Online Guide to Steamboat Image Collection Posted by Tulane University

The following excerpt is from an article posted at the Tulane University website August 11, 2016.

steamboat

The Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC) at Tulane University has made accessible to the public a new online guide to the Steamboat Image Collection.

The collection, made up of more than 60 linear feet, preserves thousands of images of riverboats including sternwheelers, sidewheelers, tugs, packets, showboats, and more.

“People from around the world can now search our online index to find out what images we preserve,” said Lee Miller, head of the LaRC.

Miller hopes to one day digitize the images so that they can be accessed remotely.

The images document all stages of the steamboats’ production —from construction to wreckage —providing a fascinating view of the country’s steamboat era in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

It is one of the larger collections of steamboat images in the world and was purchased for Tulane by the Joseph Merrick and Eugenie Penick Jones Foundation in 1966 from the estate of Capt. Donald T. Wright, editor and publisher of the Waterways Journal.

Read the full article.

Thanks to ResearchBuzz for the heads-up.

Ancestry Tourism

Carl Tiedt standing in front of the home his great-grandparents owned in Bergen, Germany, before they emigrated to America in 1883. He doesn’t know why they left.
Carl Tiedt standing in front of the home his great-grandparents owned in Bergen, Germany, before they emigrated to America in 1883. He doesn’t know why they left.

The following excerpt is from an article posted in the July 29, 2016 edition of the New York Times. Written by Amy Zipkin, the article delves into the experiences of those of us who are motivated to travel in search of our ancestor’s residences. It’s a great read.

In April, Sheila Albert, 78, a retired psychotherapist from Santa Rosa, Calif., and her niece, Terry Pew, who is 60, found themselves standing in front of the ruins of a stone house in Ireland where Ms. Albert believes her great-great-grandmother once lived.

“I felt like I came home,” she said.

Ms. Albert, whose ancestors emigrated to the United States during the potato famine of the late 1840s, found the house with the help of a genealogy and touring company called My Ireland Family Heritage, which arranged a two-day tour. It was not the first time the two women had pursued their roots: In 2014, they took a weeklong car trip through Minnesota and Wisconsin, where they toured cemeteries researching their family tree.

America is a nation of immigrants, and as many people age they grow interested in tracing their family heritage and group traditions back to their origins.

Read the full article.

Researching in Germany: A Handbook for Your Visit to the Homeland of Your Ancestors – Second Edition -10% Off Thru August 3, 2015

m0028For many, the possibility of a genealogical research trip to the home country of their ancestors is a lifelong dream. You can come up with many excuses not to go, but most can really be summarized as fear. With the new second, revised and updated, edition of Researching in Germany: A Handbook for Your Visit to the Homeland of Your Ancestors – Second Edition you can put your fears and any other excuse you have behind you. Authors Roger P. Minert, Shirley J. Riemer, and Susan E. Sirrine offer up decades of experience to help anyone with German ancestry prepare for a research trip to the motherland.

Here are just some of the ways this book can help you on a trip to the home of your German ancestors:

  • Planning trip finances
  • Research tips and tools
  • Writing emails to Germany
  • Using the telephone
  • Locating needed records
  • Eating out
  • Making appointments
  • Visiting the Antiquariat
  • Visiting churches and cemeteries
  • Finding places to stay

There is much more than these few resources and hints to be found in this guide. Ideas cover every aspect of a trip from planning and financing, selecting places to visit and stay, communication and even going out to dinner. More importantly are the tips and suggestions for conducting research. The authors have collectively made dozens of trips to Germany. Their experience shows as they seek to remove any fears and concerns the potential traveler may have. With this guide there are few reasons (mostly unforeseeable natural disasters) that should keep any researcher from having a successful trip. Look at the contents below to get an even better idea of all this book offers.

 

Contents

Introductions

Chapter One: Preparing for your visit to the land of your ancestors

  • Reasons and goals for the trip
  • Identifying the ancestral home town
  • Locating the records you need
  • Gaining access to the records you need
  • Hiring a local expert to assist you
  • Deciding when to make your research trip to Germany
  • Acquiring your passport
  • Making your travel plans
    • Air travel
    • Car rentals for travel in Germany
    • Trains
  • Lodging
  • Documents, literature, and equipment needed for conducting family history research in Germany
    • Documents and printed materials to prepare for the trip
    • Computer preparations
  • Non-research material to collect and organize before leaving home
    • The log
    • Letter of introduction
  • German Handshake Packet
  • Preparing to use your debit card in Europe
  • Preparing to enter a German-language environment
  • Gifts to take along
  • Luggage selection
  • Packing your suitcase

Chapter Two: Getting around in the land of your ancestors

  • Landing at the airport in Germany
  • You and your money in Germany
    • Need cash?
    • Credit cards
    • Travelers checks
    • Hints for handling money in Germany
  • Living between time zones
  • Rental cars
    • Picking up your rental car
    • Pointers on driving in Germany
    • Driving on the Autobahn
    • Other driving pointers
    • Driving regulations in European countries
    • Parking your rental car
    • Bicycles
  • Traveling by rail in Germany
    • The German railroad “alphabet game”
    • Train information
    • Train reservations
    • Validating the rail pass
    • Handling luggage
    • Conveniences on board
    • Which is your stop?
    • Before leaving the train station
  • Taking a taxi
  • Using other public tranportation
  • Tourist information
    • Finding a room
    • Gathering local information
    • Checking out the Antiquariat
  • Sleeping accommodations in Germany
    • Rooms in private homes
    • The Gasthaus, the Gasthof, and the Pension
    • Vacation apartments
    • Hotels
  • Restaurants in Germany
    • Water: A problem for Americans
  • Telling time in Europe
  • Post office service in Germany
    • Basic services and products
    • Shipping extra items
    • Filling out postal forms
  • Telecommunications in Germany
      • Public telephones
      • Private telephones
      • Other communication options
  • Dealing with emergencies

Chapter Tree: Conducting family history research in the land of your ancestors

  • Research at specific locations in Germany
    • The parish office
    • Regional church archives
    • Other church-owned research venues
    • Civil record venues
    • City archives
    • County archives
    • State and national archives
    • Family history societies
    • Family history centers
  • Private researchers
  • Other research venues
  • Visiting relatives
  • The Heimatmuseum
  • Research in other German-language regions of Europe
    • Alsace-Lorraine, France (Elsass-Lothringen)
    • Austria (Osterreich)
    • Bohemian and Moravia, Czech Republic (Bohmen und Mahren)
    • Liechtenstein
    • Luxembourg
    • Poland
    • Slovenia (Sowenien, Slovenija)
    • Switzerland (Schweiz)
  • Research facilities in Europe: seven examples
    • Estorf, Germany: Estorf Lutheran Church
    • Hannover, Germany: Landeskirchenamt, Kirchenbuchamt
    • Basel, Switzerland: Staatsarchiv des Kantons Basel-Stadt
    • Vienna, Austria: Zur Allerheiligsten Dreifaltigkeit
    • Graz, Austria: Diozesanarchiv
    • Plzen, Czech Republic: Stani Oblastni Archiv
    • Ljubljana, Slovenia: Nadskofiski Arhiv
  • Record-keeping and documentation

Chapter Four: Enjoying yourself in the land of your ancestors

  • Where to go and what to do
  • Taking pictures in Germany
  • Shopping in Germany
  • Chapter Five: After the trip
  • Returning home
  • Annotated bibliography

Appendices

A English-German vocabulary

B German-English vocabulary

C Vital records vocabulary

D Reading German handwritten church records

E Letters to Germany in preparation for the trip

F Computer Translations

G Archive Games

Index

Useful addresses

 

Researching in Germany: A Handbook for Your Visit to the Homeland of Your Ancestors – Second Edition is available from Family Roots Publishing, Sale Price: 17.10; Reg. $19.00.

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840

hbv3674“County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively know as “road orders.” The Virginia Transportation Research Council’s published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. Much of this information is found nowhere else in early records, making these publications invaluable not only to historical and cultural resources research, but also to other disciplines, including social history, preservation planning, environmental science, and genealogy.”

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is the result of a larger study into the history of road construction and development in the various counties of Virginia. This book represents what was to be the introduction to a larger work on the county of Albemarle. With the input of other, the author realized the value of this brief history to all interested in the early development of roads across the state. This historical sketch is intended to provide insight to the development of all Virginian roads, up to the time of heavy railroad development in the nineteenth century, while also providing understanding of the various forces which shaped transportation policy at the colonial, and following, state level.

A map book I previously reviewed, An Atlas of Appalachian Trails to the Ohio River, by Carrie Eldridge, shows the location of little known trails as well as the major routes which passed through Virginia during the early expansion years. Along these routes grew towns and communities. Only four major routes crossed the Appalachians from the eastern seaboard to the Ohio River. But, the area spread out along minor routes and eventually many of the major and minor routes became state and interstate highways. A Brief History of Roads in Virginia provides additional insight to this development; including, the legislation and thinking that was behind continued improvements and development.

Establishing and maintaining public roads was important business. Choosing between roads and canals, selecting overseers to keep roads in repair, and managing budgets was of great importance to everyone. The history of road development is probably far more important to the country’s overall history than most give it credit for. This brief look into this small subsection of American history opens windows of thought and perspective into the lives of early Americans.

 

Contents

Preface

The Colonial Period 1607-1776

Groping for a Solution 1783-1816

The Board of Public Works 1816-1827

The Board of Public Works: The Golden Years 1827-1840

Selected Bibliography

 

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBV3674, Price: $16.17.

Searching on Location: Planning a Research Trip

Even though many people use their vacation time for research trips, such trips are rarely a vacation. Getting the most out of a research trip, making the best use of time, visiting the most family member or research locations, and even making the most of limited finances all take careful planning. To help genealogists plan and execute successful research trips, Anne Ross Balhuizen has written Searching on Location: Planning a Research Trip.

Whether your next research trip is to visit with distant relatives with the hope of eking out some family information from them or, to visit a distant courthouse, library, or other archive, this book can help anyone plan a successful trip. The author suggests success is the result of a systematic approach, with a rational and organized plan. Such a plan can help avoid costly wastes of time, as well as help make sure no clues are overlooked or vital data missed. Balhuizen takes a methodical approach to reviewing the subject. Following her guidance in trip planning and execution will guarantee a positive experience; barring, of course, natural disasters. For those, a different type of planning is needed.

 

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1 What You Do at Home Saves Time on the Road

2 Practical Preparation

3 On the Road

4 Getting to Know Your Relatives

5 Visits to Libraries and Archives

6 Treasures of Historical, Genealogical, and Lineage Societies

7 Approaching Courthouses

8 Finding Help in Churches

9 Research in Cemeteries and Funeral Homes

10 Newspapers as a Resource

11 Do Not Forget the Unusual Sources

12 When You Are Not Alone: Special Consideration for Group Travel

13 Back at Home

14 A Final Word

Checklist: A Reminder of Things to Do

Bibliography

Index

 

Searching on Location: Planning a Research Trip is available from Family Roots Publishing, Price: $9.75.

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840

“County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively know as “road orders.” The Virginia Transportation Research Council’s published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. Much of this information is found nowhere else in early records, making these publications invaluable not only to historical and cultural resources research, but also to other disciplines, including social history, preservation planning, environmental science, and genealogy.”

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is the result of a larger study into the history of road construction and development in the various counties of Virginia. This book represents what was to be the introduction to a larger work on the county of Albemarle. With the input of other, the author realized the value of this brief history to all interested in the early development of roads across the state. This historical sketch is intended to provide insight to the development of all Virginian roads, up to the time of heavy railroad development in the nineteenth century, while also providing understanding of the various forces which shaped transportation policy at the colonial, and following, state level.

A map book I review a few months ago, An Atlas of Appalachian Trails to the Ohio River, by Carrie Eldridge, shows the location of little known trails as well as the major routes which passed through Virginia during the early expansion years. Along these routes grew towns and communities. Only four major routes crossed the Appalachians from the eastern seaboard to the Ohio River. But, the area spread out along minor routes and eventually many of the major and minor routes became state and interstate highways. A Brief History of Roads in Virginia provides additional insight to this development; including, the legislation and thinking that was behind continued improvements and development.

Establishing and maintaining public roads was important business. Choosing between roads and canals, selecting overseers to keep roads in repair, and managing budgets was of great importance to everyone. The history of road development is probably far more important to the country’s overall history than most give it credit for. This brief look into this small subsection of American history opens windows of thought and perspective into the lives of early Americans.

 

Contents

Preface

The Colonial Period 1607-1776

Groping for a Solution 1783-1816

The Board of Public Works 1816-1827

The Board of Public Works: The Golden Years 1827-1840

Selected Bibliography

 

A Brief History of Roads in Virginia 1607-1840 is available from Family Roots Publishing; Item #: HBV3674, Price: $16.17.

Guess the Relative – a New British TV Show

Earlier today I got a phone call from a lady with a British accent so thick I couldn’t understand but maybe one out of 10 words she was saying. Those who know me know that I’m very deaf, and don’t do well on the phone anyway, but this call was about the as bad as it could get… So I asked the lady to email her information. Following is what she sent… This does look interesting.

Do you think your family tree might have British roots?

Would you like to travel to Britain to discover your living relatives?

Dragonfly TV is making an exciting new game show featuring families, ancestors and long-lost relatives.

We’re searching for people from all over the world, who think they may have British ancestry, who would like to take part.

Whether your Great Great Grandfather was born in England or your Great Aunt lived in Scotland… If you think you, or anyone you know, may have any British ancestry, we want to hear from you!

Contact the production team NOW to find out more:

Webpage: www.guesstherelative.tv for more info or to apply
Phone: +44 207 033 2319
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GuessTheRelative
www.dragonfly.tv

Family Tree Tours Announces New Website & Upcoming Genealogy Tours

The following news release was received from Kathy Wurth of Family Tree Tours:

For those who wish to journey to their ancestral hometowns and experience the lives their ancestors led before emigrating, Family Tree Tours announces a new website featuring research resources and German heritage trips.

WASHINGTON, MO—FEBRUARY, 2011—Family Tree Tours, a leading German genealogy tour Family Tree Toursprovider for genealogy societies and individuals, announces its new website and preplanned group heritage tours for 2011.

For those who wish to know more about their family history and ancestral origins, a genealogy tour is a unique and exciting travel experience. Travelers have the advantage of researching their ancestors while visiting the town or region they came from, learning about the culture and local customs and traditions, and even meeting relatives for the first time.

“No family tree research is complete until you experience the place your family came from,” says Kathy Wurth, owner of Family Tree Tours. “There’s no feeling more exhilarating than walking the streets your ancestors walked. Even if you don’t know your hometown, our European Heritage professionals help you paint the picture of your ancestors’ lives. Our new website helps us make your research come alive.”

The website features an array of travel and research resources and books, as well as access to Wurth and her on-the-ground German expert Matthias Uthoff. The website also helps Family Tree Tours design a genealogy tour suited to each traveler. For those who like assistance from a guide, privately guided heritage tours are available. Wurth and Uthoff customize independent trips for those who prefer to research on their own, but would like the trip planned for them. Preplanned group tours are ideal for those who enjoy the camaraderie and security of a group.

Wurth notes, “Preplanned group tours for 2011 include the Northwest Germany Tour with 10 days of visiting towns around Osnabrüeck, touring castles, and exploring the Bremerhaven Emigrant Museum. The Rhineland—Southwest Germany Tour is popular, as is the Baden—France Tour, which includes visits to the Black Forest and the Strasbourg archives. No matter which stage you may be in your research, we have a trip perfect for you.”

About Family Tree Tours:
Family Tree Tours provides research assistance to genealogy enthusiasts and ancestry trips to German-speaking countries. Whether a group heritage tour, private genealogy tour, or independent heritage trip, owner Kathy Wurth and on-the-ground German expert Matthias Uthoff provide you the opportunity to learn more about your family roots, to connect with family, and to learn about your ancestors before they made their emigration journey. With a passion for both genealogical research and travel, Kathy and Matthias work closely with you to ensure your family research trip is a success.

To learn more about planning German heritage trips and genealogical research, please visit http://www.familytreetours.com.

Save Money On Your Stay at the NGS Conference in Raleigh

ngsconferenceraleigh-logoDick Eastman just posted an excellent blog that deals with cutting your costs while attending the upcoming National Genealogical Society Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina (May 13-16, 2009). He’s checked out 10 local hotels – and lists their locations, rates, addresses, phone numbers, websites, Internet access, and other stuff. Check out his blog.