Dollarhide Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides AL-MI 80% Off! – NEW MN-WY Guides 20% Off! With FREE Downloads!

Bill Dollarhide started a series of what he called “Name List” guides in the Summer of 2013. He wrote steadily on them until sometime in 2015, when life caught up with him, and he had to put the project aside. Well, he went back at it several months ago, and completed new guides for all the rest of the states, alphabetically Minnesota through Wyoming. He also wrote a full book on the U.S. Territories. Finally, Bill went back and updated an earlier volume – choosing Indiana – to test whether enough changes had taken place to make it worthwhile to do Second Editions. Bill found that a number of URL addresses had changed, which he expected, and he found additional data that expanded the volume by another 10 pages.

So this weekend we are releasing all 29 NEW volumes Minnesota through Wyoming, plus U.S. Territories and Indiana Second Edition.

To celebrate, we’re pricing all of the new 2017 volumes at 20% off, making them $15.16 (or $10 for the PDF eBook alone). As before, we’re throwing in a FREE instantly downloadable PDF eBook version with any paperback book being purchased. See my Super-Saver shipping note below.

To clear out the earlier printed books, those written between 2013 and 2017, FRPC has discounted the price 80%! That makes them only $3.79 each! We will most likely do Second Editions for those volumes sometime in the Fall or Winter. Note that if you only desire the PDF eBook alone, we’ve discounted them, Alabama through Michigan, by 60%, making them just $5. Again – this is for all volumes Alabama through Michigan.

To make this offer even more attractive, we’re offering Super-Saver (USA Only) USPS shipping on all 53 printed books. That’s $4.50 for the first book, and only 50 cents for each thereafter.

With the completion of this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what name lists, censuses, and census substitutes are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & Substitute Name Lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only do these this volumes give a detailed bibliography of Censuses and Substitute Names Lists available for each state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co. Click on the appropriate links to purchase.

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance – New and On Sale for 10% Off

Michael A. Ports – author of the groundbreaking series Georgia Free Persons of Color as well as numerous volumes of transcribed records from Baldwin, Elbert, and especially Jefferson County, Georgia – has applied his expertise in Georgia genealogy research to a “Genealogy at a Glance” guide. Like the other publications in the series, Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research is a four-page laminated folder that gives you all the useful information you’ll need to begin and proceed successfully with your research.

Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

Ports begins with a discussion of Georgia’s settlement background, beginning in 1732 when King George II granted a charter for the new colony – named in his honor – to James Oglethorpe and twenty other proprietors. County formation began in 1777 with the creation of Burke, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Richmond, and Wilkes counties, and ended in 1924 with the creation of Peach County. Many of the records most useful to genealogists are located at the county level. Therefore a general rule of thumb, Ports states, is to begin your research at the Georgia Archives, which houses original and microfilm copies of most county records, and he details the most critical of these records – marriage and divorce, birth and death, probate, and land lottery records.

Ports also gives an overview of two significant supplementary sources – land grant records and tax records – and identifies the major repositories and online resources with useful information for your Georgia family research. Along the way you’ll find research tips and references to key publications, making Genealogy at a Glance: Georgia Genealogy Research the most helpful four pages you’ll ever read on Georgia genealogy.

The following is an annotated Table of Contents of my creation:

  • Quick Facts – A timeline from 1732 through 1870 dealing with ten important Georgia events.
  • Settlement Background – A history of Georgia from 1732 through 1805, important to Georgia researchers – includes two important further references.
  • Record Sources – An introduction, and two items for further reference – followed by sections on Marriage and Divorce Records; Birth and Death Records; Probate Records, and Land Lottery Records – includes several important internet links and eight further references, all to important lottery-related books.
  • Supplemental Sources – Includes sections on Land Grant Records (with an internet link), as well as Tax Records with one book listed as an important further reference.
  • Major Repositories – a listing of five repositories, with full addresses and contact information.
  • Online Resources – a listing of seven websites invaluable for those with Georgia ancestry.

Georgia Genealogy Research – Genealogy at a glance; by Michael A. Ports; 2017; 4 pp; laminated; ISBN: 978-0-8063-2039-7; Item #: GPC4668

As noted above, Family Roots Publishing has purchased a quantity of this laminate, and discounted it 10%, making it $8.06 (Regular $8.95). This sale runs through April 4, 2017. Click here to purchase.

Louisiana’s Archives in ‘state of emergency’

The following excerpt is an article updated March 24, 2017 at shreveporttimes.com:

Louisiana’s archival and historical records are in a state of emergency, whose destruction “would represent nothing less than a devastating and irreparable loss” of the state’s historical and cultural heritage, according to historians who recently gathered for the Louisiana Historical Association’s annual conference.

An executive summary of the Louisiana Historical Association presented at the conference called Louisiana’s historical archives “endangered treasures.”

“They are more than scraps of yellowed paper and tattered leather-bound journals,” the summary stated. “Losing them will sever us off from our past and impair our ability to remain informed citizens, so critical to the functioning of democracy.”

About 50 historians attended the plenary session of the conference that discussed the state of Louisiana’s archives, hailing from several parishes in Louisiana as well as from Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, Massachusetts and even Germany. More than 200 individuals registered for the total conference, according to James Wilson, the secretary-treasurer of the Louisiana Historical Association.

“We all love history, and we’re trying to protect it,” said Michelle Riggs, a panelist and archivist at LSU-Alexandria. “This is a call to arms. This is everyone’s history.”

Watch the video and read the full article.

Arkansas SAR to Honor Revolutionary War Soldier, Asher Bagley Sr., April 8 2017

The following excerpt is from an article posted at arkansasonline.com

Members of two chapters of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will mark the grave of Revolutionary War soldier Asher Bagley Sr. on April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery in Saline County. Preparing for the memorial event are, from left, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud, Bagley’s third great-grandson, past state SAR president and past president of the Casimir Pulaski Chapter, SAR; Larry Hartzinger of Hot Springs Village, treasurer, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; Charles McLemore of Joplin in Montgomery County, president, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter; and Jimmie Weber of Diamondhead, secretary, DeSoto Trace SAR Chapter. Photo by: Matt Johnson.

Asher Bagley Sr. served in the American Revolution as a private in the first New Jersey Regiment. Following the war, he settled in Saline County in about 1828 near the community known as Bland. He is buried in the Old Union Cemetery in that community.

His third great-grandson, David James Hoss Sr. of Rose Bud in White County, and other members of the Arkansas Society Sons of the American Revolution will remember Bagley in a grave-marking ceremony at 11 a.m. April 8 at the Old Union Cemetery.

Descendants of Bagley and members of the public are invited to attend the event, which is co-sponsored by the Casimir Pulaski and DeSoto Trace chapters of the Arkansas Society SAR.

Read the full article.

Georgetown University Employee Learns the University Sold His Ancestor

The following teaser is from a must-read article posted at the New York Times website on March 24.

Jeremy Alexander, a Georgetown employee, recently discovered that his paternal great-great-great-grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at the university in 1838. Credit: Paul Jones/Georgetown University

As a Georgetown employee, Jeremy Alexander watched as the university grappled with its haunted past: the sale of slaves in 1838 to help rescue it from financial ruin.

He listened as Georgetown’s president apologized for its sins and looked for ways to make amends. And Mr. Alexander observed, with wonder, some of the slave descendants when they visited the campus.

What he did not know at the time: He was one of them.

Mr. Alexander’s paternal great-great-great grandmother, Anna Mahoney Jones, was one of the 272 slaves sold by two Jesuit priests at Georgetown for about $115,000, or $3.3 million in today’s dollars. She and her two young children were enslaved at a plantation in Ascension Parish, La.

Read the full article.

Many Irish Immigrants Lost Their Lives in the Building of the C&O Canal

The following excerpt is from an informative article dealing with Washington County, Maryland, and the Irish immigrants who worked on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, many settling in the area. Disease was not well understood in the early 19th-century, leading to the early demise of many immigrants who were just looking for a better life. Read the full article, from the Washington County Historical Society, to learn much more.

Even when we do reflect on the hardships faced by Irish immigrants to America, we tend to think mostly of places like Boston or New York City, where Irish heritage and culture have gained a lasting footprint. But Washington County was home to large groups of Irish immigrants, brought to the area specifically to work on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. This, to put it plainly, was a hard and often deadly life. Because of the hard labor and poor working conditions, daily life along the canal was filled with injury, disease and violence.

The process of building the C&O Canal was a struggle from the very beginning. This area had a bad reputation for ill health during the summers, and a lot of competition for labor from the agricultural sector. Finding workers to build the canal was a difficult and costly prospect, and so the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co. looked toward imported labor from Great Britain.

Read the full article at the heraldmailmedia.com website.

New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of March 20, 2017


The following is from FamilySearch:

Salt Lake City, Utah (March 25, 2017), Hundreds of thousands of free indexed records from all over Italy are featured in these newly published online collections. Additionally, find newly searchable records from Canada, Ecuador, Germany, The Netherlands, Peru, Sweden and the United States. Search these new free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Ecuador, Catholic Church Records, 1565-2011 – 73,853 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Germany, Baden, Church Book Duplicates, 1800-1870 – 39,041 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Prato, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1923 – 15,463 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Rieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1840-1945 – 1,525 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Enna, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1944 – 108,603 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Grosseto, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1851-1907 – 155 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Viterbo, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1870-1943 – 168 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496-1906 – 0 – 111,726 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 2,532,170 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869 – 42,862 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998 – 28,563 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Peru, Amazonas, Civil Registration, 1939-1998 – 2,668 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Norrbotten Church Records, 1612-1923; index 1658-1860 – 6,531 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden, Kopparberg Church Records, 1604-1900; index 1628-1860 – 7,194 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Find A Grave Index – 3,390,197 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES

Alaska, Vital Records, 1816-1959 – 18,844 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866 – 72,842 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

New York State Census, 1865 – 18,804 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Pennsylvania, Eastern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1795-1931 – 61,584 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

The Japanese WWII Internment – 75 years ago today

Camp Harmony, under construction in 1942, at the Puyallup Washington State Fairgrounds. 7,390 people of Japanese decent were interned here. Photo courtesy of the Tacoma Public Library.

As I’ve written a number of times on this blog, our family had friends of Japanese ancestry who lived here in the Tacoma/Puyallup/Orting area of Western Washington. They were interned in “camps” during the Second World War. The presidential order for that round-up of American citizens took place exactly 75 years ago today. One of those camps – although a temporary collection point – was Camp Harmony, right here at the (Puyallup) Washington State Fairgrounds. See the photo. We attended many concerts in that grandstand behind the temporary housing – the Beach Boys, John Denver, and Ricky Nelson, just to name a few.

This was a shameful period in American history. Our small town of Orting was hit hard by it – the uncalled-for racism and the unrooting of our citizens is still felt today – all these years later. Our community has healed, but it took a very long time.

The following is from the February 19, 2017 Los Angeles Times. It includes comments made by the Press at that time. Oh, my…:
Seventy-five years ago today, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, declaring parts of the United States to be military zones from which particular groups of people could be “excluded” for security reasons. The order set the stage for the relocation and internment, beginning the following month, of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, most of whom were American citizens living on the West Coast.

To our lasting shame, here’s what The Times editorial page had to say about the matter at the time:
“This is war. And in wartime, the preservation of the nation becomes the first duty. Everything must be subordinated to that. Every necessary precaution must be taken to insure reasonable safety from spies and saboteurs so that our armed forces can function adequately and our industrial machinery may continue to work free from peril.”

And this:
“The time has come to realize that the rigors of war demand proper detention of Japanese and their immediate removal from the most acute danger spots. It is not a pleasant task. But it must be done and done now. There is no safe alternative.”

And this, a year or so later, when some people were calling for the release of those who had been interned:

“As a race, the Japanese have made for themselves a record for conscienceless treachery unsurpassed in history. Whatever small theoretical advantages there might be in releasing those under restraint in this country would be enormously outweighed by the risks involved.”

Read the full article.

New Historic Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch the Week of Feb 13 2017

The following is from FamilySearch:

Another 15 million indexed historic records have been added to FamilySearch’s vast collections. Included are a wide variety of records from 13 countries (including Argentina, Australia, Denmark, England, and the Netherlands) containing passenger lists, obituaries, school records, marriage records and more. And check out the 7 million Oklahoma school, Illinois church, Louisiana World War I Service, Michigan obituary, and North Carolina county marriage records. Search these free records and more at FamilySearch by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection – Indexed Records – Digital Images – Comments

Argentina, La Pampa, Catholic Church Records, 1882-1976 – 61,602 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Argentina, Mendoza, Catholic Church Records, 1665-1975 – 273,551 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Australia, Victoria, Outward Passenger Lists, 1852-1924 – 1,598,094 – 116,274 – New indexed records and images collection
Australia, New South Wales, Deceased Estate Files, 1880-1923 – 211,390 – 0 – New indexed records collection
British Newspaper Archives, Obituaries – 1,795,894 – 237,537 – New indexed records and images collection
Chile Civil Registration, 1885-1903 – 182,479 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Chile, Cemetery Records, 1821-2015 – 54,266 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Croatia, Delnice Deanery Catholic Church Books, 1725-1926 – 47,665 – 3,485 – Added indexed records and images to an existing collection
Czech Republic, School Registers, 1799-1953 – 0 – 2,011,878 – Added images to an existing collection
Denmark, Copenhagen City, Civil Marriages, 1739-1964, Index 1877-1964 – 33,214 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Honduras, Civil Registration, 1841-1968 – 71,620 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hungary, Jewish Vital Records Index, 1800-1945 – 746 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Hungary Civil Registration, 1895-1980 – 41,377 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Miscellaneous Records – 728,435 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Philippines Civil Registration (Local), 1888-1986 – 68,551 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Sweden, Västernorrland Church Records, 1501-1940; index 1650-1860 – 0 – 1,313 – Added images to an existing collection

UNITED STATES DATABASES
California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994 – 3,422 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
California, County Marriages, 1850-1952 – 27,451 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
District of Columbia Court and Emancipation Records, 1820-1863 – 0 – 12,462 – New browsable image collection.
Illinois, Chicago, Catholic Church Records, 1833-1925 – 194,888 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Louisiana World War I Service Records, 1917-1920 – 74,174 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Michigan Obituaries, 1820-2006 – 449,089 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York Book Indexes to Passenger Lists, 1906-1942 – 557,105 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
New York State Census, 1865 – 0 – 392 – Added images to an existing collection
North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 – 770,164 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Ohio Tax Records, 1800-1850 – 487,520 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
Oklahoma, School Records, 1895-1936 – 7,397,703 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection
United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925 – 19,345 – 0 – Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

Catholic Records for Ireland, Britain & the USA Being Posted at FindMyPast

At Rootstech yesterday, Patty and I were able to visit with our old friend, Brian Donovan, who is the Licensing Manager at Findmypast. He brought us up to speed on what will be the most comprehensive online collection of Roman Catholic records for Ireland, Britain and the USA. Up to 100 million records. These records are being posted at FindMyPast.

The following is from their news release:

Findmypast is releasing over 3 million exclusive records including sacramental registers for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia from 1757 to 1916 as well as for the British Archdioceses of Westminster and Birmingham from 1657 onwards. This builds on last year’s publication of more than 10 million Irish Catholic parish registers.

Check the collection out by clicking here.

More about The Catholic Heritage Archive
The Catholic Church holds some of the oldest and best preserved genealogical records ever created. However, as many of these documents memorialise important religious sacraments such as baptism, marriage and burial, their privacy has long been protected and access to original copies has traditionally been hard to come by.

In collaboration with various Archdioceses of the Catholic Church, Findmypast is helping to bring these records online in one unified collection for the first time ever. Exclusively available on Findmypast, images of original documents will be completely free to view in many cases. Fully searchable transcripts will also be included, providing family historians from the around the world with easy access to these once closely guarded records.

The next phase of the Catholic Heritage Archive will include records from the archdioceses of New York and Baltimore as well as additional records from Philadelphia. There are over 30 million records in just these three dioceses. The digitization of the whole archive is a monumental undertaking and, when complete, will contain hundreds of millions of records for the USA alone.

Brian said; “The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian denomination in the world. Despite the popular perception that it had few adherents in Britain, or was not that important in American settlement, it has always been a significant component (up to 25%) of the population. The Catholic Heritage Archive will uncover the history of millions of Irish, Italian, German, Polish and many other nationalities as they made a new home in the USA.”

Looking for Groceries in Downtown Salt Lake City?

Over the years I’ve heard dozens of folks ask the question, Where can I buy groceries in Salt Lake? I’ve had folks ask me personally – and I’ve heard them ask at the front desk of the Plaza Hotel – where I always stay.

There didn’t used to be a satisfactory answer for those folks without a car. I’ve personally taken many people shopping! Full-range grocery stores were typically a couple miles away from the downtown hotels. Smiths is still there – it’s a great store – but it hasn’t gotten any closer…

That all changed a couple years ago when the City Creek Mall was built. There’s now a Harmon’s store within walking distance of the Temple Square area. The high-end full-blown grocery is located at the corner of 100 South and State Street (135 East 100 South, Salt Lake City). Now – if you’re staying at the Plaza, the Radisson, or the Marriot (all within a block of Temple Square), just walk over to the Temple Square UTA Trax platform. Take the FREE Trax ride East, then turning South to the City Center Trax platform. Get off, go 1 block East to State Street and you’re at Harmon’s. Better yet, you can do most of that without going out in the weather. When you get off the Trax at the Downtown platform, you can go into the City Creek Mall, make your way to the food court, and take the Tunnel (next to McDonald’s) under State Street, coming up at Harmon’s.

And don’t miss the deli upstairs at Harmons! There’s also a Post OIffice up there. Amazing!

Bottom line – you may have to walk (carrying your groceries) for about a couple blocks (most of that within City Creek) in total if you happen to be staying at the Plaza. Ask the cashiers to double-bag your stuff. Take a look at the Yelp reviews…

Illinois State Genealogical Society 2017 Annual Fall Conference – Call for proposals

The following is from the Illinois State Genealogical Society:

January 24, 2017 – Springfield, IL. – Lecture proposals are now being accepted for the Illinois State Genealogical Society 2017 Annual Fall Conference to be held October 27 & 28, 2017 at iWireless Center in Moline, IL.

This year’s conference theme is “Build Your Family Tree: DNA, Research, and Writing.” The ISGS Conference draws attendees of all experience levels, from the beginner to the professional and the hobbyist. Submissions utilizing our theme to promote the expansion of our knowledge and skills are encouraged as well as topics on Illinois, Midwest resources, and the Northwest Territory.

The deadline for submission of proposals is February 27, 2017. Notifications will be sent via email to all speakers who submitted proposals no later than March 10, 2017.

Please visit the Illinois State Genealogical Society’s website for more information. Contact the Conference Committee at isgsconference@ilgensoc.org with any questions.

Over 600 Graves Damaged in the Last 2 Years at Columbus, Ohio’s Green Lawn Cemetery

The following excerpt is from an article first posted in the Columbus Dispatch:

Yellow caution tape flapped in the wind, crisscrossing the entrance of a mausoleum erected nearly 100 years ago.

It’s the latest sign of vandalism at Green Lawn Cemetery, where more than 600 grave sites have been damaged in the past two years at a cost of more than $1 million.

The latest incident occurred on Jan. 9 when a man entered through a broken fence and damaged a mausoleum and eight grave sites before grabbing a fistful of American flags from the graves of veterans and lighting them afire. He tossed the burning flags into a brush pile — an act caught by a security camera — before leaving the cemetery.

“Fences are a lot like locks. They keep honest people out,” said Randy Rogers, a trustee on the cemetery’s volunteer board.

The cemetery has grave sites of five governors and five Medal of Honor recipients, including Civil War veteran Ovid Smith, whose marker was damaged by vandals on Aug. 14.

Read the full article.

The NYG&B Announces NYG&B Labs

The following news release was received from Frederick Wertz at the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society:

NYG&B Labs will create an innovative space which leverages the latest trends in technology and digital services to assist in telling the stories of New York’s families.

NEW YORK, NY – The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) announces the creation of NYG&B Labs, an innovative space which leverages the latest trends in technology and digital services to assist in telling the stories of New York’s families.

NYG&B Labs will be a destination for aspiring digital professionals who seek to advance their expertise in technology and its applications for the fields of history and genealogy. Each quarter team members will work on a designated, pre-approved project. Once completed, projects may be added to resources at newyorkfamilyhistory.org and beyond.

Members of the NYG&B Labs team will benefit from one-on-one interaction with experts in the fields of genealogy and technology as they work to creatively apply technology to traditional genealogical methods relating to New York’s history. Team members will also receive a quarterly stipend and can work from anywhere in the world.

“NYG&B Labs will provide benefits to anyone researching the stories of New York’s past,” noted NYG&B President D. Joshua Taylor; “with NYG&B labs, the opportunities to create new tools and resources are nearly endless.” The launch of the project was made possible with funding from the NYG&B, individual donors, and support from commercial and nonprofit entities within the genealogical community.

Applications for NYG&B Labs Team members are now being accepted at http://www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org/labs. The NYG&B is specifically seeking team members with an interest in technology, geo-coding, mapping, social media, website development, digital services, history, and other topics.  

About the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B)
The NYG&B has been helping people find their New York family and tell their stories since 1869. The largest genealogical society in New York, the NYG&B delivers essential online resources for researching New York State at www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org, including digital collections, articles, research aids, webinars, and other tools. The NYG&B has thousands of members across the globe, and each quarter publishes the NYG&B Record, a scholarly journal devoted to New York genealogy and biography, as well as the New York Researcher, a magazine which features instructional articles and the latest news on emerging resources and technologies. A longtime publisher of authoritative scholarship on New York subjects, the NYG&B’s recent books include the award-winning New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, offering more than 800 pages of detailed resources related to New York, and the New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians. The NYG&B provides education programs, both live and online, to New York researchers from the beginner to the professional and produces the biannual New York State Family History Conference. Each day the NYG&B engages with the dynamic, fast-growing, rapidly changing field of family history through accurate, thorough research and the highest standards of scholarship.

Graveyards of Chicago, Second Edition – 30% Off Thru December 17 – Only $11.87

Graveyards-of-Chicago-297pw

We’ve got a good stock of Graveyards of Chicago, The People, History, Art, and Lore of Cook County Cemeteries in the FRPC warehouse – so we’re making them the featured item for day 7 of of the 2016 FRPC 12 Days of Christmas sale. The book was written by Matt Hucke and Ursula Biekski and is a second edition of a much smaller volume that was published in 1999. In fact, at 428 pages, it’s about twice the size of the extremely popular 1999 book.

The book is on sale for 30% off thru December 17, 2016. Regular $16.95, it’s just $11.87! Click here to order.

The publication of this volume was extremely exciting for me, as I have Cook County ancestry, and many ancestors and relatives buried in Chicago area cemeteries. If you follow GenealogyBlog, you probably already know this, as I’ve blogged about it a number of times. I now have a book detailing the history and other information on the burial places of my folks. The book stresses the history, art and notable people buried in the cemeteries. It also lists the address or cross streets, as well as the establishment dates for each cemetery location. If they have a website, this is given. Near the back is an index that, being subject oriented, includes the names of all people mentioned in the book, as well a cemeteries and other subjects. I’ve found it difficult to lay this book aside, as the volume has so much new information of interest to me.

The authors identify a number of classifications of cemeteries, with detailed descriptions of each. Following the list, in alphabetical order:

  • Churchyards
  • City Cemeteries
  • Frontier Graves
  • Homestead Graveyards
  • Independent Mausoleums or Columbaria
  • Institutional Cemeteries
  • Lawn-park Cemeteries
  • Memorial Parks
  • Military Cemeteries
  • Native American Burial Grounds
  • Potters Fields
  • Rural Cemeteries
  • To see his monument look around you Graves

The following is an expanded Table of Contents:

INTRODUCTIONS

by Matt Hucke

by Ursula Bielski

CITY CEMETERIES

City North

Chicago City Cemetery

Graceland Cemetery

Jewish Graceland and Hebrew Benevolent Cemeteries

Wunders Cemetery

St. Boniface Catholic Cemetery

Rosehill Cemetery

St. Henry Catholic Cemetery

Bohemian National Cemetery

St. Luke Cemetery

Montrose Cemetery

City West

All Saints Polish National Catholic Cemetery

Saint Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Cemetery

St. Johannes Cemetery (Removed 2001)

Rest Haven Cemetery

Robinson Woods Indian Burial Ground

Read-Dunning Memorial Park

Irving Park Cemetery

Acacia Park Cemetery

Westlawn Cemetery

Mount Olive Cemetery

Union Ridge Cemetery

Zion Gardens Cemetery

City South

Oakwoods Cemetery

Zirngibl Grave

Mount Greenwood Cemetery

Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery

Mount Hope Cemetery

St. Casimir Catholic Cemetery

SUBURBAN CEMETERIES

Metro North

Calvary Catholic Cemetery

Church of The Holy Comforter

Fort Sheridan Post Cemetery

New Light Cemetery

Memorial Park Cemetery and Mausoleum

St. Adelbert Catholic Cemetery

Sunset Memorial Gardens

All Saints Catholic Cemetery

Shalom Memorial Park and Randhill Park Cemetery

Metro West

Eden Memorial Park

St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery and Mausoleums

Elmwood Cemetery and Mausoleum

Forest Home Cemetery (including German Waldheim)

Waldheim Cemetery

Forest Home:West

Forest Home:East

Waldheim Jewish Cemeteries

Woodlawn Memorial Park

Concordia Cemetery

Altenheim Cemetery

Mount Auburn Cemetery

Mount Emblem Cemetery

Arlington Cemetery

Elm Lawn Memorial Park

Oakridge Glen Cemeteries

Mount Carmel Catholic Cemetery

Queen of Heaven Catholic Cemetery

Chapel Hill Gardens West Cemetery

Hinsdale Animal Cemetery and Crematory

Illinois Pet Cemetery

Bluff City Cemetery

Metro South

Resurrection Catholic Cemetery and Mausoleums

Bethania Cemetery

Lithuanian National Cemetery

Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens, West

Evergreen Cemetery

St. Mary Catholic Cemetery & Mausoleums

Cedar Park Cemetery

Lincoln Cemetery

Beverly Cemetery

Oak Hill Cemetery

Holy Sepulcher Catholic Cemetery & Mausoleum

Chapel Hill Gardens South Cemetery

Restvale Cemetery

Hazelgreen Cemetery

Burr Oak Cemetery

St. Benedict Catholic Cemetery

Bachelors Grove Cemetery

St. James Catholic Cemetery

Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens

Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery and Mausoleums

BURIALS OUTSIDE OF CEMETERIES

BURIALS IN OUTLYING SITES

CEMETERY RESTORATION AND PRESERVATION, by Angie Johnson

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Scattered through the book are sidebar pages dealing with a number of cemetery and burial topics. I found all them them to be very interesting. Following a a list of titles for these pages:

  • The Cemetery Lady (Helen Sclair 1930-2009)
  • After the Fire: The Trouble With Cremains
  • St. Henry Catholic Cemetery
  • Jumpin that Train: Lincolns Last, Long Haul
  • Together Forever: The Many Ties That Bind
  • Material Considerations
  • The Remains of the Day: the Crash Site of Flight 191
  • 50 (Thousand) Ways to Leave Your Loved Ones: Burial Customs To Die For
  • Strong and Silent: The Catholic Cemeteries of Chicago
  • Modern Woodmen Of America
  • Freeze! A Chilling Alternative to Checking Out
  • Ceme-Prairies: The Silver Lining of Abandonment

Order Graveyards of Chicago at the Family Roots Publishing website.

If you have Cook County Ancestry, you might be interested in the following titles also:

Finding Your Chicago Ancestors

A Guide to Chicago and Midwestern Polish-American Genealogy