Bundle of American Revolutionary War Research Aids – 15% off through Monday, March 28 – NEW ITEMS!

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Family Roots Publishing still has large quantities of this bundle available – so we are extending the sale through Monday, March 28, 2016.

Family Roots Publishing has put together a bundle of 3 items, from three separate publishers, dealing with research on you American Revolutionary War ancestor. One of the items is only a month old, another is maybe 18 months, and the laminate was published in 2011. If you think you may have Revolutionary War ancestors, this packet is just for you.

The bundle is priced at 15% off MSRP, making it just $32.22 (Reg. $37.90) P&H is just $5.50 – a savings of $9 or more in postage, as these items all come from separate publishing companies. If you have one of more of these items already, you may purchase the other items at 10% off at their respective pages at the FRPC website. The sale now runs through Monday, March 28, 2016.

The 3 items are as follows:

NEW! Tracing Your Revolutionary War Ancestors, by David Norris
Genealogy at a Glance – Revolutionary War Research – 4 page folded laminate by Craig R. Scott CG, FUGA
NEW! Understanding Revolutionary War and Invalid Pension Ledgers 1818-1872 and the Pension Payment Vouchers They Represent,
by Craig R. Scott, CG, FUGA

Following is a description of each of the items:

Tracing-Your-Rev-War-Ancestors-250pw
Tracing Your Revolutionary War Ancestors; Compiled by author David A. Norris: from the Publishers of History Magazine; 68pp; Paper; saddle-stapled; Full Color; 8.5×11; Item # MM022

Start Your Revolutionary War Research!

Locate Your Ancestors In:

  • Military Service Files
  • Navy and Privateer Records
  • State Rosters
  • Pensions
  • Cemetery & Death Records
  • Political & Government Records
  • Bounty Land Warrants
  • Loyalists Records
  • And More!

Here is a complete list of articles you will find in this special edition publication:

Revolutionary War: Getting Started, An overview of some of the Resources for locating ancestors from the Revolutionary War era.

Revolutionary War Pension Files; An abundance of genealogical gold!

The “Other” Pensions: A bit off the beaten track; these state pension sources may revel some unexpected family history.

Federal Bounty Land Warrants; An excellent source for confirming an ancestor’s military service when other key records are missing.

State Bounty Land Records; For men with short-term army service, or who fought in the militia, these records might be the best proof of wartime service you can find.

Cemetery and Death Records; Gravestone inscriptions and burial records can provide tremendous assistance to Revolutionary War research.

Army Records; Although many records were lost over time, there are several alternate sources you should look into.

State Rosters & Databases; A sampling of books and a few online databases to assist you in beginning, or continuing, your research.

Navy Records; Between the official and private naval vessels, a sizeable portion of the patriot’s military personnel served at sea.

Privateer Records; An estimated 58,400 crew served in private armed vessels during the war, those sailors likely have a lot of decadence searching for them.

Prisoner of War Records; A look at some POW records sources, and some insight into the prisons and prison hulks used for confinement.

Loyalists Records; Resources for locating supporters of the Crown.

Political & Government Records; Documents and records books written by officials of all levels of government, as well as political committees, from a tremendous trove of material for genealogists.

_______________________

Rev-War-Laminate-250pw
Genealogy at a Glance: Revolutionary War Genealogy Research; by Craig R. Scott, CG; 4 pp., folded; 8.5 x 11; Published: 2011; Laminated, ISBN: 9780806318844; Item # GPC5210

Tracing descent from a Revolutionary War ancestor is a lofty goal, and this “Genealogy at a Glance” publication will give a much-needed kick-start to your research, setting you on the correct course by guiding you through all the major record sources and online resources you’re likely to need in establishing Revolutionary War ancestry.

Designed to cover the basic elements of genealogical research in just four pages, the “Genealogy at a Glance” series attempts to give you as much useful information in the space allotted as you’ll ever need. In less than a handful of pages (specially laminated for heavy use), it provides an overview of the facts you need to know in order to begin and proceed successfully with your research. It boils the subject down to its essence and allows you to grasp the basics of research at a glance!

In this instance, Revolutionary War expert Craig Scott provides step-by-step guidance to the standard Revolutionary War sources such as pension records, compiled service records, and records of lineage societies, explaining how they can be used and where they can be found. And he brings you quickly up to speed on the important records of the militia, state troops, and Continental troops, including muster rolls, pay rolls, bounty land records, and settled accounts.

In addition, Scott provides crucial information about National Archives microfilm records, citations to the standard works on Revolutionary War genealogy, and references to all major online resources—all of which will be invaluable in helping you find your Revolutionary ancestor.

“Genealogy At A Glance: Revolutionary War Genealogy Research” Book Review

________________________

Understanding-Revolutionary-War-Pensions-250
Understanding Revolutionary War and Invalid Pension Ledgers, 1818-1872 and the Pension Payment Vouchers They Represent; by Craig R. Scott, CG, FUGA; 2014; 8½x11, paper, 78 pp.; ISBN: 0788455869; Item #: HBS5586

The purpose of this book is two-fold:

  1. to provide advice on how to effectively and efficiently use pension ledgers
  2. act as a finding aid to pension ledgers and pension vouchers that relate to Revolutionary War pensioners and some invalid pensioners of the War of 1812. It is based on a finding aid found in the Microfilm Reading Room of the National Archives, Washington, D.C., and the author’s many years experience with pension ledgers and payment vouchers.

The pensions that are the focus of this book are the various Revolutionary War and Old Wars pensions that were paid under various acts from the end of the Revolutionary War until the last act dealing with Revolutionary War widows in 1858.

  • They include Revolutionary War survivor pensions paid under the Acts of 1818, 1820, 1826, 1828 and 1832.
  • They include Revolutionary War widow pensions paid under the acts of 1836, 1838, 1843, 1844, 1848, 1853 and 1858.
  • They include payments made to invalid pensioners paid under the Old Wars pension act.
  • Some widows of soldiers who died in the War of 1812 are included among these ledgers, when paid prior to 1873.

Chapters include:

  • Pension Ledgers;
  • Pension Payment Vouchers;
  • Last Payments;
  • Final Payments;
  • Case Studies;
  • Case Study #1: Isaac Kingman of Goshen, Massachusetts;
  • Case Study #2: Daniel Waldo, one of the last surviving soldiers of the Revolution;
  • Case Study #3: Hedgeman Triplett of Franklin County, Kentucky.

Facsimile reprints of original documents and two appendices (Pension Ledger roll list and Pension Ledger List by State, Location, and Act) add to the value of this work.

Again – the bundle is priced at 15% off MSRP, making it just $32.22 (Reg. $37.90) P&H is just $5.50 – a savings of $9 or more in postage, as these items all come from separate publishing companies. If you have one of more of these items already, you may purchase the other items at 10% off at their respective pages at the FRPC website. The sale now runs through Monday, March 28, 2016.

New FamilySearch Database Collections Posted For October 26, 2015

The following is from FamilySearch:

FamilySearch Logo 2014

Take a virtual trip around the world by diving into FamilySearch’s 2044 free online historic record collections. Some of this week’s additions include Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980, Czech Republic Land Records 1450-1889, Montana County Births and Deaths 1840-2004, and Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1840-1896.

COLLECTION – INDEXED RECORDS – DIGITAL RECORDS – COMMENTS

Argentina National Census 1869 – 0 – 1,851 – Added images to an existing collection
Brazil São Paulo Immigration Cards 1902-1980 – 107,018 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Czech Republic Land Records 1450-1889 – 0 – 236,483 – Added images to an existing collection
Dominican Republic Civil Registration 1801-2010 – 36,372 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
El Salvador Civil Registration 1704-1977 – 78,348 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Montana County Births and Deaths 1840-2004 – 448,484 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ukraine Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates 1840-1896 – 0 – 147,248 – Added images to an existing collection
United States Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors 1775-1783 – 0 – 17,891 – New browsable image collection.

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online
Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.

About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Revolutionary War Parker’s Revenge Battle Site Being Mapped Using Long-lost Artifacts

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Using 21st-century equipment, archeologists are now mapping out exact spots British soldiers and Colonial militiamen were stood as they shot at each other on a rocky hillside on the border of Lexington and Lincoln the first day of the American Revolution.

“Parker met a force approximately 10 times his size and took 20 percent casualties on the green, then made the choice to go after them,” said Bob Morris, president of the nonprofit Friends on Minute Man National Park. “It’s the kind of heroism that cries out to be researched and memorialized.”

The 44-acre Parker’s Revenge battle site is completely within the Minute Man National Historical Site. They have located both unspent and fired musket balls, and even found a button that has a fox, a windmill, and a bridge on it!

Read much more about the project in an AP article posted September 30, 2015 at the FoxNews.com website.

Read more at the campaign1776.org website.

Revolutionary War Red Bank Battlefield Yielding Up Bone Fragments and Artifacts

The following teaser is from an article posted Sept. 3, 2015 at the USA Today website:

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ASBURY PARK, N.J. — Dan Sivilich was skeptical of what his colleagues would uncover during an archaeological dig at Red Bank Battlefield, site of a key Revolutionary War battle in October of 1777.

“I would have bet my bottom dollar we would not have found anything there,” he said. “I’m shocked at what was found.”

They found a treasure trove of artifacts, including a three-pound Hessian cannonball, a shoe buckle, musket balls, grapeshot and a picture frame.

One of the project’s goals is to locate the mass graves of Hessians who were routed during the Americans’ victory. They may have hit the spot last week…

Read the full article.

Fold3.com & Ancestry.com Offer Free Access Packages This Weekend

Ancestry.com is offering free access to their records from the Original 13 Colonies This weekend. The sale ends on July 4. Click on the illustration below for more info.

Ancestry-July-4-2015promo-585pw

See the full list of the 13 Colonies Collections by clicking here.

Fold3.com is also offering free access to its Revolutionary War Records through July 15, 2015. Click on the illustration below for more information.

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“Roots: Our Journeys Home” Debuts Sunday, October 12 on CNN With 2 hour Primetime Showing

Roots---Our-Journeys-Home

Finding celebrity roots has become a big deal on television. Now CNN show hosts have gotten into the act with a “Roots, Our Journeys Home” series which begins Sunday, October 12 at 9 pm Eastern. Following is the schedule. Click on the link for more detail.

ROOTS: OUR JOURNEYS HOME” kicks off Sunday, October 12th, with a two-hour primetime special airing Monday, October 20th at 9 pm ET
Storytelling is at the core of what CNN does, and in a week-long series beginning Sunday, October 12th, thirteen of the network’s prominent hosts and anchors set out on a journey to find their ROOTS. A project one-year in the making, these journalists embark on an emotional journey across continents as they discover never-before-known details of their family histories.

ROOTS: OUR JOURNEYS HOME will kick-off on Sunday, October 12th at 9 pm ET with a special episode of Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown and will air across the network throughout the week, culminating in a two-hour special on Monday, October 20th at 9 pm ET. The following is the broadcast schedule for ROOTS:

SUNDAY 10/12
Anthony Bourdain – (9 pm ET) This investigation into the puzzling history of the Bourdain’s great, great, great, grandfather, Paraguayan émigré Jean Bourdain, serves as a springboard to his first tour of this South American country.

MONDAY 10/13
Michaela Pereira – (6am ET on New Day) Michaela Pereira’s adoption journey began when she was very young—just three-months-old in Canada.

Anderson Cooper – (8pm ET on AC360) Many people know Anderson Cooper as having come from one of America’s most famous families – the Vanderbilts.

TUESDAY 10/14
Chris Cuomo – (6 am ET on New Day) The son and brother of two governors of New York, Chris Cuomo thought he knew all there was to know about his roots, but he discovers a mysterious figure, Germana Castaldo, at the heart of it.

Jake Tapper – (4 pm ET on The Lead) Jake Tapper grew up in Philly, blocks from Independence Hall, steeped in Americana. He was surprised to learn his family members were Colonists.

Erin Burnett – (7 pm ET on Erin Burnett OutFront) After 50 years of living on a farm in Maryland, Erin Burnett’s parents are packing up their memories and moving on.

Don Lemon – (10 pm ET on CNN Tonight) Because of poor record keeping, it’s nearly impossible for descendants of slaves in America to trace their ancestry past 1870.

WEDNESDAY 10/15
Christine Romans – (6 am ET on New Day) As a journalist, Christine Romans interviews newsmakers every day. But in her family, the real newsmaker is just an ordinary girl who had the courage to leave a small town in Denmark, and everything she knew, behind to start all over again in America.

Wolf Blitzer – (5 pm ET on Sit Room) Wolf Blitzer pays a visit to Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust museum. While there, this son of Holocaust survivors discovers his paternal grandparents actually perished in one of the most brutal extermination camps of WWII, Auschwitz.

Sanjay Gupta – (8 pm ET on AC360) CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, takes his family half-way around the world to uncover his roots. (re-air Saturday 9/18 at 4:30pm ET on Sanjay Gupta MD)

THURSDAY 10/16
Kate Bolduan – (6 am ET on New Day) Kate Bolduan just gave birth to her first child, a daughter, so finding out about her family tree comes at a perfect time.

FRIDAY 10/17
John Berman – (6 am ET on New Day) Could John Berman be royalty? Is he related to the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, noted as the Prince of Philosophers?

Fareed Zakaria – (8 pm ET on AC360) Fareed Zakaria takes viewers on a historical journey as he explores his family’s roots and discovers how his personal story intersects with critical moments in history. (re-air Sunday 9/19, 10am ET on Fareed Zakaria GPS)

MONDAY 10/20
ROOTS: OUR JOURNEYS HOME – 9 pm ET – CNN anchors Anderson Cooper and Michaela Pereira will host a two hour special featuring 12 of the network’s hosts and anchors stories. The special will also include interviews with Anderson Cooper, Michaela Pereira, Erin Burnett and Dr. Sanjay Gupta about what the experience has meant to them personally.

Beginning Friday, October 10, a sneak peek at Roots will be available on CNN.com. As the journeys unfold on-air, viewers online will be invited to watch and share the segments as well as explore more of each anchor’s story through video extras, exclusive photos and first-person accounts of their individual journeys. They will also be able to compare their habits and hobbies to CNN’s anchors with a new “Which anchor are you?” quiz. Throughout, the Roots experience will extend across on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr using the hashtag #CNNRoots.

Read more details about the programs at: http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/2014/10/06/cnn-hosts-journey-to-find-their-roots-2/

Two Excellent FREE Webinars From the North Carolina Genealogical Society Oct 3-5 & Dec 5-7

NC Webinar Series Logo

The following is from Maryann Stockert Tuck with the NCGS Webinars. Note that NCGS members have free access to the live webinars, as well as the archived classes. Free webinars are limited to specific programs on specific dates.

October 3-5, 2014 Free three-day viewing of Mark Lowe’s “North Carolina Tax Lists: People, Time, and Delinquency” on www.ncgenealogy.org. This webinar was recorded on 19 September 2014.

New Webinar:

21 November 2014. The North Carolina Genealogical Society will present a live webinar featuring Craig R. Scott, CG, “Finding a North Carolina Revolutionary War Ancestry”.

North Carolinians were active participants in the Revolutionary War, providing men, supplies, and support for the revolutionary cause. Records were created before, during, and after the war. There is more to research than complied military service records and pension application files, such as public claims, pension ledgers, and pension payment vouchers. Records are found in the National Archives, Ancestry.com, Fold3.com, the State Library and Archives, and in some unexpected places. Clues to information on ancestors and descendants can be found in the lineage application papers of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Sons of the American Revolution.

See the NCGS website: www.ncgenealogy.org for more details and dates of free viewing of the recording of this webinar will occur 5-7 December 2014.

Preserving a Revolutionary War Battlefield

The following teaser is from an article posted in the April 12, 2014 edition of chonicle.augusta.com:

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SYLVANIA, Ga. — More than two centuries after a daring British surprise attack routed American forces at Brier Creek, new efforts are underway to preserve one of Georgia’s least explored Revolutionary War sites.

This battlefield has all the components very rarely seen in preservation,” said archaeologist Dan Battle, who has spent the past year assessing the Screven County historic site to determine what secrets it might still hold.

The Battle of Brier Creek unfolded March 3, 1779, when a British force of 1,500 men led by Col. Marc Prevost circled back on Gen. John Ashe’s encamped Patriot army, which included about 1,700 soldiers.

The late afternoon attack was a complete surprise. About 150 Americans died, while hundreds of others were captured. The fleeing survivors left behind their arms, food and supplies.

The British victory was so decisive scholars believe it prolonged the American Revolution by a year, changing the course of U.S. history.

Read the full article.

Bethel Presbyterian Church of Clover, York Co., SC Celebrating 250 Years

The following excerpts are from an article posted in the January 8, 2013 edition of the Enquirer Herald.

Cary Grant stands near the grave of one of the 52 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in the cemetery at Bethel Presbyterian Church. The church is in the background. Photo by Jennifer Becknell.
Cary Grant stands near the grave of one of the 52 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in the cemetery at Bethel Presbyterian Church. The church is in the background. Photo by Jennifer Becknell.

CLOVER [York County, South Carolina]
A dozen years before the United States was founded, three men gathered at a spring near Clover and decided to start one of the first churches organized in the colony of South Carolina.

Bethel Presbyterian Church, a small country church on S.C. 557 near Clover that is the oldest Presbyterian church in York County, this year plans a series of events to celebrate its 250 years of ministry, missions and prayer.

Grant and the church’s pastor, the Rev. John Gess, said the church, founded in 1764, has 52 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in its historic cemetery.

A published history of Bethel Presbyterian Church, compiled and edited by Helen Grant and Janice Currence, is available for $10, plus shipping. To obtain a copy, contact Helen and Cary Grant via email at caryegrant@bellsouth.net or call 803-962-2112.

For a 30-minute video history of the church, visit the website www.bethelchurchpa.com.

Read the full article.

FamilySearch Adds Over 145 Million Indexed Records & Images to Collections from BillionGraves, England, Russia, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch:
FamilySearch.org
FamilySearch has added more than 145 million indexed records and images to collections from BillionGraves, England, Russia, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 65,593,352 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Birth Index, 1800–1920, collection, the 35,117,915 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Marriage Index, 1800–1920, collection, and the 40,618,506 indexed records from the new England and Wales, Death Index 1800–1920, collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

BillionGraves Index – 292,519 – 292,519 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection.

England and Wales, Birth Index, 1800-1920 – 65,593,352 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

England and Wales, Death Index 1800-1920 – 40,618,506 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

England and Wales, Marriage Index, 1800-1920 – 35,117,915 – 0 – New indexed record collection.

Russia, Tatarstan Church Books, 1721-1939 – 0 – 333,592 – Added images to an existing collection.

U.S., Michigan, Eastern District, Naturalization Index, 1907-1995 – 0 – 577,690 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Montana Naturalization Records, 1868-1999 – 0 – 52,264 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Montana, Teton County Records, 1881-2012 – 0 – 98,268 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., New England, Seamen’s Identification Cards, 1918-1940 – 0 – 104,825 – New browsable image collection.

United States, Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 0 – 90,827 – New browsable image collection.

United States Revolutionary War, Virginia Pension Application Files, 1830-1875 – 0 – 220,787 – New browsable image collection.

U.S., Wisconsin, Milwaukee Petitions to Naturalization, 1848-1991 – 0 – 78,845 – New browsable image collection.

Grave of Revolutionary War Vet Found in Ringwood New Jersey, Solving Family Puzzle

From the October 29, 2013, Northjersey.com – News

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Seven years ago, Russell Dutcher III embarked on a quest to find a family ancestor, a veteran of the American Revolution whose life story was nearly lost to the ages

He pored over centuries-old census records and tax lists and scoured ancestry websites and cemeteries, driven by a will that David Dutcher not be forgotten.

This past summer, after more digging, Dutcher pieced together his relative’s footprint in New Jersey and located his nearly 200-year-old unmarked grave in the Ringwood Manor cemetery, part of Ringwood State Park. And now, he hopes to rededicate the site to give David Dutcher — his great-great-great-great-grandfather — the honor he deserves.

Read the full article.

Revolutionary War Pensions: Awarded By State Governments 1775-1874, The General And Federal Governments Prior To 1814, And By Private Acts Of Congress To 1905

gpc492Massive. How else do you describe a book with over 1,000 pages of Revolutionary War Pensions: Awarded By State Governments 1775-1874, The General And Federal Governments Prior To 1814, And By Private Acts Of Congress To 1905? Well, you could call it a brilliant reconstruction of lost records.

On the 8th of November 1800 a fire razed the War Department, destroying the young nation’s war pension records. Another fire on the 24th of August 1814, started during the British invasion on Washington as part of the War of 1812, destroyed both those files reconstructed after the first fire as well as all additional records added up to that time.

Despite the loss of these records, other records do exist. From these other resources, the author, Lloyd Bockstruck, painstakingly reconstructed a list of over 16,000 pensioner with an index of another 15,000 individuals mentioned in the text. Each entry contains the pensioner’s name, state of service, and place of residence. Available details of service may include dates and places of engagements and wounds received, date of death, and names and relationships of surviving family members, especially widows.

Key sources used in this marvelous reconstruction include the pension records generated by the governments of each of the original thirteen states (state governments had their own programs and in varying degrees preserved many of their pension files); and reports, created as the results of acts of Congress, for pensioners receiving pay for service or disability, or widows and orphans receiving benefits, mostly issued as government publications between 1792 and 1840.

Revolutionary War Pensions—Awarded by State Governments 1775–1874, the General and Federal Governments Prior to 1814, and by Private Acts of Congress to 1905; by Lloyd de Witt Bockstruck would make a fabulous collection to any genealogical, society, or personal library.

Order a copy of Revolutionary War Pensions for yourself or library, at Family Roots Publishing Item #GPC492.

The Soldiers of the American Revolution in Illinois

The following press release was received from Thomas MacEntee:
Soldiers-of-the-American-Rev-in-Illinois-200pw

August 12, 2013 – Springfield, IL. The Illinois State Genealogical Society (ISGS) announces the publication of an expanded and revised version of Soldiers of the American Revolution in Illinois.

In its first venture in the world of self-publishing and “print on demand,” ISGS has published Soldiers of the American Revolution in Illinois in hardcover or e-book version through its store at Lulu.com. Visit http://bit.ly/ilamrevsoldiers to order!

The alphabetical listing of “The Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried in Illinois” published in 1976 by Illinois State Genealogical Society has been expanded to include new entries, children of the entry, (other family members), history found in and referencing to pension records relating people, places and events, location of graves and references to searching for the Revolutionary War Soldier connected to Illinois. The expanded version includes the very early Soldiers in Illinois before the establishment of the Northwest Territory (1787) and Illinois (1818), many of French extraction.

According to Howard Manthei, ISGS Publications Chairperson, “Thanks to two years of tireless research by ISGS board member Jayne Cates, the new release of this book contains a wealth of detail about Revolutionary War soldiers that were connected to Illinois and has three helpful indexes: soldier, burial, and spouse. The e-book format, with the ability to search the contents on a computer or e-reader, adds a new dimension to our publications.”

Those interested in review copies of Soldiers of the American Revolution in Illinois should contact Howard Manthei, ISGS Publications Chair at isgspublications@ilgensoc.org.

FamilySearch Adds 18 New Collections Including Germany, Italy, Netherlands, & the USA

The following is from FamilySearch, dated Februry 15, 2013:

Included in this week’s records update are 18 new collections; seven from Napoli, Italy, seven from the United States, four from Germany, and one from Netherlands. Among these collections are the United States Draper Manuscript Collection from 1740-1960 (more information can be found here), the Germany, Brandenburg, Bernau bei Berlin Jewish Records from 1688-1872, and the United States Revolutionary War Rolls from 1775-1783. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 3.5 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Germany, Brandenburg, Bernau bei Berlin, Jewish Records, 1688-1872 – 0 – 2,058 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Prussia, Saxony, Various Protestant Church Records, 1594-1936 – 0 – 4,056 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Westfalen, Minden, Index to Funeral Sermons, 1580-1740 – 0 – 33,073 – New browsable image collection.
Germany, Württemberg, Schwäbisch Hall, Probate Records, 1803-1925 – 0 – 36,814 – New browsable image collection.
Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 0 – 1,811 – Added images to an existing collection.
Italy, Napoli, Fontana, Parocchia di Santa Maria della Mercede – La Sacra, Catholic Church Records, 1641-1929 – 0 – 2,660 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Grumo Nevano, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 18,810 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Lacco Ameno, Parrocchia di SS. Annunziata in Santa Maria delle Grazie, Catholic Church Records, 1630-1929 – 0 – 3,193 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Marano di Napoli, Civil Registration (Comune), 1839-1929 – 0 – 18,199 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Sant’Angelo, Parocchia di San Michele Arcangelo, Catholic Church Records, 1905-1929 – 0 – 77 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Sant’Antimo, Civil Registration (Comune), 1809-1929 – 0 – 24,177 – New browsable image collection.
Italy, Napoli, Serrara, Parocchia di Santa Maria del Carmine, Catholic Church Records, 1659-1929 – 0 – 2,714 – New browsable image collection.
Netherlands, Noord-Holland Province, Church Records, 1553-1909 – 0 – 672,330 – New browsable image collection.
Spain, Cádiz, Civil Registration Records, 1870-1960 – 0 – 37,980 – Added images to an existing collection.
Spain, Province of Sevilla, Municipal Records, 1903-1918 – 0 – 159,510 – Added images to an existing collection.
Ukraine, Kyiv Orthodox Consistory Church Book Duplicates, 1840-1845 – 520,550 – 146,178 – Added index records and images to an existing collection.
U.S., California, Cemetery Transcriptions – 0 – 17,138 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Georgia, Elbert County Records, 1790-2002 – 0 – 63,290 – New browsable image collection.
U.S., Mississippi, Confederate Records, 1889-1942 – 0 – 2,740 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Ohio, Cleveland Cemetery Interment Records, 1824-2001 – 346,248 – 10,585 – New indexed records and images collection.
U.S., Ohio, County Records, 1841-2003 – 0 – 92 – Added images to an existing collection.
U.S., Vermont, Orange County, Bradford District Estate Files, 1780-1915 – 0 – 75,694 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Draper Manuscript Collection, 1740-1960 – 0 – 84,177 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914 – 0 – 41,172 – Added images to an existing collection.
United States, Remarried Widows Index to Pension Applications, 1887-1942 – 52,939 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.
United States, Revolutionary War Pension Payment Ledgers, 1818-1872 – 0 – 8,955 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 – 0 – 93,048 – New browsable image collection.
United States, Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933 – 852,027 – 0 – Added index records to an existing collection.

The Dark Side of Genealogy

The following article was written by my friend, Thomas Fiske
Thomas Fiske

Who knew there was a dark side to genealogy? I certainly did not know until today. It was news to me before I figured it out.

While looking at an Internet epistle from Family Roots, I saw two books that looked mighty interesting. As a fan of Amateur Radio and Genealogy, I was long accustomed to being disappointed at Christmas when I opened packages of socks and underwear. No one knew what to give me. This last year I decided to take matters into my own hands and get something I really wanted: genealogy books. Besides, my chest of drawers were full and my shelves were empty. This year I opened two packages containing books and I loudly thanked an obscure aunt who lives in Kentucky. I even wrote her a note of gratitude for the volumes. But I didn’t mail the envelope.

The first book, titled something like Ontario People, contains information about those folks who were loyalists when the Revolutionary War ended. I read that Americans offered them a hanging with all the appropriate amenities, while King George III offered them land in Ontario, Canada. Most people wanted to escape the rope and III wanted to fill Ontario with his subjects. Outside of the cold weather, it was a match made in heaven, proving that III was no fool.

Now, it just so happened that among the loyalists were a group of folks named Shippee who lived in Rhode Island. They quickly fled to Ontario. Over the next 100 years the Shippee/Shippy clan worked their way in a south-westerly direction until they found the American border. There they slipped across and traveled until they got to Iowa, where they settled.

The second book was titled Expansion of New England. It seems that my ancestor, a man named Fiske, had with his ancestors, been living in Rhode Island for some hundred years or so. There was a big recession in the area in 1837, so he took his small family and left for Southern Indiana near the Ohio River. He settled in New Albany, across the Ohio River from the city of Louisville, Kentucky. There, he had many children and all of them lived to maturity. In 1866, just after the close of the Civil War, Fiske moved across the Ohio to that wonderful city of Louisville where his number one son took up residence and established a profitable business. The river was about 3/4 of a mile wide without bridges, so the move was no small thing.

The Fiske family settled down and waited for me to be born. Eventually I showed up and there was great rejoicing. But I did not lead them. I tried several cities such as Cleveland, Schenectady, and Ontario, California before settling down.

And it was in Southern California that I met a pretty young woman from Iowa. Her maiden name was Shippy.

We had a wonderful courtship and then we married. While in middle age I took up the august hobby of genealogy. After several years of recording facts about my family, I began looking into my wife’s family. Her uncle had been doing the same thing, so his records were a wonderful help. My wife is an identical twin whose husband is also a genealogist.

All three of our records showed the same thing. The Shippee/Shippy family were loyalists who fled from Rhode Island and went to Ontario as guests of King George III.

Only my records showed that my Fiske ancestor was a captain his local militia. His side won the War and was charged with the responsibility of hanging loyalists.

I tried very hard to keep this information from my wife and her family, but eventually it leaked. I found out when I came home from work one day and noticed the silence. My wife was not speaking to me that day. She had discovered that the Fiskes were wanting to hang the Shippees. Or could have been; it made no difference. It made for a dark day.

When I saw these two very interesting books for sale on the Family Roots web site, I was reminded of that time and how much pain it brought to my wife. Oddly enough, it brought me no pain at all. Did I buy the books anyway? You can bet your bottom dollar I did.

But I may keep them hid behind my collection of various texts about the intricacies of Amateur Radio.