions and assizes. The accounts list date of payment; attorney’s surname; full name of prisoner; when prosecuted; and cost. The abbreviations used are 1 S. for Epiphany Sessions; 2 S., Easter Sessions; 3 S., Midsummer Sessions; 4 S., Michaelmas Sessions; Spl. S., Special Sessions; Sp. A., Spring Assizes; S. A., Summer Assizes; W. A., Winter Assizes.

New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases have been added at The Original Record this week.

1755 – Officers of Fifty New-Raised Companies of Marines
The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty directed the officers in the fifty new-raised companies of marines to ‘repair, with the utmost Expedition, to the respective Head Quarters of the Company to which they belong, unless they are commanded elsewhere by their Superior Officers’. Twenty companies were raised at Portsmouth, eighteen at Plymouth, and twelve at Chatham.

1807 – Subscribers to Nisbett’s Original Evidences
‘An Attempt to Display the Original Evidences of Christianity in their Genuine Simplicity’ by N. Nisbett, A.M., rector of Tunstall, was printed for the author in London in 1807. The list of subscribers generally gives surnames, occasionally with a christian name or initial, and addresses.

1843 – Births, Marriages and Deaths in India
The Indian Mail, ‘A Monthly Register for British & Foreign India, China, & Australasia’ commenced publication 9 May 1843 as a continuation of the digest of Eastern intelligence that thitherto had formed a part of the Asiatic Journal. The Register section contained notices of births, marriages and deaths from the presidencies of Calcutta (extending across northern India, and into Burma), Madras, and Bombay (including Aden), as well as Australasia, Ceylon, China, Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius, and Singapore.

1845 – Mariners’ Church Donations
Each monthly issue of The Mariners’ Church Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Gospel Temperance Magazine, published by the Temperance British and Foreign Seamen’s, Soldiers’ and Steamers’ Friend Society, and Bethel Flag Union, to promote religious instruction and temperance moral reformation and general unsectarian missions in the British Empire, at home and abroad, contained a section of Acknowledgments of sums contributed by individuals or through the Bethel churches to the society’s funds, and in support of the orphan home. There are general lists, as well as those for particular localities – Appledore, Aylesbury, Barnstaple and Newport, Bath, Bedford, Bembridge, St Helens and Ryde, Berkhampstead, Bideford, Bonchurch, Bradford (Yorkshire), Braintree and Bocking, Brighton, Bristol, Castle Hedingham, Chelmsford, Cheltenham, Chesham, Cirencester, Coggeshall, Colchester, Cowes, Devizes, Dunstable, Gloucester, Gosport, Greenwich and Woolwich, Halstead, Hampstead, St John’s Wood and the suburbs of London, Hastings, Hemel Hempstead, Hitchin, Holloway, Hull, Ilfracombe, Ipswich, Islington, Leeds, Leighs (Essex), Leighton Buzzard, Lewes, London, Luton, Maidenhead, Maldon, Manchester, Marlborough, Mortimer, Newbury, Kintbury and Hungerford, Newport (Isle of Wight), Niton, Norwich, Readng, Richmond (Surrey), Rye, Salisbury, Shanklin, Shorwell, Slough and Nailsworth, South Molton, Southampton, Staines, Stony Stratford, Sudbury (Suffolk), Ventnor, Wakefield, Wallingford, Watford, West Bromwich, Winchester, Windsor, Winslow and Buckingham, Witham, Woburn, Worthing, Wroxall (Isle of Wight), Yarmouth (Isle of Wight), Yarmouth (Norfolk) and York.

1858 – Members of the Sussex Archaeological Society
“We may fairly ascribe the origin of the Society to the discovery, in the autumn of 1845, of the remains of Gundrada and De Warenne at Lewes Priory. That remarkable exhumation of the illustrious and long-buried dead, excited a deep and long-sustained interest, not only in the history of those noble personages, but also in the annals of the monastery they had founded, and in many cognate but hitherto much-neglected matters of research.” By 1858 the membership had risen to about 550, and the tenth volume of Sussex Archaeological Collections had been published. The membership list gives christian name or initials and surname, and address. An asterisk prefixed to a name denotes a Life Compounder.

1872-1874 – Infants in Irish Workhouses
Return, “with Christian and Surname of each, of Infants Born in Irish Workhouses, or Admitted thereto when Healthy under Twelve Months Old, and attempted to be Reared therein during the Years 1872 to 1874, showing what has since become of them”. The returns from each poor law union workhouse give: Christian and Surname of Infant Born in the Workhouse, or Admitted Healthy, under Twelve Months; Year; and whether discharged, healthy, in hospital, or dead.

1885 – Justices of the Peace, England and Wales
“Return giving the Names and Professions of all Justices of the Peace in the Boroughs and Cities of England and Wales, on the 1st day of June 1885, with the Dates of their Appointment; showing which were Non-resident, or had ceased for a Year or upwards to attend the Bench.”

New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases were added this week at The Original Record:

1804 – Subscribers to Zoonomia
‘Popular Lectures on Zoonomia, or The Laws of Animal Life, in Health and Disease’ by Thomas Garnett, M.D., Member of the Royal College of Physicians, London; of the Royal Irish Academy; of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh; Honorary Member of the Board of Agriculture; Fellow of the Linnean Society; Member of the Medical Society, London; and of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, formerly Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry in the Royal Institution of Great Britain, was published in London, from the press of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, in 1804, for the benefit of the author’s children by his executors.

1821-1826 – White Poor in Antigua
The vestries of the parishes of Antigua raised a tax every year, under an Act of the island, for the maintenance of ministers and the poor; there were no poor rates. A tax was also assessed on merchandizes imported and sold within the island, the property of non-resident traders, in relief of the burdens of the parishes. The maintenance of the poor was weekly distributed to them; there were no free coloured or black paupers provided for by the parishes. The free coloured or free black were not taxed for the support of the poor; slaves were supported by their owners. This return of the white poor supported by the parishes was made to the Colonial Department: it gives full name, age, residence, and amounts disbursed, year by year.

1838 – British Inhabitants of Bengal
List of British inhabitants of Calcutta and the upper provinces of Bengal, excluding government and army personnel, clergy &c. Full names are generally given, surname first, in italics, with profession and/or address.

1841-1865 – Australian Intestates
The probate courts of the Australian colonies furnished returns of estates of deceased intestates, giving full name, colonial residence, supposed British or foreign residence of family (often unknown, or left blank), amount of the estate and how much had been disbursed and how. The date of death is often stated, and if by accident, suicide or crime. Names were carried forward from return to return until the estate was expended or exhausted. New South Wales 1841 to 1862; District of Port Phillip, becoming Victoria 1841 to 1865; South Australia 1849 to 1856; Western Australia 1848 to 1860. There are also returns for Mauritius 1850 to 1855; New Zealand 1850 to 1853; and Van Diemen’s Land 1850.

1870 – Unclaimed Money and Property
Gun & Co. of 6 Prince of Wales’ Road, London, in about 1870 published this fifth ‘List of Next of Kin & Heirs, &c., who have been Advertised for in the English, Irish, Scotch, United States of America, Canadian, Australian, East and West Indian, and other Newspapers, since 1704. Money & Property to the value of many Millions Sterling want Claimants’. The list of 4,128 names gives surname, christian name, and, occasionally, other information. Copies of the actual advertisements were furnished to enquirers by the company at a cost of six shillings.

1873 – Imperial Bank Shareholders
Copy of the return by the Imperial Bank Ltd to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

1920 – Naval Officers
The alphabetical list of officers on the Active List of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines (RM) and of the Retired and Emergency Officers serving gives: number of ship or where otherwise serving; name (surname, first christian name and initials); rank; and the dates of their seniority. This is the list from the March 1920 edition of the Navy List, corrected to 18 February 1920.

New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases have been added at The Original Record this past week:

1809 – Ordnance Staff
‘An Account of the Establishment of the Office of Ordnance, as it stood at Midsummer 1809; with the Names of the Persons holding the several Offices; and the Salaries or Emoluments arising therefrom.’ The return is set out in tabular form, on facing pages, giving: office; full name (or occasionally surname and initials); salaries and emoluments by His Majesty’s warrant or by order of the Master-General and Board of the Ordnance – with separate columns for salaries by quarter books, by bill and debenture, and gratuities, house rent, coals and candles, stationery allowance, and pay of assistant clerks at the Tower and Pall Mall. There are returns for barrackmasters, clerks, porters, doorkeepers and messengers, senior officers; the gunpowder manufactories at Faversham and Waltham Abbey; the gunpowder magazines at Gravesend and Tilbury, Hyde Park, Keyham Point (near Plymouth), Picket Field (Hungerford), Priddy’s Hard (Gosport), Purfleet, Tipner Point (near Portsmouth) and Upnor Castle (near Chatham); the Inland Depot at Weedon Beck; the Office of the Inspector of Artillery; the Royal Carriage Department; the Royal Laboratory; the Royal Military Academy; the Royal Military Repository; the Depots for Small Arms at Brecon, Briston, Bury St Edmunds, Chelmsford, Derby, Horsham, Lincoln and Shrewsbury; the Small Gun Department; and for the local staff at Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Cape of Good Hope, Carlisle, Ceylon, Chatham, Chester and Liverpool, Curacao, Demerara, Dominica, Dover, Gibraltar, Greenwich, Grenada, Guernsey, Halifax (Nova Scotia), Hampton and St James’s, Hull, Isle of Man, Jamaica, Jersey, Landguard Fort and Harwich, Malta, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Pendennis Castle, Portsmouth, Quebec, Scarborough Castle, Scilly Island, Scotland, Sheerness, St Christopher, St Croix, St Lucia, St Thomas, St Vincent, Surinam, Tinmouth Castle and Clifford’s Fort, Tobago, Trinidad, Windsor, Woolwich and Yarmouth.

1818 – Ashton-under-Lyne Directory
‘The Commercial Directory, for 1818-19-20, Containing the Names, Trades, and Situations of the Merchants, Manufacturers, Tradesmen, &c. in Ashton, Barnsley, Beverley, Bilston, &c. Birmingham, Blackburn, Bolton, Bradford, Burnley, Bury, Chester, Chesterfield, Chorley, Colne, Congleton, Coventry, Derby, Dewsbury, Doncaster, Dudley, Halifax, Heckmondwike, Huddersfield, Hull, Kidderminster, Lancaster, Leeds, Leek, Leicester, Liverpool, Macclesfield, Manchester, Newcastle and the whole of the Potteries, Nottingham, Oldham, Prescot, and St. Helens, Preston, Rochdale, Rotherham, Saddleworth, Selby, Sheffield, Stockport, Stourbridge, Tadcaster, Wakefield, Walsal, Warrington, Wigan, Wolverhampton, Wrexham & York. Together with A List of the London, Country, & Irish Bankers, Tables of the Current Coins of Twenty-eight Countries, With their relative value in British Money. Embellished with a New Map of England and Wales’ was published by James Pigot, in Manchester, in 1818. The section for Ashton-under-Lyne is divided into: Attorneys; Auctioneers; Bookseller and Stationer; Boot and Shoe Makers; Cabinet Makers; Calico Printers; Canal Agents; Carriers to Manchester; Cloth Dressers; Clothes Dealers; Coal Merchants; Confectioners; Corn Dealers; Cotton Spinners; Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers; Drapers and Hosiers; Druggists; Fire Insurance Agents; Flour Dealers, Bakers, &c.; Grocers; Hat Manufacturers; Innkeepers; Ironfounders; Ironmongers; Joiners; Linen and Woollen Drapers; Liquor Merchants; Machine Makers; Miscellaneous; Muslin Manufacturers; Plumbers and Glaziers; Reed Makers; Saddlers; Straw Hat and Bonnet Makers; Surgeons; Tallow Chandlers; Taverns and Public Houses; Timber Merchants; Tinplate Workers; Wheelwrights; and Woollen Manufacturers. In most cases full name is given (surname first) and address.

1820-1824 – Vagrants imprisoned in Essex
The return of persons committed under the Vagrant Laws to the Prisons and Houses of Correction in Essex includes lists of vagrants committed to the Houses of Correction at Barking, Chelmsford, Colchester and Saffron Walden, the Borough Gaol at Colchester, and the Gaol of the Liberty of Havering atte Bower. Full names are given, with a brief description of the acts of vagrancy, such as wandering abroad, begging, prostitution, abandoning family, idle and disorderly, &c. January 1820 to January 1824.

1837 – London, Salisbury, Exeter, Plymouth and Falmouth Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the London, Salisbury, Exeter, Plymouth and Falmouth Railway, subscribers to shares amounting to £1,410,865 towards the £1,700,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber (or surname with initials), residence, addition (occupation), and sum subscribed.

1843 – Subscribers to Willcolkes and Fryers’ Arithmetic
‘The United New and Much Admired System of Arithmetic and Mental Calculations, of Doctor Willcolkes and Messrs. T. and T. W. Fryer; Being the Result of Many Years’ Study. Eighth Edition, Much Enlarged and Carefully Revised’ was published in 1843 in Derby. The list of subscribers includes sections for Ashton, Beverley, Boston, Dewsbury, Doncaster, Grantham, Halifax, Heckmondwike, Huddersfield, Hull, Ireland, Leeds, Lincoln, Liverpool, Manchester, Newark, Oldham, Rochdale, Rotherham, Sheffield, Stalybridge, Stamford, Stockport, Wakefield, Warrington, as well as separate lists of bankers and principals of seminaries. More precise addresses are rarely given, christian names hardly ever.

1855 – Killed and Wounded before Sebastopol
The Adjutant-General’s return of British officers and men killed and wounded before Sebastopol in the final days before the fall of the city, 3 to 6 September 1855. The lists of wounded generally specify whether ‘slightly’, ‘severely’ or ‘dangerously’. Full names are given, with regimental number and rank. There are separate returns for the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 7th, 9th, 14th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 23rd, 28th, 30th, 31st, 31st, 33rd, 34th, 38th, 41st, 46th, 48th, 49th, 55th, 56th, 62nd, 63rd, 68th, 77th, 88th, 89th, 90th, 95th and 97th regiments of Foot, the 1st and 2nd battalions Rifle Brigades, the 1st battalion Coldstream Guards, 1st battalion Scots Fusilier Guards, 3rd battalion Grenadier Guards, the Royal Naval Brigade, and the Royal Sappers and Miners, all of which have been indexed separately.

1890 – County Court Judgments: England and Wales
Extracts from the Registry of County Courts’ Judgments. These judgments were not necessarily for debt. In some cases they were for damages on properly disputed causes of action, but no distinction was made on the Register. Judgments settled otherwise than through the Court may appear, unless ‘Satisfaction’ was entered up within the fourteen days allowed for that purpose. These printed extracts include occasional notes giving more detail about certain cases, and also list Satisfactions entered on the Register.

New Databases at The Original Record

The following databases were added this week at The Original Record:

1652 – Signatories on behalf of several Midland churches
Representatives of several Midland churches signed this letter of 1 February 1652 (1651 Old Style) to Lord General Cromwell, advising him, amongst other things, that there remained ‘many burdens and grievances yet unremoved, and the many good things yet obstructed, together with your many promises and ingagements before the Lord and his people, to endeavour the effectinge hearof’. The churches represented are Stafford, Shadbury, Berry Hill, Wasall (Walsall), Lichfield and Burton in Staffordshire; Porwidge (Parwich) in Derbyshire; Leicester, Mountsechill (Mountsorrel), Busswell and Gumley in Leicestershire, Ranstrop (Ravensthorpe) in Northamptonshire, and Bridgnorth in Shropshire.

1826 – Trainee Schoolmasters and Schoolmistresses for Ireland
‘A Table of the Names of those Teachers admitted to be trained in the Male (or Female) Model-School’ 6 January 1826 to 5 January 1827: giving number in the scheme, full name, attendance (date of entry and date of discharge), and by whom recommended; for which school he or she was being trained; his or her age; when he or she commenced teaching; and his or her religion. The training was undertaken for the Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland; mainly for schools connected with the society (pp. 46 to 51, 54 to 57) but also for eighteen unconnected (52 to 53, 58 to 59).

1835 – Glasgow Directory
‘The Post-Office Annual Directory For 1835-56: Containing An Alphabetical List of the Merchants, Traders, Manufacturers, and Principal Inhabitants: And A Second List of the Names of Merchants, Manufacturers and Traders, in Glasgow and Suburbs, Classed and Arranged under Each Distinct Head of Trade or Profession with A Street Directory: And An Appendix, Containing Many Useful Lists’ was published in Glasgow in 1835. This main alphabetical section is from page 21 to 253, and comprises about 11,000 entries.

1838 – Trustees of Municipal Charities
J. F. Le Cointe, Master of Reports and Entries in Chancery, of the Report-Office, made this return 23 July 1838 of the names of persons appointed as trustees for municipal charities of the cities and boroughs of England and Wales. The information is given in tabular form, listing the names of cities and boroughs; full names of trustees appointed; number of trustees; and date of appointment, most having been appointed in 1836 or 1837.

1851 – Subscribers to ‘Poems for Home’
‘Poems for Home’, by Isabella Caulton (authoress of the ‘Domestic Hearth,’ and other poems) was published at Leamington Spa in 1851.

1918 – Meritorious Service Medal
King George V on 17 June 1918 approved of the award of the Meritorious Service Medal to these Warrant Officers, Non-commissioned Officers and Men, in recognition of valuable services rendered with the Forces in France during the Great War.

1939 – Naval Officers
The alphabetical list of officers on the Active List of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines (RM) gives: where serving; name (surname and initials); rank; and the dates of their seniority. This is the list from the March 1939 edition of the Navy List, corrected to 18 February 1939.

New Databases Added at The Original Record

The following databases have been added this week at the Original Record:

1597-1601 – Salford Portmote
The earliest surviving records of the portmote of the borough of the township and manor of Salford in Lancashire were transcribed and edited by J. G. de T. Mandley and published by the Chetham Society in 1902. The court was held after Easter and Michaelmas each year. The record usually starts with a list of jurors, sometimes with a general suit roll. Officers are appointed in the autumn court – borough reeve, constables, miselayers, burleymen, alefounders, scavengers, and overseers for the pump. Where a freeholder had died since the previous court, an inquiry was made as to his or her heir. There are presentments of minor offences, particularly affrays and selling ale contrary to statute.

1756 – Europeans at the Siege of Calcutta
S. Charge Hill, Officer in Charge of the Records of the Government of India, compiled this comprehensive list of Europeans and others in the English Factories in Bengal at the time of the siege of Calcutta, including those who died in and those who survived from the Black Hole. One of his main sources, the returns of payments made by the government of Bengal to ‘European sufferers’, is printed as an appendix – September 1759 pages i-iv; October 1759 iv-vi; November 1759 vi-vii; December 1759 vii-viii; February 1760 viii-xii; March 1760 xii-xiv.

1800 – Subscribers to Thomas Sanderson’s Original Poems
Thomas Sanderson’s ‘Original Poems’ was published in Carlisle in 1800. The list of subscribers is arranged geographically: London; Tunbridge; Gloucester; Epsom; Exeter; Nottingham; Northampton; Cambridge; Oxford; Hertford; Carlisle; Penrith; Longtown; Hesket Newmarket; Wigton; Keswick; Durham; Newcastle; Maryport; Dublin; Edinburgh; York; and Liverpool, each including surrounding areas; Madras; and the West Indies. Where more than one copy was ordered, the number is given after the subscriber’s name. At the foot of the list is this note: ‘The Author cannot take leave of his friends without warmly thanking them for the generous encouragement they have given to the subscription. Their benevolence does them the more honour, as it was called forth in the favour of a Person who cannot make them any better return than mere professions of gratitude.’

1835-1844 – Merchant Seamen
At this period, the foreign trade of ships plying to and from the British isles involved about 150,000 men on 15,000 ships; and the coasting trade about a quarter as many more. A large proportion of the seamen on these ships were British subjects, and so liable to be pressed for service in the Royal Navy; but there was no general register by which to identify them, so in 1835 parliament passed a Merchant Seamen’s Registration Bill. Under this act a large register of British seamen was compiled, based on ships’ crew lists gathered in British and Irish ports, and passed up to the registry in London. A parliamentary committee decided that the system devised did not answer the original problem, and the register was abandoned after less than two years: the system was then restarted in this form, with a systematic attempt to attribute the seamen’s (ticket) numbers, and to record successive voyages. The register records the number assigned to each man; his name; age; birthplace; quality (S = seaman, &c.); and the name and official number of his ship, with the date of the crew list (usually at the end of a voyage). Most of the men recorded were born in the British Isles, but not all. The system was still very cumbersome, because the names were amassed merely under the first two letters of surname; an attempt was made to separate out namesakes by giving the first instance of a name (a), the second (b), and so on. In this volume the register is restarted from 1840 onwards, with the mariner’s previous number (if any) being entered in the column after his birthplace. In the event of it becoming known that a man had died during the course of a voyage, that information is written across the remaining empty columns. This volume (BT 112/11) covers mariners whose surnames start with Ca (and McCa).

1847 – Deaths and New Superannuation Allowances: Public Officials
The annual return for 1847 of ‘Allowances or Compensations granted as Retired Allowances or Superannuations in all Public Offices or Departments’ lists new compensation allowances (usually for loss of office under reorganization), superannuation allowances (for retirement), and temporary allowances (for sickness or accident) arising during the year; and the cessation of such allowances by death (or occasionally because the individual has been re-employed, or the allowance has remained unclaimed for six years). The format of the returns varies from department to department, but generally the details of a new allowance give full name or surname and initials, office, age, length of service, affliction, and rate of allowance. The lists of deaths give full name or surname and initials, office, date of death, and the amount paid in the year. Throughout the death returns the column ‘annual amount’ means ‘the amount actually paid out during 1847’, rather than the yearly amount of the allowance.

1899 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State under the provisions of 33 Vic. cap. 14 and been registered in the Home Office pursuant to the act during each previous month. These notices, from January to December 1899, refer to naturalizations from December 1898 to November 1899.

1931 – Imperial Service Medal
Awards by king George V of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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New Databases at The Original Record

New databases added this week at The Original Record:

1702 – Irish Pensioners of William III’s Huguenot Regiments
From an original return in Miscellaneous Bundle 17 of the Civil List books preserved in the Public Record Office, William A. Shaw prepared this abstract, published in 1902. The paper itself was entitled ‘Abstract of the Examination of the French Pensioners now on the Civil List of the Establishment of Ireland’. The return was in book form with very wide pages, each folio or spread divided into eight columns. In his abstract the first number is the folio number; (a) is the name and station of the pensioner, either by first commission, second, or incorporated by warrant; (b) allowance on the establishment per diem; (c) where served and how long; (d) what substance and in what it consists; (e) what family they maintain; (f) able or not to serve, and why not; (g) when disbanded. In some cases some of the columns are blank in the original, and are ignored in this abstract. The least informative entries give just surname and rate of pension. Christian names are rarely given. The return is divided into two sections – Galloway’s Regiment, and Old Pensioners. The latter include some women, presumably widows. The return was forwarded to the Lords Justices of Ireland as an appendix to a report, dated 29 June 1702, from Charles Dering, Auditor-General of Ireland. In all there were 590 pensioners, 398 being in Galloway’s Regiment. Dering provided an analysis of the return, and annotated with an asterisk those ‘absent out of the kingdom, dead or otherwised provided for, whose names are in the abstract blank’; with a dagger those ‘that have been placed on the establishment by his late Majesty’s warrants & have not served’; and with a double dagger those ‘that have pensions above their stations markt upon the abstract.’

1796-1798 – Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks’ articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master’s trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice’s name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield: in 1770 a change was made to describe many of the collectors according to their county rather than their town, but no change was made to the rule that they might stamp indentures from all the surrounding area, so these labels are deceptive. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. There are returns from Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Brecknockshire, Bristol, Cambridgeshire, Cardiganshire, Cheshire, Cornwall, Cumberland, Denbighshire, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Durham, Essex, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, East and West Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, Monmouthshire, Newcastle upon Tyne, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire, each of which has been indexed separately. IR 1/68

1833 – Subscribers to the Charity Schools of St Andrew Holborn
The Charity Schools of St Andrew, Holborn, were supported by private benefactions and subscriptions. This list of the subscribers, for 1833, gives their names and addresses and the amount of their subscription. Apart from a handful of life subscribers, who had paid a substantial lump sum, the payments were annual. The lefthand column shows the year at which their subscriptions commenced. Full names are given in some cases, but often christian names are omitted or indicated only by initials. The addresses include house numbers in many instances. Those who had served the office of Steward are indicated by a dagger.

1833 – Subscribers to the Last Lays of Thomas Dibdin
The list of patrons and subscribers to ‘The Last Lays of the Last of the Three Dibdins: containing Fifty New Songs, Poems, &c. and One Hundred and Fifty Selections from his Published and Unpublished Productions. By T. Dibdin’, published in 1833, gives surnames, and usually, but not always, initials: and indicates where more than one copy has been bought.

1840-1849 – Prisoners in Durham and Newcastle-upon-Tyne for Contempt of Court
The returns of prisoners imprisoned in Durham County Gaol and Newcastle-upon-Tyne Gaol for contempt of court give full name; when committed; by what authority; cause of committal; and date of discharge.

1917-1918 – Durham University Matriculations
The matriculation roll for Durham University is arranged college by college, unattached, home students and college of medicine. Full names are given, surname first. Michaelmas term 1917, Epiphany and Easter terms 1918.

1946 – Royal Corps of Signals
The Army List for October 1946 lists the 4300 officers of the Royal Corps of Signals by rank and seniority (i.e., the date from which their particular rank was to be reckoned). The names are given as surnames and initials. The many temporary commissions bestowing brevet or higher rank are listed in italics, with date, together with any decorations. In front of the surnames three abbreviations may occur: a bold R, meaning released to unemployment; a crossed-swords symbol for meritorious war service; and a pilcrow, for service without pay and allowances. There are separate sections for retired officers temporarily re-employed, the Territorial Army, and Regular Army Emergency Commissions (including African Colonial, Caribbean, Egypt and Palestine forces), Supplementary Reserve Category B.

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1413-1414 – London Drapers
The accounts of the Worshipful Company of the Drapers of London for August 1413 to August 1414 include £13 10s for ‘les resseytez del Apprenticialtez’, being the fees for thirteen apprentices at 20s each, plus 10s of debt for a fee from a previous year. The surnames of the masters in question are given, some with christian name; the apprentices are not named.

1821 – Capetown Shipping: Captains
The Capetown register of ‘Arrivals and Departures of all Ships and Vessels, that have frequented the Parts of this Colony’ from 20 December 1820 to 20 December 1821 gives date of arrival; ship’s name; captain’s name; nationality; where from; whither bound; cargo; and the date of departure.

1826 – Teachers in county Longford Deserving of Encouragement
The Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor of Ireland awarded gratuities to ‘Teachers, appearing, from the Inspectors’ Reports of their Schools, to be deserving of encouragement’. 11 such teachers were identified in Longford in 1826, and these are listed in the society’s report for the following year, with their full name and the name of their school.

1853 – National Provincial Bank Shareholders
Copy of the return by the National Provincial Bank of England to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or Partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

1853-1854 – Ticket-of-Leave Men and Women
1205 convicts (1157 men, 48 women) were granted tickets-of-leave giving them conditional pardon from 10 October 1853 to 11 July 1854. This return gives full name, where and when convicted, offence, sentence in years, date of licence and annuity.

1861-1865 – Carpenters Excluded from the Union
Each annual report of the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners included a list of excluded members, arranged by branch. The great majority of the exclusions were for non-payment of entrance money or arrears, but other reasons are cited from time to time – fraud; bringing the society into discredit; dishonesty; entering the society under false pretences; working contrary to the society’s interest; not being a competent workman. In most cases names are given in full. There are lists from Bath, Battersea, Bethnal Green, Beverley, Birkenhead, Birmingham, Bishop Auckland, Borough (Southwark), Bradford, Brighton, Bristol, Burslem, Burton-upon-Trent, Bury, Camberwell, Camden Town, Cardiff, Chelsea, Chester, Congleton, Coventry, Crewe, Croydon, Darlington, Devonport, Doncaster, Droylsden, Drury Lane, Durham, Ealing, Edgeware Road, Exeter, Falmouth & Penryn, Gray’s Inn Road, Halifax, Hanley, Harrogate, Hartlepool, Hereford, Heywood, Huddersfield, Hull, Kentish New Town, Kidderminster, King’s Cross, Knutsford, Lambeth, Leeds, Leek, Liverpool, Longton, Lymm, Malvern, Manchester, Manchester Square, Middlesbrough, Middleton, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Newcastle upon Tyne, Newton Abbot, Norwich, Norwood, Notting Hill, Oldham, Oxford, Paddington, Penge, Penzance, Pimlico, Plymouth, Poplar, Portman Square, Radcliffe Bridge, Ramsbottom, Richmond, Rotherham, Rugby, Salford, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Scarborough, Sheffield, Shipley, South Kensington, Spitalfields, Stafford, Stepney, Stockton-on-Tees, Stonehouse, Sunderland, Surbiton, Torquay, Tottenham Court Road, Twickenham, Westminster, Whitby, Wimbledon, Windsor, Wolverhampton, Wood Green, Woolwich, Worcester, and York.

1914 – Naval Ratings Killed in 1914
The monthly lists of the nearly 4000 Royal Navy ratings killed from the start of the Great War through to the end of December 1914 are aranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with rank, and official number. The lists include marines, reservists, and a few civilian canteen staff also killed in the conflict. Full names are given, except for a few cases where a middle name is represented only by an initial.

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1578 – Cheshire Knights, Esquires, Gentlemen and Freeholders
This muster roll, dated 7 October 20 Elizabeth 1578, is entitled ‘A booke conteyni’ge the numbre and names of all the knights, esquiers, and gent’m wth freehoulders wthin the countie of Chester, togethers wth their horses, armor and other furnyture of proporc’on beinge also devyded into seurall hundreds accordinge to their peculiar habitac’ons’. Full names are given, with the details of the horsemen, archers, arms and armour each was required to furnish. There are returns from all seven hundreds of the county – Broxton (Broxon), Bucklow (Buckley), Eddisbury (Edisburie), Macclesfield (Mackesfeilde), Nantwich (Namplewiche), Northwich (Northwicke) and Wirral.

1793-1796 – Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks’ articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master’s trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice’s name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield: in 1770 a change was made to describe many of the collectors according to their county rather than their town, but no change was made to the rule that they might stamp indentures from all the surrounding area, so these labels are deceptive. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. There are returns from Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Brecknockshire, Bristol, Cambridgeshire, Cardiganshire, Cheshire, Cornwall, Cumberland, Denbighshire, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Durham, Essex, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, Monmouthshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire, each of which has been indexed separately. IR 1/67

1809 – Inhabitants of Bandon
2 July 1809 George Kingston of Bandon offered this reward: ‘WHEREAS about the hour of three o’clock this morning, some wicked and evil-minded person fired a musket ball into one of the windows in the front of my house, in the town of Bandon, which passed through the curtains of a bed and lodged in the wall, close to a lady who lay thereon: I do hereby offer a reward of thirty guineas to any person or persons who will, within six months from this date, discover the person who fired said shot, so as that he may be prosecuted to conviction.’ He was supported by neighbours offering in addition sums from £3 8s 3d to £50, in all £586 15s 6d.

1813 – Subscribers to The Racing Calendar
The list of subscribers to The Racing Calendar for the Year 1813 by Edward and James Weatherby (Volume 41) commences with the nobility, by rank. The main mass of subscribers are then listed county by English county, and Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. Initials are often given, christian names occasionally, addresses hardly ever.

1818 – Staffordshire Villages Directory
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in thirty sections for the major towns, followed by lists for the separate villages. In each village the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation. These are the villages recorded, each of which has been indexed separately: Acton Trussell, Adbaston, Admaston, Aldridge, Alrewas, Alstonfield, Alvington, Armitage, Ashley, Audley, Bagnall, Barlaston, Barton under Needwood, Baswich near Stafford, Bednall, Betley, Biddulph, Billington, Bishton, Blithbury, Blithfield, Blore, Bloxwich, Blurton, Blythe Bridge, Bobbington, Bradeley, Bradley, Bramshall, Branston, Brereton, Brierley Hill, Brockmoor, Broom, Bucknall, Burston, Bushbury, Butterton, Cannock, Cauldon, Caverswall, Cellarhead, Charnes, Chartley, Chebsey, Checkley, Cheddleton, Chesterfield, Chesterton, Church Eaton, Church Mayfield, Clent, Clifton Campville, Coalbourn Brook, Codsall, Colton, Colwich, Comberford, Consall near Leek, Coppenhall, Coseley, Coton, Croxden, Curborough, Darlaston near Stone, Deepfields near Bilston, Dilhorne, Draycott, Drayton Bassett, Drointon, Dunston, Edensor, Elford, Ellaston, Ellenhall, Endon, Enson Moor, Enville, Farewell, Fazeley, Flash near Longnor, Flash near Newcastle, Ford Green, Forsbrook, Forton, Fotherley, Fradley, Fulford, Gayton, Gnosall, Goldenhill, Gratwich, Great Barr, Great Haywood, Great Madeley, Grindley, Grindon, Hammerton, Hammerwich, Hampstall Ridware, Hanbury, Handsacre, Hanford Bank, Harborne, Harlaston, Haughton, Haunton, High Offley, Hilderstone, Hill Ridware, Himley, Hints, Hixon, Hopwas, Horninglow, Horton, Huddlesford, Ilam, Ingestre, Ipstones, Keele, Kidsgrove, Kings Bromley, Kingsley, Kingston, Kingswinford, Kinver (Kinfare), Leigh and Lower Leigh, Little Haywood, Little Hay near Shenstone, Longdon, Lynn, Maer, Marchington, Marston, Mavesyn Ridware, Meaford, Meerbrook, Milford, Milwich, Mobblerley and Huntley, Monmore Green, Moor Lane, Mucklestone, Newborough, Newton, Norbury, Norton, Norton-in-the-Moors, Onecote, Over (Upper) Penn, Pattingham, Pelsall, Pipehill, Pipe Ridware, Radford near Stafford, Rocester, Rolleston, Ronton (Ranton), Rowley, Rushall, Rushton James, Rushton Spencer, Salt, Sandyford, Sandon, Seabridge, Sedgley, Seighford, Shallowford, Shareshill, Sheen, Shenstone and Woodend, Sheriff Hales, Shirleywich, Smethwick, Stanton, Statfold, Stoke near Stone, Stonnal (Upper and Lower), Stowe near Shirleywich, Streethay, Talke (Talk-o’-th’-Hill), Tatenhill, Tean, Tettenhall, Thorpe Constantine, Tittensor, Tixall, Trentham, Trysull, Tutbury, Wall, Walton, Warslow, Waterfall, Wednesfield, Weeford, Weston Green, Wheaton-Aston, Wetley (Whiteley) Rocks near Leek, Whitmore, Whittington, Wichnor, Wigginton, Winkhill, Wolseley Bridge, Wolstanton, Wombourn, Wordsley, Wrinehill and Yoxall.

1853 – Customs Officers at the Outports
The lists of customs officers at the outports of Great Britain and Ireland give the full names of the staff arranged by rank – usually the collector, controller, clerks, landing surveyors, searchers, superintendent of lockers, chief tide surveyor and inspector of water guard, tide surveyors, inspectors of patrol, and inspecting commander of coast guard. There are lists from Aberdeen, Aberystwyth, Alloa, Arbroath, Arundel, Ayr, Ballina, Banff, Barnstaple, Beaumaris, Belfast, Berwick, Bideford, Bo’ness, Boston, Bridgwater, Bridport, Bristol, Caernarvon, Campbelltown, Cardiff, Cardigan, Carlisle, Chepstow, Chester, Clay, Colchester, Coleraine, Cork, Cowes, Dartmouth, Deal, Douglas, Dover, Drogheda, Dublin, Dumfries, Dundalk, Dundee, Exeter, Falmouth, Faversham, Fleetwood, Folkestone, Fowey, Gainsborough, Galway, Glasgow, Gloucester, Goole, Grangemouth, Greenock, Grimsby, Guernsey, Hartlepool, Harwich, Hull, Inverness, Ipswich, Irvine, Jersey, Kirkcaldy, Kirkwall, Lancaster, Leith, Lerwick, Limerick, Liverpool, Llanelly, Londonderry, Lowestoft, Lyme, Lynn, Maldon, Manchester, Maryport, Milford, Montrose, Newcastle, Newhaven, Newport, Newry, Padstow, Penzance, Perth, Peterhead, Plymouth, Poole, Port Glasgow, Portsmouth, Preston, Ramsgate, Rochester, Ross, Rye, St Ives, Scarborough, Scilly, Shields, Shoreham, Skibbereen, Sligo, Southampton, Stockton, Stornoway, Strangford, Stranraer, Sunderland, Swansea, Teignmouth, Tralee, Truro, Waterford, Westport, Wexford, Weymouth, Whitby, Whitehaven, Wick, Wigtown, Wisbech, Woodbridge, Workington and Yarmouth.

1886 – Members of the Association of Municipal and Sanitary Engineers and Surveyors
The alphabetical list of members of the association gives surname and christian name or initials, qualifications, and current official position.

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1645-1646 – Astrologer’s Clients
William Lilly, an astrologer, kept practice books listing his clients, their questions and the figures or horoscopes that he cast. Their questions relate to stolen property, probable success in any undertaking, ships at sea, health, long-life, love, marriage, pregnancy, &c. The books came into the possession of Elias Ashmole, who bequeathed them to Oxford University. This calendar was prepared by William Henry Black and printed in 1845. He lists the clients by folio number, remarking ‘the names are often omitted, and usually written invertedly, or disguised in some other manner’. Where a date of birth is specified in the practice book, it is given in the calendar. Practice Book II is for consultations from 22 September 1645 to 17 August 1646.

1766 – Derby Small Debt Court Commissioners
‘An Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of Small Debts within the Borough of Derby, and the Liberties thereof’, 6 Geo. III c. 20, appointed 120 initial commissioners to hear and determine cases as a court of justice to be called ‘The Court of Requests for the Town and Borough of Derby, and the Liberties thereof’.

1775 – Loyal Addresses of the Inhabitants of Haverfordwest and of Cirencester
A loyal address, 18 October 1775, from the Mayor, Sheriff, Aldermen, Common Council-men and inhabitants of the town and county of Haverfordwest, condemning rebellion in the American Colonies, and expressing wholehearted loyalty to Crown and Parliament, was presented to king George III, 14 November 1775, ‘Which Address His Majesty was pleased to receive very graciously.’ ‘Let those wicked Persons, who from hence either secretly abet, or in America openly support, this destructive Contest, be taught some Truths, of which it is material that they and their misguided Followers should no longer be ignorant.’ A similar address was presented at the same time from the Steward, Bailiffs and principal inhabitants of the ancient borough of Cirencester condemning ‘so ill-founded and so unnatural a Rebellion’. Both addresses are subscribed by lists of inhabitants.

1812 – Union for Parliamentary Reform: Subscribers
Following several meetings in London in June 1812, a Union for Parliamentary Reform was established, drawing support from throughout Britain. The union’s principal tenets were:
‘1. Representation – the happiest discovery of political wisdom – is the vital principle of the English Constitution, inasmuch as it is that alone, which in a state, too extensive for personal legislation, constitutes political liberty.
‘2. Political Liberty being a common right, representation co-extensive with direct taxation, ought, with all practicable equality, to be fairly and honestly distributed throughout the community, the facility of which cannot be denied.
‘3. The constitutional duration of a Parliament cannot exceed one year.’
This list of subscribers gives full names, with the town of residence. Those subscribers who paid three guineas a year have a dagger in front of their names.

1848 – Bedfordshire Land Tax Commissioners
‘An Act to appoint additional Commissioners for executing the Acts for granting a Land Tax and other Rates and Taxes’, 11 & 12 Vic. c. 62, 14 August 1848, lists the new commissioners county by county and borough by borough, giving full name, with addresses in italics. Where part of a county lay, for taxation purposes, within a borough &c., the list of new commissioners for the rural portion is headed ‘For the Rest of the County of …’.

1850 – London Missionary Contributions:
The monthly Missionary Magazine and Chronicle listed contributions to the London Missionary Society received from individuals and through the auxiliaries. The issues for 1850 covered contributions received from 1 November 1849 to 31 October 1850. There are returns from Albany Chapel, Camberwell; Albion Chapel; Barbican; Barnsbury Chapel, Islington; Broad Street; Buckingham Chapel, Pimlico; Camberwell; Clapham; Claremont Chapel; Coverdale Chapel, Limehouse; Craven Chapel; Ebenezer Chapel, Bermondsey; Falcon Square; Fetter Lane; Finsbury; Hanover Chapel, Peckham; Hare Court; Haverstock Hill; Holloway; Holywell Mount; Hoxton; Islington Chapel; Jamaica Row; Kensington; Kingsland; Latimer Chapel; Lower Street, Islington; Maberly Chapel; Mile End New Town; New Court, Carey Street; Old Gravel Pit, Homerton; Orange Street; Paddington Chapel; Poultry Chapel; Queen Street, Ratcliffe; Robert Street, Grosvenor Square; Spa Fields; Stepney; St John’s Chapel, Walworth; Stockwell; St Thomas’s Square, Hackney; Surrey Chapel; Tabernacle; Tottenham Court Road; Trevor Chapel; Trinity Chapel, Brixton; Trinity Chapel, Poplar; Union Chapel, Islington; Union Street, Southwark; Walthamstow; Walworth; York Road; and York Street, Walworth.

1857 – Bengal Civil Servants
The East India Register and Army List was compiled, by permission of the East India Company, from the official returns received at the East India House. The list of civil servants in Bengal presidency is arranged by class of rank, and then by seniority of appointment. The season of appointment is given on the left, then name (usually in the form christian name, initials for middle names, surname) and current position, or if on furlough – except in the case of the appointees of the season of 1856 in the sixth class, where no position is stated, and christian names are given only as initials.

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1664 – Leicester Hearth Tax
The Michaelmas 1664 hearth tax returns for the city of Leicester, transcribed by Henry Hartopp mainly from the original collectors’ books in the Public Record Office (Exchequer Lay Subsidy county Leicester 251/4). The names are listed by ward, with the number of hearths. The latter part of the list for each ward consists of the names of those not chargeable by reason of poverty. Hartopp annotated the heading for each ward with a list of the streets comprised.

1834 – City of Oxford Electors
A List of the Freemen and Householders of the City of Oxford, Registered July 31st, 1834, as Entitled to Vote in the Election of Members for the said City. This starts with an alphabetical list of the freemen of the city, which gives (as in the sample scan) full name, address and occupation. Then follow lists of householders, by parish or ward, but without giving occupations: All Saints, Binsey, Cowley, Holywell, St Aldate’s, St Clement’s, St Ebbe’s, St Giles’s, St John’s, St Martin’s, St Mary Magdalen, St Mary the Virgin, St Michael’s, St Peter le Bailey, St Peter’s in the East, St Thomas’s.

1848 – Directory of Bath
Hunt & Co.’s ‘Directory & Court Guide for the Cities of Bath, Bristol, & Wells, and the Towns of Bradford, Calne, Chippenham, Devizes, Frome, Lavingtons, Melksham, Shepton Mallet, Trowbridge, Warminster, & Westbury, containing The Names and Addresses of The Nobility, Gentry, Clergy, Professional Gentlemen, Traders, &c. Resident therein. A Descriptive Account of each Place, Post-Office Information, Copious Lists of the Public Buildings, Law, and Public Officers – Particulars of Railroads, Coaches, Carriers, and Water Conveyances – Distance Tables, and other Useful Miscellany’, published in May 1848 includes this alphabetical directory of Bath.

1861 – Members of Durham University and Newcastle College of Medicine
This alphabetical list of members of the University of Durham and of the College of Medicine, Newcastle, gives full names; those marked with an asterisk being Members of Convocation; those marked with a dagger being either fellows or late fellows of the university. On the righthand side is a column of dates. In the case of graduates this is the year in which the examination for the degree of B. A. was passed; and in the case of Licentiates in Theology, and of Civil Engineers, to the year in which each passed the final examination. Those dates that are marked with a double dagger are years in which the graduate, being a member of another university, passed the final examination in theology at Durham. The centre column gives the degree and, where appropriate, college.

1912 – Blind Annuitants
The General Register of Blind Annuitants for 1912 listed nearly 6000 recipients of annuities from various charities and trusts in the British Isles. This index sets out the same information again in tabular form, giving: register number; surname; christian name or initials; full address; year of birth or age; amount of annual payment; year of appointment; recurrence (if renewed: yearly, weekly, or monthly); and abbreviated name of the charity. Many individuals were receiving sums from more than one source. Where (n) is given after the surname, it indicates a pension granted since the last previous edition; (+) shows an increase in pension; (-) a decrease.

1927 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1927, refer to naturalizations from December 1926 to November 1927. The lists give full name (surname first) with any aliases; country of origin; occupation; full postal address; date of taking the oath. An asterisk indicates re-admission to British nationality.

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1720 – Wigan Poor Rate
The poor rate assessment for Wigan is arranged by the seven divisions of the town – Hallgate, Market Street, Millgate, Scholes, Standishgate, Wallgate and Woodhouses – with an appendix of occupiers of lands. Full names are usually given, occasionally with occupation.

1776-1779 – Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks’ articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master’s trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice’s name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield: in 1770 a change was made to describe many of the collectors according to their county rather than their town, but no change was made to the rule that they might stamp indentures from all the surrounding area, so these labels are deceptive. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. There are returns from Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Brecknockshire, Bristol, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cardiganshire, Cheshire, Cornwall, Cumberland, Denbighshire, Derbyshire, Devonshire, Dorsetshire, Durham, Essex, Flintshire, Glamorganshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, Monmouthshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Scotland, Shropshire, Somersetshire, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and Yorkshire, each of which has been indexed separately. 3 September 1791 to 17 January 1794. IR 1/66

1823 – Apothecaries
The membership list of the Associated Apothecaries and Surgeon-Apothecaries of England and Wales lists members alphabetically by surname and christian name, usually giving address. Those marked P. had served the office of President; V. P. as Vice-President. Those marked with an asterisk had previously been upon the General Committee; those with a dagger were on the then present Committee.

1824 – Liverpool Directory
Volume I of Edward Baines’s History, Directory, and Gazetteer of the County Palatine of Lancaster, published at Liverpool in 1824, includes this directory of Liverpool, which in addition extends to cover those principal inhabitants living on the Cheshire side of the Mersey.

1868 – South Shropshire Poll Book
The poll book of the election, November 1868, for the Southern Division of Shropshire, is arranged by polling district, and then by parish, township, &c., showing the votes cast (H, Herbert; C, Corbett; M, More), the number on the electoral register, and the full name of the voter, surname first. Where a person had voting qualification in more than one parish, the name is given in each place, but with a cross-reference to the parish list with the entry the vote(s) cast. At the head of each column of register numbers there is a letter in bold indicating the polling district – A, Bishop’s Castle; B, Bridgnorth; C, Church Stretton; D, Cleobury Mortimer; E, Clun; F, Ludlow; G, Pontesbury; H, Shiffnal; I, Wenlock.

1888 – Students at University College, Bristol
The list of students at University College, Bristol, for session 1888 to 1889, is arranged in three sections: Day, Evening, and Assistant Teachers. Men and women are listed separately in each case. Full names are given, surname first, but middle names only by initial – except that married women’s christian names are generally only represented by initials, and their maiden names are not stated.

1900 – Long-Lost Relatives
Each issue of Lloyd’s Weekly News, of London, contained a column devoted to searches for Long-Lost Relatives. The inquiries were arranged in three groups: Home Inquiries (i. e., from correspondents in the United Kingdom); Colonial and Foreign Inquiries (from abroad); and Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Inquiries. Results from all these were grouped together as ‘Answers to Inquiries’.
Each column was headed: ‘Correspondents MUST give full addresses and the DATES OF THE INQUIRIES to which they refer. We cannot search back numbers, nor print inquiries for “missing husbands.” These columns are not intended for inquiries in respect to claimants for money, and no agents, at home or abroad, have any connection with Lloyd’s.’

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1653 – Diverse that Wait for the Lord Jesus in Denbighshire
An undated loyal petition, of about 1653, ‘A voice out of the hearts of diverse that waite for the Lord Jesus, in Denbighshire’, to Lord General Cromwell and the officers of the army of the Commonwealth: ‘for wee are fully assured that the late and long sitting Parliament was grown (as to the major part) too rusty for the high and supernaturall worke, now on the wheeles in the earth. Wee are also perswaded that in this matter your hearts are upright, and rule with God, and are found faithfull with the most holy.’

1776 – Gloucestershire Poll Book
The election of a knight of the shire to represent the county of Gloucester in Parliament began 6 May and continued until 17 May 1776, the Hon. George Cranfield Berkeley and William Bromley Chester, esq., being the candidates. The franchise was for adult males possessing freehold worth 40s or more per annum. This poll book lists all voters, arranged by hundred and then by township according to the place where their freehold lay. The voter’s full name is given (surname first); place of abode; of what the freehold consists (such as messuage and lands); in whose tenure; and how his vote was cast.

1818 – Black Country Directories
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in sections, 21 to 30 relating to towns in the south of the county: 21. Bilston; 22. Brewood; 23. Darlaston; 24. Handsworth; 25. Tipton; 26. Walsall; 27. Wednesbury; 28. West Bromwich; 29. Willenhall; 30. Wolverhampton. In each section the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation and address.

1841 – County Cork Poll Books
The poll books of voters in the parliamentary election for county Cork 13 to 15 July 1841 delivered in to the select committee that subsequently looked into the propriety of the proceedings, and then annotated with observations as to those votes to which objection had been raised. There are separate books for seven booths, with the electors’ names in order of voting: giving each freeholder’s full name, place of abode, situation of the freehold, value, number and date in the alphabetical registry book, and for which candidates they voted (Daniel O’Connell, Edmund Burke Roche, Nicholas Philpot Leader, and Robert Longfield). The seven booths are for these areas: 1. Duhallow barony; 2. Hall County Side, East East Carbery, West East Carbery and East West Carbery; 3. Barrymore and West West Carbery; 4. Condons and Fermoy; 5. Imokelly and West Muskerry.

1873 – Alliance Bank Shareholders
Copy of the return by the Alliance Bank Ltd to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

1883 – Pensions to Foreigners in Distress
The annual report of The Society of Friends of Foreigners in Distress for 1883 includes an appendix listing the candidates newly elected to pensions 1 March 1883; the unsuccessful candidates; 88 persons receiving the pension of 5s a week; 122 at 2s a week; 10 at 7s a month; and 31 at 5s a month. There is also a section giving biographical sketches of some successful and unsuccessful candidates. Each of the lists, other than that of unsuccessful candidates, gives full name, age, and country of birth. In the case of existing pensioners, the year when elected is also stated.

1934 – Imperial Service Medal
Awards by king George V of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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1537 – London Liverymen
J. Caley, F.R.S., F.S.A. transcribed this ‘curious record’ found in the Chapter House, Westminster, ‘a list of the freemen of the various companies resident in London and Westminster; from Thomas Lewyn being mentioned as sheriff, it appears it was made in the year 1537.’ Thirty-seven companies are listed, comprising 2400 individuals: Armourers, Bakers, Barber Surgeons, Blacksmiths, Brewers, Broiderers, Clothworkers, Coopers, Cordwainers, Curriers, Cutlers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Fletchers, Founders, Freemasons, Fruiterers, Goldsmiths, Grocers, Haberdashers, Innholders, Ironmongers, Joiners, Leather Sellers, Merchant Taylors, Painter Stainers, Plasterers, Plumbers, Saddlers, Salters, Skinners, Spurriers, Tallow Chandlers, Tilers, Vintners, Wax Chandlers and Weavers. Full names are given: the liverymen were not quite exclusively male, three ‘goodwives’ and a Mrs Danby occurring at the end of the list of saddlers.

1594 -Norden’s Table of Named Houses in Essex
John Norden, the cartographer, prepared this ‘Alphabeticall Table Of the Howses hauing speciall names [in Essex]. And the present occupiers of them.’ In many cases only the occupier’s surname is given.

1645 – Commanders for the Summer Expedition
‘A List of such of the Navy Royal, as also of the Merchants Ships as are set forth to Sea for this Summers Expedition [31 May] 1645, in the Service of the King and Parliament. Together with their Names, Captains, Burdens, Bumber of Men and Ordnance in every Ship’.

1653 – Herefordshire Churches of Christ
An undated loyal petition, of about 1653, from the Churches of Christ ‘and other persons rightly minded to the publique wellfare of the nation’ in the county of Hereford, to Lord General Cromwell: as ‘humble suitors to you that sith, by divine providence, the power of the nation is devolved upon you, you would hold on to act for these ends which you have ingaged your selves to promote, being assured that the Lord is with you, while ye be with him, and do ingage our selves, by our persons and prayers, to assist you in your actings for those ends’.

1716 – Coventry Rental
The rental of the very extensive estates held by the guilds and chantries, by which the sequestrators collected in 1716, with the rental of the warden’s account from Michaelmas 1715 to Michaelmas 1716.

1746 – Royal Navy Captains
A general list of the captains of His Majesty’s Fleet, with the dates of their first commissions as captains, from which they are allowed to take post. The list gives full name and exact date of seniority.

1775 – Inhabitants of Bristol
On 7 October 1775 a loyal address of the ‘Mayor, Burgesses, Clergy, Freeholders, and Inhabitants of the City of Bristol’, 880 in all, was presented to king George III viewing ‘with Astonishment the Conduct of a few disappointed Men, whose sophistical Arguments, and seditious Correspondences, have, in a great Measure, been the Occasion of deluding your American Subjects into open Rebellion’, lamenting ‘the Misfortune our American Brethren have brought upon themselves’, and hoping ‘that the Loyalty which prevails here, will soon convince our Fellow-Subjects in America of their Error, and bring them back to a just Sense of their Duty and Allegiance’. The address was presented to the king at St James’s by fourteen gentlemen on the citizens’ behalf, ‘Which Address His Majesty was pleased to receive very graciously: And they all had the Honour to kiss His Majesty’s Hand.’

1777 – Subscribers to the Racing Calendar
The extensive subscription list for 1777 to the annual Racing Calendar first gives the names of the nobility, then the other subscribers county by county for England, with separate sections for Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Initials or christian names are stated only occasionally.

1787 – Staffordshire Merchants and Pottery Manufacturers
William Tunnicliff’s ‘Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster’ included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Staffordshire, there are lists of traders in Burton-upon-Trent, Cheadle, Leek, Lichfield, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Rugeley, Stafford, Stone, Walsall and Wolverhampton, as well as pottery manufacturers in Burslem, Cobridge, Fenton, Hanley, Lane End, Shelton and Stoke.

1787 – Convicts sent to New South Wales
‘The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay, with a Account of the Establishment of the Colonies of Port Jackson and Norfolk Island: compiled from Authentic Papers’ included as an appendix this list of convicts sent to New South Wales in 1787: giving full name (surname first), where convicted, date of conviction, and length of sentence.

1787 – Lancashire Merchants
William Tunnicliff’s ‘Topographical Survey of the Counties of Stafford, Chester, and Lancaster’ included directories of the principal merchants and manufacturers in each county. For Lancashire, there are lists of traders in Bacup, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Haslingden, Kirkham, Lancaster, Leigh, Liverpool, Manchester, Prescot, Preston, Rochdale, Rossendale, Ulverston, Warrington and Wigan.

1794 – Dorset Volunteer Rangers
A subscription of Ł1425 10s was raised in Dorset in 1794 towards the cost of ‘forming Bodies of Men for the Internal Defence of the Country, not liable to be drawn out, except in cases of actual Invasion or Commotion’. On 17 September 1794 the whole corps was reviewed by king George III under Maiden Castle, ‘who returned them thanks, and expressed much pleasure at seeing them so alert and forward in their manoeuvres’. The muster roll of the Dorset Volunteer Rangers gives the full name and parish for each volunteer. ‘These men clothed and horsed themselves entirely at their own expense, without receiving one farthing from Government, except their sword, one pistol, and holsters.’

1808 – Master Printers in London
‘The Compositor’s of Pressman’s Guide to the Art of Printing’, published in London in 1808, includes this alphabetical List of the Master Printers, giving surname and address (often with street number).

1812 – London Master Bootmakers and Shoemakers
At a general meeting of the master boot- and shoemakers of the cities of London and Westminster held at the British Coffee House, Cockspur Street, 24 February 1812, it was unanimously resolved ‘That we feel deeply concerned at the present disturbed state of the trade, occasioned by our workmen having unjustly and impoliticly demanded a considerable advance of wages. We therefore take this opportunity of declaring our utter inability to comply with so unreasonable and unwarrantable a demand, for which there does not appear the smallest pretence or plea of necessity, but would on the contrary, if complied with, be productive of the greatest injury to them and us.
‘2dly. Being, however, fully persuaded that this injudicious and improvident transaction is in reality disapproved of by the sober, industrious, and most discerning of the workmen, we avail ourselves of this occasion to request those who have not left their employment, to continue at their work; and also those who have been incautiously and inconsiderately misled, to return to their respective employments, confidently relying on our support and protection.’ The list of those present in most cases gives only the surname.
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1569 – Newbury Muster Roll
In the year 1569, when the insurrections in the North caused so much alarm, and levies were raised throughout the country for the service of queen Elizabeth, the commissioners for musters in Berkshire (sir Edward Unton, knt., of Wadley, John Fettiplace of Besils Legh, high sheriff, William Forster of Aldermaston, Edmond Docura of Chamberhouse and Roger Yonge of Basildon) attended at Newbury, when this return was made of men ‘able to bear arms and mete for service in the warres’ (State Papers Domestic Elizabeth lxiv 5). Full names are given, preceded by the letter a (archer or bowman), b (billman), g (gunner or musqueteer) or p (pikeman).

1609 – Huntingdonshire Freeholders
‘The King’s Majestie’s Ayde, to make the most high and noble Prince, the King’s Majestie’s eldest sonne, knight’ was levied from freeholders in the sixth year of the reign of king James I and VI. This is a copy of the return for Huntingdonshire, printed in 1774, giving the name of each contributor, often with address or indicating for which lands in the county the money was due, together with the amount raised.

1764 – Strood Church Book
4 May 1764 this assessment was made, at 4d in the £, on ‘lands and tenements in the parish of Strood, for and towards the necessary repair of the parish church’, by John Boghurst and John Bowes the churchwardens and John Goldstone and Richard Otley the overseers. The assessment, recorded in Strood Church Book ‘a ponderous old folio’, gives the surname (sometimes with christian name too) of each tenant, the annual rent, and the rate of the assessment.

1768 – Citizens of London
The poll of the livery of London for four citizens to represent the city in Parliament took place at Guildhall from 16 to 23 March 1768, the candidates being the Rt Hon Thomas Harley (H), sir Robert Ladbroke (L), sir Richard Glyn (G), William Beckford (B), Barlow Trecothick (T), John Paterson (P) and John Wilkes (W). This poll book lists all the voters by initial letter of surname, and then company by company, giving full name (surname first), address, and votes cast.

1776 – Birmingham Directory
The Birmingham Directory; or, Merchant and Tradesman’s Useful Companion included this ‘alphabetical list of the principal inhabitants, their respective trades, and places of abode’. Printed and sold by Pearson and Rollason in 1776, and reprinted by Charles E. Scarse, librarian of Birmingham Library, in 1896. Full names are generally given, surname first, with trade and address, including house numbers.

1780 – Inhabitants of the City of London
In August 1780 this loyal petition was made to king George III, subscribed by 2800 ‘Liverymen, Freemen, and Others, Inhabitants of the City of London’, expressing grateful thanks ‘for that Protection, which, by the Wisdom, Vigilance, and Activity of your Majesty in Council, was so seasonably given to us, at a Time when our Lives, Property, and every Thing dear to us, were in such imminent Danger, from the Violence of the most outrageous Banditti that ever existed.’ This refers to the Gordon Riots, caused by a bill which Parliament introduced in 1778 to repeal certain harsh laws against Roman Catholics: in June 1780 a mob protesting against this repeal assembled in London, forced its way into the House of Commons, attacked Newgate prison releasing many prisoners, and destroyed a great deal of property, until dispersed by the military.

1814-1815 – British Casualties at New Orleans
The unsuccessful attempt to gain possession of the enemy’s lines near New Orleans led to nearly 2000 casualties among the British forces, 23 December 1814 to 26 January 1815. The report of the losses gives the army officers’ names, not those of the rank and file: but there are separate returns of naval losses during the capture of three American gun-vessels, listing all the sailors killed and wounded.

1817 – Yorkshire West Riding Freeholders
A ballot was held at Wakefield 12 to 16 May 1817 for the choice of a new Register (registrar) for the West Riding Registry of Deeds, following the death of J. A. Busfeild esq. The candidates were Francis Hawksworth, esq. (1) and William Lister Fenton Scott esq. (2). 2544 freeholders voted, qualification being male adults in possession of at least £100 per annum. This alphabetical poll book was compiled from the scrutators’ and poll clerks’ books: it gives full name (surname first) and residence, as well as the situation of the qualifying freehold. Each man’s name is preceded by a 1 or 2, indicating for whom his vote was cast

1818 – North Staffordshire Directory
The Staffordshire General and Commercial Directory was published by W. Parson and T. Bradshaw in 1818 in sections, the first seven relating to the north of the county: 1. Newcastle-under-Lyme; 2. Golden Hill, Tunstall &c. (including Talk’o’th’Hill, Red Street, Chesterton, Greenfield, Sandiford, New Field and Brown Hills); 3. Burslem &c. (including Longport, Cobridge and Hot Lane); 4. Hanley and Shelton; 5. Stoke, Etruria and Penkhull; 6. Lane End &c. (including Fenton and Lane Delph); 7. Leek. In each section the traders are listed alphabetically under surname, with occupation and address.

1822-1845 – Prisoners in Exeter for Contempt of Court
The returns of prisoners imprisoned in Exeter Gaol and Exeter City Gaol, for contempt of court give full name; when committed; by what authority; cause of committal; and date of discharge.

1832 – Liverpool Poll Book
A poll for the election of Members of Parliament for the Borough of Liverpool, between William Ewart esquire (E), Lord Viscount Sandon (S), Thomas Thornely esquire (T) and Major-General Sir Howard Douglas, baronet (D), took place on 12 and 13 December 1832. The poll book lists all voters with full name (surname first), occupation, address, and initials indicating for whom they voted. The lists are in six sections: Everton, Kirkdale, the parish of Liverpool, Toxteth Park, West Derby, and Liverpool burgesses and freemen. All householders of property worth Ł10 a year of more were entitled to vote.

1837 – South Eastern Railway Shareholders
The return of the railway subscription contracts deposited in the Private Bill Office lists the shareholders in the South Eastern, or Ashford and Canterbury Railway, subscribers to 2347 shares amounting to Ł117,350 towards the Ł225,000 estimated expense of the project. The list gives full name of each subscriber (or surname with initials), address, designation (occupation), number of shares, and amount.

1854 – British casualties at Inkerman
Sebastopol in the Crimea was the great Russian naval arsenal on the Black Sea. A combined assault by British, French and Turkish troops resulted in the reduction of Sebastopol and led to the Treaty of Paris of 27 April 1856, guaranteeing the independence of the Ottoman Empire. In the battle of Inkerman, of November 1854, the Russian troops made an ultimately unsuccessful attack on the allied army. In December the War Office issued lists of soldiers killed and wounded at Inkerman: there are separate returns for 2 to 6 November, 7 to 20 November, and 21 to 26 November, as well as one for soldiers missing, and one for members of the Naval Brigade killed and wounded.

1865 – East Kent Poll Book
The poll for two knights of the shire to represent the Eastern Division of the county of Kent in parliament was taken 18 July 1865, the candidates being Sir Edward Cholmeley Dering, bart., (D), Sir Brook William Bridges, bart., (B), and Sir Norton Joseph Knatchbull, bart., (K). This poll book lists all registered electors, whether they voted or not, by electoral district (Ashford, Canterbury, Dover, Faversham, Hythe, Margate, Ramsgate, Romney, Sandwich, Sheerness, Sittingbourne, Whitstable and Wingham) and then by township or parish within which lay the property whereby the electors had qualified. The lefthand column gives sequential number in the whole volume; then follows the elector’s full name, surname first, and his address (often elsewhere); and on the righthand side for whom he voted. When the elector was qualified in duplicate the vote is recorded opposite to the number upon which he claimed to vote at the polling booth, and wherever his name occurs elsewhere a refere
nce is made, immediately after the address, to the number where his vote is recorded, with the initials of the candidates for whom he voted. Duplicate voters who were dead at the time of the election, or did not vote, are printed in italics to signify that they did not vote, or are stated to be dead once only; and wherever the names of such electors occur elsewhere references are made to the numbers where alone they are reckoned in the abstract of the poll as dead or not voting. Whenever a number only, without any other reference, follows the address, it denotes that at the number referred to, the elector is entered as not voting.

1867 – Godalming Tithe Apportionment
This extract from the summaries of the apportionment and altered apportionments of the rent-charge in lieu of tithes in the parish of Godalming, Surrey, was attached as a schedule to the grant of the same by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to the incumbent of the perptual curacy of Busbridge, under the provisions of 29 & 30 Vic. cap. 111, s. 5.

1868 – Oxford Poll Book
The poll of the freemen and electors of the City of Oxford was taken 17 November 1868, the candidates being the Rt Hon Edward Cardwell (C), William Vernon Harcourt esq., Q.C. (H), and James Parker Deane, Esq., Q.C., D.C.L. (D). This poll book, published by the Oxford Chronicle, lists all the voters alphabetically by parish or township, freemen’s names being preceded by an asterisk. Postal addresses are given, including street numbers, and in the case of freemen occupation is usually given. Lodgers are listed separately at the end of each section. The areas covered are: All Saints, St Aldate, Binsey, St Clement, Cowley, St Ebbe, St Giles, Headington, North Hincksey, South Hincksey, Holywell, Iffley, St John, St Martin, St Mary Magdalen, St Mary the Virgin, St Michael, St Peter in the East, St Peter le Bailey, and St Thomas; and there is also a list of Out of Town (non-resident) freemen who voted.

1873 – Union Bank of London Shareholders
Copy of the return by the Union Bank of London to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation (often not stated).

1873 – London Joint Stock Bank Shareholders
Copy of the return by the London Joint Stock Bank to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

1873 – London Joint Stock Bank Shareholders
Copy of the return by the London Joint Stock Bank to the Inland Revenue listing the ‘persons of whom the Company or partnership consists’, pursuant to 7 & 8 Vic. cap. 32: giving full name (surname first), residence and occupation.

1874 – English Colonists at Cananea
Carlos B. Cenci compiled this report on the condition of the English colonists at Cananea in Brazil: the colony comprised 124 English (23 familes and 3 single men), as well as 15 German families and a few Brazilians.

1875 – Mining Fatalities
The fourteen Inspectors of Mines for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland made separate annual reports, each including a tabular account of fatal mining accidents within his area, giving date; sequential number of accident for the area for the year; the name of the mine; where situate; the owner’s or agent’s name; the full name of the person killed; his occupation; age; cause of death, and remarks. There are in all fifteen tables, for: Cornwall, Devon, Dorset and part of Somerset; Cumberland, Northumberland and Furness; Ireland; the Midlands; North and East Lancashire; North Staffordshire, Cheshire and most of Shropshire; North Wales (including an adjoining part of Shropshire) and the Isle of Man; Western Scotland; the rest of Scotland; South Durham, Westmorland and the North Riding of Yorkshire; Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Wiltshire, Monmouthshire and adjoining parts of South Wales; South Staffordshire and Worcestershire (the Black Country); the rest of South
Wales; western Lancashire; and Yorkshire (other than the North Riding) and Lincolnshire.

1897 – Soldiers’ Balances Unclaimed
The War Office, under ‘The Regimental Debts Act, 1893’ compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1897 new lists CCXCI to CCC relating to recent deaths, estates 1896-1897, were issued, as well as republications of lists CCXLI to CCXC from previous years (estates 1891-1896) showing details of balances still remaining unclaimed

1906 – Psychologists
The Journal of Mental Science for 1906 included a full list of members of the Medico-Psychological Association of Great Britain and Ireland, giving year of joining, full name (surname first), qualifications, and address: an asterisk indicates a member who joined between 1841 and 1855. There is also a separate list with full name (surname first) but no address, of those who had passed the Examination for the Certificate of Efficiency in Psychological Medicine, entitling them to append M.P.C. (Med.-Psych. Certif.) to their names.

1914 – Soldiers’ Balances Unclaimed
The War Office, under ‘The Regimental Debts Act, 1893’ compiled and published lists of names of deceased soldiers whose personal estate was held by the Secretary of State for War for distribution amongst the Next of Kin or others entitled. These lists give full name (surname first), rank, regiment, and the amount of the estate unclaimed. During 1914 new lists CCCCLXXI to CCCCLXXX relating to effects 1913-1914 were issued, as well as republications of lists CCCCXI to CCCCLXX from previous years showing details of effects 1907-1913 still remaining unclaimed. In addition, List VIII of Balances Due to Soldiers Discharged was issued (effects 1913-1914), as well as republication of Lists II to VII for effects remaining unclaimed 1907-1913.

1916 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1916, refer to naturalizations from December 1915 to November 1916. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.

1917 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1917, refer to naturalizations from December 1916 to November 1917. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.

1918 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1918, refer to naturalizations from December 1917 to November 1918. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.

1919 – Naturalizations
The Home Office issued monthly lists of aliens to whom Certificates of Naturalization or Readmission to British Nationality had been granted by the Secretary of State and whose oaths of allegiance had been registered in the Home Office. These notices, from January to December 1919, refer to naturalizations from December 1918 to November 1919. The lists give full name, surname first; country of origin; date of taking the oath of allegiance; place of residence; and occupation. An dagger indicates re-admission to British nationality.

1930 – Aviators’ Certificates
Lists of certificates granted by the Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom to newly-qualified aviators of powered aircraft: giving certificate number, full name, and name of his or her aero club. Certificate numbers 9000 to 9080 and 9203 to 9637

1931 – Aviators’ Certificates
Lists of certificates granted by the Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom to newly-qualified aviators of powered aircraft: giving certificate number, full name, and name of his or her aero club. Certificate numbers 9638 to 9864 and 10152 to 10213.

1935 – Imperial Service Medal
Awards by king George V of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name(s), with office or rank in the service.

1935 – Imperial Service Medal on Retirement
Awards by king George V of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service on their retirement. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name(s), with office or rank in the service.

1936 – Imperial Service Medal
Awards by kings George V and Edward VIII of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

1936 – Imperial Service Medal on Retirement
Awards by kings George V and Edward VIII of the Imperial Service Medal to officers of the Home Civil Service on their retirement. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname and christian name(s), with office or rank in the service.

1950 – Imperial Service Medal
The Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood at St James’s Palace announced these awards by king George VI of the Imperial Service Medal to members of the Home Civil Service. The names are arranged alphabetically by surname (in capitals) and christian names, with office or rank in the service.

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